Dog Company – War Stories

CAD002_vinyl_cover_art_final

Continuing the recent trend of punk rock throwing up some real treats we have another from you in the mighty shape of War Stories from US punks Dog Company. Stomping with eight massively virulent anthems, the album is a feisty protagonist of thoughts and passions, a fusion of old school punk and Oi! with additional twangs which is quite simply essential punk ‘n’ roll. The release celebrates the ten year anniversary of the band and the Dallas quartet could not have sculpted a stronger revelry to mark its moment.

Formed in 2004 and including members from Dallas punk bands The Staggers, Wayward Boy, and Dryline, Dog Company has been a persistent source of inciting political lyrical antagonism and rigorously invigorating sounds. It is a proposition which is thrillingly lean and direct as well as passionate in its intent and invention. Steering well away from the mediocrity and excesses the genre can sometimes indulge in, vocalist/rhythm guitarist Joe Blow (ex-Staggers/Riot Squad) leading the way from day one, the band soon earned a passionate and loyal fanbase. The album Songs of Discontent in 2008 drew certain spotlight upon their emergence which the acclaimed A Bullet for Every Lie two years later reinforced and pushed further. Live the band has equally impressed and constantly roused passions headlining and sharing stages with bands such as Street Dogs, Flatfoot 56, Lower Class Brats, The Briefs, Vice Squad, Agnostic Front, The Business, and Subhumans. War Stories though is the band at its mightiest and the perfect way to signpost their anniversary whilst surely recruiting an even greater horde of fans.

With lead guitarist Garrett Chapman, bassist Shea Close, and drummer Mick alongside Blow, Dog Company declare the rebel within its presence and southern kissed sound with a pleasing intro before the first irresistible contagion Elected Enemy hits the sweet spot. The track immediately sizes ears up with strikes of guitar and thumping rhythms which already are driven by the need to shape an anthem. It is a magnetic entrance which refuses to lose its potency as the song settles into an easy stride, guitars sending out twanging grooves and sonic colour to skirt the just as straightforward and appealing vocals of Blow, aided at times by both Chapman and Close. Feet are soon enslaved by the urgency and rhythmic bait of the song whilst imagination is coaxed into action by the lyrical narrative and heated guitar endeavour.

The captivating start is swiftly matched by the storming charge of For Our Friends, that earlier contagion taken to a new thrilling toxicity. The guitar craft of Chapman lights up the rapacious eagerness of the song, enterprise drizzling over and veining the riotous canvas and breath-taking stomp careering skilfully over its surface. Like a mix of The Clash in their early days and Flogging Molly, the song is insatiable in rousing emotions and thoughts whilst breeding an even greater flush of hunger and rapture for the album with its commanding presence.

Both Printed Word and Battle Fatigue keep the exhaustive pleasure flowing, the first a punchy and incendiary offering which again has limbs and emotions submissive to the catchy bait laid before them. As with most songs, the track feels like a friend before it has even completed its first suasion, a familiarity that is present but undefined in the fresh presentation and invention of Dog Company. The song’s successor entwines delicious sonic grooves around the ears straight away; a Buzzcocks like venom fuelled their enticement before the song provides a raw and wholly persuasive brew of riffs and rhythms ridden by again a lyrically challenging and vocally recruiting theme. The jagged scrub of riffs across the song only adds to the impossibly addictive nature of the track whilst the sonic croon of guitar simply adds coal to satisfaction’s fire.

Rhythms announce Combat Zone just how you would expect and hope they would, their military bearing the lead into a bracing blues seeping rock ‘n’ roll storm before Not Dead Yet brings its defiance, musically and vocally to bear on the eager passions. Again it is one to have the listener bursting in on its territory with voice and body, the song irresistible with its roving bass lines, battling rhythms, and sonic lures. As shown by the song as an example, Dog Company looks at issues and comments in a way all can relate to without ramming it down throats. Like the music Blow delivers the song’s heart with a forceful but undemanding swagger aligned to a fun built relish which ensures a good time for all comes hand in hand with the intent.

The album closes on the ridiculously contagious Last Call and the similarly epidemically driven and succeeding Can’t Keep Me Down, both tracks slabs of rock which brawl and seduce with an instinctive understanding of what makes the passions tick. Looking for something to temper our enthusiasm for War Stories proved fruitless with only the fact the release is sparse on major originality though definitely not short on invention, enterprise, and most of all passion. The album is one of the best punk records this year so far and if memory serves across the last too.

War Stories is available now via Cadre Records and Rebel Sound Music on CD and various 10” vinyl options.

https://www.facebook.com/dogcompany

9/10

RingMaster 02/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Herod -They Were None

Herod 10

An encounter and experience which permeates senses and imagination with a ravenous and intense emotional hunger, They Were None is a dramatic and merciless introduction to Swiss post hardcore band Herod. Their debut is a leviathan of weight and intrusive endeavour, a dark and stark tempest of voracious atmospheres and inescapable intensity examining every pore, thought, and emotion. It is at times a testing and exacting encounter but one which is as rigorously compelling as it is intrusively predacious.

