Tina V – Cut The Tent

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Known as the vocalist/guitarist with the excellent UK rock band This Wicked Tongue, a quartet who released one of the best singles of 2013 in Mick Hucknall’s Hair, Tina V has stepped forward with her debut album to show a captivating diversity to her presence, songwriting, and invention. Consisting of ten tracks which employ essences of rock, electro, folk, pop and much more, Cut The Tent is an album which persistently dances and rocks, seduces and stirs up the senses. Most of all it is a proposition which irresistibly ignites the imagination and passions, an encounter set to thrust the lady into the keenest of spotlights you suspect.

Tina V, the performing name of Christina Maynard, is the founding member of This Wicked Tongue which began in 2010, not long after she had started performing solo. At the start the band beefed up her existing compositions before evolving into its own material to increasing attention and success with fans and media around the globe. Now Tina gives her solo side a sizeable airing and it is hard not to be thoroughly impressed and excited for her first offering. Recorded with Dave Draper (Spunge, Dodgy, Kerbdog), Cut The Tent follows her You Don’t Know Me EP of 2011, a release which it seems like us a great many missed, something you cannot see happening with the new album. The years between her solo offerings has seen This Wicked Tongue release a trio of increasingly acclaimed EPs as well as that triumph of a single, with Tina also engaging in numerous collaborations within styles from dubstep to classic rock. It is easy to suggest though that her finest hour to date is with Cut The Tent.

As soon as opening track Going Home embraces ears there is the feeling of a returning friend, the tones and potent voice of Tina as memorable and impressive as with her band but also with an immediately new and fresh twist and pledgeadventure. The first track cups the ear in thudding dulled beats and the harmonic beauty of Tina’s voice initially for a gentle caressing which grows through just as seductive harmonies as an electro seeded energy slowly but openly raises its head. Tina is soon unveiling the full lyrical narrative whilst adding a hint of fire to the encounter, a heat soon expelled forcibly with a melodic rock thrust of purposeful riffs and swiping rhythms. In full swing the track strides like a mix of dance music and gothic heavy rock, essences of Lacuna Coil seeping into the magnetic incitement for a rich and compelling start to the release.

You kind of assume from the track that you have an early handle of the album but those ideas are swiftly left floundering as the deliciously mischievous Feel Less steps in next. An acoustic punkish wipe of guitar makes the first suasion on ears before being swamped by a glorious jangle of guitars within a maze of melodic enterprise. This masterful weave intensifies as the song reaches deeper in thoughts and passions with its inventive endeavour, hooks and melodies a constant tango of broadly grinning revelry. It is pop rock at it very best with a puppeteer ability to make feet and passions dance to its every whim.

The title track comes next, agitated beats skirting Tina’s emotive tones with fuzz lent guitar lures adding evocative hues to the emerging melody sculpted canvas of emotion and elegance. With keys and harmonies adding their colour to the evolving scenery, a landscape which seamlessly punches with sinew bred steps or glides with stringed beauty, the song is a flame of dramatic melodic rock. It adds yet another facet to the character of the album as does the brilliantly bewitching Don’t Cry. A piano croon matched by additional keys makes the first breath of temptation before effect surfaced vocals trip eagerly between their evocative lines. It is a strong draw but it is when the song kicks off its shoes for a shuffle of fascinating almost devilish invention that it explodes to a new mesmeric plateau. Again rock and pop merge for a lasting suasion but equally flirtations of classical, melodic, and RnB to name just three of the flavours, add their tonic to the feisty aural wine.

The diversity keeps coming as first Could Have Saved and then First Born unveil their musically poetic ventures. The first of the two is a noir coloured captivation with pungent keys casting shadows over the vocal and musical drama brewing beneath. As intensive and sultry as it is sinisterly mysterious yet insatiably beautiful, the song is another pinnacle of the release. Its successor holds onto the tempered gothic feel as it casts its own melodic and provocative flame of sound and enterprise. A tide of irresistible harmonies and melodies veined by slight but spicy minimalistic intrigue from keys, the song engulfs the senses in a tenacious climate of sound.

The emotive balladry of And I’m Trying brings a warm breath over the senses, its body and charm epically potent but lacking the spark which ignited earlier songs whilst Golden provides another punchy pop rock canter with just a hint of country seeding. It also fails to meet the high demands implanted by its predecessors but still engages feet and emotions in a catchy and hunger feeding romp, both tracks continuing to push the album deeper into a lustful appetite.

The electro fuelled, eighties synth rock sprayed Tomorrow Comes ignites body and emotions fully again, its fire hot pop romping impossible to resist, even though it flirts with the mainstream area of the genre more than liked. To be fair though with bold rhythms and those ever commanding vocals, submission is inevitable with the track leaving a thick dose of pleasure in its wake which the closing ballad I Watch The Sunrise brings a hypnotic sunset to. With keys and Tina’s voice transfixing, the song is a final hug for thoughts and emotions, and a masterful end to a thrilling release.

If you are expecting something similar to This Wicked Tongue then you will be given much to eagerly devour, but a whole lot more varied ingenuity and enthralling invention to bask in. Cut The Intent is a masterpiece of melodic and unexpected adventure, and Tina V a presence, in whichever side of her creativity she offers, we will be increasingly pleasured by you can only suspect.

Cut The Tent is released on July 21st with the first single from the album, And I’m Trying available now.

http://www.tinaveronica.com/

http://www.thiswickedtongue.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Godflesh – Decline & Fall

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There are some bands you always find a soft spot for in the vast ranks of likes and thrilling encounters which accost the senses and imagination over a lifetime, and Godflesh is one of the most impacting and self-sustaining examples. The prime provocateurs of not only industrial but metal full-stop, the band even in the few years they were ‘AWOL’, continued to incite and inspire personally and emerging propositions, their influence constantly openly audible in new bands and sounds. Now the UK band has unleashed its first new material in 13 years through the carnivorous ear seduction of the Decline & Fall EP. Birmingham duo Justin Broadrick (Jesu, Palesketcher, Final) and GC Green has twisted the richness of their early sounds with the experiment intrusiveness of latter inventions to give birth to an exhaustingly primal and vindictively fresh predator. The four tracks making up the release are ravenous tempests of industrial toxicity, metallic hostility, and punk rabidity, a brew which simply steals the passions just as the band has done so many times before.

Also acting as a potent teaser for the band’s new album A World Lit Only By Fire, due out this Autumn, Decline And Fall as well as rigorously casting out a new net of virulently antagonistic enticement also holds a nostalgic strain of bait most notably in opening track Ringer. As well as unearthing past memories of the band’s earlier forages into the psyche there is a raw but definite early Killing Joke repetitious tone and bait to its carnal charm. A sonic wash disturbs ears first, brewing up a portentous air which heavily cascading rhythms and bestial riffs pounce upon with greedy ferocity. The beats stamp with a military like enmity and precision whilst the bass of Green brings arguably it’s most primal and tenacious malignancy of sound yet. It is a delicious and glorious savaging which prowls imperiously alongside the feverishly caustic scrubs of guitar and the loathing fuelled monotones of Broadrick, the years having seemingly only increased his scornfully raw and imposing tones. The track is pure primal evil, a contagious tension soaked malice to devour greedily.

The following Dogbite immediately infest ears and psyche with sonic squalls which seductively sway with wanton designs whilst the bass brings its own salacious swagger to the emerging animus. The track has its own unrelenting gait to its predecessor but equally suffocates and consumes with a base fury which resourcefully blazes with cold flames. Repetition is one of the most instinctive addictive tools in music, along with discord, and there are few who can swing that bait so potently and seductively as Godflesh. The track crawls over thoughts and emotions with the gnawing patience of a dog, every chewing snarl and intensive lick of sonic persistence an irresistible incitement.

As impressive as the EP is to this point, it touches perfection with Playing With Fire. The track is simply an inescapable epidemic, its harsher industrial climate and alienating sonic web pure destructive and addiction spawning manna. We mentioned new bands being influenced by the duo but here alone you equally know and recognise the well which the likes of bands such as Fear Factory and Prong drank inspirationally. That mentioned discord is a passion igniting flavouring around the vocals whilst again bass and rhythms frame the maelstrom of sonic vendetta and enterprise with sheer grudge clad might.

The title track brings the release to a close, its viscous feud of sound a corrosive abrasing sculpted into another magnetically inspiring and senses grinding, almost cathartic challenge. The least dramatic in its attack and incessant in its confrontation, the track is the most inventively tangled weave of fascination on the EP but also the least gripping, though to be fair it still chains imagination and ardour drenched passions without mercy.

If the Decline & Fall EP is a hint of the album to come we are in for something special once again from Godflesh. We admit we might have a slightly blinkered appetite for the band and their sounds over the years but it cannot disguise the impressive and blistering might of the new release, or the impatient anticipation of the impending full-length.

