Body Futures – Brand New Silhouettes

10489703_759493504073095_4007080140165090152_n

Mischievous, unpredictable, and relentlessly adventurous, Brand New Silhouettes is a debut which swiftly sets its creators apart from the crowd. The first album from US indie rock pop band Body Futures, the scintillating encounter is a delightfully warped and devilishly captivating collection of songs which seduce the imagination with the creative innocence of the playground and the adventurous revelry of illicit moments behind the school bike shed. To that there is a captivating mix of feverish ideation and exploratory maturity which turns every track into a unique emprise of ingenuity. The album is simply glorious which is destined to head best album lists and make the Wisconsin band one of your new best friends and lustful obsessions.

Formed in 2012, Body Futures took their time before stepping into a spotlight, taking their first year writing and rehearsing before making a live debut in 2013. Consisting of vocalist Dixie Jacobs (ex- White, Wrench, Conservatory), guitarist/vocalist Christopher Maury (ex-Five Mod Four), bassist/vocalist Michael Wojtasiak (ex-Everybody at Midnight), and vocalist/drummer D.J. Hostettler (ex- IfIHadAHiFi), Body Futures linked up with Latest Flame Records before entering Howl Street Studios to record their album with Shane Hochstetler earlier this year. What has emerged is one of the most riveting and exciting introductions to a band in a long time, certainly in the realms of indie and pop rock.

The Milwaukee quartet instantly engage ears and thoughts with opener Hooks & Eyes, the harmonically aflame vocals of Jacobs a vibrant caress to which the more unbalanced expressive tones of Hostettler bring a delicious almost crazed accompaniment. Rhythms jab within the appealing blend whist riffs carry a jagged attitude and the bass a darker throat to the enticement. It is not the most startling song to leap at the senses but a vivacious start to the album with its Weezer like festivity and slightly frenzied vocal glow which reminds of eighties band Girls At their Best.

Things move up another step with the following When You Had A Jaw and even further with A Complete Divorce straight after. The first of the pair with its great mix of male and female led vocals again carries that eighties essence, LFR-44-cover-300x300the same band as reminded of in its predecessor coming to thoughts as well as fellow US band Late Cambrian. The bouncy chorus and anthemic call of the song makes for a ridiculously catchy tempting but the band mingles it with a muddled flame of sonic agitation and atmospheric intrigue which turns the track into a whole other type of creative bedlam before closing out on the irresistible romp which set it off. It is a clever piece of songwriting and sonic incitement but soon left in the shadow of its successor. The third song starts with Jacobs alone, voice revealing more of its depths before being paced by the absorbing tones of Wojtasiak’s bass and subsequently an evocative glaze of guitar. The track is a ‘regular’ proposition initially but soon blessed by shards of discord kissed guitar resonance and a delicious flow of vocal harmonies. Thoughts of The Passions and Jingo come to the fore here, the latter the one band which most comes close to the inventive majesty of Body Futures.

From the first big peak of the album, the band dances with ears and passions through the feisty beauty of That’s So Church, its enthralling swing of hooks and beats as gripping as the mouth-watering vocals. By now you expect a little of the unexpected and the track certainly offers that with a closing discord lilted twist of inventive drama before making way for the more reserved melodic caress of Is The Skeleton A Weapon? The song smoulders and moves engagingly with a sixties teasing pop charm but along rails of sonic causticity which adds that perpetual tinge of surprise which roams the release. Not the strongest of the songs on the album but one to lick lips over all the same, it is followed by (That’s A) Big Smile (for Someone About to Drown) and its starting blaze of Sex Pistols seeded guitar and riffery. The track proceeds to jangle and rile up the passions with clashing but beautifully merged punk spiced vocals, predatory rabidity, and the melodic resourcefulness of Jacobs’ synth and autoharp prowess and of course her mesmeric vocals. Imagine Devo meets Morningwood and you get the gist of the beauty of the song which triggers another ascent in the album’s exploration and might.

The opening ‘Psycho Killer’ like lure of bass which opens up Save the Clock Tower is potent bait alone but with the military seeded rhythms and stabbing riffing soon courting the magnetic web being cast, the track is soon in irresistible control. Jacobs walks alone through it all, her voice and keys seducing from within the compelling trap like a solitary figure in the midst of an addictive alchemy, but she is really the puppeteer urging and pulling the listener into the concussive and at time disorientating maelstrom of sound and invention. It is a stunning track which is swiftly equalled by the similarly beautifully deranged fascination of Phantom Patterns Arson. Running with a pop punk energy and virulence, the track is as jagged and irritable as it is melodically rampant, vocals and keys a relentless temptation within the more antagonistically captivating web of rhythms and guitar endeavour.

