Johnny Wore Black – Walking Underwater Pt 2

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Anticipation for the second part of his absorbing album has been as excited as it has been impatient, but Johnny Wore Black has rewarded the wait with another proposition which stops you in your tracks and immerses ears and imagination in an evocative embrace. The hunger for Walking Underwater Pt 2 comes from the strikingly impressive Part 1, an emotional canvas drenched in poetic melodies and fiery textures. Its release came in March of this year but such the appetite it bred the months between seemed like years. Its successor is here now, released on November 26th, and with even closer intimacy and impassioned imagination re-confirms the band as one of the UK’s premier melodic rock provocateurs.

Johnny Wore Black is the brainchild of London based songwriter/producer and stuntman (Les Miserables, The Dark Knight Rises, Fast and Furious 6, Fury ) who prefers to just be known as Jay. As renowned for his collaborations as well as his own work, Jay released a host of attention grabbing and riveting singles as the band before the first part of this debut album. Many of the songs were bred from a gripping collaboration with Megadeth bassist David Ellefson, and as on Part 1, the pair has linked up again on Walking Underwater Pt 2 with Ellefson co-writing a trio of tracks for it and playing bass across the bulk of the release. The band line-up is completed by drummer Simon Hutchby alongside guitarists Pete Mathers and James Coppolaro, the latter mixing much of the album with other tracks mixed by Grammy Award winning producer David Bottrill. Produced by Jay, the release takes little time in re-igniting the pleasure and emotions which were stoked by its predecessor, leading them into rich emotion fuelled reflections and sonically coloured atmospheres.

Opener Firefly sets things in motion and from the first electro influenced moment has the imagination engaged and then fired up as rich hooks and rugged riffs embrace ears. There is an immediate infectiousness which transfers to the potent vocals of Jay and the crisp rhythmic persuasion which guides the inventively spicy song. The song’s delicious throaty bassline aligns to sonic scythes and persistent grooves from the guitars as the song expands whilst the vocals smoulder harmonically and expressively as they colour the provocative narrative of the song. It all combines to provide a thick and potent stroll of anthemic rock ‘n’ roll coated in creative drama and emotive intrigue.

It is a potent and impressive start continued by recent single A Cut Above. From a charming melodic coaxing the song unveils its rhythmic muscles and raw riff led provocation. It is an walkingunderwaterpt2imposing presence tempered though by the increasingly mesmeric tones of Jay and the weave of sonic enterprise which wraps the brewing unrest in the belly of the song. Again Ellefson lures a heavily shadowed voice from his bass to menace and enthral whilst elsewhere everything merges in a portentous tempest which threatens more than assaults but leaves thoughts rampant and satisfaction basking. Again the track is an anthem, not one which charges with nostrils flared but an incitement which rouses the passions as it explores dark intense scenery.

Both Comfy Slippers and Fallen Angel explore different shades and depths, the album just as the previous full-length, a web of distinctly unique and imaginative explorations in sound and premise. The first of the two swiftly presents a pungent almost stadium rock texture to its emerging temptation, beats and hooks thick yet rapier like in the less condensed climate of the song. There is a warm radiance to the rock pop spawned encounter too which transfixes as it envelops and helps spark further hunger in an already greedy appetite for the album. The song pulsates in its melodic glow before making way for the scintillating drama of its successor. Every note and syllable has a sinister air and touch here, a haunted feel which is simultaneously sultry and alluring. As already proven Jay has the knack and skill at making dark and intense situations musically and lyrically seduce like a unashamedly flirtatious temptress, at making loud and subtle extreme collude for an inescapable web of aural theatre and no example any finer than right here.

