Snaking adventures and confrontations: exploring Medusa with band founder Julian Molinero

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UK rockers Medusa are one of those provocations it is impossible to lose an appetite for especially when they unleash creative tempests as impressive as new album Headcase’s Handbook. The successor to their acclaimed second full-length Can’t Fucking Win, the new album is punk fired rock ‘n’ roll which explores a new maturity and inventive ferocity to the songwriting and sound bred by founder and vocalist/guitarist Julian Molinero. Having been seduced by the excellent incitement we were eager with thanks to Julian, to find out more about its breeding, recording, and look back over the history of Medusa.

Hi Julian and thanks for sharing your time to talk with us.

For those new to the world of Medusa can you first of all just tell us about the band and its origins?

We formed in 1998 in Blackburn, Lancashire as a punk band while I was still at school and over the years, it’s had a lot of different members and varied in style but the band is still as passionate and obnoxious as ever.

We all have a band, a song, or moment which makes music from something which is just there, to being as essential as carnal endeavour; what was it which flicked the switch for you?

Just the punk and rock I discovered as a teenager, I just absolutely connected with it and it made everything else make sense.

From that moment was a band always the destination?

There wasn’t a moment but I did gradually slide more and more down that path and it felt right.

Is Medusa the only creative adventure for you or were there other exploits before its formation?

Aside from a couple of jokey cassettes I made prior, Medusa was the first and only band I’ve ever been involved with.

I believe Medusa has been around in two parts with a couple of years as a ‘hiatus’ in between. What brought about the gap and in turn what sparked the band’s return? 15264114200_e1e89dfc64_z

I was living with the other members of the band and it all turned really horrible and eventually ended. The level of drama on a day to day basis was the absolute maximum imaginable. Up until that point we were a punk band and then I started becoming very interested in flashy guitar solos and also some heavy metal music, so for one or two years there was no active band and I was purely interested in developing as a guitarist. When we re-emerged it was with the debut album and that has a definite influence in there of the type of heavy metal I was into at that time. The fact it was recorded so fast, under very tight, difficult circumstances is what gives it its punk edge and I guess that combination makes it quite unique but it definitely wasn’t how it was intended to sound.

Was there anything different in your thoughts and intentions sound wise for the band when you resurrected it? Did you see Medusa as the same band as when it started second time around or something entirely new?

The new direction and debut album were intended initially to be a platform for my guitar solos but I wasn’t able to get my amplifier to the studio and my guitar broke beyond repair the night before going down to record so these factors sent the album in a different direction and, as I say, more like punk than was intended.

We discovered you guys with the excellent Can’t Fucking Win album, a striking attention grabber certainly for us. It in many ways was just the appetiser for your new full-length Headcase’s Handbook which came out a few weeks ago. How do you see the evolution and differences between the two releases?

Well, I feel I’ve developed more as a songwriter and it’s possibly more of defining album. It has the same kind of sound throughout so it’s less confusing to people as to what the band’s style is. To me though, I don’t think either of them is better than the other, they just have different appeals. Can’t Fucking Win has a more epic quality where the drama is greater and the songs are longer and then the new one is more simplified and concentrated. I see it as almost kind of patronising, like a ‘for dummies’ version.

It is easy to say and hear your previous two albums are not short on passion but Headcase’s Handbook seems to have tapped into an even greater fire in that aspect; what do you feel has sparked that new burst?

If that’s true then it’s something I’m oblivious to because if anything the dramas in my life that I was writing about were much less extreme and intense for this album. I see the albums partly as a continuing autobiography of whatever happened in my life at the time of writing. There were definitely things that I was really pissed off about for this one but I just remember the intensity being much bigger for the first two. Maybe I’m communicating it more effectively now or maybe it’s the production value… or the fact we were trying to make it more concentrated? Who knows…

I have also felt an intimacy in the lyrical side of your songwriting; what sparks that side more often than not, is it experience or observation?

It is honesty and my experiences but the focus is on emotion. The lyrics are only there to serve that.

coverTell us about the new album’s title and is there an underlying theme across tracks?

