Machinista – Xenoglossy

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Having set a striking standard with their Arizona Lights EP barely five months ago, Swedish electro/synth pop band Machinista not only confirm the potency and potential of their sound with debut album Xenoglossy, but expand it with an even more rigorously captivating and enterprisingly inventive persuasion. Consisting of eleven tracks which are as boldly fresh and bred of a modern creative climate as they are seeded in an eighties nostalgia, the album is an irresistible blaze of electronic pop, quite simply persistent bait for body, imagination, and emotions to romp and bask in.

Machinista is the creation of Malmö/Kalmar based pair, vocalist/lyricist John Lindqwister (Cat Rapes Dog,Departementet, Basswood Dollies) and musician Richard Flow (ex.Vision Talk, Haze For Sale). Starting the project in the December of 2012 alongside their other bands, the duo instantly gripped attention and keen responses with a cover of David Bowie´s Heroes, which now closes up the new album. Its success and that of their first self-penned release, the single Molecules And Carbon, both accompanied equally appreciated videos, led to an eager spotlight soaking the band not only from fans but media too. Last year the band signed with the Juggernaut Music Group with the Arizona Lights EP their first release this past March. Recently and really before the dust of fervour around the EP could settle, Xenoglossy was uncaged to as mentioned not only reinforce their opening presence but cast a whole new mesmeric spell on the synth pop scene.

From the opening almost warning prod of first track Take Comfort In Being Sad ears and attention are wide awake breeding a just as immediate appetite. Punchy beats thump their coaxing next before keys relax into a melodic sway coveraround those persistently provocative textures. The equally as tantalising voice of Lindqwister is soon caresses the senses too around that jabbing rhythmic punctuation, the mix of forceful tempting and seductive soothing an enthrallingly magnetic proposition. As the song bounces along thoughts of The Cure, certainly vocally and in the shadowed essences which lurk within the bright sounds, and of A-ha musically make their suggestions. It is a masterful start swiftly matched by Arizona Lights. The second song casts a hazy yet crystalline ambience before eager beats and similarly feisty electronic grooves wrap around ears. As with the first track, and the majority of the album, there is a familiarity to the encounter but a recognisable spicing which only enhances the fun and potency of the offerings. Here a Thomas Dolby/Paul Haig like air makes hints as the song unveils its sparkling revelry.

Its lively presence and heart is followed by an initially more reserved and shadowed suasion through Molecules And Carbon, its first breath holding a melancholic spice before opening up into its own vivacious if still slightly reined in dance. Again it is hard to resist adding comparisons to Robert Smith and co, but it is only an appealing hue in the flowing imagination of Machinista. Though not as striking as its predecessors, the song satisfies a by now greed ridden appetite for the release before letting its outstanding successor, Salvation intrigue and seduce the passions. Sporting the irresistible charm and vibrancy of Landscape and poetic melodies of Zero-Eq, the track soars in elegance and beauty, keys and vocals a glowing smouldering climate to immerse in.

An industrial unpredictability and dark air brings the next up Summersault in to view, the track a stirring protagonist with military bred rhythms and an imposing atmosphere of stark and binding incitement. There is also the most vivid cinematic aspect to the song. Each track has that ability to work with the imagination visually it is fair to say but none as voraciously and enthrallingly as here. With drama clad keys and the ever impressing vocals, the song leaves thoughts reminded of Associates and in an evocative grasp before the equally thrilling Pushing The Angels Astray steps forward to sweep body and emotions to their feet for a perfect slice of synth pop. Melodies and hooks blaze away with harmonic resonance whilst rhythms steer the whole thing into the instinctive eagerness of feet and passions. It is the chorus where you lose self-control though, its contagion as toxic as a sunset and just as colourfully entrancing.

Ensuring that pinnacle is not a lone voice in what are nothing but peaks across Xenoglossy, next track Wasted sways and stomps with tenacious enterprise and pop infused vivacity. Featuring guest vocals from Toril Lindqvist of Alice in Videoland, the track is like a flaming collusion between OMD, Blancmange, and MiXE1, and ridiculously addictive. Maybe not quite as gripping but certainly a flavoursome and resourceful coaxing is Love And Hate Song. It has the unenviable task of following the two previous triumphs and does so with a unfussy and minimalistic march covered in a thick and enticing melodic weave which itself is coated in an unpredictable emotive suggestiveness. It is a gentle yet powerful tempting showing another strain of invention and intelligent variation to the album.