Sha Na Na: Clone Project Alpha is a song about Elmer Edward Solly, an escaped convict who masqueraded as a dead member of Sha Na Na, and just as frantically warped as the other pinnacles of the album. Lurching around with the will and intensity of a Dervish yet still making time to smooch with ears through melodic fondling, the song is impossibly infectious and unique, a track to rival Save the Clock Tower though both have to bow to What Bugs Eat. The penultimate song of the album, it is an immediately challenging fusion of two extremes which simply thrills. On one side there is the vocal pop toxicity of Jacobs alongside acidic yet warming melodies and on the other, a caustic discord spawned rapacity of sound which breeds hooks and riffs which scamper over the senses with the irritancy of a thousand insects. It is a simply bewildering and brilliant union as the sides merge in a bedlam of enterprise and ingenuity

The album finishes on the thick and rich psychedelic sunset of The Spanish of Scraping, a track with a sultry air but unafraid to interrupt with moments of poetic lunacy. It is an outstanding end to a quite brilliant album, Brand New Silhouettes destined to be a marker for indie rock and pop to come you sense as it twists its mischief through ears.

Though not in sound, there is one band which Body Futures reminds of in unique invention and the distinctness of the sounds they can conjure, and that is Talking Heads and we all know what happened to them.

Brand New Silhouettes is available now on vinyl and digitally via Latest Flame Records @ http://www.latestflame.com/content/lfr-44/ and @ http://bodyfutures.bandcamp.com/album/brand-new-silhouettes

https://www.facebook.com/BodyFutures

9/10

RingMaster 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Cole Childers – Aurora EP

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Providing an intriguing and seriously captivating blend of hard and alternative rock with also a slight tendency for metal, the Aurora EP is one of those potential soaked treats which catches you by surprise and opens up a certain appetite for more. The debut solo release from Cole Childers, the impressive six track encounter is a bed of drama and evocative enterprise which roars and seduces with equal potency. It is not a proposition to explore new avenues for fiery melodic rock but certainly one making a tasty addition to its ranks whilst marking Childers out as a striking presence to contemplate and keep a keen eye on ahead.

The Bainbridge Island, Washington hailing, now Seattle based musician brings his experiences from being a member of the United States Navy since 2000, as well as other personal moments and insights into his songwriting, lyrically and in sound songs gaining a dark and often challenging texture to their incitement. Returning from a six month deployment in 2006, Childers formed rock band Chasing Corona which released the critically acclaimed album Black Eye and Candlelight as well as going on to share stages with artists such as Motley Crue, George Clinton, Creed, and Joan Jett. In 2010 he left the band and also since leaving the military, found in his words that “I was able to move back to where it all began, with new purpose and clear direction.”

As soon as the opening track from Aurora embraces ears there is recognition of that passion you sense in the man running through the release in sound and vocal delivery. Save Me straight away casts a wall of demanding riffs and ImageProxy.mvcrhythmic swipes which awaken attention and imagination instantly. It is a feisty entrance by the song which is soon entwining senses in taught grooves before relaxing into a melodic and emotive caress clasped by evocative shadows. It is a fiery relaxation though which is soon aflame as the rigorous chorus erupts with similar vocal causticity from Childers. It all combines for a gloriously magnetic lure aided by the great throaty prowl of the bass and those firm swinging rhythms which punctuate every twist and emotional expulsion of the song. As lyrically gripping as it is in sound, the song is like a mix of Johnny Wore Black and Sick Puppies, and a scintillating start to the release which alone fires up a hungry appetite for more in the passions.

Childers latest single comes next to continue the immense presence of the EP, Fall With Me also entangling the senses in raw and strongly imposing scythes of guitars at first before Childers begins unveiling the emotively striking and stirring premise of the song. It along with an accompanying video, potently tries to portray the turmoil and sacrifice in war which goes unrecognised or certainly felt by those on the outside. It has a metal edge which makes for a predatory essence whilst a 3 Days Grace like angst and expression adds further rich hues to the incendiary and thrilling encounter. There is equally a skill and poise to the musicianship of Childers which hones the emotion and aggressive flavours that drive the heart of the song into a thought sparking proposition.