Well, the theme is insanity and feeling lost. It does spread across the tracks, the album’s sub-heading in the liner notes says

“a guide to living for the confused, lost or mentally disturbed [those who see things as they really are]”.

The artwork is tied up in it too and there’s a conclusion to it all at the end of the album, if you look out for it.

Headcase’s Handbook was recorded with producer Lee Batiuk, compared to Can’t Fucking Win which was partly with Romesh Dodangoda. How did the link up with Lee come about and what did he bring forth in your songs which you had not foreseen or imagined?

Only two songs on Can’t Fucking Win were mixed by Romesh, we didn’t really have a producer for that one. For the new one, I just eventually came to the conclusion that a polished type of sound is what the album needed. I was thinking about it in terms of the discography as a whole and that it would be good to have one album that had that obvious type of production that gives focus to the songs. Lee did have a few changes he put in place, to make the arrangement more powerful in places, for example. With him being a perfectionist and me being a perfectionist too, but in a totally different way, it really helped to refine it but it didn’t make it easy.

Tell us about the recording process of the album.

We travelled to Wisbech in Cambridgeshire to record it. It was tense but fun in places. We would drink beer and play cards at night and then fully focus on recording during the days. It was filmed on high quality equipment which will become part of a documentary on the band, at some point.

Are you a head to the grind kind of band in the studio or like to let things evolve in a gentler energy; is it possible nowadays to record without an enforced urgency because of time and finance restraint?

Well, I think the sense of urgency is needed for this type of music to work. We were sleeping in tents the whole time while recording and I absolutely hated it but at the same time, I planned it like that so it wouldn’t be too comfortable and I specifically wanted to be pissed off and at the end of my tether when doing the vocals, which I was. The vocals were done in two days, both ending early and in the morning before the first, it had rained so hard during the night, that the inside of my tent was soaking and my shoes fell apart like soggy paper on the walk to the studio. We had to get a taxi to a supermarket so I could buy some new shoes and socks.

There is an open eighties rock and punk inspiration to your sound as evidenced by Headcase’s Handbook. How has the sound shifted since those early days of the band?

I think on this album, it’s kind of gone back a lot more to how we initially sounded in 1998; simple punk songs. The eighties influence was definitely at its peak on the first one.

Has it been an intentional changing or simply organic?

Intentional but that was just the formula for this one album. I don’t see any need to make another album like this one, that would just be repeating ourselves. The current vision for the next one is something very different.

Before we do that, I just want to go with the flow of life and see what happens. I think it’s important for your life to be different and to have new experiences before you start working on a new album. We never use old songs from before that era when we do an album so that’s why I feel each one is a document of those years.

As with any album certain tracks stand out over others and hit the listener’s sweet spot. For us the pinnacle comes with the consecutive and distinctly different pair of The Sweetest Elixir and 15072752751_fe2ca517ca_zBlack Snow. Can you give some background to the two adventures?

The Sweetest Elixir seems to be the song most people compliment at the moment. I think we just eventually found an arrangement that worked for it, mainly with the drum parts, which was really difficult. If we hadn’t found the right arrangement, I can just as easily imagine it being the least liked song on the album. As far as what that song’s about, as with a lot of the others, I already said way too much in the lyrics! That was one of the aims of this album too, to make it confessional and autobiographical in places, in a slightly more obvious way than the previous albums. Black Snow is a little bit different because that’s kind of about life after the bomb. I don’t know how obvious that is to people but if you look at the lyrics once knowing that, those references should be pretty clear.

Is there a particular moment or twist on the album which gives you personally an extra tingle of satisfaction or excitement?

Maybe but I view the album as more for other people so I think their relationship with the album is more important and hopefully the messages and ideas I was trying to put across, did come across.

I can assume Medusa will be thrusting the album out live at some point? Where can people catch you next?

We should be playing Nambucca in London, before the end of the year.

Thanks again Julian for sitting down and chatting with us. Any last thoughts you would like to share?

Our first music video to the Headcase’s Handbook album will be out in a couple of months, to the song Sid and Nancy and should be a cool video. We just cast 2 ten year old kids to play the lead roles.

Thanks!

