Ste McCabe – Brains of Britain

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Punk rock for body, imagination, and the passions to relish and parade their wanton sides, the vivacious sound of singer-songwriter Ste McCabe has been a constant source of acerbic lyrical prowess and salacious musical enterprise since his emergence. His virulently contagious and biting political pop songs have provoked and thrilled across three absorbing and acclaimed albums, and his unrelenting hunger to gig, but with his new full- length Brains of Britain, McCabe has brewed up a new pinnacle in his creatively mischievous and lyrically striking assault on thoughts and emotions. It is a glorious stomp of punk, art-pop, and electronic devilry, an incitement which never gives the senses and imagination time to lay dormant.

With the vocal magnetism and melodic flair of Pete Shelley, the inventive agitation and social snarl of Mark E Smith, and the infection spewing invention of Pete Wylie, McCabe brews up a presence and sound which is individual yet carries a familiarity to gloriously feast upon. There is an inescapable charm and raw honesty to his confrontations, an almost anthemic call which finds even greater irresistibility and strength within the Maneki-Neko Music released Brains of Britain.

It is fair to say as that as soon as the big bulging electro pulse of opener Fool hits ears a lustful twinge shot through thoughts and emotions, its resonating call pungent bait reminding of Blancmange. It is a forceful and vibrant lure which is lifted further by the distinctive tones of McCabe, his expressive toning as always an easy liking to the Buzzcocks frontman. The initial electro beats soon break into a thumping stride beneath the vocals whilst synths spread a melodic breath and glaze over the brewing abrasion of punk guitars, it all creating an irresistible blaze of electro punk loaded with lyrical causticity.

The thrilling start is continued by Cockroach, a darkly shadowed, post punk spiced slab of provocative expression which features Billy Bragg who superbly alternates his equally distinctive presence and lyrical antagonism with that of McCabe. It is a song which crawls over senses and psyche, bass a lingering toxicity upon which light but scarring riffs and the outstanding vocal mix flourish. There is no avoiding the fallout of the exceptional song, its heavy radiance and gripping drama a lingering spark in thoughts and passions from the very first infestation.

Mantos ’99 moves in next with dark electro flirtation aligned to slight but potent scythes of guitar. It is another song with a minimally dressed landscape and intensive attraction, though it just misses the heights of its predecessors, even a2655639157_2with the increasing confrontation of its manner and energy. Again a post punk tempting ingrains the electronic wind of the song for a fulfilling helping of sonic bewitching around vocal devilry but it is soon left in the shadows of The Family Values Song. Imagine Swell Maps in league with Buzzcocks for a far too brief and exhausting but most of all scintillating blast, and you get sense of this riotous treat.

The pair of Chinless Wonders and Don’t We Have Nice Hair spark ears and imagination on new thrilling escapades next, the first a flight across an exotic climate of synth melodies and an evocative narrative painted by vocal variation, both aspects around a spine of heavy pulsation. Glistening before and creeping over the senses it is a magnetic prowl and seduction setting up an already greedy appetite for the second of the two. The track is a punk growl coated in a post punk chill of melodic melancholia. Barely two minutes long but flying by within a blink of the eye, the track croons and infects like a delicious mix of Television Personalities and Magazine with an OMD emotional discharge.

The spiky I’ll Do It sets up its contagion next, again a short burst of electro punk irreverence immediately irresistible to feet and emotions but no more so than the gripping PiL like sonic tempest of Go Polski Boy! Thrusting that caustic sonic radiance into a voracious electro and ravenous trance bred stomping, the track flexes and pulsates with creative gluttony and glorious insatiability. It sets another plateau for the album but itself is surpassed by the brilliant Them There Different People, the most potent art punk song you could wish to be seduced by. With a more than passing whisper of The Vibrators to it and the rawer agitation of 999, the track stomps and swaggers with an almost primal persuasion, leaving ears through to the heart enslaved.

The album finishes with the equally epidemic temptation of What Are You Worth, a track which has control of body and soul from its first predatory bass hook and electro niggling. Also expelling a moment of corrosive energy and sonic causticity, the song is a repetitive and merciless baiting which leaves the release on a high and fingers eager to press start and set in motion the whole thrilling adventure again.

Brains of Britain is easily one of our favourite albums of 2014 but also one of its best. Venomous and naughty, challenging and irrepressibly addictive, Ste McCabe has cast punk alchemy in its most creative and inspirational form. If there is one album you get before the year closes its eyes, it is easy to recommend that it is this one.