Herod was initially the solo project of guitarist/bassist Pierre Carroz which came to life in 2006. Holed up in Malmø in an isolated studio apartment, he began creating and merging dark and depressing riffs with his baritone guitar, recording them on an old 4-track recorder. Taking inspiration from the cold and desolate Swedish climate he returned back to Switzerland where in 2011 he met former Twisted drummer Fabien Vodoz and A Fine Day to Exit vocalist David Glassey. Uniting to form Herod, the trio worked the already bred ideas of Carroz into new songs, tracks which would come to make up their impressive debut They Were None. Recorded in 2012 with producer Julien Fehlmann (The Ocean, Coilguns, Unfold) and mastered by Svante Försback (Volbeat, Rammstein), the album has emerged as a devastating proposition soaked in destructive beauty and venomous enterprise. It is an uncompromising and often punishing incitement brewing a consumption of sludge, hardcore and progressive metal which instantly thrusts Herd, with a line-up completed by guitarist Bertrand Pot, into an immense spotlight.

The album opens with The Fall and within seconds is smothering the senses in a thick cloud of sonic suggestion and heavily weighted Herod Artwork 1breath. Its intimidating expansion begins as a distant squall but is soon immersing ears and beyond in a rapacious caress. The guitars cast a portentous and immediately menacing toxicity, crisp rhythms and sinewed throaty riffs spearing and veining its malevolent air to further engage and twist the psyche as the track’s exhaustive narrative unfurls lyrically and emotionally. It is a murderous encounter but irresistibly captivating especially with the brief escape of clean vocals and its entwining melodically bred sonic web; thoughts of Converge meets Cult Of Luna whispering in thoughts as the song invades further.

It is an attention capturing appetite igniting ten minutes immediately matched and pushed further by Glory North and then Inner Peace. The first roars at and contests with ears from start to finish whilst employing further unpredictable and enthralling twists of vocal diversity, a restrained passage of emotive design, and predatory imagination. Essences of Meshuggah add to the carnivorous qualities of the throaty guitar and even darker bass as the track persistently breeds fearsome yet seductive bait to its persuasion. The second of the two is even more dangerous, its more controlled gait adding menace to the intensive manhandling of thoughts and emotions by the of song’s voracity and that of its individual elements. It is a suffocating proposition but as the previous songs is swamped in rewarding violations and ingenuity.

A melodic entrance with a hypnotic percussive accompaniment instantly makes the following Northern Lights a virulently appetising proposition, the bestial gnawing in the background sparking encroaching shadows around the elegant seduction flirting with ears and imagination. The beauty of the scenery continues to call even when the track unleashes its barbarous wash of domineering rhythms and corrosive riffing; the track a brutal yet warm temptation exposing further the outstanding songwriting and composing of the band. In the hands of others the song could be just an overpowering slab of hostility but Herod sculpts it to be certainly uncontrollably demanding but also the enabler for the imagination to explore its canvas and textures.

From the sinister and immersive instrumental Sad Hill Part I, the pair of Albert Fish and We Are the Failure expose the weaknesses of emotions, exploring and pushing the limits of their and the listeners fears. The first is a ruinous concentration of coarse vocals and riff spawned rabidity which initially has assumptions expecting a primal storm throughout but the veining of sonic tempting and angst clad expression to the vocals ensures another engrossing premise, if one lacking the adventure and lures of previous songs. Its successor though is another matter, the track a melancholic proposal which from its sombre opening melodies soars into the passions with the heavy lipped dark tones of Glassey, his clean vocals merely hinted at on other songs, given full rein to immediately impress. He is not the strongest singer in that style but with such passion and expression to every squeezed syllable he is magnetic. The track itself is a helter skelter of angst bedded voracity and enslaving metallic design, every note and thought a glorious trap.

Through the bordering on savage aural protestations of Betraying Satan, captious rhythms and guitars spiteful intrigue to the tempestuous vocals and sonically laced grooves, and the rigorously erosive Watch ‘em Die, the album continues to exhaust and impress whilst the excellent No Forgiveness For Vultures moves from a heavily soaking persuasion into a mouthwatering maze of unpredictable riffs, persistently twisting invention, and biting yet composed rhythms. With the dramatic final instrumental Sad Hill Part II concluding the release, They Were None proves itself to be not only a masterful debut but an immensely exciting one. Herod has announced its arrival in a strenuously impressive way, one which is still increasing its potency with every brave immersion into its depths.

They Were None is available now @ http://herod.bandcamp.com/album/they-were-none

www.herodnoise.ch

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

 

Erotic Market – Blahblahrians

©narcissenoyé

©narcissenoyé

With a name like Erotic Market you automatically expect and definitely hope to get something spicy from their album Blahblahrians and we can joyfully say that you do. The album is a fruity adventure of sound and imagination, quite simply a refreshing kaleidoscope of electronic mischief, vocal intrigue, and sonic ingenuity. There are times where the band finds more success with their riveting conjurations then in other moments but from start to finish the album is an excitingly unpredictable and invigorating exploration to capture the passions.

