Idols of Apathy – Unheard Words

IOA Promo

Unleashing a sonic cyclone of unwavering hostility and technical victimisation, Unheard Words the debut EP from UK metallers Idols of Apathy is one formidable and gripping slab of creative savagery. As striking as it is vicious, the release explains with ease why there is a healthily buzz brewing around the band. It is not without aspects which prevents it making an even more major impact but with a raging potential and openly impressive craft to its sound and textures, it is easy to raise excited anticipation of big things for the band ahead.

Hailing from Essex and uncaged in 2013, Idols Of Apathy probably could not have made a more attention grabbing assault on the senses to start off their consumption of the country’s senses than with Unheard Words. Five tracks across a fifteen minutes furnace of sound and aggression, the release is a short bludgeoning shock to the system but one which does leaving a lingering impression and hunger in thoughts and appetite. It certainly takes work to explore and reveal the intricacies and superb skilled invention at play, its thick surface similarity to an arguably formula attack of songs already having fallen short in the opinion of some others, but dive into the eye of the storm and that is where songs and Idols of Apathy excel and surprise.

The EP starts off with brief instrumental Rebirth, a piece which enthrals from its first seconds with a melancholic ambience and melodic wistfulness, soon graced further by a harmonic haunting. It seduces senses and imagination before Artworkthe staggered djent charm and tenacity of the guitars within viciously stabbing rhythms ravage the air. That initial mesmeric beauty still persists though as it settles seamlessly into the portentous tempest stirring ruggedly around it. That intimidating suggestion is swiftly realised with Death Row. The corrosive vocal roar of Jack Paul Dervish explodes in ears first, matched by the ferocious backing tones of Dean Chignell whose guitar, alongside those of Tom Johnson and Joe Gregory, collide in an ear splitting maelstrom of intensive and technical voracity. As much as the track seemingly is intent on annihilation of the senses, there is a swagger and a budding nest of grooves poised and hinting in the belly of the fury. It swiftly makes for an intriguing and riveting encounter, to which the returning melodic call from the instrumental adds a rich emotive hue . It is a stunning track which continues to reveal new corners and depths within its bestial rage; every breath and twist a punch and treat for ears but within a frame of less than three and a half minutes there is no time for excess and showing off, not that you ever feel the band has the urge to go into that kind of indulgence.

The dramatic and impressive encounter is backed up by the just as imposing The Devil’s Clock Tower. That earlier comment about similar touches of songs is evident here as the rhythmic and guitar enterprise bleeds into what came before without close attention, even with the evocative sonic coaxing in their midst. As it grows and digs deeper into its intensive heart though, the guitars sculpt an individual web of temptation whilst the bass of Elliot Black in league with the ear drum puncturing beats of drummer George, brutalise and seduce in equal measure as the vocals again provide a caustic challenge to sink teeth into. As all songs, it is not just about the maliciousness though, the atmospheric fire and melodic colour drenching the track being as provocative and imaginative as its inhospitable drive and passion.

The release is concluded by firstly Ventriloquist, a track which filters its predatory animosity through a maze of scything riffs and mouth-watering ideation. The rhythms refuse to have a veil of course, their crippling designs and hard fisted rabidity resourcefully vengeful and as irresistible as the sonic binding and aggravated riffery working away on the passions. It is a fine torturous confrontation which is matched by the closing Deceiver, which as the previous song comes from distant scenery but this time simply takes the senses in its teeth and musically and vocally flails and tears their security to shreds. It is a devastating onslaught with strangely a touch of Mudvayne to it initially before the track unleashes another creative blend of metalcore and technical metal to engross and violate ears. It is a powerful and viciously engaging protagonist bringing the EP to a potent end.

Unheard Words is a commanding and impressive debut which leaves thoughts in no doubt to the promise and quality of Idols of Apathy. For sure it has that to be honest minor issue of tracks sharing certain aspects of their identities and it is fair to say that their sound just now fails to really stand out against the best similarly styled, aggression clad bands pushing the genre. Idols of Apathy though easily stand in the company of most of that crop with all the potential to find their lone voice in the future with you imagine even more impressive endeavours.

The Unheard Words EP is available now as a free download @ http://idolsofapathy.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/IdolsOfApathy

8.5/10

RingMaster 25/07/2014

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Categories: EP, Music

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