Hardcore Anal Hydrogen – The Talas of Satan

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen

Sometimes a release just stops you in your tracks, presses an irresistibly inviting hand into yours, and pulls the psyche into an undiscovered experience which ignites every pore, thought, and emotion. Such is the case with the unpredictable, thoroughly compelling, and insatiably gripping new Hardcore Anal Hydrogen album, The Talas of Satan. Though their third album it is the first to cross the always eccentricity inspired greedy appetite of the site, which is quite irritating realising we had missed out on the previous sure to be thought provoking creativity of the French quartet. Their new album is quite glorious, an exploration where predictability and assumptions do not even get a sniff of realism in its exhausting inventive tapestry of sound and imagination. It is an unforgettable adventure everyone should experience at least one in their lives if only to show that originality and bold invention is not a dying trait of modern music.

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen was formed in 2009 with the meeting of Martyn Clement (guitar/backing vocals) and Sacha Valony (vocals/keys/flute). A duo in the studio expanding to a quartet with the addition of bassist Jonathan Marole and drummer Damien Salis on stage, the band has released two albums before the new revelation, Fork You and Division Zero in 2009 and 2011 respectively. The band’s sound is a fusion of metal and ethnic music, brewed into rabidly diverse and fascinating ventures in turn soaked in experimentation and imagination. Released via Apathia Records, The Talas of Satan is an eclectic dance of modern and traditional spices thrust through a maelstrom of structural instability and physical might aligned to disorganised invention sculpted with the purest skill and instinct.

Every track on the album is a unique character in presence and sound, making a general description or comparison for the album impossible. logoThat is a wonderful essence which constantly exploits and ignites the imagination from the opening track Dhamar. Hand drums, possible tablas open up the track, the eastern lure instantly captivating as the thick blaze of metal spawned riffs and pungent rhythmic caging join in soon after. Still merging both ethnic and aggressive counterparts, the track steers ears into a groove and psyche metal escapade which constantly relaxes to flirt with that initial Indian folk tempting. The vocals scratch and scowl as an additional texture to the opening piece, provoking thoughts of Korn whilst musically elements suggest Motherjane and Pryapisme, the last a constant and most accurate relation to Hardcore Anal Hydrogen.

The mouthwatering start is swiftly reinforced by the outstanding Ramahd, a ravenous squall of sonic and hardcore hostility with plenty of sonic and electronic toxicity which again sends the passions into a hectic scramble for more. There is a definite Mad capsule Markets feel to the rawest psychotic aspects of the track whilst the guest scratching skills of DJ Mattéo produces a spice you can find anywhere from Limp Bizkit to The Kennedy Soundtrack for another potent flavour to the virulent contagion. It is a bordering on pestilential treat with rhythms which resonate in their uniquely specific tone, a breath-taking enticement taken further by Release The Crackhead. The track prowls and prances with a posing gait which dances mischievously around the ears, coaxing closer attention for the subsequent unleashing of blackened vocal spite and dramatic intensity. With more shadows and colours to its imposing endeavour than on a dysfunctional TV, the track courts every emotion from passion to fear, seduction to madness .

The following Pentamère is a celestially borne instrumental with twinkling sonics and bubbling expression within its expansive flight. It is a piece of music which at first was not a certain success for ears but once it stretched its warm arms into an oriental sunset with tribal chants and charmed vocals, submission was rapidly given and retained by the following Kalakaka. The storm unleashes a punk metal ferocity, its persistently twisting sonic grooves entwining the senses as the vocals rage with tempestuous expression, again the previously mention Japanese band coming to mind. The track scores and rages against ears and emotions, taking stabs with rhythmic spite and antagonistic riffery whilst vocals torment thoughts and its victim within the climax. It is another song which unveils a new facet and side to the album, as does quite brilliantly Rupack. It isa track which stomps and dances with the imagination through fevered keys and menacing rhythms. Side steps into jazzy avant-garde revelry makes a delicious fuse to the already smiling appetite helping it develop a greater predatory hunger. Imagine a mix of Pryapisme, Cardiacs, Kontrust, and Mucho Tapioca and you get a whiff of the mania superbly offered.

Next up COI rages with chucky riffs and brutal rhythms for another addictive metallic onslaught; guitars scything air and senses with vicious intent whilst bedlamic vocals find a new vitriol to their grazing tones. Once more though there is a wealth of additives which ensure song and experience is one of a kind, just like the very short sonic disorientation which KRR offers, the track psyche/hardcore at its noisy inventive best.

The seemingly distressed passion of 한오백년 probesthoughts next, driven by the equally intense guest vocals of Doowah before Coq au vin strolls in with a big naughty grin on its face and an electro/Nintendo devilry which masterfully teases around the coarse punk vocals and ravenous riffs. It is no surprise at this point to hear the song unlock a bedlam of ideas and psychotic imagination converted to equally deranged sounds, continuing the strengths of the album so far. The song is a beautiful meshuga sparking a rapturous and maybe equally cracked ardour for it.

