Seneron – Parasites And Poets

 

PARASITES AND POETS

A year and a half ago, the potential ridden Order Restored EP roared and confronted whilst thrusting Northern Ireland rockers Seneron into the keen gaze of attention. It was not an explosion to ignite the world of heavy melodic rock but one richly satisfying and enticing invitation into the appetising emergence of the band. Now the Derry trio return with debut album Parasites And Poets and show not only that their early promise has been realised but they have opened up another vat of intriguing and exciting possibilities.

Fusing aggressive essences of alternative and punk rock with grunge, Seneron from its founding in 2011 swiftly sparked the local underground scene live and with their first release, the Well Driven EP a year later. Its raw and rugged presence made for a strong and alluring entrance which last year’s Order Restored reinforced and pushed on, just as the new album does again. Signing with GlobMetal Promotions the same year for a worldwide management, the band through the EP found themselves catching the attention of US radio as well as at home, its successful release supported by numerous shows, tours, and festival appearances. It was a potent year for Seneron and one easy to imagine being eclipsed over upcoming months as Parasites And Poets infests more and more ears and passions.

As soon as the opening song of the album hits there is a more rounded and flavoursome presence and texture to the band’s sound which has evolved between releases. The accustomed fire and snarl of tracks are still there but honed into a more contagious and adventurous charge. First track and new single Don’t Cave In sets things off and instantly grabs ears and appetite with a wall of hungry rhythms and tenacious riffs. Grooves are swiftly employed too, the mix voracious bait which grips the imagination as feet straight away offer their support. It is a powerful start which once into its muscular and forceful stride, expels an anthemic call which is part Foo Fighters, part Turbonegro, and all fun. It is fair to say song and album has an agreeable familiarity about it but also a pleasing freshness in character and enterprise which combines for a healthy stomp. The track continues to rage and flirt across its length, the strong stony vocals of guitarist John Shields backed by those of bassist Ivor Ferris, stirring up senses and pleasure as potently as their sounds and the heavy thumping beats of drummer John Hamilton.

The feisty start is continued with Talk the Walk, a song with an initial Queens Of the Stone Age air to its appearance before striding with a heavy rock swagger and punkish attitude. As its predecessor, the song is immediately infectious with thick riffs and imposing rhythms bound by fiery melodies and spicy grooves. That recognisable essence talked of before, ensures this and subsequent songs have the feel of an old friend but as shown by the following lively smoulder of Breath, there is plenty to fuel each with unpredictable and intrigue fuelled drama. The third song is a mellower but still feisty proposition with a bounce which perfectly conflicts with and compliments the great grizzled tones of bass as beats swing with less intensity but equal animosity to their intent on the first pair of tracks.

Riches and thrills within the album keep coming as the inescapably Foo Fighters influenced Dig Deep steps in next, though those open energetic and melody soaked flavours are also aligned to a more caustic growl which brings greater depth and expectations avoiding substance to the song and its invention. Equally there is a slight Metallica seeding to its even paced stroll and rigorous terrain of rhythms and rugged riffery, a bled which makes a great appetiser for the impressive What a Way to Go. The song is a growl from start to finish, bass and guitars an intimidating provocation of heavy rock ‘n’ roll courted by the punchy swipes of Hamilton and the again great vocals. A slight sniff of Therapy? adds to the intensive incitement of the track, melodic flames caressing the predacious intent and enterprise as it grips ears and thoughts with ease.

Both the more even tempered persuasion of It All Ends Here and the riveting and incendiary imagination of Freakshow keep ears and emotions tightly embraced, the first an unspectacular yet captivating creative croon whilst its successor with a similar core intent, latches onto more imposing and striking hook littered scenery within a melodic fire of catchy temptation. Their easy to digest lures are followed by the grittier blaze of final track Outbound, a song which has raw rabidity to its vocal and heavily boned roar but also a contrasting melodic seduction which simply mesmerises with Soundgarden/Gruntruck like vivacity. It is with little problem an outstanding close to a great release.

Parasites and Poets shows that Seneron has not only found a new plateau for their invigorating sound and creativity but untapped another source of potential. The album is not a major ground breaking provocation it is fair to say but has a spark and invention to its assault which ears and emotions can only embrace and find full pleasure in, an enjoyment which puts a vast amount of heavy rock releases this year in the shade.

The self-released Parasites And Poets is available now @ http://seneronband.bandcamp.com/album/parasites-and-poets

http://seneron.sitefly.co

RingMaster 10/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 



Categories: Album, Music

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: