Trioxin Cherry – Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space

TC Photo by Holly Monroe

The excellent Hell To Pay EP in 2012 more than suggested that its creators had the potential to make a big mark on the UK punk scene but Trioxin Cherry go far beyond making a mere potent impression with their debut album, unleashing one of the real treats of the year so far. Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is a virulent contagion of rock ‘n’ roll, a brew of garage and horror punk which sculpts its own identity whilst insatiably working on senses and passions. Carrying hooks like a gunslinger and grooves like a nocturnal temptress, the release is punk at its riotous inventive best.

The Nottingham bred trio as mentioned made their first sizeable impression with their Hell To Pay EP, a raw and magnetic five track release which stirred up eager attention and support for the line-up of guitarist/vocalist Rebecca Campbell, bassist/vocalist Pete Grady, and Ryan Murphy on drums. Their two song contribution to the Chainsaw Ballads split with Thirteen Shots and Razing Hell only cemented their promise and an eager appetite for their presence and sound. The releases certainly hinted at the possibility of big things ahead from the band but may be not to the extent offered by Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space or certainly as soon as its release. Since the recording of the album Murphy has departed the band to be replaced by Nathan Hart but he has left being part of a massive breakthrough and step for Trioxin Cherry.

The raw energy and intent of the previous releases has been retained in the new album but honed into a concentrated and clear proposition TC cover which simply ignites ears through to passions from first track to last. After a Japanese spoken intro, opener Baka Manko thrills and catches the imagination by surprise. Also sung in the oriental language, the song bursts into view like a robust caped crusader, muscles flexing and energy brewing for a riot. Riffs stride purposefully and rhythms stomp with crisp sinews but not for the last time it is the bass adding the danger to the character of the song. It has a grizzled throat to its prowl, a gnarly air which is infectiously toxic alongside the similarly virulent riffs and soon to charge vocal declarations. As to what the song is about who knows, but it matters not as the romp is irresistible and an open call to feet and imagination to climb on board with the awaiting rampage.

The brilliant Fly, Bill Murray! steps up next, riding on a rigid spine of grooves from bass and guitar punctured by again firm rhythms. It is a composed yet hungry stroll of rock with nostrils flaring in its intensity and inventive chorus. The song sees the band just as keen to twists vocals and harmonies as they are their sound, but never taking its foot off of its anthemic potency as it roars and badgers as a fiery climax comes into view before making way for the equally voracious Psycho Killer. Campbell takes little time to unleash a masterful howl as the new track establishes a predacious stalking of the senses, guitars climbing over ears with hungry riffs as the bass again bringing a bestial growl to the scenery. Caged by a similarly intimidating stroke from the drums, the song crowds and pressures the senses until submission is inevitable, wiry hooks and that grizzled bass temptation only adding to the addictive lure with Campbell’s vocals the icing on the bloody cake.

It is a massive start to the album which only builds and seduces the further you go, Good Day To Die the next triumph in line to steal the passions. Campbell brings her Fay Fife like tones out for the song, backed by some great vocal shadows from the band. The track is a real predator, lurching and glaring with withering riffs beside antagonistic rhythms, but it is the glorious twisted surf rock toxicity of the emerging groove which is the most venomous and scintillating temptation and helps send the track to the top of the pile.

Both the melodically sinister Wrong Turn and Let’s Take Off continue the slavery of thoughts and emotions, the first a blaze of discord kissed sonics and pacey beats lorded over by the ever fine tones of Campbell and plays like the result of a demonic act between The Rezillos and The Duel. The second of the pair launches from another deliciously primal bass sound, guitars soon replicating its lure in their own colours. The song swings and saunters belligerently as it gives the kiss of death to the world below, adding its rapacious stomp to the dust.

A reworked version of the acclaimed title track from the band’s EP comes next, Hell To Pay crafted into an even stronger and irresistible enticement than before. Cored by a sultry groove which worms under the skin within seconds, the bass again providing its own addictive dark poison, the song manages to brew richer hues and darker corners to it’s just as epidemically contagious incitement, a success matched by another revisit to a track from the previous release, Hit Me. This track again develops new toxins and depths to its original premise but also an even greater aggression to its defiant spite and avenging intrigue. With another groove which simply winds so tight around the passions that lust bleeds from pores, the track is quite magnificent and with the previously mentioned song makes the atmosphere tough for the song splitting the two to contend with. Not that the old school punk bred Ratbiter notices as it rampages with relish, riffs and rhythms abrasing with contentious brawls and badgering as ridiculously catchy hooks and another bass exploit provide something more to drool over. It is the storming chorus though that clinches the deal, its venom and enterprise sensational.

You Belong To Me is the most adventurous song on the release but also pleasing ‘messy’. Like a fog of intense sonic squalls and thickly clouded aural animosity, the song is the soundtrack to hell, a caustic hymn to the outbreak of ravenous cemeteries and waiting devastation. It’s a noisy maelstrom which works a treat and shows more of the adventure of the band and further hints of how strong the band is yet going to become.

The album is completed by the excellent Rebellion, a storming ode to the renowned UK festival. Starting with an acoustic caress of Campbell and guitar, the track explodes into one last stomp of punk rock. It is the perfect anthem to close the release, like a mix of Holly and the Italians and Flogging Molly. Do remember to hang on after its conclusion too, as a great acoustic version of the same track is hiding in the silence.

Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is a massive festival of punk rock, multi-flavoured and diversely sculpted and proving that punk is always an essential proposition and Trioxin Cherry one of its new masters.

Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is now available on STP Records (www.stprecords.co.uk) and @ http://trioxincherry.bandcamp.com/album/lets-take-off-and-nuke-the-site-from-space

https://www.facebook.com/trioxincherry

10/10

RingMaster 29/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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