Gift of Desperation steps up next and takes little time in absorbing ears and thoughts with its pulsing electronic courting which itself is soon wrapped in emotive resonance as vocals and slender but striking melodies entwine the sinew sculpted heart of the song. It has a dark and imposing presence which never drifts too far away from predacious heaviness and a destructive emotional theming, but it also expels blazes of sonic and harmonic passion courted by tempestuous tenacity and intensity. The outstanding track is unrelenting as it flares and traps the passions with stormy beauty, creating a consuming shadowed majesty which I Do Dissolve has to follow. It does in fine style, its vivaciously shimmering electro flooded entrance equipped with another irresistible vocal bassline and the grippingly expressive tones of Jay. It is just the initial lure though as a funky swagger infests the song to inspire a sturdy bounce which in turn seems to ignite the richness and theatrical elements of all corners of the song. For some reason the track at times reminds of Ugly Kid Joe, though it is a fleeting thought in the expansive enterprise of the fun.

The brilliant Noise carves another pinnacle, of which admittedly there are many, in the album, again dramatic suggestiveness coating every sway of notes and swing of strings. Challenging modern social habits online and beyond, the song is virtually smooching with ears and emotions from its first melancholic kiss and caress. To this tempting, crescendos of raw expression and ferocious sonic endeavour bursts in, hooks and riffs as antagonistic as the melodic heart of the track is tenacious. Seriously anthemic and the heaviest encounter on the album, the track is rock at its most instinctive and incendiary.

Featuring Croatian singer Sara Renar alongside Jay, Shine On glides in next to cup ears in enchanting melody seducing balladry. As expected there is still a dark edge to the song, a shadow which watches as the beauty colours senses and imagination. Though a slow burning persuasion in relation to other tracks, it soars into the emotions and memory with ease, its sonic flair and emotive tempting a lingering affair even after making way for the outstanding Whose Children. This is another song where hooks and grooves entrench in the listener with swift efficiency before flavoursome diversity in voice and sonic invention tango together in a compelling and ingenious design of suasion.

From that highlight the album leaves on another in the engrossing shape of Winter in July. A cover of the Loretta Heywood song, it also features the soul singer alongside Jay and as it soars and glides over the senses with a haunting elegance and harmonic grace, there will be few duets as powerful and thrilling as the album’s final track.

There were obviously high hopes and expectations for Walking Underwater Pt 2 because of its predecessor but also a wonder and maybe doubt whether lightning can strike twice in the same place in such a short time. Not only can it but it proves to be with greater scintillating success. The UK has numerous potential soaked melodic rock bands emerging, but with their promise realised and pushed on again, Johnny Wore Black is leading the way.

Walking Underwater Pt 2 is available digitally and on CD from November 26th via Dark Cherry.

For more info check out http://www.johnnyworeblack.com

RingMaster 13/11/2014

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Deaf Eyes – Self Titled

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Started as a side project in 2013 of the experimental psych progressive metallers Incoming Cerebral Overdrive, Dead Eyes proves itself to be a distinct and formidable entity in its own right with its self-titled debut album. Colliding eight tracks of intense and thunderous post metal with senses and imagination, the instrumental band lives up to its intent of exploring “obscure experimental sounds and atmospheres,” and “a monolithic approach to hard and heavy riffs with a “delayed research” of alternative vibes mixed in a psychedelic mood.” That is quite a wordy description of what consumes and seduces within their album but one realised within the leviathans of sound and textures which transfix and immerse the listener from start to finish. The album is a beast of a proposition but equally a rigorously sultry temptress journeying through exhausting landscapes as imposingly cinematic as they are carnally ravenous.

The Italian quartet begins their voracious seduction with Black Canvas, and in no time thoughts and emotions are engulfed in the drama and almost savage soundscape of the track. Carnivorous riffs and even more bestial bass predation swiftly overwhelm the senses, backed by the intense weight and hunger of the swiping rhythms. Just as the track is immensely intimidating it also impressively takes the imagination into an evolving and challenging climate of sonic and inventive suggestion, across a terrain of danger and intrigue which erupts and snarls with skilled rabidity and riveting ingenuity. It is a demanding and irresistible experience with a contagion which is toxic and inescapable.