Read the review of Headcase’s Handbook @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/02/medusa-headcases-handbook/

http://www.medusaworld.co.uk

Pete RingMaster

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Ringmaster Review 17/11/2014

Duncan Reid and The Big Heads – The Difficult Second Album

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If it was as problematic as its title might allude to, The Difficult Second Album from Duncan Reid and The Big Heads has no intentions of showing it within its fluid and mischievous power pop revelry. The trickiness of following an impressing debut is one of those issues which is arguably more imagined and supposed than generally realised, and certainly there is no hint of anything but an equally thrilling and potent encounter from Reid for his second solo offering. Spawned from the same punk and pop rock devilry which marked its predecessor and its creator’s career, The Difficult Second Album is a contagious romp which explores more power pop essences this time around but still provides an instinctive and inescapable incitement of hook laden rock ‘n’ roll.

Reid’s impact and inspiration on punk rock came as bassist/vocalist of melodic punks The Boys, an outfit which Joey Ramone declared his favourite band in the eighties, and indeed that decade saw Reid alongside fellow Boys member Casino Steel provide backing vocals for the live version of The Ramones hit, Baby I Love You. Alongside band founders Matt Dangerfield and Steel, as well as Honest John Plain and Jack Black, Reid and The Boys released four albums and a host of singles before splitting in 1981.Eighteen years later the band reformed for a couple of shows in Tokyo, which in turn eventually led to a full comeback and tours across varied areas of the world. Leaving the band in 2011, Reid set about recording his debut solo album Little Big Head which gripped attention and appetites upon its release in 2012. Now he returns with its successor and another excursion into majestic power and punk pop.

With multi-instrumentalist Alexander Gold, guitarist Sophie Lynch, and drummer Ciara Lavers alongside him, Reid and the band swiftly light up ears and appetite with opener Another City. Within a breath melodies are teasing and captivating whilst crisp beats and a dark bass seducing are adding their potent coaxing to the songs immediately catchy invitation. It is not long before the tones of Reid bring their distinctive hues, his voice somewhere between Ste McCabe, Pete Shelly, and Ian Broudie, and fuelling the track with even greater temptation. With suggestive melodies dancing on the senses, the song is a lively croon setting the release off in fine and magnetic style.

The strong start is instantly surpassed by the outstanding Baby Doll, its entrance a flight of Devo-esque keys bred persuasion which has the imagination in the palms of their colourful hands. duncan_album_2Nestling into a minimalistic stroll with a tangy bassline escorting Reid’s compelling narrative, the song lyrically as intriguing and enthralling as the sounds it casts, it is in no time a devilish treat. With an even pace even through its mini crescendos, the track persistently inflames and ignites ears with spicy enterprise and Pixies like imagination across its singular rhythmic direction. The song is an early pinnacle for the album backed strongly by C’est La Vie, a juicy pop infused blaze of bracing riffs and glowing harmonies. Admittedly at its strongest in the verses rather than the hazy choruses, the track is a magnet for the passions and vocal participation, raising an eager smile at every turn of its mischief.

Both End of the World and Joe keep things bubbling vivaciously, the first of the two a weave of incendiary rhythms and flavoursome chords which at times are early Undertones like and in others more like The Briefs, whilst the second is a riveting drama of Beatle-esque melodrama and melodic rock colouring with a gorgeous breeze of melancholic strings matched by keys. Though neither can quite match those before them, each adds a rich new shade to the character of the album and a treat for ears to devour before Just As Good As I Used To Be unveils its quaint balladry. It is a slow embrace and admittedly persuasion until it suddenly erupts into a fevered pop punk stomp which in turn ignites the already appealing vocal lures with extra spice and energy. From its appealing but underwhelming start the track turns into the life of the party and feeds the greedy appetite now in place for the album with its exciting The Freshies like revelry.

Little Fingers and Toes steps up next and straight away is flinging spicy riffs and hooks which spark in the imagination with Rezillos like radiance. It should be stated that for all the references and reminders moments in songs inspire they more often than not are fleeting or simple essences which only spice up the unique propositions. The song itself has a curled lip to its presence, a belligerence which is all punk rock and lingering attitude, even as contagious hooks and vocal harmonies steal attention. As across the album, the excellent encounter is unfussy and to the point but still a masterful web of textures and sounds dragging feet and emotions into its persuasion with sublime ease.