The evocative balladry of Addict is next, keys and voice making a captivating embrace which flourishes further as Childers explores a flowing harmonious presence whilst embraced by shadow kissed strings. An electronic agitation adds its resonance across the brewing climate of the song, a whisper of Linkin Park spicing up a Pearl Jam/Breaking Benjamin like croon. It is a mesmeric blaze of dramatic enticement which makes way for the tempestuous air and energy of Run Away. Again Sick Puppies comes to mind as hooks sparkle and riffs rub their captivating bait on ears whilst a raw energy colours the song’s emotional bellow. As with all the tracks, there is an inescapable contagion and ferocious beauty which wraps and ignites the imagination whilst forming a lingering lure in the passions.

The EP is completed by firstly the heavy rock fuelled Impossible, a track which lacks the spark of its predecessors yet still has plenty to ensnare and draw back eager attention, especially the potent and increasingly impressing vocals and expression of Childers. It is followed by the title track to being things to a potent close. The acoustically cast track looking at a broken relationship and its twist, is a smouldering caress of a song where vocally Childers again shines and melodically is an evocatively flaming sunset of sonic richness and emotive endeavour. It is an excellent finale to an outstanding release which just gets better with every listen. As mentioned at the start, Aurora is not setting new plateaus to emulate but definitely provides one captivating promise drenched adventure which suggests to expect big things from Cole Childers ahead.

The Aurora EP is available now via Vanity Digital Music on iTunes, Amazon, Google Music and other digital download sites.

colechilders.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Grifter – Return Of The Bearded Brethren

Pic SarahStygall

Pic SarahStygall

Almost three years after the release of their very appetising, riff stocked debut album, UK rockers Grifter return with another mighty slab of muscular temptation in the form of second album Return Of The Bearded Brethren. The successor to their acclaimed self-titled full-length which delivered eleven slices of unbridled dirty rock ‘n’ roll, the new proposition finds the trio building on all the essences which made the last release a formidable triumph. With greater maturity and style raging through the songwriting and increased devilment to their sound, Return Of The Bearded Brethren is a seductive beast of a release with grooves, hooks, and riffs all honed to an irresistible stature. It is fair to say that the album is again not exactly creating new templates for heavy rock but definitely the band is giving another very healthy and thrilling stomp to greedily devour.

Released as their 2011 debut on Ripple Music, Return Of The Bearded Brethren sees the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Ollie Stygall, bassist Phil Harris, and drummer/backing vocalist Foz Foster finding a tighter ruggedness in their sound as well as a keener and equally potent adventure. Formed in 2003 Grifter, as shown by their High Unholy Mighty Rollin’ and The Simplicity of the Riff is Key EPs in 2008 and 2010 respectively, has never been slow in barging through ears with the meatiest attack of contagious big boned riffery and spicy grooves. Their first album set a new plateau for the band with its collection of songs crafted over the years leading up to its release, a base which the Rich Robinson produced blaze of The Return Of The Bearded Brethren has embraced whilst breeding its own dirt encrusted and invigorating character. Spawning songs themed by tales of “Guinness, ’70s sex symbols, drinking regrets, religious folly, and more”, the weighty treat of heavy rock revelry is one of those encounters which turns a party into a riot, a raucous gathering into an orgy of unbridled debauchery, and leaves all concerned exhausted and blissfully wasted.

As soon as the album hits the ears with opener Black Gold you know things are going to get filthy and lustful, especially with the following She Mountain backing it up with a similarly lusty seduction of infectiousness and sinew driven RIPPLE_2393energy. The first track primes ears with punchy beats before unleashing the most delicious of contagion drenched grooves. The bass riffing of Harris sets a throaty spine to which the swinging rhythms of Foster provides irresistible bait, but it is once the excellent vocal lure of Stygall alongside his increasingly tempting string play that the song becomes an inescapable slave master to feet and emotions. With hints of blues fire and imagination entangling sonic enterprise across its narrative, the track continues to bind body and soul tightly whilst its swagger and relentless stride of vocals and sound is the purest anthemic enticement. Its successor is similarly commanding and insatiable in recruiting senses and passions. A stronger whisper of blues flirtation makes its touch known but primarily the song is again an anthem of heavy boned rhythms, saucy grooves, and antagonistic riffs which converge into one blaze of addictiveness.