Its dark realms are shadowed by those of the following Mirrors, its specific turbulence and antagonism expelled in a barely milder tempest but one with flickers of light and melodic charm to its hostility. The bass has a growl to reverse a tsunami of ravenous beasts whilst guitars wield a sonic enterprise which binds with venomous potency whilst its infestation of infectiousness is Deaf Eyes - Coverimpossible to fend off or resist. It dark corners and shadows are no less merciless than its outright tempestuous climate as the song unleashes a sound which holds essences of the likes of Neurosis and Russian Circles to its breast as well as those of Morkobot.

A more celestial jeopardy is investigated in Orbits, though with all tracks the adventure unfurling is as unique to the listener’s thoughts as the sounds casting the canvas and sonic emprise inspiring them. The track is one of the less intrusive on the album but still a provocative maelstrom of seriously confrontational invention and enterprise, a description suiting both the tantalising exotic and evocative scenery of The Eyes Of Regret and the agitated majesty of Draining Sun. The first of the two descends into a cavernous and melodically infused sonic haze which is as emotionally expansive as it is ferociously unpredictable and inventively coloured. Its exceptional sonic and innovatively perilous emprise is equalled by its successor, the track a hypnotic dance of repetitive riffery and preying rhythms within a psychedelically hued blaze of disturbed sonic revelry. The track is scintillating, a corrosive waltz physically and emotionally which bewitches with cultish persuasion. The accompanying press release listed Goblin as references and of all the songs this with its haunted shadows and demonic colouring is the prime reason.

Red Desert Lullaby keeps body and emotions just as eagerly busy, its thick smouldering climate a wrap to perilous escapades to envision and a sonic rapacity to bask in whilst next up The Withered drifts into a sinister province of crawling shadows and haunted emotions. Their dark secrets converge around a rugged spine of bass and rhythmic bullying of ears and emotions, an ensnaring and violation of the senses setting thoughts and passions aflame. It is a glorious predator and portrait of lost and turbulent emotions, another binding and ingenious traverse of places most fear to contemplate let alone traverse.

The album closes with the just as dark and Luciferian Commiserate, a primal senses ravishing beauty which scars as it seduces. The bracing incursion into psyche and emotions is an enthralling end to an exceptional release, an album which is a playground for the imagination and trial by sonic fire for the senses. It is quite exceptional and provides a new excursion into the unknown for thoughts and emotions with every violating listen.

Deaf Eyes is available now via Argonauta Records @ http://www.argonautarecords.com/shop/music-/41-deaf-eyes-deaf-eyes-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/deafeyesband

RingMaster 12/11/2014

https://soundcloud.com/deaf-eyes

Metal Moth – Rise EP

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Though the band name might not have convinced yet, there was no such problem with the aggressive incitement unleashed by UK metallers Metal Moth on their Rise EP. The band’s debut is four slabs of classic metal bullied and twisted into a rampage of modern melody enriched rock ‘n’ roll. It has more familiarity than originality to its potency and presence but this only fuels the potential and thorough enjoyment given by the heavily flavoursome entrance of the band.

Formed in 2012, Metal Moth was soon stomping across country and venues with their adrenaline fuelled barbarous sounds. An enthusiastically growing fan base came hand in hand with their emergence, one sure to be reinforced and accelerated with the release of the Rise, the first of three consecutive EPs. Band and release ignite appetite and imagination within seconds as opener Moth To The Flame stands toe to toe with ears, flinging weighty rhythms and sinew crafted riffs with antagonistic intent. It is a ferocious start which only intensifies as the riffing and heavily swinging beats stampede with flared nostrils across the senses. Around this assault invention mischievously offers acidic grooves and a deliciously carnal bassline whilst vocally Kurt Hudson excels with his melodic yet snarled delivery. From the merciless swipes of drummer Natalie Gaines to the threatening bass predation provided by David Collinson (who announced his departure from the band in recent days), and the fiery adventure and skilled devilry provided by guitarists Mark Gibbons and Chris Fisher, the track is gripping drama and ruggedly impressive.