Brains of Britain is available from October 20th via Maneki-Neko Music @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brains-Britain-Ste-McCabe/dp/B00MU9374A or http://stemccabe.bandcamp.com/album/brains-of-britain

http://www.ste-mccabe.co.uk/

RingMaster 13/10/2014

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Riwen – Self Titled

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Making their debut with a furious three track self-titled EP, Riwen is the new hardcore fuelled project of Cult Of Luna guitarist/vocalist Johannes Persson. It is an encounter which prowls a whole new landscape for the musician but on the evidence of the band’s first release, one as passionately driven and explored as anything you would expect from his creative mind and craft. It is intensive and brutally imposing, and whilst the release is not breaking dramatic new ground for hardcore, its ferociously dark and heavy presence veined with sonic and melodic tenacity, makes it potently stand out.

Alongside Persson, Riwen’s line-up is completed by Totalt Jävla Mörker current and former members in respectively Christian Augustin and Fredrik Lindkvist. The band emerged from songs which Persson wrote last year, a clutch of tracks inspired by in his words, “the vein of music that I grew up to and was the influence when I learned to write music about 20 years ago. Think early 90’s hardcore like Integrity, Judge, Damnation AD, Battery, Amce and onward in that fashion.” The result is a presence and sound to the band which takes no prisoners and is ill-tempered in breath and touch but also emotionally transfixing and melancholically hostile.

The EP opens with Nature Calls Us Back, a sonic resonance the spring board for a colossal avalanche of beats and grievous predatory riffs. That wall of sound is soon into a heavily imposing stride blistered with an intermittent sonic 10491081_247638098767358_6414857369916074870_nenterprise. It is an uncompromising and intensive examination yet deceptively contagious, raw grooves and barbed hooks littering the tsunami of passion and intensity guided by coarse vocal squalls. It may not blow the senses from their safety but the track permeates and grows in strength and corrosive rabidity over time to linger and mark an impressive first attack from the band.

The following Values similarly flies at ears though it gets down to business with a quicker and more voracious viciousness from its opening breath. An acidic groove even in its short intrusions makes compelling bait within the sonic and impassioned fury raging around it, before making a longer and spicier impact as the brawl of vocals and rhythms spread their venom with energy and spite to match the rage of guitars. It is a relentless torrent of noise and anger which again grips the imagination with ease before making way for the closing track, Karlsgrundet.

Initially a slower, more lumbering protagonist but with a keen canter to its hungry predation, the song builds up its intimidating climate and intensity until it breaks and careers into a furnace of fleet footed rhythmic animosity and sonic savagery. There is still some rein on it all though which allows an adventurous tempest of enterprise from drums and guitars as the bass prowls with bestial purpose. Though the release is not exactly a ground-breaking exercise within hardcore, the track explores a blackened and heavily unleashed violation which certainly adds new flavoursome twists and endeavour to anything from the genre in 2014.

Ending with a shadowed stringed coaxing which still holds a portentous threat, the song is a drama drenched investigation of ears and emotions which, added to the first pair, provides something as riveting as it is imposing. Riwen, band and EP, leaves appetite and anticipation healthy and eager for more from the project ahead, whilst expectations are now high and greedier thanks to this impressive first offering.

Riwen has now added bassist Christoffer Röstlund Jonsson and guitarist Marita Jonsson Mätlik to the line-up.

The Riwen EP is available on CD and 10″ vinyl from October 13th on Indie Recordings @ http://www.omerch.eu/shop/indierecordings/search.php?pg=1&stext=Riwen&scat=2302&nobox=true

https://www.facebook.com/riwenhc/

RingMaster 13/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Another Dead Hero – Dystopia

Though it makes a potent initial impact, Dystopia does its best persuasion over time, worming under the skin to provide a perpetually pleasing and exciting proposition. It is an album which can be described as being made up of familiar parts but those essences aligning for something fresh and invigorating from a band drenched in potential and riveting creativity. Bands such as Rage Against the Machine and Deftones are constantly and to be fair rightly offered up as references to the sound of Another Dead Hero but it is only part of the imaginative incitement provided by the band, spices twisted into something more distinctive and flavoursome from the UK quintet.

Hailing from Burnley and formed in 2003, Another Dead Hero has spent the subsequent years building and honing their sound whilst infecting the expanse of Britain with their uncompromising creative attitude and adventure. As evidenced by their album, the band has a raw touch and breath to their music, an honesty to their sound and invention which is just as potent as the imagination within it. The live presence of Another Dead Hero has persistently marked the band out, as has their previous trio of albums, but it is Dystopia which it is easy to feel has the key to reach the strongest spotlights.