To be honest such the majesty of the first pair of songs that the album never manages to reach the same pinnacle again but that is no slight on the rest of the impressive encounter. The sultry Southern rock twang of Paranoiac Blues immediately feeds the greedy appetite already triggered by the album with its flavoursome flame of blues angst and spicy sonic endeavour. Like Seasick Steve does ZZ Top with the weight of Orange Goblin behind it, the track winds around the imagination with a glorious invention and melodic flaming before making way for Princess Leia. Guitars and bass are immediately prowling ears, appearing its slower stride with bursts of catchy urgency, whilst the rhythmic taunting of Foster ignites a tension of aggression in the again impossibly infectious proposition. With it also having a video for it, the track looks like the lead into the album which is understandable though you do also wonder why the might of the first two tracks were overlooked.

The outstanding Bow Down To The Monkey adds its bear like prowl and smouldering enticing to the album next, vocals and grooves as magnetic as the jabbing rhythms and carnivorous tone of the bass are predatory. The song wraps itself lasciviously around ears with an open flirtatious enterprise to add another creative twist to the album, as does Braggard’s Boast with its raunchy riffing and acidic grooves within a bar room brawl of heavy rock meets classic metal. It is not a track which grips as potently as others upon the release but still has body and emotions leaping eagerly, making a great appetiser for the bluesy rampancy of It’s Not Me, It’s You. As with many of the songs on the album there is a familiarity to some of the twists and essences within the track yet it only brews up a stronger link between the release and passions for the main. At times storming with all cylinders ablaze and in others smouldering with a smooch of a coaxing, the track is a riveting evocation of old and modern rock ‘n’ roll, something Grifter are very adept at fusing.

Both Fire Water and the title track keep the juices of the album and reactions flowing keenly, the first an old school seeded rocker with a sauntering and mischievous gait to its infection soaked endeavour, especially around an addictive chorus, whilst the second is prime sonic enticing which again feels more like an old returning friend than a new acquaintance but is still as fresh and inspiring to limbs and voice as you could wish for. Its rigorous success is followed by album closer Fairies Wear Boots, a cover of the Black Sabbath track which hits all the right notes and sweet spot with a raw and caustically graced Grifter unique stroll. It is a fine end to a mouth-watering release from the band. The Return Of The Bearded Brethren is not a awe inspiring triumph or maybe one to squash all expectations but it is one to bring one of the most enjoyable and compelling rock ‘n’ roll treats this year and that is more than enough to get excited over.

Return Of The Bearded Brethren is available via Ripple Music in North America now and in Europe on the 18th August on CD, limited Vinyl, and Digitally and at http://grifter.bigcartel.com/product/the-return-of-the-bearded-brethren-cd-album

http://www.grifterrock.co.uk

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Flourishing on other’s scorn: an interview with Greg Burgess of Allegaeon

allegaeon_photo02

   The past two years between previous album Formshifter and its successor Elements of the Infinite has not been an easy time to say the least for US melodic death metallers Allegaeon. The departure of band founder and guitarist Ryan Glisan alone offered a threat to the future of the band and seeds to doubters of their ability to continue to be a potently impacting force within metal. Overcoming those obstacles and determined to prove certain people wrong, Allegaeon has not only shown itself to be as powerful and impressive as before but unleashed one of the albums of the year and their finest incitement yet. Keen to find out more about the time leading up to the new album, the difficulties it faced, and the heart of Allegaeon itself, guitarist Greg Burgess kindly spared a chunk of his time to reveal all…

Hello Greg and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

It is a few days after the release of your outstanding new album Elements Of The Infinite, a definite album of the year contender in our book. How are the emotions and expectations as it starts seducing the world with its sounds?

Thanks so much man for having me, it’s mixed for me. I’ve been so busy making sure things go right and with all the jobs I have, I haven’t been able to fully enjoy it. That being said I kinda feel a little vindicated from some of the hate mail I received saying we were shit without Ryan.

Does Elements Of The Infinite feel more of a triumph because of that then, because it comes after the departure of as you mentioned band founder guitarist Ryan Glisan and drummer Jordon Belfast as well as other obstacles which came the way of the band in the past couple of years?

Well Jordon hasn’t been with us for like what 4 years now? He hasn’t been in the equation for us as a band for a long time, but the Ryan thing absolutely. Like I said in the previous question there were a lot of people that thought we were gonna crash and burn without him. I’ve always written half of the albums up to this record, why people thought I was incapable of writing more than that pissed me off. I found their lack of faith disturbing, so yeah I feel I triumphed a little bit. This has nothing to do with Ryan by the way, I wanna make that clear, we only wish the best for that dude, and I really hope he’s successful in his pursuits. But sometimes having a point to prove can really lead to good things. Look at Mustaine’s career, a whole career based off of getting even with Metallica; I think he was very successful.