The closing stretch of the release is led by the heated emotion and climate of Crash. It is a strong and thought sparking encounter but lacks the spark of earlier tracks even with its Vangelis like flumes of epically honed melodies. It is also left looking pale sandwiched between the last song and slow burning success of The Blues And The Reds. Holding a feel of Pete Wylie to its provocative caress of electronic sound and floating harmonies, the song takes a while to warm up thoughts and emotions but does so to a lingering success.

Xenoglossy is completed by an excellent version of Heroes, and it is easy to see why the track made such a powerful impact with its band introducing release. The Eno/Bowie penned classic is not dramatically changed but given an insertion of electronic teasing and enterprise which brings new inescapable infectiousness to its charm. It finishes off the album in fine and thrilling style. With the fact that despite the praise it is also one of the weaker tracks on the album, it shows the might and impressive adventure across the whole release. Synth pop is an awakening inspiring genre it seems and it is fair to say that Machinista is destined to be one of its leading lights.

Xenoglossy is available now via Juggernaut Music Group @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/xenoglossy

http://www.machinistamusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014

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God Destruction – Novus Ordo Seclorum

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Having preyed upon and traumatised the world with their richly acclaimed and exceptional debut album Illuminatus two years ago, Mexican provocateurs God Destruction return with its successor Novus Ordo Seclorum. It has been a battle to bring the release to bear upon the senses, the demise of their previous label an imposing obstacle, but finally the insidious collection of dark and intensive anthems for the soul and psyche has been unleashed to the continue the impressive emergence of the band. Darker, intently more venomous, and arguably even more viciously intimidating than its predecessor, the album infests the trio’s industrial and harsh EBM sound with a black metal rapacity which infects and enflames the senses and imagination voraciously. It is another uncompromisingly thrilling and hostile proposition which without surpassing the previous release sits potently alongside its stature.

Consisting of Imperor, Charles Black, and Muteitor, the 2009 formed band as expected explores the most primal and vindictive sounds within the new release’s satanic themed tracks. The album exudes a constant pressure and gripping irritant on the senses, each song crowding the listener with ravenous and at times concussive waves of sound and ideation which exhaust as they spark ears and imagination into willing submission. It is a mighty and riveting encounter but one which suffers from a meandering and at times potency defusing mix from Mario Carrasco (SIN DNA). There are certain tracks where clarity is smothered in a distorted touch which corrupts the quality of the song within though the strength of the songs always wins through.

The Juggernaut Music Group release opens with New World Order and immediately has ears wrapped in a predatory sonic provocation veined by a sample of Middle Eastern suggestiveness. The track instantly surveys the climate of the world with its initial seconds, beats a menacing incitement to the vocal suasion flirting with thoughts. Eventually the track explodes into a tsunami of electronic enticement bred in inhospitable breath, where it shows itself to suffer from the awkward mix, though maybe the warped sound and touch is intentional. Nevertheless the track continues to swarm around the senses, its melodic and sonic appetite entangled for a scorched and acidic enterprise. It is not a startling start to the album but one rigidly gripping attention and appetite which I’m Your God and especially Bellum capitalise on. The first of the pair also takes a mere second to intrigue and grab the imagination, its initial heavy emotive keys a classical lure into the waiting arms of abrasing electro caustic and punishing beats. The song proceeds to leer at and climb over emotions with its demonic intent and the equally serpentine vocals, exposing them to its treacherously seductive heart before making way for the album’s best moment. Bellum is a bordering on sadistic provocateur from the first intensive scrub of riffs and electronic scowling. Antagonistic rhythms join the corrosive mix swiftly after as the track blossoms into a twisted tempest of deranged electronics, warped guitar endeavour, and again that irrepressible erosive vocal presence which marks out the band as pleasingly as its sound. The track is scintillating, a traumatic blend of metal and industrial antipathy soaked in epic drama and climactic atmospheres.