The dark climate and menacing atmosphere of Intro opens up Dystopia, its electronic jungle intimidating scenery for the imagination to spark against before the piece flows straight into Change The Game. Beats and riffs are soon rummaging in ears before settling into an imposing and formidable provocation. Limp Bizkit spiced vocals and scythes of guitar cross the spine of the song whilst an aggravated persistence breeds in the guitars to pressure ears even more potently. It is a strong and pleasing start which slips into darkened Deftones mellowness before merging both climates along the way. The vocals of Josh Baldwin roar and croon with a flavour of Keith (now Mina) Caputo to their provocative tone and texture, whilst the fierce raps of drummer Gaz Connor and the grizzled tempting to the bass of Craig Robertson snap and growl with dark intent. Added to the guitar antagonism and craft of Daniel Crawshaw and Josh Beckwith, it all makes for a formidable full start to the album with its closing One Minute Silence like finale especially anthemic and biting.

The following Greed grumbles with a heavy breath and intensity from the start, the Rage Against The Machine essence which was a loud whisper in its predecessor steering the stalking brilliance of the track. The instant blaze of sound and anovocals soon drops into a prowling gait led by weighty bass shadows. It is a scintillating passage to the song, again One Minute Silence coming to mind alongside that of Zack de la Rocha and co. It is also a minimalistic attack but gloriously gripping and incendiary for ears and passions as it preys on thoughts and psyche with every dark twist and furious blaze. It is the first pinnacle of the album setting a high plateau for System to aspire to. The song is a muscular and busier offering but still holding a rein on its attack to stroll with threat around the senses. Life of Agony comes to mind as the brief track expels its intensive provocation before making way for the volatile hostility of Bullshit (Voice Of Lies), a furious and confrontational assault unafraid to venture into calmer waters. It as the previous song does not match the early peaks but easily provide compelling and richly satisfying confrontation.

The volatile temperament of I Don’t Care comes next, a song merging the reflective elegance of a Nine Inch Nails and Palms croon with the agitated resistance of RATM and Kennedy Soundtrack. It is a transfixing encounter, a revolving wind of melodic caresses and sonic causticity which entwine for an intriguing and captivating proposition. Its lingering presence is emulated by the next up Infection. As all songs there is a raw and abrasing resonance to its presence which almost haunts the senses as the resourcefulness of the guitars and rhythms explore their individual, and here almost tribal antagonism. Like the album generally, it is not a song to set off a fire in the passions though it has them boiling up nicely, but a song which as its title suggests worms away for lingering and just as potent pleasure.

Stoner presents a more voracious offering, its fuller alternative metal and heavy rock persistence a provocation which veins its bracing bait with melodic mystique and spicy grooving. Grunge flavouring also offers its colour to the song’s landscape, essences of Soundgarden and Gruntruck adding rich hues to the nu-metal/alternative metal exploration. An excellent examination of ears and thoughts it is matched by the weighty energy and depths of Fist Full Of Anger. From a melodic coaxing the song ripples with grizzled basslines and fluid vocals, flexing its sinews and emotional fury with evolving intensity and diversity. It is another which smoulders rather than burns but emerges as an enthralling emotive struggle.

The more than decent ebm/electro fuelled instrumental Control MKII makes a break in the rage of the album, though its air is equally portentous and challenging, before the dark sinister tones of the outstanding Feed Me Your Lies moves in on the imagination and passions. Its gentle but predatory start is hypnotic, smooth vocals and tantalising melodies seducing ears before the track shrugs off its calm for a rugged and thrilling confrontation. The track never explodes, walking that edge before providing another dose of the mesmeric enticement which opened it up, and though the lack of that final spark is missed it cannot stop the track making another dramatic and thrilling statement within the album.

Closing with a fiery and enjoyable remix of Remember This Day, a track from previous 2009 album Generation Zero, Dystopia is a feistily satisfying release. There are times where songs hold a too similar character though it is never long before inventive and exciting twists ignite their canvas, but ultimately the album provides more than enough proof that Another Dead Hero is heading towards the fullest attention nationally and beyond, especially if they find the underlying strain of originality which arguably is still untapped.