The album ends just as powerfully compelling as it started, Chautal a rigorous mix of ethnic and metallic genius which flows as if family whilst offering extremes in beauty and character. It is impossible not to immerse in and be seduced by the track and all of its imagination, drama and epic intent making for a sensational finale. The Talas of Satan is quite brilliant and Hardcore Anal Hydrogen a rare proposition which creates something that is truly new and inspirational, not forgetting unbridled fun.

https://apathiarecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-talas-of-satan

https://www.facebook.com/hardcoreanalhydrogen

http://hardcoreanalhydrogen.com/

10/10

Ringmaster 01/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Boyfrndz – Breeder

BOYFRNDZ selects (4 of 5)

Mere days after having van, cargo trailer, and all their equipment stolen in San Francisco midst their extensive  North America tour, Texas band Boyfrndz can at least give themselves and us a big boost with the release of new album Breeder on the first day of April. The release is an absorbing flight through unique climates and smouldering adventures employing a sound as ever distinct to the band and evocations which simply envelop and seduce the imagination. Breeder is a new innovative beast from previous band unveilings but still has that certain Boyfrndz voice as it stirs passions and sculpts captivating landscapes. Whereas previous releases blend a punchy indie craft to an intensive bite, the new album explores soaring melodies aligned to equally mesmeric vocals and expansive sonic exploration across provocative sceneries. It is a riveting encounter which draws thoughts and emotions in deeply with each traverse of its soundscapes, and more importantly a thoroughly compelling triumph.

Hailing from Austin, the band has earned acclaim and a rich fanbase through sound, shows, and their impressive releases. As mentioned Breeder is a different move in their inventive investigation, taking the essences which made the likes of their debut album All Day Pass of 2012 and last year’s Natures EP such formidable and satisfying propositions. Self-produced and engineered/mixed by Erik Wofford (Maserati, The Black Angels, White Denim), Breeder is a warm haven, like a beach of romantic seduction leading into varied melodically cast, often shadow kissed lands. Boyfrndz and their sound have always been defiant to labelling and certainly make it no easier for those who wish to add that tags with the new album. We can suggest though if the epic emotive potency of a Mars Volta or a Disappears catches your attention than this is an album which deserves your appetite.

Released via Brutal Panda Records, Breeder opens with an ambient intro which is haunting and yet coaxing in its sinister breath, keys boyfrndz_breeder_frontcovershaping thoughts and emotion with a dark menacing design. It is a heavy intensive opening which evolves without losing intent or weight into Each Others, a song which submerges senses in an invasive and heftily rewarding embrace. The vocals of Scott Martin and his guitar enterprise side by side with that of Jesse Moore immediately enslave, drawing thoughts deeper into the cavernous but equally intimate surroundings and depths of the narrative whilst the unpredictable rhythmic enticement built by drummer Aaron Perez aligned to the shadowed voice of Joseph Raines’ bass add keener textures and intrigue to the whole scenario.

The gripping unveiling of the album as its creative full height bears down on an awoken appetite, is swiftly reinforced by the dramatic breath and air of All At Once. The song is a range of subtle crescendos, emotive respites interspersed with powerful passion bred surges of sound and energy with every aspect a bewitching entwining of the imagination and the increasingly greedy hunger rising for the release. Its success is soon surpassed by the outstanding Shape Shifter, another song which brews a drama from its first emerging suasion which itself gives home to provocative shadows. The rhythmic juggling of Perez is instant magnetic bait which keeps the listener wrong footed as the smouldering air of the track through the guitars and the keys crafting of Moore, soaks pores and synapses. The entry of the celestial tones of Martin only accentuate the already Muse like feel to the song even though in truth his style is nearer to Cedric Bixler-Zavala if anyone. It is a temptress of a song, but one which lays a seducing touch around the body with fingers and a lure you just know is dangerous and only telling half the truth.

That Mars Volta suggestiveness comes back with stronger potency in Dark Braining though any reference is mere spicing to the unique Boyfrndz recipe. The song ebbs and flows across the senses, coating them in a thick melodic endeavour which is equally elegance and infectious, it’s often acidic and always charming ingenuity bordering toxic in its seducing and capture of the soul. The song is as fascinating in its progressively infused ingenuity as it is in its bordering on shoegaze rapture. It pushes limits with ease but in an easily accessible way, something which is achieved in a more testing way by the following Design with similarly impressive results. It opens with a celestial tempting which glances over the ear as the vocals glide with the first breath of its narrative. The peace is soon broken by a sonic surge of sound and energy which from there, shares air and space with its predecessor in a fluid ride of swirling melodies strapped to inciting rhythms and shimmering vocals. The course and depth of the song continues to enlist senses and imagination with resourceful aural contemplation making a provocation which takes longer than a great many to explore but lingers longer than most.

