Dirty Thrills – Self-Titled

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It is fair to say that the release of the Growing Young EP easily put UK blues rock band Dirty Thrills on the landscape of emerging potential soaked propositions. The band’s 2013 debut was a richly enjoyable slice of dirt clad rock ‘n’ roll with only the lack of a truly distinct voice the issue. It was a potent base though from which the London quartet has impressively blossomed and matured, the band realising the promise of that moment and then some as evidenced by their new self-titled album. Stretching all the richness of the previous release and unveiling even more depth in songwriting and sound to be explored ahead, Dirty Thrills has evolved from an emerging prospect into a rigorously compelling incitement.

Formed in 2012, last year was a potent year for the band, Dirty Thrills drawing strong acclaim and attention with not only the Growing Young EP but a live presence which has left venues like London’s 100 Club, O2 Academy Liverpool, and Shepherd’s Bush Empire sweaty and rocking. Consisting of vocalist Louis James (the son of ex-Moody Blues singer Nicky James), guitarist Jack Fawdry, bassist Aaron Plows, and drummer Stevo Corrigan, each bringing experience and open craft with youthful tenacity, Dirty Thrills have bred a sound which merges blues and heavy rock for an incendiary stomp of old school and modern, dirt encrusted rock ‘n’ roll. It was an intriguing temptation on the band’s first release but now a roaring blaze on their self-released album.

As soon as the first flame of guitar winds its lures around ears in opener No Resolve, there is a sense of something spicy and flavoursome in store, a prospect soon brought to fruition as the deep bass lure hailing from Plows adds its Dirty_Thrills_Coverflirtation to the crisp beckoning of Corrigan’s swings whilst Fawdry’s magnetic designs only broaden their persuasion. It is a thick weave of blues soaked sound brought further to life by the impressive tones of James, his voice a fire all on its own. The song proceeds to swing with a slow stride, its pungent sounds somewhere between The Black Keys and Bad Company with a healthy dose of Rival Sons, a suggestion fitting the whole album. The impressive start is swiftly surpassed by the outstanding Burning Bridges, a song tempting with salacious grooves from its first breath before finding a melodic and suggestive swagger to a contagious stride of resourceful enterprise and magnetic revelry. As elsewhere, it is a track which is unafraid to switch around its pace and creative gait, a fluid invention which brings fascinating unpredictability yet easily accessible twists. The familiarity which was rife in the previous EP is still hanging around on song and album but now has an indefinable source and a fresh adventure with every recognisable and suggestive moment.

From one major peak on the album another strolls in straight away with the lively stomp of Rock n Roll, a track more than living up to its title. Bouncing with virulent infectiousness and raw melodic temptation, the song becomes a saucy temptress within seconds as rhythmic bait with anthemic potency and the inflammatory craft of the guitar enslaves imagination and passions, all lorded over by the increasingly stunning voice and delivery of James. The tempestuous revelry is given a slight breather with the easier going but certainly just as pleasing Resume Regret, a song with a less imposing style and an eighties hard rock flavouring offering plenty to be enticed by, adventurous grooves and hooks laying down a captivating invitation for ears too.

The gentle croon of Is This Home adds another varied flavour to the release, vocals an expressive protagonist over precise melodies and sultry emotion before the song erupts into a hazy and impassioned smoulder. It does not ignite ears as previous songs but has thoughts alive and involved with every emotive note and syllable shared, before being followed by the raw energy and instinctive dynamics of Reign where again grooves and riffs come clad in blues rock humidity and vocal vivacity. It is further proof of Dirty Thrills’ strength at writing and letting loose pure rock ‘n’ roll, here a straight forward yet creatively inflamed encounter and in tracks like the next up Wolf In Sheeps Clothing, a more aggressively inventive and hungry proposition. Driven by the riveting agitated rhythms of Corrigan, matched by the heavy and hearty voice of Plows’ bass, the track feverishly romps with sinews stretched and sonic enterprise afire, harmonies an additional irresistible spice to the glorious festival of sound and passion.

     The Man Who Lost His Way is a similarly sculpted encounter, its muscles flexing with eager intent whilst the guitar of Fawdry brews up a sizzling tapestry of sonic intrigue and temptation. It has relaxed moments around the vocal roar of James which lack some of the fire of the song’s imposing twists but still add to the blistering enticement which thrills ears in its company though it fails to linger around like other songs on the album once departed.

The release is completed by the conflagrant charm and craft of Follow Me Home and lastly the Southern rock grooved and blues aired Sigh, both songs further climactic spicery to the album with especially the final song an inescapable enticement warranting further plays before putting a close on the album for the day.

Dirty Thrills set down a potent marker and base with their last encounter, one sprung from in impressive and distinctive style by their album. As suggested you still feel there is more to come from in imagination and uniqueness from the band but they seem to be heading right to the forefront of European blues rock.

The self-released Dirty Thrills is available now digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/dirty-thrills/id907284883 and on CD via http://dirtythrillsclothing.bigcartel.com/

http://www.dirty-thrills.com/

RingMaster 19/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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