Erotic Market is the French duo of Marine Pellegrini and Lucas Garnier, the two forming the band in 2012. The pair has been making music for over a decade playing in contemporary jazz bands and has already worked on a project together called N’Relax, which across three years released two studio albums and undertook numerous tours. Describing Erotic Market’s sound is difficult at the best of times but undoubtedly flavours such as hip hop, psyche and noise rock, quirky electronic pop, and at times garage rock colour the cryptic canvas the band casts over the senses. Blahblahrians is as seductive as it is disorientating, as instinctively magnetic as it is bewildering, and ultimately an irresistible experiment to embrace and devour with greed.

The album immediately flirts with the imagination through opener Retro retardo, a mix of Morningwood and The Ting Tings meets em coverThe Knife. Resonating beats hit the senses first, awakening attention for the sharp appealing vocals of Pellegrini amidst percussive and sonic spatterings. It is an instant temptation sparking a hungry appetite in the emotions, a greed fed and inflamed by the expanding smog of electronic toxicity and exotic hues of electro teasing offered. There is a punk essence to the vocals and a j-rock whisper to the sounds at times which only increases the flavoursome presence of the animatingly mesmeric encounter.

The following I want to be some booty continues the potent emergence of the album, its smouldering and subtly sultry climate the surface for a minimalistic breeze of empowering seduction. Like its predecessor the song weaves and sways around the listener even if it is with restraint to its energy though it counters by sharing an irresistible potency to match the first.

Two songs in and diversity is an open roar and hopes that its continues are soon satisfied by Bitchy muses and Blah blah, the first fusing a pleasingly shallow breeze of hip hop bred vocals with climactic keys and tribal rhythms, both aspects skirting rather than imposing on ears and the delivery of Pellegrini. Again it is an appealing uncluttered premise precisely spotted with aural colours which voices launch their suasion over, a delicious siren of sound bringing danger through the increasingly heavier involvement of primal beats. Its successor is an enchanting slice of electro pop, though as already expected it comes through ever twisting manipulations of sounds and ideation. The track ebbs and flows with its melodic breast; breathing captivation and fascination with every rise and swell of its contagious narrative. There are times where you feel the legacy of bands like The Slits and Rip, Rig and Panic in the song and album to be honest, all adding refreshing spice to the ingenious recipe.

Pellegrini croons and smothers the ears in vocal elegance and glory to bring Blue blue into view next and such her charm and quality it would be easy and very satisfying to listen to her swarming over the senses alone for the remainder of the track. Instead evocative and heated keys bring their dramatic caresses and incisive inventive flames to enlarge and intensify her declaration. It is a gloriously smooching fire with Pellegrini quite scintillating and is replaced by the just as tantalising if wholly different psyche spawned DDDDrunk. It opens with smokey vocals and an ascending spotting of sonics which can only be described as Devo-esque. That alone steals a rabid rapture and when added to a barren but compelling and rigorously intriguing landscape of imagination and enterprise, the proposal is as bamboozling as it is invigorating, especially with its fiery scuzz infused climax.

She –ass provides twenty seconds of tempting sound but leaves before it can make any real impression and imprint on thoughts, and truthfully is soon forgotten when Snakes writhes and winds its engrossing techno lent electro maelstrom of adventure around the body. It is a sensational psychotic dance of prowling beats, electronic innovation, and carnal seduction; an exhilarating brew which simply increases its power and toxins across its vivaciously thrilling body, the vocals similarly catching fire towards a rigorously fertile finale. Easily the best track on the album, which shows how immense it is with the pack of triumphs around; it alone reveals the might and potential of the duo. In many ways the album struggles from here on to compete with its highest pinnacle though the vigorously resourceful Are U cool? and the bewitching It’s a breaking both entrance ears and imagination whilst Clitacasm brings one minute of racy and sensual tempting which is brief but sonically amorous.

The slow groove infested Societoy provides a last temptress for heart and mind, its predatory gait clad in a stirring and innovative design of melodic and rhythmic incitement honed into a warm embrace of electro adventure. The song feels like the real end to the album though it is followed by Weird arabic stuff which we have to be honest we could not get or find any peace with and a remix of It’s a breaking by Everyday. It is decent enough but from a promising start evolves into the expected direction and sound so many re-mixes bring to songs no matter the original’s uniqueness. Nevertheless neither can defuse the brilliance of Blahblahrians. Erotic Market is band which was unknown to us before this release but now is a permanent feature of thoughts and acclaim, something we suspect will be emulated torrentially as the album envelops the world.

Blahblahrians is available via Jarring Effects now!

https://www.facebook.com/EroticMarket

9.5/10

RingMaster 02/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com