Insane Prototype – These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything

IP

Hailing out of Pokrov in Russia, Insane Prototype is a band still cloaked by shadows from world attention but if they continue producing releases as enjoyable and potential strapped as their latest album These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything, it is easy to suspect that a wider recognition is on the horizon. Brimming with creative intrigue and eclectic sounds sculpted into a dark voracious fusion of rock and metal, the release is a potent wake-up call to a band which is still evolving its presence you feel but well on the way to making a loud statement for the wider scene to hear.

Insane Prototype was formed in 2012 by Dmitry Kalinin, the founder of Russian electronic band The Phase, and guitarist Andrei Knyazev. Working on songs written and recorded by Kalinin previously, the pair was soon recording These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything. Since its release the seven track encounter has drawn strong responses and not only in their homeland, its touch impressing and persuading media and new fans further afield. With a full line-up now in place, the band has been earning similarly strong reactions with their live performances, whilst their album continues to make a potent base camp for the next propositions the band is currently working on.

An ambient haze is soon in the arms of a melancholic caress of dark strings as opener Interlude N3 sets up the release. It is an immediately evocative incitement, violins and cello casting a richly emotive embrace to which short Coverabrasing scrubs of guitar and restrained yet intimidating rhythms add their voice. An emerging epic breath blends with the portentous air of the orchestral incitement, the instrumental making an appealing but deceptive start with bred expectations of a blackened or symphonic proposition swiftly set straight with the appearance of Void Reflection. Keen rhythms rap on ears first, quickly joined by the expressive tones of Kalinin which spear themselves with savage roars simultaneously matched by sound. Soon settling into a controlled stroll with jangling riffs and firm beats, the track lays a canvas of nu-metal and melodic rock to which expulsions of aggression and intensity unleash their welcome bait. The song is a solid and captivating encounter, not one to light a fire but with plenty to hold attention tight whilst coaxing out a keen appetite for the forthcoming tracks.

That eagerness is soon fed a healthy dose of invention with Broken Blues, a track which glides in on a sultry flume of sonic enticement and low mellow vocals. With the black velvet tones of bass and again sinew built rhythms making their own slow seduction, the song provides a humid weave of intrigue with a Palms like emotional resonance within a Helldorado coloured ambience. The track smoulders in presence and persuasion, growing in weight and riveting expression across its length and over each taking of its compelling flight. Adding discord kissed keys, blasts of tainted brass, and cloudy washes of guitar, it is an enthralling investigation.

   Demons Of The Past is a different kind of beast, carnivorous riffs caustically gripping ears from the start as punchy rhythms descend on the senses. The track is soon crowding in with greater ferocity through varied vocal intent aligned to a similarly flavoursome and resourceful sonic web of design and intimidation. The track is a demanding and predacious tempest but also offering a seductive croon which simply ignites the imagination, essences of Korn and Nine Inch Nails spicing up the creative blaze. It is a richly textured weave which is taken to greater success and heights by the next up Prey To Passion. Every flirtatious sonic grimace and rapacious toxin of its predecessor is intensified within the instantly predatory encounter. Grooves entwine venomously around ears from the first second of the song, their irresistible grouchy lure emulated and enhanced by the slow Deftones like crawl of vocals and bass tempting. It is a primal enticement which devours the passions, tightening its grip as flames of melodic hues and mellow breath cross the senses. The best track on the album, it simply bewitches and tantalises with a carnally bred beauty.

Another dip into a Korn like tenacity and invention boils contagiously within Things That Overcome, its combination of bruising voracity and melodically driven sonic fire a magnetic persistence which is unrelenting in its solicitous charm and instinctive consumption of the senses. It is a masterful blend which in some ways never goes far enough in either extreme, the song lacking the bravery to go for the jugular or to truly romance the passions. Nevertheless it is an outstanding trigger for the imagination which is not quite matched by the more regular rock spawned closing song, Great Illusion. As the previous track it twists and flares up with hostile intent and ferocious enterprise around concentrated passages of melodic and merciful sonic temptation, making a thrilling proposition but it lacks the bite and sharpness of other songs to quite grace the same heights.

Overall These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything is a hugely impressing introduction from a band easy to see at some point becoming a boldly noticeable presence outside of their local landscape. Insane Prototype is a name to watch out for starting with this fine release.

These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything is available now @ http://insaneprototype.bandcamp.com/album/these-seven-words-do-not-mean-anything

http://insaneprototype.com/

8/10

RingMaster 10/07/2014

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Categories: Album, Music

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