The initially folk lilted Long Long Gone is next and strides with a blues flame to its accomplished design and air before making way for Not The Kind of Guy Girls Hug, another song with an open whisper of Lennon and McCartney to its charm. Adding another enjoyable twist to the album, the song still lacks the spark of its predecessors though admittedly that is more personal taste driven than any shortcoming in its skilled persuasion, though it is soon forgotten as One Night in Rio uncages its rock ‘n’ roll rampage. An out and out punk stomp with a blues rock underbelly, the track is the kind of song Reid has become renowned for which is hungry punk rock at its melodic and insatiable best, this track offering a great Ramones meets Eddie and the Hot Rods tasting.

The thrilling success of the song is instantly emulated by Wasting Time, this showing distinct and sultry personality with its first flame of blues and surf rock enriched glaze of guitar. It is a tempting which never leaves the rigorous lure of the song, only lays in wait during moments of predatory riffing for the chance to again soak subsequent melodies and harmonies. A radiant gem of a suasion for body and emotions, the song leaves for closer When We were Young to bring the infectious shindig to a close. Toying with synth rock and indie pop within its alluring body, the track is a tenaciously satisfying end to a release which makes you groan in disappointment once its last note is cast.

The Difficult Second Album hits the sweet spot time and time again across its nostalgia and modern infused body, and even when it misses the target for individual tastes, it still leaves a feverish and lingering wake which only leads to a hunger for more.

The Difficult Second Album is available now via LBH Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00MPNSP9I/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=19450&creativeASIN=B00MPNSP9I&linkCode=as2&tag=uberoc-21&linkId=N5K5ZLSPALFB6SUJ

http://web.little-big-head.de/

RingMaster 17/11/2014

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Clear The Auditorium – The Final Broadcast EP

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Released in May this year to strongly positive responses, The Final Broadcast EP from Welsh electronicore band Clear The Auditorium gets a national reboot November 17th and such its gripping presence a new wave of acclaim and recognition is a certainty. It is not a release which startles with originality yet presents a striking and rigorous confrontation which is as compelling as it is invigorating. The band’s second EP, The Final Broadcast is an attention grabbing statement of intent from a band with the potential to light major fires ahead.

Hailing from Pontypridd and formed in 2011, Clear The Auditorium entwines electronic and rock essences in a voracious merger spawned from the inspiration of bands such as Enter Shikari and Linkin Park. Last year saw the release of their debut EP 2021, a concept release following a young soldier in the midst of the third World War. Its thematic enterprise brought references to bands such as My Chemical Romance which continue to apply in The Final Broadcast, its drama centred on a post-war wasteland and rebellion against a tyrannical superpower formed in the wake of first EPs scenario. It is a lyrically enthralling encounter, though it is the music where the creative theatre is most successful. The Todd Campbell produced EP leaves appetite and its hunger greedy and satisfaction full to bursting whilst anticipation for their next endeavour is already brewing up some impatience.

The release opens with Prologue, an introduction surrounding a news alert with heavy shadows and tempting electronics before the band pushes forward with the start of the apocalyptic narrative. The electro provocation unleashed by Dafydd Richards instantly raise intrigue and sinister incitement which is simultaneously tempered and accelerated by his outstanding vocals, the vocalist strong and bullish in his raw squalls but even more impressive with his clean tones. Musically the song too seduces and threatens on its way to its successor If We Burn, a song similarly bred from the same climate of the first track. The song is a blaze of a provocation, one aflame with electronic devilry aligned to muscular rhythmic intimidation cast by drummer Caleb Priday-Jeremiah and bassist Conor Evans and courted by the predacious intent and enterprise of guitarist Matthew Bennett-Jones. The song shows where those earlier mentioned comparisons are seeded but even more it holds a strong similarity to bands like Jensen and Dead By April whilst their at times raw aggression suggests The Browning. The track is a beast of an incitement which flares up and sizzles like a battlefield.PromoImage.jpg