The same can be said of the following One More Time, again a proposition which has speakers bulging under its savage rhythmic onslaught and ravenous riffery. Equally there is no escaping the rigorous contagion uncaged within the track or the unpredictable twists and jagged barbarism which gnaw on the senses as wiry flames of melodic endeavour flirt with similarly rapacious intent. It is a full blooded stomp which again has recognisable traits but just as plentiful new designs and invention in its lyrical and sonic provocation.

Melt Down steps up next and immediately is a haze of sonic menace swiftly speared by those pungent beats of Gaines and the crunchy scythes of riffs from the guitars. Either side of that core Metal Moth Pic 2there is the vocal quality and fluid expression of Hudson and the dark predatory tones of Collinson’s bass, each complementing and sparking against the other. It is a blend which magnetically colours the threatening prowl and confrontation of the track, especially when aligned to the intermittent eruptions of melodic and unpredictable intrigue offered by Gibbons and Fisher. Though the song does not brawl with and corrupt the passions at the same strength and immediacy as its predecessors, it reveals more depth to the invention and skills of the band whilst laying down a tasty appetiser for the EP’s finale.

The closing Metal Maniac also takes a more restrained approach to its seducing of ears, the bass rumbling with dark devilry whilst guitars create a web of melodic coaxing. It is not long though before the song settles into a fevered stroll as addictive grooves and hooks provide riveting barbs to the feisty lure of the track. Providing a thrilling end to a just as exciting debut, the track sums up the band and release perfectly, that being rock ‘n’ roll at its instinctive and insatiable best.

If the next pair of EPs matches and confirms the promise and already accomplished quality in skills and sound of the band, it will be impossible not to suggest that as they evolve Metal Moth will be a band playing a big part in the evolution of British metal ahead. To be honest though, if this is as good as it gets there will be few complaints either.

The Rise EP is available digitally now @ http://metalmoth1.bandcamp.com/album/rise

https://www.facebook.com/MetalMoth/

RingMaster 12/11/2014

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The Jacques – Pretty DJ EP

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Like a hybrid infestation spawned from a mix of Babyshambles, Arctic Monkeys, and The Sugarcubes, The Jacques in one scintillating swoop has announced themselves as one of the UK’s most exciting newcomers. That potent introduction comes in the sensational shape of the Pretty DJ EP, a four track stomp of Britpop and pop punk infused with garage rock devilry, which from first to last breath inflames the imagination and incites the body.

Formed only in January of this year and consisting of two sets of brothers aged 16 to 21, The Jacques inspired by the sounds they were raised upon which included the likes of The Strokes, The Ramones, The Jam, The Lemonheads, and Elvis Costello, swiftly made their mark on the live scene. In a few brief months the Bristol hailing quartet of vocalist/guitarist Bonnie Jacques, guitarist Jake Edwards, bassist/vocalist Oli Edwards, and drummer Elliot O’Brien found themselves playing numerous festivals across the summer including Guilfest and at Hyde Park where they supported The Libertines and caught the attention of their drummer Gary Powell, the co-founder of 25 Hour Convenience Store, who signed them on the spot to the label which now uncages the band’s first irresistible offering.

Recorded at Rockfield Studios with Dan Swift, Pretty DJ opens with its title track and instantly ignites the imagination and appetite with an initial jangle of spicy guitar. With rhythms soon in tow, the song relaxes into a warm yet unpredictable stroll littered with quirky hooks, a rhythmic shuffle, and a richly persuasive bassline. It is potent bait especially when the distinct and unbroken vocals of Bonnie flirt with ears, his tones refreshingly unique and individually expressive even at a young age. The song proceeds to weave its salacious sonic curves and healthy rhythmic persuasion with raw and compelling seduction, every syllable and note brought with a dose of eclectic enterprise. It is a sensational first taste of the band and release which only inflames hunger the_jacques-pretty_dj-ep-2014-artwork-e1414933180481and passion for more with every twist in its armoury

The following Foreign Films has a more relaxed gait than the great agitated endeavour of its predecessor, but is no less virulent bait with its sultry melodies and a great vocal duelling between Bonnie and Oli. It is hard to look further than The Libertines as a spicy influence here, though equally there as whiffs of bands like Supergrass and Pulp at play too. The song also carries garage rock tenacity to its sonic and lively cosmopolitan temptation as it reveals a little more of the rich potential and imagination of the young band.

