The Sticky Boys – Make Art

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An album which is as much punk as it is hard and heavy rock, Make Art is an unexpected pleasure which is simply what all great albums should be, out and out rock ‘n’ roll. The new slab of dirt encrusted sleaze kissed revelry from French trio The Sticky Boys, is certainly not making a major statement of originality but for riotous fun aligned to bruising voracious sounds it is hard to think of many better mischievously enjoyable heavy rock rampages this year.

Rampaging out of Paris in 2008, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Alex Kourelis, bassist/vocalist J.B Chesnot, and drummer Tom Bullot drew attention with their early demo Rock’n’Roll Nation two years later but more so with debut album This Is Rock’n’Roll in 2012. The album was an easy on the ear arguably unsurprising but thoroughly satisfying rock ‘n’ roll. Make Art can in many ways be described by the same line but with its stronger fresh adventure and that punk seeded ferocity to an undemanding presence, the Listenable Records released album is a new and attention grabbing offering from The Sticky Boys.

Opening track Mary Christmas swiftly ingrains flavoursome riffs upon ears before unleashing a feisty tide of thick guitar and bass enterprise punctuated by the jabbing beats of Bullot. If like us you have an aversion to seasonal songs never fear as the lyrics soon steer towards the salacious side of festivities whilst hooks and rhythms bring an intoxicating spirit. Like Turbonegro meets Skid Row, surprises are few and pleasure high as the track strolls proudly towards the following Bad Reputation. Here a Motorhead influence is open as grimy riffs entwine with predacious hooks and rhythmic confrontation. There is also a breath of Offspring to the track, the punk bait making its most vocal suasion yet around the subsequent melodic flames of Kourelis which scorch and treat ears simultaneously.

A great throaty bassline opens up the AC/DC spiced High Power Thunder and continues to spine the stroll of heavy metal draped in guitar cast melodic flame. It is a strong if unspectacular track, keeping attention and appetite keen 10501716_10152593575618919_2268711738949228514_nbefore making way for the similarly toned classic rock coloured Mrs Psycho and subsequently Uncle Rock, a quickly pleasing anthemic stomp primed with a classic hard rock swagger and belligerent rhythmic attitude. Again neither song sparks a fire in the belly but leaves the body drenched in sweat and emotions well satisfied.

There is no need to reveal the theme of Party Time, its title the perfect summing up of the addictive energetic mosh and rhythmic contagion. It the previous track was anthemic this is a brawling call to arms for the devil’s mischief and rock ‘n’ roll at its primal best , a triumph swiftly matched by The Ramones spiced The Future Is In Your Hands. Equally there is an essence of The Clash to the album’s best song, both flavours adding to the captivating hard rock cored encounter.

Love On The Line explores the same classic rock/punk scenery as found in Bad Reputation to similar success as Make Art continues on its most potent stretch to date, its sonic intrigue and craft a compelling texture to probably the most intensity soaked song on the album. That high level is reinforced by the excellent agitated confrontation of The Game Is Over. Persistent scythes of rabid riffs and uncompromising beats gnaw and flirt with the senses whilst the bass sculpts another dark temptation as Kourelis explores a seemingly Lemmy inspired delivery. It is a thrilling proposition which makes its own claim for best track accolades.

Make Art concludes with the more than decent pair of Juicy Lucy and its title track, each providing a strong and in the case of the closer a thrilling finale to the release. The first of the two is an all-out heavy rock charge and the last a punk infused rocker which opens with Boomtown Rats like keys and proceeds to twist and flirt through pop punk hooks, sonic causticity, and aggressive vocals, all within a melody strewn hard rock climate. It is a real grower and to be honest over time manages to make the strongest persuasion with its adventurous and imaginative invention; think 999 meets Mötley Crüe.

Not carrying major surprises but loaded outright creative revelry and undiluted fun, Make Art offers the kind of devilry it is hard to get enough of. Every rock ‘n’ roll party, riot, and rampage needs a heart to drive it and they do not come much more enthusiastic and enjoyable than this from The Sticky Boys.