The following Vacant Streets is a less forceful encounter, certainly at its start but is soon imposing with rabid beats and fiercely simmering electronic vivacity. Across its equally rugged and welcoming terrain, vocals roar and spit malevolent intent whilst within the embrace of the sizzling flight of melodies, Richards croons with warm and thrilling clean tones. As all tracks, as well as being part of the overall story, there is individual drama to the song inspiring intimate reflections and connections alongside the stark landscape of the central theme. As its predecessor, an exhausting and thrilling offering it leads into Intermission, a fascinating short piece which is hard to read, but with the turning of a radio dial connecting the two tracks it feels like it represents a moment of light and lost enjoyment found by souls locked in the cold reality and broken world they hide within.

It is followed by the extraordinary We Are The Danger, easily our favourite track on the release and the band at its most adventurous and imposing best. Ignited by a dance of Morse code which is the spark to a rebellious uprising in sound and defiance, the track rages with scythes of beats and riffs, all matched by the acidic rants of electro pulses. It instantly gets body and emotions fired up ready for the heroic emprise of grooves and rampant riffing which follows. Everything about the song is anthemic from the hoarse and warm vocals, through the aggressively agitated rhythms, to the hellacious devilry driving guitars bass and mass vocal shouts. An uprising and creative brawl, the track is one of the most rousing and exhilarating songs this year reminding of now demised UK band Always The Quiet Ones.

Ozymandius comes next with gentle and elegant sonic mystique within a psychedelically kissed atmosphere. Swiftly catching the imagination with a seeming tour of lost wonders and hopes, it explosively evolves and broadens its inventive weight and passion as it strives for a new horizon of sonic light. The track is a powerful slab of evocative textures and expression potently holding its own against the masterful triumph of the previous track.

The EP is brought to a close by the slow burning and persuading Epilogue, an ultimately engrossing song which from bare voice and keys erupts into a pungently brewing tempest of emotion and climactic rhythms aligned to burning melodies. It is a fine end to an excellent adventure of sound and story. Already there are seeds of uniqueness to the character of Clear The Auditorium’s sound but there is still a fair way to go to be truly individual but with offerings like this, a release which just impresses more with every listen, we can happily wait.

The Final Broadcast EP is available now @ http://cleartheauditorium.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ClearTheAuditorium

RingMaster 17/11/2014

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Dirt Box Disco – I don’t want anything for Christmas

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Going hand in hand with every Christmas we get overtired squabbling brats, unwanted guests, and the worst clothing since MC Hammer was causing blindness with his flashy pantaloons and their movements. The worst import in the festive season though is the Christmas single, a disease which with few, very few, exceptions turns skilled and accomplished musicians into creatively retarded festive jumper wearing disasters. There are the occasional successes which buck the trend, though right now only Jona Lewie’s Stop the Cavalry comes to mind and that is debatable if it truly qualifies. To that positive list you can now add UK punk ‘n’ rollers Dirt Box Disco and their single I don’t want anything for Christmas.

They have not totally escaped the curse it is fair to say, the song not their finest moment, but the band does what Dirt Box Disco does best with the single and that is unleash mischievously stomping rock ‘n’ roll. Whether it will be a song which remains as potent and favourably welcomed over repeated plays as it is right now, time will tell but the Burton on Trent certainly provides an evocative tease which borders on maudlin but escapes through its infectious and smile inducing revelry.

From its first breath the track is declaring its intent and almost self-pitying premise through vocals and simple but fiery riffs. The chorus opens up proceedings, a simple repetition of the song’s FRONTtitle primarily before slipping into a more relaxed stroll with the vocals of WEAB.I.AM and Spunk Volcano entwining for the track’s narrative. It is a straight forward offering of the band’s distinct sound which ignites more strikingly with the sizzling sonic enterprise unveiled by the guitars of Danny Fingers and Spunk, whilst throughout the rhythmic probing of bassist Deadbeatz Chris and drummer Maff Fazzo keeps it all compelling and contagious. It is fair to say that there is nothing out of the Dirt Box Disco ordinary going on but that alone ensures the track will surpass any other Xmas offering this year, even though they do insist in having infernal sleigh bells to accompany its end.