Scum In A Bottle also visits that garage rock breeding as well as a punk causticity which adds further tasty shades of endeavour to the release. Guitars spark and flame with raw charm whilst again the vocals tantalise with their seamless union and magnetic uniqueness. Littered with mouth-watering craft and creative revelry from the guitars and a pungent baiting from the intrepid rhythms, the track steals its own thick wedge of the rich praise building up inside waiting to shower the release, a portion matched by that garnered by the closing Weekends.

The final track swiftly has its temptation ingrained through an opening bass lure. Always a sucker for throaty enticing like this, the track had us gripped from its first second and only proceeded to increase its hold with tangy grooves and similarly tasty hooks across bracing swipes of sonic causticity. As with all the tracks, it is impossible for feet and vocal chords not to join its call, with pleasure in close quarters to their eagerness.

It is fair to say that The Jacques wear their influences on their sleeve but only as homage to those inspirations and as an invigorating hue to their own invention. The Pretty DJ EP is easily one of the highlights of the year and easy reasoning as to why Mr Powell leapt upon them within a breath of discovering their existence.

The Pretty DJ EP is available now via 25 Hour Convenience Store @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/pretty-dj-ep/id930507850

https://www.facebook.com/TheJacquesBand

RingMaster 12/11/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Sperø – Pride EP

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Crafting a sultry weave of blues and folk rock which is as intriguing as it is openly magnetic, US rock band Sperø makes a richly flavoursome proposition which is just as potent for the imagination as ears. The quartet has just released the Pride EP, a spicy collection of songs which sparks everything from feet through to emotions with sublime ease. Its initial touch admittedly was strong if not striking but by half way through the first track there was the realisation that it had wormed under the skin and seduced the psyche with inescapable majesty, and from there submission was inevitable.

The beginnings of Sperø come with self-taught guitarist Jesse Hofstee and classically trained pianist Hillary Laughery rehearsing together daily in Southern California in 2013. Exploring and crafting a sound which infuses classic and modern influences from the likes of Neil Young and Manchester Orchestra, the band subsequently expanded with the addition of bassist Nick Hankins and drummer Ryan Malette. They were soon taking their unique rock ‘n’ roll around the San Diego area to an increasingly growing and inflamed fan base. That first year saw the release of the well-received debut album Rational Paths, a potent entrance backed by the band’s live expansion touring up and down the West Coast and appearing at RedGorilla Music Festival. Now they unveil the Pride EP, a release “written as a testament to the great benefits of believing in yourself and working hard to get what you want”, and a proposition to seduce a new wealth of hearts and appetites it is easy to suspect.

Recent single Can’t Get More opens up the release and soon has ears grasped by vocal harmonies and fiery riffs. It is an attention sparking start which as swiftly relaxes into a smouldering Spero_Pride_Coverstroll of inflamed grooves cored by a tangy bassline ridden by the vocals of Hofstee. It’s a potent coaxing but still does not ignite a lot more than intrigue initially. That changes once Laughery opens up her rich and seductive tones as the chorus suddenly comes alive and feistily tempts, which in turn seems to incite the rest of the song. As mentioned earlier it is around halfway that feet and voice find themselves involved and that enslavement is realised and binding. The track is a glorious slice of emotively hued expression under a sultry climate, but even with its rich persuasion soon surpassed by the outstanding Friend.

From the first stroke of its acidic and irresistibly captivating groove the second song is in command of thoughts and passions, it’s aggressively shimmering air, a gripping wrap to the two vocalists and the dramatic elegance of Laughery’s keys. Growing with every chord and syllable, the track is soon rocking speakers and ears with a mix of blues and old school rock ‘n’ roll, a stomp sounding like The Black Keys meets Jerry Lee Lewis under the persuasion of The Lumineers. It is a blaze of a treat, a song as comfortable and commanding whether gently coaxing or rigorously stoking the fires of it and the listener’s passion.

