Empty Yard Experiment – Kallisti

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   Kallisti is an album to which you have to commit time and attention but rewards with an enthralling journey for thoughts and emotions to deeply immerse within. The new release from Empty Yard Experiment, the fourteen track encounter is a transfixing and compelling proposition which never lets you comfortably settle into its exhausting textures and climactic structures but equally never relinquishes its grip and temptation on the imagination. A riveting web of progressive and melodic rock with just as rich veins of post rock and alternative metal, the album is an expansive landscape of consuming atmospheres and provocative emotion wrapped in a craft and enterprise which pushes Empty Yard Experiment to the forefront of progressive exploration.

Formed in 2006, the Dubai based band consists of musicians from the United Arab Emirates, Serbia, Iran, and India. Taking influences from the likes of Tool, Porcupine Tree, Nine Inch Nails, and Mogwai into their own invention, Empty Yard Experiment (E.Y.E.) has certainly on the evidence of this second album, forged a unique yet almost recognisably engaging presence and sound. It comes in an ingenious tapestry though which sets it well apart from the band’s influences and others engaged in a similar weaving of multi flavoured styles into sonic experimentation. With the band already earning acclaim through shows with the likes of Evanescence, Metallica, and Anathema, their Joshua F Williams (Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Wonder) produced Kallisti has the quality and potential to thrust the band into the keenest spotlight. Named after the inscription on the ancient Greek Apple of Discord, Kallisti is a concept album themed by the threads of chaos and discord which permeate our lives and existence, its lyrical provocation as rich and intensely provocative as its sound.

The journey starts with Sunyata, an instrumental introduction which places melancholic keys from Gorgin Asadi and strings in a crystalline and slightly portentous ambience. It is an easily engaging opening cloaked in emotive shadows and swiftly has thoughts wrapped up in its restrained yet potent drama. The track builds up a sonic link between itself and the following robust and intimidating Greenflash. That threat is slightly defused with the great ragged rub of riffs which soon emerge and mellow vocals which instantly brings a whisper of Deftones or Palms to the otherwise predatory entrance of the track. As it opens up its rhythmic pressure and sonic ruggedness everything takes on a fresh, bordering on antagonistic, approach to the melodic temptation. The result is a song which flirts and melodically roars like a mix of Alice In Chains and Karnivool. As with most tracks there is so much going on that we can only give brief glimpses, each proposition within Kallisti an on-going exploration of an evolving soundscape.EYE_CoverArt_Kallisti

The outstanding track makes way for the dystopian ambience of Red, a brief instrumental clad in an emotively sinister ambience before it in turn slips into the reflective caress of The Blue Eyes of a Dog. The track is like a stark imposing breeze, its emotional intrusion at times a wispy elegance and in others a forceful wind all sculpted by respectful rolling rhythms, melodic experimentation, and emotional turbulence. The instrumental is a beacon for ears and especially imagination to find their own scenic visions within the track and album, matched to more sinister effect by the more disturbed There Will Never Be where keys and vocals unite for a severely troubled caress.

Entropy provides the loftiest peak on the album, the track an enslaving bait of sinew stretched riffs from Bojan Preradovic and the probing beats of Josh Saldanha within an atmospheric sonic glaze courted by a gripping throaty bass temptation unveiled by Kaveh Kashani. Vocals swiftly add their smooth and evocative tension as keys swarm tenderly over the senses with a smouldering breath of seduction. The song prowls as it seduces, expelling raw abrasing flames of sonic and emotive passion throughout for a climactic and absorbing flight.

Blue is another short cinematic slither of industrial bred scene setting before the transfixing beauty of Anomie immerses ears and senses, the skilled designs of guitarist Mehdi Gr a gripping narrative alongside the increasingly mesmeric vocal qualities of Preradovic. There is a sinister almost bedlamic eruption of discord kissed sonic ingenuity within certain twists of the song which simply adds to its engrossing intrigue and unpredictability. The following Lost In a Void That I Know Far Too Well has less of the second of those two aspects but certainly a wealth of the first within its soaring melody strewn instrumental landscape. The piece again has thoughts flying their own agenda before Untitled spreads its unique but easily accessible melodic rock revelry and provocative expression. Detours into cinematic glimpses of life and festivities wrong foots at first but opens up further exploration within the constantly surprising track which over time only enhances its suasion.