The dangerous air and sonic swing of Disintegrator comes next, its lures as infectious and crystalline as they are caustic before making way for a cover of the Marilyn Manson track Angel With The Scabbed Wings. The encounter coveris another crawl through the psyche, the band employing the prime essences of the track’s creator and twisting them into an impervious fiendish temptation which impresses far more than expected. It is a richly appetising baiting which is matched by the following Prominent Darkness. The slow predation which marked the previous track is again the formidable gait and intent of the song, its thick toxicity an oppressive weave of electronic sultriness and emotive storming spiked with industrial unpredictability and melodic crooning.   Through the despotic Destroyer with its patchwork of bad blooded invention of sound and climactic provocation, and the similarly structured Satan’s Storm, the album persists in its riveting exploration and diabolical persuasion. The latter is toxic bait for the dance floor which works as easily on feet as it does emotions, though it is soon lost in the shadow of the excellent Revolution. The track drives an industrial demanding through ears with its first gasp of sonic breath, keys and guitars rippling with primal rabidity as the vocals spill an officious rancor with every syllable. It is an exhilarating assault which only elevates it’s tempting with disorientating shards and splinters of ear bending and unpredictable ingenuity. The track is sensational and stands beside Bellum as a pinnacle.

Touched By Lvcifer rises from a minimalistic coaxing into a roaring ferocity of sound and emotional spite to sear body and soul before the demonstrative Doomsday parades its own distinct ravaging with magnetic shafts of melodic and scarring electronic beguiling. Both leave hunger greedier whilst Regresus Diaboli provides a lingering manipulation of senses and emotions with its transfixing and fascinating tide of searing sonic elegance and rhythmic grudging, all as ever lorded over by the Luciferian vocals.

Completed by the C-Lekktor Remix of Touched By Lvcifer, as well as the Esquizofrenia Viral and Satanized By Alien Vampires remixes of Regresus Diaboli, the album is another inescapable and increasingly impressive violation from God Destruction. It does have that issue with its mix but again the band has cast songs which simply corrupt and ignite for the fullest invigorating pleasure, Novus Ordo Seclorum returning the band to the frontline of corruptive ingenuity once again.

Novus Ordo Seclorum is available now via Juggernaut Music Group @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/novus-ordo-seclorum

https://www.facebook.com/GodDestruction666

8/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014]

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Wovenwar – Self Titled

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Pic by Ty Watkins

The events around and causing the imprisonment of As I Lay Dying frontman Tim Lambesis is a well-publicised happening which does not need our commentary. It also left the rest of the band with a major decision. No strangers to success and acclaim, the remaining quartet of guitarists Nick Hipa and Phil Sgrosso, bassist Josh Gilbert, and drummer Jordan Mancino had to decide their next step and thankfully chose with music their life and calling, to strike forward with a new project and what a stunning proposition it has turned out to be. Recruiting lifelong friend and ex-lead guitarist/vocalist of Oh, Sleeper, Shane Blay, the quintet emerged as Wovenwar and has just unleashed a monster of a debut, in their fifteen track self-titled album. Exploring with muscular ferocity and passionate tenacity the melodic metal side of their imagination, the band has created a proposition as distinctly different yet equal in quality and temptation to anything their previous triumphs have unveiled.

Recorded with producer Bill Stevenson (Descendents, Rise Against, NOFX, Black Flag) and mixed by Colin Richardson (Slipknot, Machine Head, Trivium), the album also reaps with sinew driven voracity the rich essences of hard rock to create blazes of sound and enterprise which stand astride genres whilst offering recognisable flames within fresh adventures. On top of that there are the, at times breath-taking and always tantalising vocals of Blay, his clean tones which helped shape his previous band given full expansive rein here to excel and show the strength and weight of the man’s power and craft. It is a magnetic and persistently surprising mesh of sound and ideation which courses the album and immediately awakens attention and appetite through All Rise which follows the opening intro of Foreword. A drama instilled prelude to the creative emprise ahead, the opening track makes for a potent coaxing before the second track explodes with a thumping roll of rhythms, agitated riffs, and a sonic shaping of melodic intent. It is a busy entrance soon enhanced by Blay and the heavy throated predation of the bass. The track is swiftly as anthemic as it is technically bewitching, guitars and drums nimble footed yet leaving heavy impressions with their stormy endeavour.