Make Art is available now via Listenable Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/ee/album/make-art/id904560291

http://www.stickyboys.eu/

RingMaster 30/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Milestones – Higher Mountain-Closer Sun

Photo by Pasi Rytkonen Photography

Photo by Pasi Rytkonen Photography

We cannot say we have a natural appetite for southern and classic rock, nor an over attentive interest, but occasionally something hits the right spot and sparks a thorough investigation. The recent impressive album from Norwegian blues rockers Electric Woodland has been one and the legendary Bad Company in the past another to light a fire of interest and pleasure. Now with new album Higher Mountain-Closer Sun, Finnish southern rockers The Milestones have lit another potent appetite with their hot sultry sounds. Another reason for mentioning the first two bands is that this album comes with a healthy soak of blues/hard rock to its southern sonic climate which brings potent comparisons in many ways to the enticing sounds of those two bands. Higher Mountain-Closer Sun seems to soak up those essences and many more flavoursome spices to create its own feistily simmering proposition, an offering which seduces even our more aggression wanting tastes.

Twenty years since taking its first steps and with now four albums under the belt, The Milestones has earned a strong presence within world hard rock since the release of their debut album Vol. 1 in 1996, an album seeing a re-release later this year. Acclaimed and drawing strong interest in the States, its success and the band’s live presence led to them traveling to New York to record second album Souvenirs of 1999. This proved to be nowhere near as successful in sound and impact as its predecessor and as the promo sheet accompanying the new album states, “Ultimately it would take ten years for The Milestones to heal the wounds.”

That was when album three emerged, Devil In Men in 2009 pushing the Helsinki quintet back to the stature and acclaimed attention enjoyed before on a global scale. It was followed by tours around Scandinavia, Central Europe, and the US the band supporting the likes of Whitesnake, Deep Purple, Black Stone Cherry, Gary Moore, Raging Slab, and D.A.D. along the way. Now they uncage Higher Mountain-Closer Sun through Listenable Records, a magnetic and fiery romp of instinctive rock ‘n’ roll taking body and passions on a fevered stomp.

From the first track the album seems to have a hook deep into thoughts and emotions, the opening Walking Trouble instantly smothering ears in a blaze of sonic and melodic haze with the guitars of Tomi Julkunen and Marko 10301540_10152415122872560_6266331794037874146_nKiviluoma a seductive graze on the senses whilst the bass of Veli Palevaara roams with equally captivating enterprise and swagger. Completed by the firm beats of drummer Tommi Manninen and the dusty vocals of Olavi Tikka, whose harmonica flair also ignites a twinge of hunger, the track is a storming romp to start things off and get the listener to their feet.

Both the smouldering heat of Shalalalovers and the tarmac stomping Drivin’ Wheel keep the impressive start heading along the same plateau. The first of the two merges a great sultry climate over verses with an almost too easily accessible chorus, its lure predictable and over familiar yet irrepressibly addictive. The union works a treat with a soft spot for the harmonica well fed again before the song’s successor pulls on a Stones like blues colouring to wrap its southern bred adventure. Again there is a simple but inescapable virulence to the chorus which makes a great contrast to the more intensive creative tenacity before and after their expulsions. Both tracks incite full engagement physically and emotionally before allowing a breath to be taken with the evocative southern rock heated scenery of Oh My Soul. With a breath of gospel passion and ‘red neck’ causticity, the track is a sizzling temptation which increases its strength with every listen.

The acoustic ballad Grateful is a pleasing encounter but lacks the spark of previous songs, though that is probably more down to personal preferences for feet sparking revelry. To be fair it is a vocally and musically accomplished song which at times sounds like a mix of Elvis Costello in his country era and Bon Jovi. The following Sweet Sounds does have the body moving with intent next and again apart from its stirring chorus is another enjoyable but underwhelming offering when up against songs like the brilliant It’s All Right. The track is an insatiable rocker from start to finish, grooves and hooks as eagerly tenacious as the increasingly impressive vocals of Tikka and the addictive rhythmic bait. As with all the songs on the album, you feel you already know this bruiser of rock ‘n’ roll devilry which only adds to its invigorating and refreshing presence.

Such the strength and tremendous pull of the track it gives the likes of the energetically fevered You and the melodically and vocally reflective Looking Back For Yesterday a stiffer task to match up to, but both without quite lighting the same fire still treats ears and imagination to exciting endeavour and enflamed melodic sounds. Their success is taken to a new level by the raw and gripping drama of Damn. Again ridiculously compelling hooks and grooves vein what is a darker and sonically fevered canvas to the song. It makes a slow initial impression but emerges as another evolving into a big highlight within the album.

The scintillating Fool Me brings the main body of the album to a tremendous close, the guitars of Julkunen and Kiviluoma bordering on sonic eroticism such the potency and spellbinding strength of their grooves whilst vocals and rhythms dance with impassioned devilry around them. It is a stunning track, a show stealer on any other album.