The dark cavernous depths of Sama make another short but impacting twist in the narrative of Kallisti before it seamlessly evolves into the melodic enchanting of God Has His Reasons, a self-reflection driven slice of melodic and harmonic beauty. Keys and vocals steal the ears but only because the striking canvas built by restrained rhythms and an inescapable web spun by the enterprise of the guitars and bass gives them a potent background.

A final short piece called Green leads into the closing triumph of The Call, a track from its initial rhythmic trap binding ears and passions in a nine minute travelogue of gentle and tempestuous emotional climates and rugged aural terrains. It is a final emprise for thoughts and feelings, a thrilling sonic gest to lose reality within.

Though many tracks work alone superbly, Kallisti works best as a whole even though that means greater attention and effort is needed. The rewards though are enormous as Empty Yard Experiment proves themselves to be one of the truly exciting emerging forces in melodic and progressive endeavour.

The self-released Kallisti is available now @ http://emptyyardexperiment.bandcamp.com/album/kallisti

http://www.emptyyardexperiment.com/

RingMaster 29/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Us Amongst The Rest – Follow the Truth

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Impassioned and skilfully driven, the alternative rock bred sound running through Follow the Truth is an easily impressive proposition. The debut album from UK band Us Amongst The Rest, it contains twelve tracks which are ablaze with invention and emotive fire to spark a definite keen appetite for their creators. It is a curious affair though, in that it impresses and oozes enterprise on every level but lacks the indefinable spark to completely excite. To be fair there are tracks where it is easy to shout loud about their potency and thrilling presence but ultimately the album is more about the sizeable potential within it leading to an anticipation of big things for and from the band ahead.

Formed in 2012, the quartet from York is a maturely accomplished proposition through the previous exploits and experiences of its members and an obvious instinctive ability to write infectious and intelligently sculpted rock songs. Follow the Truth provides all the evidence needed to back up that claim, the album which was recorded with Sam and Joe Graves (Axewound, Glamour of the Kill, Asking Alexandria) at InnerSounds Studios, a collection of stylishly crafted and passionately paraded intriguing encounters. Lyrically its songs are themed by personal struggles and emotional conflicts and again this only adds to the undeniable emotive blaze at the heart of release and contents.

From its piano shaped atmospheric Intro, the album swiftly cages ears and imagination with Fields of Fray and its feisty blaze of thumping rhythms and aggressive riffs. It comes bound in an instantly engaging melodic enticement from guitarists Danny Beardmore and Dan Stockdale, resulting in a stirring entrance soon enhanced by the excellent and increasingly impressive vocals of bassist Karl Sandor. Once established the track settles in to a powerful stride of sonic and melodic tenacity, like a mix of Atreyu and Alterbridge with spicing from 30 Seconds to Mars and the band’s own inventive twists. It is a pleasing if unspectacular beginning to the album which is straight away reinforced by Love Is the Bull. Punctuated by the punchy beats of Paul Fernandez, the track supplies emotional flames over persuasive guitar and bass temptation to wrap ears and thoughts in provocative textures and expression. As the album in many ways, it is hard to announce real originality to the song but easy to announce the superb craft and melodic depths within it.

Bring the Fuel is another matter, a track to wax lyrical about with pumping energy and contagious enterprise uniting for an anthemic stomp lorded masterfully over by the voice of Sandor and the inventive adventure of the guitars. The Us Amongst The Rest album artworksinger’s bass exploits too find a heady virulence in their temptation matched by the crisp jabs of Fernandez. With essences of Avenged Sevenfold definitely spicing up the excellent track, it makes for the first pinnacle of the album and no surprise it has raised such interest and anticipation for the album as a single alone in a great many.

The track gives a tough task to follow for both Blood in Me and Angels, one which they provide strong offerings in reply. The first of the two is a pungent mix of scorching melodies and stabbing riffs resulting in a track which sways from seductive warmth to antagonistic intensity with seamless success whilst the second is a radiant power ballad confirming the vocal and individual skills of the band perfectly. As with many of the songs it does not startle but leaves a healthy appetite in place for the album and the band’s emerging diversity in songwriting and presence.

The excellent title track steps up next, it’s initial almost melancholic idle up to ears again a refreshing caress of vocal and melodic expression which leads to a richer and forceful sonic fire framed by probing rhythms. It is a slow burner of a song to some extent but another emerging as one of the album’s highlights before stepping aside for the less successful but enjoyable Silver & Lead. Expectations are not left hungry by the track but still fed a tasty slab of melodic metal which sparks only satisfaction which next up Horizons gives a spicier rewarding incitement to through its catchy grooves and dramatic heart bred tenacity.