Death to Rights erupts with similarly intensive and rugged energy and adventure next, jagged riffs and demanding rhythms evolving into scorching weaves of melodic passion and sonic intrigue, though that only hints at the fluid Covermovement and invention within the blistering encounter. As the album, every aspect of the song calls out with invigorated energy and refreshing ideation, raw and almost antagonistic power crowding in with sultry melodies and rapacious infectiousness. It is probably unfair to say the members of the band have found a new lease of life with Wovenwar but certainly there is a freedom and elation to the sound and passion behind it which is as magnetic as the songs themselves.

Through Tempest and The Mason, band and album continue to impress with no restraint. The first of the two finds a carnivorous tone to the bass which alone ignites the passions but also makes a shapely blend of that aggression with an elegant melodically tempering countenance to remind of a more ferocious Sick Puppies. The second of the pair digs into a more furious breath in sound and personality, though the rich tones of Blay never allows the primal intent and fury beneath his vocals to have complete reign with their glorious causticity. The same applies to Moving Up and Sight of Shore, though they are more even tempered naturally with easily pleasing and flawlessly accomplished if less imposingly striking presences compared to previous songs on the album. Each leave a greedy appetite well fed nevertheless before Father Son makes its claim for best track notoriety. The song is simply bewitching, its soothing melodic opening caress over a metronomic lure, irresistible coaxing which increases in temptation as soon as Blay opens up his deliciously mesmeric tones. With keys an evocative ambience over the picturesque narrative of the guitars, and both colourful scenery in a mountain range of epic rhythmic enticement, the track is pure poetry as it leads to its mouth-watering climactic crescendo of a finale.

Profane then thrusts ears into a tempestuous exploit with thunderous rhythms and scathing riffery, the track the rawest and anthemically volatile track on the album yet still holding a seduction which wraps around the aggression and vocal roars which Blay unveils within ever formidable delivery. It is a beast of a track which along with its predecessor puts the likes of Archers and Ruined Ends under pressure to deliver. Neither falls at the hurdle though, the first a voracious blaze of entwining sonic rages, passion drenched vocals, and flavour fuelled melodies whilst its successor is a deeply satisfying mix of abrasing textures and contagious designs ridden by earnest and heated vocal expression.

Things take a bit of a breather with Identity, its well sculpted and unquestionably impressive presence also lacking the spark of those leading up to its moment, though again to be fair there is nothing to leave disappointment a chance to breed. Matter of Time is in its own individual way the same, which offers the suggestion that maybe the album was a couple of songs or so too long but with its compact yet weighty intimidation and stormy air leaving senses and thoughts contented, you feel to omit it and other tracks would be to our real loss.

The album is completed by the acoustically opened Prophets, another spellbinding matching of Blay’s voice and melodic guitar enticing as group harmonies float engagingly over the poetic scenery which works into a climactic landscape of equally thrilling provocation, and lastly the cinematic instrumental Onward which gives the imagination one final flight to immerse in. It enjoyably concludes a scintillating proposition which proves that every cloud has…etc. Though its members are no newcomers to creating inspirational metal, Wovenwar has made a debut which definitely is startling and leaves anticipation for their next step afire, and the passions right now basking.

Wovenwar is available via Metal Blade Records now @ http://www.indiemerch.com/metalbladerecords/band/wovenwar

http://wovenwar.com/about

9/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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MORASS OF MOLASSES RELEASE STUDIO VIDEO OF ASHTABULA !

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After spending the last few months of extensively and voraciously gigging, which was interspersed with new recording sessions, Morass of Molasses has increased the summer heat with the release of the studio video of their recently released second track Ashtabula.

