The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

Photo 2

Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

G.R.I.M – Progtronic EP

IMG_1108

Provocateurs already renowned for leading the body and imagination into diverse and adventurous stomps soaked in a lyrical fervour and experimental voracity, UK band Great Riddims In Mind have nurtured a new steel and maturity in their explorations. It is a growth which provides a rich core to the band’s new Progtronic EP, an evolution as potent and gripping as their increasingly addictive sound. The upcoming release reaps all of the mouth-watering and riveting essences of its predecessors but develops them with the band’s most composed and striking ingenuity yet. Already a relentlessly inventive and incendiary proposition, the band has sculpted in the shape of Progtronic, a creative tempest where intrusive unpredictability, uncompromising imagination, and raw passion are an unrelenting norm.

Better known as G.R.I.M, the Manchester quartet began in 2011 and were soon stirring up attention and appetites locally with their raw and fiery fusion of dubstep, hip hop, rock, drum and bass, and plenty more. A wider spotlight was switched on by the release of the Sounds Like These EP last year, the acclaimed debut reinforcing the already potent reputation the band has earned for their live performances in their home city and beyond. Earlier this year the single Answers was uncaged, the track with its maelstrom of textures and bordering on psychotic invention strikingly hinting at the new step in the band’s evolution, something the new EP confirms and stretches even further.

Opener G.R.I.Mtro throbs with electro resonance in its first breath, the second bringing in an equally pulsating lure of vocals as synths expand their hues and beats darken their persuasion. It is a gentle but imposing entrance, the band almost leering into the imagination whilst holding a whisper of belligerence in every note and syllable shared. The track meanders from this point as if searching for its switch, which when found sparks a still restrained but strikingly colourful stroll, the rhythms of drummer Kyle Larkin a low key stalking alongside similarly predacious lines from bassist Nathan Larkin. Vocalist Lance Hargreaves dances mischievously over this web with the guitar of James Glenn almost egging on his revelry as synths flirt with magnetic and sinister persuasion. Though suggested the song never explodes; its tension simmering forcibly in voice and sound but holding check for the main, before evolving into the following Grill Me.

The second track emerges with a similar melodic tempting and structural baiting but is soon binding ears and thoughts with the impressive vocal prowess of Hargreaves and the sonic adventure brewing up in the rest of the band. There is aprogtronic gig poster1 sense of bands like Hadouken and the now demised Janice Graham Band, but whereas on the first EP these were loud comparisons they are mere spices for reference in the new vat of creativity and originality fuelling Progtronic. Badgering and seducing senses as well as thoughts with its bubbling tenacity and inventively lively canvas, the fascinating proposition whips up the appetite into a hungry greed ready for the outstanding Terrorisms, a lyrical and musically striking track which sways with seductive and rugged elements simultaneously. As with the previous pair of songs, there is a control to the intensity and urgency which embraces the frantic and deranged creative fervour of previous releases, but channels it into a just as invigorating and fascinating success and protagonist. Thickening its climate with funk and jazz seeded winds, the track enthrals and sparks the imagination with sublime ease, whilst ears and emotions are immersed in a perpetual and thrilling tantalising.

There had to be an outbreak of unbridled devilry at some point on the EP, and they come with the final two tracks. Metanoia comes first, its entrance also calm but within a tempestuous climate of stormy emotion. Vocals and bass riffs find a home in ska and hip hop planted fields whilst the caustic rub of guitars and keys provide an early agitation and inflammatory air to the building inflamed passion of the song. A midway breather of just a single melody and vocal is the spark to a flirtatious and reggae bred striding, this in turn firing up further the vocal melodies and pulsating adventure of the scintillating offering. A moment in time that surely nobody can resist, it has feet and moves soon enlisted and lurching with the pulse and temptation of its presence.

Final track Him Without Sin is an immediate blaze of vocal rapping and sizzling sonic endeavour which in turn brings in a ridiculously contagious swagger of riffs and hooks, all diversely spiced and virulently enticing. That earlier mentioned frenzy within the band is a rampant toxicity in the song but again under a precise and impressive measure. It does not stop it, as all tracks, being irrepressibly anthemic and ferociously incendiary but allows the just as hard hitting lyrical commentaries to firmly place their potent grips too.

Another ravenous treat, Progtronic is a new turn in the emergence and sound of G.R.I.M, a milestone on their increasingly certain and creatively inflammatory ascent.

The Progtronic EP is released on December 2nd.