Unforgettable similarly gets feet and ears swiftly on board if passions are left more reserved with its creative resourcefulness and vocal potency whilst Rise whips up another riveting anthem. Arguably the most inventive track on the album with its subtle vocal twists and entwining sonic threads, it is a tantalising proposition which as all tracks is drenched in the potential suggesting that the band will ascend to impressive heights ahead.

Completed by the very decent and pleasing Falling Skies, which also vocally features Sam Graves, Follow The Truth is undeniably an impressive and attention grabbing release which raises expectations and hopes for Us Amongst The Rest, something going by their first release you can see the band probably surpassing with relish and ease.

Follow The Truth is available now on Two Star Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Follow-Truth-Us-Amongst-Rest/dp/B00MO2DSZQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=dmusic&ie=UTF8&qid=1412009363&sr=1-1&keywords=Us+Amongst+the+Rest

http://www.uatrband.com

RingMaster 29/09/2014

Pale Fires – Mammoth EP

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Taking little time to excite but increasing its psychedelic seduction with every listen, the Mammoth EP from UK psych rockers Pale Fires, is a tenacious little offering which just does not let go even after it physically departs. With flirtatious hooks, transfixing melodies, and raw sonic temptation, the release grows from a flavoursome warm proposition into a glorious shimmering blaze over time whilst its creators show themselves to be a prospect to breed real anticipation over for their subsequent growth.

Formed in 2010, the Camden quartet of vocalist Leo Runswich, guitarist Oli Swan, bassist Harry Wreathall, and drummer Jean Stevens has built an eagerly followed presence across London and beyond, igniting audiences across venues such as The Cavern Club, 93 Feet East, The Purple Turtle, and Scala with their explosive set. Their EP Louring Skies earlier this year has equally wowed acclaim and support but it is with the Mammoth EP that a sense of something about to break for the band is truly inspired. It has a festering potency which as mentioned makes a strong first touch but continues to expand and enslave over time through six tracks which are as enthralling as they are fuzzily striking.

Opener River simply cups ears in a rhythmic enticing to set release and attentive appetite in motion before laying out a gentle scuzz lit stroll of guitar aligned to bass bred shadows and the distinctive tones of Runswich. Into its stride the song swings with a gentle melodic sway whilst guitars turn up the sonic heat in between the vocal coaxing. Runswich has a voice somewhere between Boy George and Brian Molko and increasingly impresses as song and subsequently EP immerses ears and imagination. There is not a real fire to the first song, at times missing the spark to ignite as expected, yet it is a smouldering temptation which dances with ears and passions for a highly enjoyable start to Mammoth.

The following title track offers a heavier toned bass coaxing from the off, its throaty bluster inciting a greater fiery breath in the guitars and their intensive sonic designs wrapping the excellent track. That wind relaxes for Runswich’s vocals Cover Art2caress before breaking tout again across the mesmeric heart and rumble of the track. A fuller sixties psychedelic wash and warmth flows through the song than in its predecessor, taking the listener on a sultrily glazed shoegaze infused harmonic flight. The song simmers feistily throughout, again never coming to a boiling point but flourishing in its temptation before the brilliant Peace Of Mind glides in. Once again shadows and melodic flames converge and merge around the senses, gentle grooves seducing as vocals invite subsequent sonic roars to join the irresistible slavery of the passions. When the track’s kindling does catch to set a fire, it is veined by superb guitar enterprise soaked in fuzzy and caustic beauty before drifting back into the mellow embrace of the song.

The Boat That Is Rowing Slow does not match the songs before and after it, though it is a skilfully crafted and presented slice of fuzz draped blues and Oasis like melodic balladry. With a sonic acidity to its climate and expressive elegance to its raw canvas the song does present a strong addition to the EP others will bask in but misses personal tastes here, especially when up against the closing pair of majestic sonic tempting.

First comes Howl, a slow burner of a song which almost yawns itself into existence before guitar and vocals stretch their melodic and harmonic abilities ready for the subsequent expulsion of their fiery psychedelic waltz. There is a sense of The Cult in their early days to the track in many ways, its predominantly instrumental adventure almost meditative and shamanic as it transfixes ears and imagination. It’s delicious presence is followed and matched by Earth Mother, a similarly captivating exploration of warm vocals and infectious radiance within this time an, and there is no other word for it, earthy landscape of unpolished and crystalline sonic hues draped in a melodic colour lit further by scorching sax and blistering guitar drawn flames.

