Post Adolescence – Goodbye from the Future

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As impressive a debut and introduction that it was, the album My Nothing from US pop rockers Post Adolescence was as much potential as it was substance. Certainly the release opened up a fresh world from the band to be explored which in turn welcomed a soaking of deserved attention from certainly the underground media. It easily awoke a keen appetite in fans too for its fusion of Brit pop, post punk, and fiery melodic rock; the band finding themselves regulars on underground radio shows including ours. You can only feel though that what came before will pale against the response to the band’s recently released second album Goodbye from the Future, an encounter which realises all the promise of its predecessor and so much more. Consisting of seven thumping incitements it ripples with a maturity and confidence which leaves anything else the band has offered in the shade, offering pop infused rock ‘n’ roll of the highest compelling order to bring another sparkling highlight in the year.

The Seattle quartet seem to have taken time to hone and explore their already captivating sound over the four years between releases, resulting in as stated that maturer craft and invention to their virulent contagiousness described as songs. Formed around 2008, the band employed influences from the likes of Placebo, Manic Street Preachers, Ash, Buzzcocks, and Suede into their own imaginative songwriting and the new release again openly shows their inspirations but within a more distinctive voice to their sound. Led by the ever emotive and passionate tones of guitarist Johnny Straube, his Brian Molko like vocal warble nestling even more comfortably within the resourceful landscape of colourful sound crafted by his stringed prowess alongside the equally impressive skills of guitarist/keyboardist Adrian Garver, drummer Brian McCrossen, and bassist Gar Hooker (who since the album recording has left to be replaced by  Siobhan McCloskey), Post Adolescence has grown into a aggressively potent protagonist for ears and imagination. There is a new spark and flame to the band, and a fiercer almost punk like energy which gives life to each song as evidenced from the first moment.

Opener Asexual takes mere seconds to intrigue and stoke up an eager appetite as its initial blaze of caustic guitar comes with almost Post Adolescence - Goodbye from the Future Album Artbrawling like intent. The immediate urgency kicks up another gear as thumping rhythms batter the ear and riffs lick their lips with stronger intensity. With infectious twists and hooks playing around the distinctive vocals of Straube, the track continues to stomp with punk mischief before throwing in another curveball through a mouthwatering lure of magnetic electro inspired keys. Additional discord and warped melodies also flavour its unrelenting stride as the song makes a brilliant start to the release, an incendiary fuse to inventive revelry to come.

The following Everybody’s Sober Nowadays is given a big task to match its predecessor but it does so with individual ease, its more controlled attack and purposeful lyrical incitement swiftly captivating thoughts as keys and guitars cast a creative web to take care of ears. The song has a thick body of sound but each element is allowed clarity to add their light and shadows, the bass of McCloskey especially an appealing cloud against the more constrained rhythms of McCrossen and the fire pit of sonic endeavour and melodic intrigue offered by guitars and keys. Melancholic with the heaviest shadows, it continues the impressive flight of the album before making way for the title track where a caress of guitar coats ears first before the bass roams emotively around the emerging melodic and vocal narrative. The strongly appealing song is a tender and reflective proposition which, as all songs, is unafraid to open up its lyrical heart and show it is looking ahead with hope from within darker corners, evidencing a description of the album by Straube, “Goodbye from the Future is a final word to all the relationships from past songs, a message that won’t occupy his thoughts anymore. It’s about moving on.”

Recent single Hindsight steps up next, instantly treating ears to an electronic web as Straube’s voice opens the entrance to another sinewed proposition of honest riffs and mesmeric melodies within a raucously catchy embrace. As with the music there is a richer antagonistic edge to his delivery which brings a new potent character to sound and songs, whilst in this particular romp a devilish pop punk element is at large to create a presence which swings somewhere between Top Buzzer and Fall Out Boy. It is a masterful persuasion which ripples with ingenuity; swiping hooks, seductive harmonies, and raw passion all adding to the tenacious triumph.

The defiance soaked Fuck Off strolls in next, its tidy and keen gait making another swift persuasion if without sparking the same depth of passion for its bounty as other songs on the release. Once again there is a noticeable pop punk/power pop element to the easily pleasing stomp, a song which goes without the originality which marks the rest of the proposition and marks out the delicious Blindsighted. To be honest there is a familiarity to the glorious breeze of melodic seducing with envelops imagination and emotions too, but it only brings richer spice to the synth pop spawned beauty. It is a fascinating and irresistible weave of evocative melodic colours and sonically sculpted hues within a spellbinding web of bracing textures and mellow elegance. The best song on Goodbye from the Future it almost alone shows the new plateau Post Adolescence walks.

The album is concluded with What You Would Call Socialism (I Would Call Civilization), a final emotionally anthemic, musically enthralling dance to spark another wave of unbridled satisfaction. A sturdy yet radiant adventure with more of the unpredictable and eagerly bristling invention which has emerged in the band’s song writing and sound, the track is an exciting finale to a thoroughly impressive and thrilling release. Post Adolescence has graduated from a strong enjoyment into a mouthwatering and breath-taking proposition; it was on the cards with their first album but expectations have been left looking pretty feeble by the brilliance of Goodbye from the Future, and you still feel it is only a step in something even greater to come.

Goodbye from the Future is available now @ http://postadolescence.bandcamp.com/album/goodbye-from-the-future

http://www.postadolescence.com/

9/10

RingMaster 18/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Categories: Album, Music

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