G.R.I.M will be holding the EP launch party @ Joshua Brooks in Manchester on December 2nd with sets from special guest MC’s, and supported by Eyes Like Twenty

For more info check out the band’s official website @ http://greatrhythmsinmind.wix.com/grim

RingMaster 21/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Fayne – The Queen of Kings

FAYNE - Press Photo

The first release since returning from a hiatus in 2013, Canadian metallers Fayne have unleashed a maelstrom of a fury in The Queen of Kings EP. Bracingly raw yet just as feverishly sculpted the five track metalcore fuelled encounter reasserts the Montreal quintet as a seriously compelling proposition. It is merciless and ravenous examination of the senses and a perpetual spark for the imagination to feed upon. It is probably not an incitement for those liking an easy life with their music but for the rest it is an increasingly rewarding savaging which impresses more with every listen.

Before the break in 2008, Fayne drew strong attention and a potent following through their uncompromising sound, similarly imposing live performances, and the EPs You Took it All Away and Delivering The Final Blow in 2004 and 2006 respectively. Those releases led to numerous tours across Canada as well as the sharing of stages with the likes of Alexisonfire, Underoath, Hopesfall, and Blessed By A Broken Heart. Now the band unleash their new exploit, returning with an even more ferocious and creatively gripping sound but still sparking from inspirations such as Counterparts, Mastodon, and Periphery which have always spiced their invention. Produced by the band’s guitarist Alex Gonzalez with Alan Douches of West West Side Music (Dillinger Escape Plan, Every Time I Die, Between the Buried and Me) joining him for the final mastering, The Queen of Kings is a rabid blaze of sound and enterprise from its first second, never relenting even after ears and emotions are frayed and seduced.

The title track opens up the EP, its initial epic melodic coaxing swiftly turning to a blistering fury driven by the hoarse malevolent roars of Joseph Espinosa. Just as quickly an array of vocal tones join the mix, captivating as strongly as the EP Cover - Fayne - The Queen of Kings 2014abrasing riffs and intimidating rhythms alongside them. With no info to the contrary, the varying degrees of raw aggression and clean vocals are all assumingly bred within Espinosa and it is an impressive and unpredictable aspect of him and the band’s attack. Just as ferocious and inventively riveting is the web of intrigue crafted by the guitars of Gonzalez and Nick Fazioli, riffs hellacious and technical prowess in abundance as the pair spin a fascinating and enthralling weave of enterprise and adventure. The track continues to impress, whether a bestial assault or a flavoursome tempest, everything caged within the more directly intensive and predatory rhythmic tenacity of bassist Chris Kasp and drummer Carlo De Iuliis.

As evidenced by the whole release, there is plenty going on and involved in the structure of tracks with repeat listens the only way to discover the heart and depths of each offering. It is a demand which may test some but will reward all as shown by the following Believers which emerges from the tail of its predecessor with blistering grooves, rampaging rhythms, and further vocal diversity. Even more of a predator of the senses than the first track, it has an almost deranged and certainly fiercely agitated attack to its persuasion, everything driven with urgency but also a technical rabidity which almost deceives its quality through hostility. As it unveils more, the song is almost schizophrenic in its enterprise and twists, moving through shades of spite and aggression to explore more melodic pastures and sultry climates, though it is never too far away from savaging the listener.

This song and the fourth, is linked by Isonic Flight, a just short of two minute sonic drift through a haunting atmosphere with dulled rhythmic pulses for company. It is a piece which probably means more to the band and the journey of their release than it will for the listener, especially with it soon being forgotten once the outstanding Concord rises powerfully and contagiously from its tail wind. Riffs and rhythms are instant potent bait, across which raw flames of guitar erupt and a cleaner delivery from Espinosa lures, though he is soon entwining hoarse squalls into his again gripping attack. You would not call the frontman the most skilled vocalist in metal but there are few who are brave and daring enough to test themselves on songs with such a varied and successful arsenal. Arguably less vicious than the early tracks, though not short of malice and rage, the song is a potent fire of melodies and inflamed grooves toying with numerous styles and venturing into alluring experimental pastures.

The release is finished by Nomad’s Land which features Karl Schubach of Misery Signals. A spicy mix of metal flavours combine to encase the hoarse growls of Espinosa as the track sizzles venomously and engagingly from its first breath. Not quite matching the might of its predecessor, certainly until it’s dramatic and rigorously antagonistic final third, the song still provides an engrossing tapestry of interwoven sounds and textures which at times become quite muggy in their union but only provide a proposal which grips and excite ears and thoughts.

Though Fayne is not exactly a new band, they are still relatively a secret outside of their homeland, something The Queen of Kings will go some way to addressing and the unbridled potential within the band will eventually turn into something of the past.

The Queen of Kings is available digitally now via Crystal Math @ https://itunes.apple.com/ca/album/the-queen-of-kings-ep/id937274484 and http://faynemusic.bandcamp.com/track/believers

https://www.facebook.com/faynemusic

RingMaster 21/11/2014

Grab the track Believers free below…

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/