Both tracks are scintillating, the richest creative tempting to bask and immerse in which over time becomes inescapable for thoughts and emotions, much as the whole of Mammoth. They make a ravishing end to a stunning release, one as said that only increases its strength and dramatic alchemy with each and every taking of its creative journey.

The Mammoth EP is available now as a name your price download and @ http://palefires.bandcamp.com/

http://www.palefires.com/

RingMaster 29/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Agency – Of Ghosts

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Regaling tales of gothic breeding and devilish intent, Of Ghosts the new album from UK folk/rock band The Agency is one of the most compelling releases you are likely to hear this year. It is not a release which leaps from the speakers, though it has individual moments which are inescapable, but over time casts a captivation which through slow and potent persuasion makes for a captivating proposition. Like a hybrid mix of Nick Cave and a folk version of Southern Death Cult with extra shadowing from Coil, the band’s sound and album is a riveting adventure. It maybe does not ignite the fires as much as it should but never relinquishes an enticing grip on appetite and imagination from start to finish.

Formed in 2012, The Agency started out as a large musical collective before slimming down to a five piece core, though the Newcastle upon Tyne band still invites guests and friends from the beginning to add their flavouring to their sound, Of Ghosts seeing Fraser Smith (Little Man Tate/Shed Seven), pianist Scott Wall (My Exit Music), and Jim Ward contributing to its offerings. Debut album For the Brave and Troubled the band’s first year raised strong attention around the band but it is with this successor that the quintet of Andy Ludbrook (bass), Steven K Driver (singer/songwriter/guitar), Steve Beyer (guitar), Garry Cosgrove (drums), and Kerry Ramsay (vocals) will surely breach a nationwide spotlight.

The album opens with She and instantly has ears and thoughts tied up in the song’s attractive coaxing. Teasing rhythms and a dark flirty bassline entice first before the plain yet alluring vocals of Driver unveil the first narrative of the release. The song slowly sways and embraces senses and imagination, its sultry climax increasing in colour as melodies swim elegantly across ears and the siren-esque harmonies of Ramsay float across the growing sinister scenery. The song is glorious, a sonic and emotional emprise to immerse in whilst an ever present mischief within the band plays.

Next Child So Careless gently shuffles in on a keen rhythmic lure aligned to another melancholic bass temptation and varied guitar revelry. There is no real urgency to the song but it still strolls with an energy and feistiness which brings Picture 73feet to life and has ears rigorously attentive. It is a thrilling encounter with brightly shimmering melodies within a smouldering climate of emotive and dramatic heat, reminding in some ways of fellow city kinsmen Bernaccia. Keeping the impressive start of the album going, the song moves over for the less immediate hugs of ballads For The Daughter and Border Song. Though both take time to seize thoughts compared to their outstanding predecessors, each explore enthralling landscapes of sound and intrigue to place a steady hand on a growing appetite for the release. The first is a warm yet haunting, almost funereal croon with strings an emotionally inspiring hue alongside the dourly expressive vocals whilst the second slips into an even more sobering atmosphere of melancholy and sonic radiance for a less successful but still enjoyable proposition.

The organ fuelled Fast raises the album’s strongest lure again, its thick drama and minimalistic touch a tender and sonically blistering incitement which would fit a Twin Peaks episode perfectly. It is only part of the story though as a funky folk festivity breaks out with melodies and vocals flirting with Wickerman like devilry. The track is engrossing, a pinnacle of the album and a doorway into the darkest corners of the band’s songwriting.

Through the colourful journey musically and lyrically of The Traveller and Sad Parallel which holds a tone and presence which can almost be described as Mark Lanegan meets The Doors, The Agency hold the imagination in the palms of their creative hands. Without lighting obvious fires, the tracks majestically get under the skin with lingering temptation before an atmospheric reprise of For The Daughter leads into the irresistible call of The Temple. The track is a warped dance of vocal and melodic contagion brushed with sonic causticity and addictive rhythmic bait. Simultaneously intimidatingly dark and vibrantly light, the song is a scintillating eventful stroll.

Of Ghosts is brought to a more than decent end by the evocative vocal and guitar led croon of Jack and Spade, a blood soaked reflection of gothic expression. It is a fine end to a release which simply grows and seduces with every listen. The Agency have a masterful ability to tell and colour tales from the darkest shadows for richly satisfying explorations for imagination and emotions, and their album an enthralling portrait of that skill.

Of Ghosts is available digitally and on CD now on Solarbear Records and @ http://theagency1.bandcamp.com/album/of-ghosts

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Agency/235291636504985

RingMaster 29/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/