The successor to the acclaimed Rotten TeethAshtabula is available for FREE Download or ‘Pay what you want’ via their bandcamp page @ http://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com/track/ashtabula

 

The video for  Ashtabula was shot during the actual recording of the track in the studio, and as a result has a ‘CCTV-during-an-earthquake’ vibe throughout. Gritty, and at times bewildering, the film captures a snapshot of the band’s visceral attitude both in studio and on stage.

Frontman Bones says of the new video: ‘The video has been a while coming. We shot everything way back when we actually recorded the song. However, due to the demands of gigging, and further recording we have only been able to release it now’ adding that ‘It has a very different feel from the Rotten Teeth video

 

You can watch the video here: http://youtu.be/qIWaz6mSwpo

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 It is still less than a year since Morass of Molasses erupted onto the scene in Reading, since when they have been busy cramming in gigs aplenty; persistently wowing audiences with their unique and ever evolving brand of Sludgy Stoner Rock, a sound which has fans and critics alike clamouring to sing their praises.

Morass of Molasses has a clutch of shows coming up where they will be at…

South Street Arts Centre, Reading on Tuesday 12th August

‘Wickedfest’ The Facebar, Reading on Sunday 17th August

The New Cross Inn, London on Tuesday 27th August

Find out more about the band@

www.facebook.com/morassofmolasses

Twitter: @morassmolasses

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/morassofmolasses

Bandcamp: http://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com

email: morassofmolasses@icloud.com

Ashtabula 3

Opening new episodes: an interview with Richard K of Machine Rox

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   Originally the solo project of Richard K, Machine Rox has increasingly and persistently created a fiery and attention grabbing mix of metal and electro rock which is never afraid to push at and venture outside of its creative confines. Through a host of EPs and debut album Shout, the band has evolved and honed their consistently provocative sounds into a formidable and contagious incitement, none more so potently than on the stirring Activate your anger EP. Next month sees the unleashing of second album Next Level, a release which pushes and expands the bands ingenuity and sound to even more imposingly magnetic and intriguing levels. Ahead of its unveiling we took the opportunity to catch time with Richard K to explore the upcoming release as well as look at the beginnings of the band, its evolution from a one man to a four piece project, and much more.

Hi Richard and thank you for sparing time to talk with us.

For those new to Machine Rox can you give some background to the early days of the band?

After years of playing in different Rock bands as bass player, guitar player and programmer, and having more or less some kind of success I had enough of the “Music Industry” bullshit and I actually stopped playing music for few years before I started MACHINE ROX as an Electro- Industrial solo project when I discovered MySpace 🙂

What inspired the band name?

It was a statement basically saying that machines and electronic music could rock as hard as guitars oriented bands.

The change from a solo project to a full band line-up has not been a swift transition compared to other projects Was this intentional to take it slow and recruit as your music decided or just how things evolved?

It just the way things and the music evolved. There was no precise plan behind it; every time I recruited someone it just felt right. I recruited Aga on backing vocals and keyboard when I felt it would be cool to add something new to the sound and then we took Nuj on drums for live shows and ended up adding more and more guitars so we took Val who contributed to a lot of guitar riffs in the songs.

I imagine it to be hard for a solo musician and begin letting others into something you once fully controlled, how have you found it as the band evolved?  MR

Yes it’s not easy to let people involved in something that is so close and personal to me but I have nothing against a bit of change and having other people ideas is a good thing if you want to evolve. Saying this I still have a lot of control in MACHINE ROX and I have my whip with me constantly for members who wouldn’t follow my orders 🙂

No, not really. I’m quite open minded… if you go my way 🙂

How would you say your sound and the way you look at writing and composing songs has changed over time and through the growth in personnel?

The way of song writing is pretty much the same as when I started as a solo artist except that the others bring ideas, Aga contributes a lot in the songs structure and brings her own vocals and Val brings most of the guitars ideas now. Nuj hasn’t been involved much in the song writing and recording process but he will be in the next album we are starting working on.

The band is poised to release its new album Next Level, what are the emotions and thoughts before its impending unveiling?

Personally I think it’s the best album we’ve done so far and I really hope that people will take time to listen.

Your sound has always explored a rich merger of metal and electro rock, pushing its and your boundaries and it is fair to say Next Level is no exception?