The CD version of Higher Mountain – Closer Sun is finished by a couple of bonus tracks in Call Of The Wild and Quicksilver which sadly our promo did not contain but such the quality of the rest of the album it is easy to assume they only add to the fun. The Milestones may have taken ‘ten years to heal the wounds’ but there is little to stop them now with releases like this.

Higher Mountain – Closer Sun is available now via Listenable Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Higher-Mountain-Closer-The-Milestones/dp/B00ILWB4VS and http://www.levykauppax.fi/artist/milestones/higher_mountain_closer_sun/#cd

https://www.themilestonesmusic.com

RingMaster 30/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

Ocasan – Confessions EP

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Quite simply if there has been a better slab of pop rock than the Confessions EP from UK rockers Ocasan this year than we must have missed something very special as the Buckinghamshire trio has just set a very high bar for the scene. To be fair the band has pretty much matched the quality of this release already in the past twelve months with their two previous EPs, London Town and Whitey Two Step, though Confessions has the edge over both. The third of a trilogy of releases which makes up the band’s second album Elixir, which presumably itself will get an individual release ahead, the EP is a riotous stomp of contagious hook loaded songs which give feet, ears, and emotions a fun filled work out.

Hailing from Milton Keynes, Ocasan formed in 2007 and were swiftly earning attention from fans and the underground media, which in turn led to a wider spotlight, especially with the release of debut album Ricochet in 2011. Live too the band has drawn acclaim and constantly left audiences regaling their performances whilst touring relentlessly across the UK and Europe, as well as taking in Russia, Canada, and festival appearances at the likes of Spirit of Burgas and AmpRocks. The three EPs introducing and making up Elixir sees the band press on the strongest spotlight yet, one to match the open maturity in songwriting and sound soaking them. Confessions is the prize of the lot with its dark tone and seductive shadows, though each EP brings an invigorating and potent aspect to what will surely be a greedily devoured album.

The best way to describe Ocasan’s sound is The Police meets Fall Out Boy and eighties band Jim Jiminee with, in the case of the new EP, a healthy and warped spice of Oingo BoingoLondon Town and Whitey Two Step, t. It is a sound Confessions - Artworkwhich is familiar yet new simultaneously and from opening track Invincible, manna for the ears. An opening bait of rhythms from drummer Luke McDonnell sets ears and attention alert before chunky riffs from Nick Burns and a pulsating bassline laid by Nathan Naidoo go to work on the imagination. Just as quickly stabbing reggae spiced enticement openly seeded in the likes of The Police, flirts as Burns’ vocals impressively unveils the song’s narrative. Sinews and rugged rhythms add to the captivating mix, expelling moments of rigorous intent within the warm stroll of the song. There is also a drama to the track, and ultimately the EP, which arguably has not wrapped the band’s previous encounters, an imposing almost theatrical essence which helps the songs leap out with their inescapable lures.

The impressive start is followed by the similarly flavoursome Dark Cloud, guitars instantly cladding ears in melodic enterprise as equally expressive and vibrant vocals join the transfixing call of the magnetic track. As catchy as anything on the release, there is also a heavier rock tone and underbelly to the excellent encounter which nicely tempers yet compliments the melodic roar of song and vocals. Its success though is soon paled by the outstanding Parasite, one of the songs of the year in our book. From the first bulging note of the addiction forging bassline opening the song, passions are gripped and enslaved. Beats pound masterfully across this irresistible bait too, the central bass hook swinging like a lust fuelled temptress as the guitar sends sonic slithers across its temptation. It is a delicious start which only ignites again as the band’s vocal adds anthemic mischief before Burns like a vaudeville host parades the track’s tale. With more ingenious snags than barbed wire fencing, the song is simply glorious and has voice and body grooving to its tune quicker than Usain Bolt in a tail wind.

The title track brings the EP to a close and returns to the same sultry charm and warm melodic endeavour which started it all off, though through its own individual and riveting design. Easy going and smoothly flavoursome, the song is less inventive than certainly its predecessor but another stylish and virulently infectious proposition to reinforce the potency of the EP and increasingly impressive creative adventure of the band.

Confessions may at times feed more than wrong foot expectations from those well aware of Ocasan, but it also adds to the release’s strength to provide one of 2014’s most enjoyable and exciting rock ‘n’ pop releases.

The Confessions EP is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/confessions-elixir-3-ep/id922878604

http://ocasan.co.uk/

RingMaster 230/09/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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