Accompanying I don’t want anything for Christmas the band offers Punk By Numbers, a raw and belligerent slab of old school punk with a healthy soaking of The Ramones and The Dead Boys to its riot. It is a brilliant rock ‘n’ roll threat which again is the band revelling in creative devilry proving what it is that sets them apart from the crowd with consummate ease. Even without the second song the single would be very worthy of attention but it adds the icing on the flavoursome Christmas cake.

I don’t want anything for Christmas will not dramatically change views on Christmas singles but it does make one very palatable helping which will ensure one year has a beacon of hope and a gift which you think you might not want but will greedily devour. Now just have to convince Granny that it is really Cliff Richard bursting from the speakers over the festive pudding.’

I don’t want anything for Christmas is available now via STP Records/Deadfly Recordings digitally and on CD @ http://dirtboxdisco.bigcartel.com/product/dirt-box-disco-i-don-t-want-anything-for-christmas-cd

Dirt Box Disco live dates over Christmas:

DEC 13 – The Bridge inn, Rotherham

DEC 20 – Star And Garter, Manchester

DEC 27 – ZOMBIE HUT, CORBY

DEC 28 – The Maze. Nottingham

DEC 30 – Adam & Eve, Birmingham

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk

RingMaster 17/11/2014

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The Art of Amputation – Distorted Pop Song/ Californian English

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Listening to Distorted Pop Song, one half of the new AA-sided single from UK progressive rock band The Art of Amputation, is like being wrapped up in a warm duvet against a squalling wind. It is a thick haze of melodic and sonic enterprise which gives you a fuzzy feeling in the senses warding off shadows and at times reality. Aligned to the more tenacious and incendiary Californian English, song and single is a captivating offering from the London quintet, not a startling one but an encounter which though an instant enjoyment takes its time truly seducing the emotions.

Formed when Hugh Fox (drums, programming, percussion) and Allan Harrod (vocals, guitar, keyboards) linked up as a duo after the break-up of a previous band, The Art of Amputation soon Picture 172became a trio as the pair began writing and recording their debut EP. Realising they needed another guitarist to realise their explorations inspired by the likes of Weezer, Pixies, The Beatles, and David Bowie, they recruited Mark Hyden (guitars, vocals). Next Freddy de Lord (keyboards, vocals, saxophone) was enlisted with subsequently their acclaimed self-titled EP unveiled in April this year. With a line-up now completed by Tim Harrod (vocals, percussion), the band unveil their new single, a release which as mentioned does not take the listener by the scruff of the neck but as it smoulders vibrantly, leads them into a sultrily twisted seduction which in turn recruits a keen appetite.

Distorted Pop Song emerges from a distant horizon, keys and sonic endeavour light smog which spreads as the song nears and mellow vocals glides resourcefully across the senses. In full view the song becomes a rich and thick tapestry of emotive vocal hues and evocative melodic colour immersing a heavier rhythmic and shadowed enticement. It ebbs and flows with bulging waves of sound and enterprising textures to toy with the imagination whilst its blustery climate and provocative embrace comes superbly lit by voice, keys, and exotic flames of sax.

Its companion Californian English has a more indie rock essence to its breath and presence, thoughts of Editors coming to the fore as the song opens up a persuasion of jangling guitars and flowing keys around a great varied vocal enticement. Again there is a rich and dense atmosphere to the song, psychedelic breezes colluding with jazz and rock intrigue for an enthralling weave of sound. With slightly more bite to its presence, the song is the peak of the pair but both tracks of the single standout and raise a hunger to know and hear more from the band.

Alongside the darkly enchanting EP, The Art of Amputation’s feistier new single reinforces their impressive emergence whilst showing further adventure and character to their songwriting and sound. The single is not the spark to a fire in passion’s belly but definitely a richly satisfying stoking of their embers from one of the more exciting prospects within the British scene.

Distorted Pop Song/ Californian English is available digitally now via Ruby Music @ http://www.rubymusic.ie/

https://www.facebook.com/TheArtOfAmputation

RingMaster 17/11/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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