Yes Electro-Rock Metal-Industrial is our sound. That’s what we feel like playing today. Maybe tomorrow will be different

 

The album arguably leans on the more electro and industrial side of your exploration than certainly the previous album Shout. How do you see its direction in comparison from the inside?

I always try to find the right balance between Electro and Rock/Metal so it’s difficult for me to say it’s more Electro or more Rock. Some songs sound more Electro and some more Rock. What I want or try to do is to make a diverse and varied album with different moods and beats and sounds. I don’t want to bore people with an album where all the songs would sound the same. I would say that Next Level got more Metal elements than the albums before and I guess that’s coming mainly from Val’s guitar playing which is Metal.

Since those first outings as a band how would you describe the growth and evolution in your sound overall?

We are definitely going for a more Rock/Metal sound. I think in the future there will be less and less Electro in our sound but well you never know.

a2738925395_2Tell us about the recording of Next Level, did you approach it any differently to previous releases?

The recording process has been the same as the previous releases (except the Intox EP that has been recorded in a studio in Germany), in my recording studio.

There is a healthy DIY essence and honesty to the album…

Yes I’m mister DIY J I finance my band, I record my band, I release our music and I organize most of our gigs. It’s not always easy but you learn and learn from your mistakes. And at least I know where the money goes ha, ha! And about honesty, well I don’t think you can find a more honest guy in the music industry than me and my honesty is reflecting in my songs. Like it or not but you can be sure there’s no bullshit in those songs.

From the album title and new inventive breath of the songs, Next Level feels like a new distinct chapter in the journey of Machine Rox, is that how you feel about it?

Yes it’s exactly what I feel. I think it’s a turning point for us, a new chapter. The beginning of great things to come I hope.

I have always felt there is an intimacy to your songs, a personal element of you which fuels their anger, spirit etc. and certainly Next Level is no exception. So how close to heart emotionally are songs and their lyrical inspirations?

Well, lyrically it’s very personal and intimate of what’s going on in my head. I don’t hold back, tell the truth and release all my emotions. I’m not trying to sell some washing powder product or say “buy my album” here; I’m spilling my guts out no matter what!

Was there a broad input across the band into the creation of the album and how does the writing generally come about with songs?

I write the first draft of a song which is 70% of the finished song then I play it to the others and Aga and Val bring their input into the song. Nuj hasn’t been involved yet in the writing process but we are planning to change this in the next album. The thing is this is the fastest and easiest way to write songs. It’s very difficult to put 4 people regularly in a room to write something because everybody got their own life, their jobs and other commitments.

Next Level hints at varied spices of inspirations and listening to albums and EPs over time you sense your tastes are varied and wide. What are the major inspirations to your music and simply being a musician?

My inspiration and song-writing is varied because I have been listening to a lot of different styles of rock music over the years so I guess some of this music stayed in me. Traditional 60’s Rock, 70’s Rock progressive and Metal, 80’s Alternative and Goth, 90’s Grunge and Industrial + on top of all this Electronic music. I was even into soundtrack at some point. I did a 2 years course on writing music to pictures and films and I have a diploma to prove it 🙂 + I released a few Electro-House tracks for a Dance label. So if you put all that in a pot and stir it you’ve got Richard K music.

What comes next for the band after the unleashing on Next Level?MR3

We have some very exciting gigs coming up in Manchester and London with Deadcell, the DARK7 festival in October; plus we are headlining the Cesspit in Sheffield and the ORKZ bar in Holland in November.

Thanks again for chatting with us, any last thoughts?

No problem you’re welcome. I just want to thank all the people who are supporting us, I really appreciate it!

And finally give us a sales pitch straight from the horse’s mouth for Next Level 🙂

Sales? What sales? Are bands selling music these days? 🙂 I’ll be happy if we can match our EP Activate your anger sales which was sold out with few hundreds copies of the CD sold (sorry I lost count about Downloads). Anyway if anyone wants to buy Next Level they can find it for download on all Digital Stores and on CD on our official website www.machinerox.com

http://machinerox.bandcamp.com

The review of Next Level coming soon…

Pete Ringmaster

The RingMaster Review

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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