The EPs title track idles in next, a lone acoustic guitar beckoning before welcoming the mischievous drama of beats and keys. As with the first two songs, there is a swagger to the encounter which even in its initial slow steps is unmistakable and inviting. There are also outbursts of creative urgency and intensity, again as in the previous song, which only ignites air and imagination as a tenacious blues tempting binds the whole climactic web. Everything aligns for another irresistible highlight of the release before the full on seduction of Better Man. With a shimmering crawl of a slim evocative melody courting the delicious vocals of Laughery, the song simply glows as it sublimely and tenderly enthrals the senses. Unbridled temptation from its first breath and atmospherically cinematic throughout, the song is pure magnetism of voice and electrified strings, with only the restrained ambience of keys for company.

The pungent presence of Talking Up makes the perfect contrast next, its bulbous bassline and electro baiting a thick shadow to the again sultrily laying sonic endeavour of guitar and keys around compelling vocals. Its psychedelic blues tinged air over another slowly strolling gait makes the brilliant track as gripping in drama and sound as anything before it, whilst the expulsions of sonic flame courted by just as inflamed vocals is pure mesmerism.

The release closes with the acoustic led revelry of They Say, a track part folk quick step and part funk induced devilry which with its layers of blues tempting and classical hued keys, ensures the EP leaves on richly lingering persuasion. The diverse two prong enticing of vocals is just as unpredictable and thrilling as the sounds around them and leave their and the band’s infection deep rooted and burning in appetite and emotions.

The Pride EP is a gem of an encounter from a band which manages to turn recognisable essences and spices into something unique and impossibly addictive. Quite simply Sperø and their sound is a hex on the ears and quite irresistible.

The Pride EP is available now https://speroband.bandcamp.com/

http://www.speroband.com/

RingMaster 13/11/2014

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Kicking Harold – Kill You

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Ahead of new album Red Light District which is scheduled to unveil its suggested fascination next year, US alternative rockers Kicking Harold unleash its first single, the rigorously infectious Kill You. A song which originally appeared on the band’s 1995/6 debut album Ugly & Festering, the track has been updated, fired up, and re-recorded to make a potent teaser for the impending full-length.

Formed in the mid-nineties, the Californian band are no strangers to acclaim and a feverish following as they proceeded to release three further albums with the last Zombies, Cars & Evil Guitars whipping up keen attention in 2010. The years have been equally up and down too, the band going through a lull after the release of third album Space Age Breakdown with members leaving and other projects consuming the attention of band founder and vocalist/guitarist Tim David Kelly. The success of the song Gasoline from that album though ignited another wave of enthusiasm and energy within the project, especially with its placing on auto makeover reality shows Overhaulin’. A 2006 re-release for its source album was a success as was the following Zombies, Cars & Evil Guitars 4 years later. Earlier this year the band re-issued second album Return Of The Bulbmen to strong responses for its rare presence and now with bassist Bret Domrose and drummer Peter Burke alongside Kelly, the band is looking keenly ahead with Kill You their next spicy offering.

The song makes a potent entrance with bulging riffs and fiery melodies surrounding punchy beats. It is an attention grabbing start which suddenly relaxes with slightly lesser impact as Kelly opens up his delivery and the song’s narrative. It is not because of his presence but just a making room for his voice that brings a minor dip but there is still plenty to fire up the appetite and intrigue, it’s gentler coaxing only the early step in the build up to a ridiculously compelling and anthemic chorus. That moment swiftly lures assistance from the listener’s voice, irresistibly tempting with its brief but pungent contagion, an infectiousness which spills into the following gentler sonic embraces and rhythmic shuffle. The choruses are crescendos which only spark and continually influence the drama and passion of the increasingly impressive and persuasive encounter.

It is easy to see why the song is a lingering fan favourite since its initial appearance way back in time, and if the new material destined to flavour the new album lives up to its majestic temptation and addictiveness, Kicking Harold might well be the name on excited lips once again.

Kill You is available now for info on this and the band check out www.kickingharold.com

RingMaster 12/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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