The Decline & Fall EP is available on Avalanche Recordings now and @ http://godflesh1.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Justin-K-Broadrick/118373041529126

9.5/10

RingMaster 11/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Bjarm – Imminence

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Listening to Imminence, the debut album from Russian symphonic death/black metallers Bjarm, is like standing in the middle of two separate but merging dramatic climates. Walking the line between beauty and savagery, both extremes embracing each other for a tumultuous ravenous tempest, imagination and emotions are buffeted and stripped raw yet simultaneously seduced and exposed to gloriously epic and invigorating ambiences. The release is an enthralling and intimidating journey, a treacherous and at times disorientating conflict but dramatically compulsive and rewarding.

The Severodvinsk band was formed in the early months of 2009, taking its name from a territory mentioned in Norse legends and tales. The following year saw their demo Defect released, live shows, and subsequently as the next year fell changes in personnel before the band settled down to work on their first album. Self-produced, the Pavel Korotaev mixed and Tony Lindgren (Paradise Lost, Kreator) mastered album was recorded last year and has emerged as a striking and potent introduction to the impressive band.

The scene and atmosphere is imposingly set by opener Approaching of the Close, an instrumental with the charmed harmonies of angels and portentous intimidation of war. It is an epically rising portrait of the time and land Bjarm-Imminence Cover Arttheming the release, every scenic exposure caressed by orchestral beauty and dark shadows within predacious climates. Though it does not come with many surprises in its cinematic grandeur, the track grips attention ready for the opening clutches of Knowledge of Doom. Riffs rub invitingly on ears first whilst the symphonic lure of keys swirl with melodic intrigue, both swiftly joined by pungent rhythmic strikes and the throaty rapaciousness of the bass. The track expands its magnetic narrative musically with increasing washes of keys and threatening intensity whilst lyrically hoarse guttural vocals unveil the blackened premise. With siren-esque harmonies gliding overhead the track embraces and violates in equal measure for a formidable and increasingly impacting suasion. The twists do not slow, captivating female vocals laying elegant melodic hands on ears whilst intensity and provocation laps at the senses with sea like relentlessness.

It is an impressive track matched by the heavyweight presence of Ominous Dreams. Rumbles of doomy beats and brewing antagonistic air smothers ears first before keys and guitars cast a web of ill-boding enterprise. It is a strong entrance but the song really gathers pace and riveting invention with a contagiously predatory groove which emerges and the following raw rabidity which fuels a twist in vocals and the sonic toxicity expelled. The mix is insatiable in its voracious intent and merciless attraction, permeating every pore and thought as does the evolving symphonic radiance and melodically rich hues which crowd in later dripping expressive beauty. The track bewitches across its traumatic and thoroughly rewarding landscape before making way for the equally menacing and fascinating enticement of The Nine Worlds. As across the whole release, the listener is thrust into the heart of brutal intent and transfixing melodic romance, the track a battlefield for tenebrous depths and intent with golden hope and enchantment accentuated by again stunning female tones.

Fire Lord’s Torment comes next to make a strong and imagination sparking incitement but despite its skilfully crafted invention and powerfully sculpted textures fails to invite the same strength of passion and hunger for its accomplished offering as other songs, the same slip found by the instrumental title track straight after. Both tracks leave ears and thoughts alive and keen to explore more but fail to leave a lingering and deep rooted impression in their company or after, something the mouth-watering Oracle does not have a problem with. From a deliciously captivating acoustic and melodic coaxing with rising breezes of keys courted by sinew built rhythms, the song sways and immerses senses and emotions in a superbly evocative and spellbinding serenade of sound. Admittedly the caustic vocal scowls which are at odds to the seducing take time to accept but as the song continues to cast its binding spell on the emotions they become a strong texture to the siren song.

Both Secret of the Immortals and The Highest Hall keep the by now greedier appetite for the encounter well fed, the first a provocateur with thrashing swipes of riffs and rhythms aligned to a concentrated charge of intensity. It is a rolling adventure striking out from the poetically smothering melodic breath of keys which also soak the start, an emprise given greater infectious toxins by the great female vocals; something not used enough on the album, as well as unpredictable stabs and scythes of guitar imagination. The second of the two is as primal and brutal as it is rigorously compelling and masterfully incendiary, thanks again to melodies and a female croon. It is a bestial predator at times and a comforting mother’s breast in others, a torment suffocating and strangling hope tempered by the peace and security of instinctive beauty.

Imminence is closed by Tree on the Bones, a threatening and skilled fury to consume the senses but lacking that fuse to full lustful reactions, even though it creates arguably the most intricate and emotion involving proposition on the album. Bjarm has created a striking and at times startling entrance into the world of metal, with only the fact that many tracks are swiftly gone from memory and thoughts once leaving the ears. Nevertheless it is a potential loaded and thrilling incitement to suggest the Russians have a rather healthy future.

Imminence is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/ru/album/imminence/id889323814

http://www.facebook.com/bjarmofficial

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com