Enlighten the readers of other problems around that time. It was a serious threat to the future of Allegaeon?allegaeon_photo06

Well I mean after our tour with Job For A Cowboy, we came home and basically lost a guitar player, the van’s transmission was shot, and we had no drummer. It was a lot to overcome. I guess it’s all in attitudes. We looked at it as an opportunity to excel instead of walls. I think that is what propelled us further. When we were offered the Wretched tour, Metal Blade basically said to us, “Hey look if you wanna do this, figure it out and do it. If you don’t well then we’re not sure you have a future with us.” It wasn’t harsh; it was just a reality check. We launched an indiegogo campaign, and the fans basically saved our asses. After that I got some fill in’s and we did the tour, and it basically was a new beginning for us.

Tell us about new members Michael Stancel and Brandon Park, how did the link-up with the guys come about?

Both of the guys started off as just tour fill in’s, they did such an amazing job and we had such a good time with them that it became clear very fast that they were our guys. They were fans to begin with and their attitudes were hungry. It felt great having new blood in the band, and honestly we needed a full line-up since we’d been in pieces for the past 3 plus years. I knew Mike from his other band Artemesis. The other guitar player in that band was my student so I knew the guy could play. Brandon just was persistent on Facebook, and really wanted the gig. We’d played with his former band Suffer The Wrath so I knew the dude was good, it was just a chemistry issue.

Taking the evidence of your first two albums alone, Fragments of Form and Function and Formshifter, for a non-musician and knowing the technical level and imagination you guys are at it would be a prospect to intimidate many guitarists and drummers joining the band. Did you find a full or sparsely filled queue applying or were Michael and Brandon your prime suspects anyway?

Well to be honest we were looking elsewhere to fill the spots. Our buddy Peter Joseph who was in the Absence was slated to take Ryan’s spot. I had been talking to him for a while and the talks were really really good. Mike did the tour and was just killing it every night; every band on the tour was like you should just take Mike. My biggest concern was respecting Peter, so we didn’t give Mike the job outright, but when we went through Tampa Peter basically said “dude you should just take Mike he’s rad”. It kinda just was right. As for Brandon, it’s a little more complicated. We actually got JP who played on Formshifter to join the band for like a couple of weeks, but he couldn’t do this tour we had lined up. I just couldn’t take the risk of it being a recurring problem. It sucked cause JP is incredible, and one of our best friends. After JP I asked our last touring guy Shawn McGuffin to step in, he wasn’t interested. So I got into that desperation mode. Our buddy Jeremy Portz who’d performed on all the Vale Of Pnath albums we kept going after, but it just wasn’t coming together. So we were just drummer less once again. I needed a drummer for the tour, and I remembered Brandon. I’d had reservations about Brandon due to association through other people. The first time I ever saw Brandon play this dude came up drunk off his ass, and started bashing our guy, saying we should get Brandon to do it. I was immediately pissed ‘cause our guy was great, and this dude was just disrespecting him to our faces. So that was kinda strike one against Brandon. Next we were playing another tour in St. Louis and another “friend” of Brandon’s came up trying to get us to do coke with him. It was automatically guilt by association. Both these dues claimed to be friends of B Park, one was an ass the other was a coke head. No Thanks!! I don’t want that shit screwing up what we got going on. Then Brandon said something on Facebook about how stupid drugs were or something so, I reached out. It’s so funny now, ‘cause these dudes almost blew this opportunity for Brandon, and getting to know B Park, he’s completely the opposite of everything I thought about him. Crazy! We can laugh about it now, but I was really concerned at first. After the first show with Park, I knew he was our guy. We did a few more shows on that tour then our van broke down. B Park works on a farm so he’s really good with machines. The dude fixed it and got us up and running again…so here we are sitting freezing our asses off in our busted van, and I’m like this dude is so hired.

Allegaeon-ElementsOfTheInfiniteDid you approach Elements Of The Infinite any differently to your previous albums, especially with Ryan no longer part of the process?

Very much so…My work load was double! Not only did I have to write all the material but we had to take over his responsibilities. He usually communicated with the artwork guy and he worked with Metal Blade on the fine details. I had the most free time so I just took it up. Also getting Joe Ferris on board to collaborate with all the orchestra stuff, yeah it was the hardest I’ve ever worked on an album.

How long did the album take to make?

To record, about a month and a half.

There has obviously been plenty of pressure to the making of Elements Of The Infinite so was it as enjoyable as other releases to bring to life?