Dystopia is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/dystopia/id704561906

http://www.anotherdeadhero.co.uk/

RingMaster 13/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Lost Gravity – Self Titled

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Though it would be wrong to claim that the self-titled debut album from UK based Lost Gravity set a fire in ears straight away, it certainly left a smouldering lure and attraction which over time has inspired a very healthy appetite for the band’s brand of heavy melodic rock. Consisting of ten skilfully accomplished and contagious tracks which make up for what they lack in originality with passion, the release is a potential fuelled introduction to a highly enjoyable proposition in the London based band.

Lost Gravity was formed in 2007 by Brazilian born vocalist/guitarist Breno Val. Taking influences from the likes of AC/DC, Megadeth, Ramones, Chroma Key, Metallica, Alice in Chains and more into their songwriting and sound, the band started out as a quartet but with a flux of line-up changes eventually emerged as a trio in 2012 with drummer Giuliano Kolling joining the band around the same time. Completed live by bassist Chris K, but not involved with the album, Lost Gravity now makes a powerful play for attention with their first full- length. It follows a trio of earlier well-received EPs in Anywhere But Home (2008), Selfish (2009), and Lost Gravity III (2012), all released as the album on Val’s own label Priston Records. The new release is a bold encounter openly wearing its inspirations which arguably defuses its originality, but for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll, the pair of Val and Kolling has unleashed a thoroughly satisfying incitement.

The album opens on the bulging presence and might of What Goes Around Comes Around, a melodic lure leading ears into a wall of vivacious riffs and thumping rhythms. It is an instantly potent persuasion of grunge and hard rock PromoImagewith spicy grooves and strong vocals combining to swiftly wake the imagination and appetite up for the rest of the album. The gnarly tone of the bass adds to the impressive bait of the song, as does the sonic enterprise of Val’s guitar which is as flavoursome in straight rock ‘n’ roll riffery as it is in sonic endeavour. It all adds up for an anthemic and magnetic start to the release soon matched by the bluesy laced Changes. There is not quite the striking touch and unique flame to the second song in comparison to the first, but again the duo provide a skilled and easily accessible slice of heavy melodic rock to convince body and emotions. An excellent relaxation into mellower scenery adds a welcome twist to the song too as Lost Gravity reveals more fluidity and invention to their songwriting.

Both Back Where You Belong and Alone keeps the thick lures and persuasion coming, the first a grooved flame of sonic and melodic intensity which seems bred in the fire of an Audioslave or Stone Temple Pilots. It is a song which evolves across its length, entwining stoner-esque grooves and alternative metal seeded ingenuity within a sultry climate. It is a riveting encounter, one of the peaks of the album which its successor does not quite rival in impact but with its sinew crafted balladry afloat with evocative melodies and vocal expression it is an endearing offering which grows in stature with every listen.

Anywhere But Home comes next and opens on a delicious transfixing hook which is arguably never matched in success by the rest of the song, though it pleasingly bristles and roars with fresh creativity not previously explored by the album. That initial lure is never far from the surface of the song either but somewhere there is a missing spark to push a certainly great song into sensational realms. To be fair though, it is hard to tear away from the track as you almost urge it to greater success and it certainly enslaves a hungry appetite over time.

The infectious swagger and flirtation of Friendly Fire sets up feet and ears for a sizeable pleasure next, its Foo Fighters like tenacity flirting with rock pop vivacity before the more heavyweight and moody presence of Selfish takes over to ignite the senses with sonic spicery and melodic intrigue. The track is structured similarly to Anywhere But Home, and also breeds an enthralling presence with a potential not quite realised. This applies to the whole of the album really, so many great things exploring and playing across its appealing body but not quite finding the missing piece to truly catch alight. Song and release though does breed real anticipation for when the band make that transition at some point ahead.

All the Same looks at an alternative/punk pop infused landscape for the placing of its skilled and bracing temptation whilst the following Venom In Vial parades a raw antagonistic breath and attitude in its muscular confrontation. The pair are further sides to the sound and invention of the band, each a firmly pleasing offering before the might of the closing Walk On. With a blues tinge to the opening groove and a ferociously rumbling torrent of rhythms, the track makes a dramatic and thrilling entrance which it subsequently accentuates with a punk rock agitation to its blues kissed charge of dirty rock ‘n’ roll. It is an impressive end to an attention grabbing encounter, an album which makes a hefty persuasion to the promise and skills of Lost Gravity and a feisty suggestion of even bigger and better things ahead.

Lost Gravity is available now digitally and on CD via Priston Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/lost-gravity/id901847667

http://www.lostgravity.co.uk/

RingMaster 13/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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