It’s early days yet, but so far I’d say the opportunities we’ve already gotten from this record have made it the most enjoyable record we’ve done. I am definitely proud of it. I certainly feel all the hard work is paying off for once.

You recorded the album as the others with producer Dave Otero, he seems to add an essence and presence which your sound requires and flourishes even further with?

Well Formshifter wasn’t recorded with Dave it was done with Daniel Castleman. We really liked working with Castleman however after the split with Ryan, and the Pyrithion EP, and everything going on there, and the Lambesis fiasco on top of it, we really wanted to separate ourselves from it. Plus my friendship with Dave had grown a lot over the years, so it felt really good coming back. We really sought out his producer role, since I thought my objectivity was compromised from writing so much material. I needed a fresh perspective, and we really respect Dave to not pull punches. I’d ask him straight up, I have no idea if this part is good or it sucks, what do you think? I even wrote multiple solos for parts going, hey man which do you like better? He was very helpful to us.

How would you on the inside say your sound has changed just between Elements Of The Infinite and Formshifter?

Well Formshifter was interesting ‘cause we went in cold, and there was a lot of trust developed between everyone. We didn’t have a drummer so we kinda didn’t know how the album was going to sound. This one, I was meticulous. We had the track listing, all the preproduction done before we even stepped into the studio. We knew everything about this album before it was even recorded. That helped keep the vision. We even had all of Joe’s stuff ready to go before we got in. It made the process go really smooth.

Has it been an organic evolution or something you have been working towards or had in mind for a while?allegaeon_photo04

I think it’s been organic. The decisions on this album weren’t spur of the moment, they were all thought out, and methodical.

Talking to you and reading other interviews members have made, it feels like the band was as much as anything just trying to produce a strong and potent album to keep the band on track. Has the fact that for us and a great many it sees the band at a whole new plateau and creative ingenuity surprised you, either the reactions of the fact that it is that good?

I think so. I mean I was just hoping that this record wouldn’t lose ground…that we could make a point that we were still relevant. The fact that not only we seemed to achieve that, but also the vast majority of the reviews think we’ve surpassed our previous efforts is very rewarding. The band is more a family now than anything we’ve had before. We look out for one another. Everyone is happy within our organization, and that’s the way we aim to keep it. It makes for a great working environment.

There are strong evocative orchestral elements across the new album; who composed and brought those to provocative life?

Being a studied classical musician, this is something I’ve wanted to do for years. We’ve just never had the technology until now to pull it off. The composition of the orchestral and choir elements was a direct split between Joe Ferris and I. Working with him couldn’t have been more exciting, and he’s definitely part of our writing team now. I’d write these choir and string parts and he’d flesh them out or just revamp them in some cases. In others he would just run with an idea he had, and made it truly awesome.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the album and songs.

OK from the beginning. Threshold Of Perception is a look at death. It’s a look at it from a sociological and chemical standpoint. Tyrants Of The Terrestrial Exodus is about the evacuation of earth and some of the corruption that will inherently be present in the choosing of who gets to go. Dyson Sphere is about building super structures around a star, The Phylogenesis Stretch is about Goldilocks Zones…the distance where life as we know it can exist around a star. 1.618 is about the golden ratio. Gravimetric Time Dilation is about gravity and mass, and how it effects time. Our Cosmic Casket is about black holes. Biomech II is about 3D printing organs. Ages of Ice is about an Ice Age that comes as a result of a meteor hitting earth. And lastly Genocide for Praise is about the 10 plagues of Egypt as it is described in the Bible.

allegaeon_photo03You guys have a passion for science or just lyrically it suits your musical ideation?

It’s really just what we’re interested in. We love it, we love learning about it. It truly is a pleasure to write lyrics about this stuff you learn a lot.

Is there a particular moment or aspect to Elements Of The Infinite which gives you the greatest pleasure or satisfaction considering it’s kind of harder than expected journey into being?

Just that we achieved what we set out to do and it’s broadened our goals to expand onto the global stage.

Now the album is uncaged and out there, what comes next for Allegaeon?

Lots of touring…we wanna crush these couple of US tours we have lined up and then head overseas.

Thanks again for chatting with us, any final thoughts you would like to share?

Thank you to everyone who’s supported us, and to all the new fans, we couldn’t do this without you!

 

Read the review of Elements Of The Infinite @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/allegaeon-elements-of-the-infinite/

http://www.facebook.com/allegaeon

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/