Both the muscular stance of Make Believe and the riotous causticity of Burn Through It, steal a fair chunk of the already ardour soaked passions, the first simply melody enriched alchemy within sinew built rhythmic walls and intensive sonic flames which tower over the agitated simmering and dramatic heart of the song. It is a glorious blaze matched by its successor, an encounter which from the first note is abrasing the senses with a blistered glaze to guitars and keys which fires up the exhaustive voracity of the song. Martin again opens up distinct avenues within the intent of the track; his harmonious tones a scintillating conflict and antagonist to the snarl of the great song.

The closing Big Faces provides a seemingly surf rock seeded melodic toxicity to its irresistible web of mystery and intrigue crossing a similarly magnetic pull of psychedelically enhanced persuasion. It is a stunning end to a sensational release. Boyfrndz has impressed before without really lighting fires in our thoughts  but with Breeder the band has set themselves as one of the essential investigations all should partake in whilst stealing a march on most with a definite album of the year contender.

To get yourself a copy of Breeder whilst helping the band regroup and complete as much of their tour as possible, check out their website http://www.Boyfrndz.com.

https://www.facebook.com/boyfrndz

https://www.boyfrndz.bandcamp.com

9/10

RingMaster 01/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Lizzyspit – Trouble Lies Deep

lizzyspit pic

It has never been difficult to be enchanted by the radiant talent of singer/songwriter Lizzyspit and with her new release, the Trouble Lies Deep EP, that artistic tempting has never been stronger. Consisting of four alternative folk/pop songs which touchingly croon to involve the listener’s ears and thoughts, the EP caresses imagination and emotions like a summer evening of reflection. The release comes from the heart for the heart, Lizzy at her most melancholic yet but also at her most potently seductive.

Hailing from London here in the UK and a resident of Sydney, Australia for around the past couple of years, it is fair to say that Lizzyspit has been one big digital success story. Over one and a half million fans have devoured her online performances as well as downloaded her music and hit up her videos. It has pushed her into a deserved brighter spotlight whilst her live shows have only cemented and pushed her stature further, the lady thrilling notable venues in the UK such as The Troubadour London, The Camden Roundhouse, and Manchester’s Lowry Theatre and in her new home, including The Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. Add places like New York’s famous Bitter End and you see the worldwide presence Lizzy has earned, something her releases and especially Trouble Lies Deep you feel, has and will drive forward. Currently back in England, the name and sound of Lizzyspit will be refreshing lips and ears of her elegant artistry through the new EP and it has to be said she has never sounded better.

The release opens with Once Upon A Time, guitar and vocals an immediate evocation of emotion and sombre reflection; Lizzy, as she is so 1959719_386215978184184_97481912_ngood at, exploring a situation and emotional shadow everyone has embraced or been shaded by. With shuffling beats and percussive coaxing plus delicious additional melodic hues provided by Carlos Adura and Carl Dimatage respectively helping colour the emerging small but rich drama, the song evolves into an understated yet fully magnetic and tonally busy proposition. It is a mesmeric wrap around senses and feelings easily enthusing ears and passions.

Second track All Dressed Up Nowhere To Go builds on the strong start with its sultry melodic endeavour and emotive dance. Unveiling a slightly more urgent energy and poise to its subtle stroll, the track transfixes sonically and lyrically, its warm skies and adventure enriched by the ever expressive voice of Lizzy and sighs of heated melodies which vein the compelling fascination. As in its predecessor, the skittish percussive essences and incisive guitar design adding extra enticement and depth to the voice of the song as it once again enthrals and lights up the imagination.

Goodbye (to the ones who screwed you over), from a tender gentle start which simply strokes ears like a loving partner, lifts its spirit and energy for a lively but controlled canter kissed by evocative strings and impacting rhythms. It never really elevates beyond that stance, merging the loftier gait with the opening tempered presence, but still evolves a lively infectiousness which infests senses through to passions. It is a masterful persuasion which lingers and continues to work its temptation long after its departure, the songwriting of Lizzyspit never lacking potent bait here at its most irresistible yet.

The release is closed by an acoustic version of Gone Gone Gone, voice and guitar at one in a melancholy wrapped narrative of a disappointing lost relationship. For a voice so vibrant from within a smile, going by her promo shots, which is a simple sunspot, the lyrical heart of the EP is surprisingly heavy hearted in sentiment and an investigation which feels it maybe intimate to her as much as the experiences of its listeners.

Lizzyspit is a bright light who just gets stronger and more eloquent musically and lyrically with every release, Trouble Lies Deep her most revelatory and impressive so far.

http://www.facebook.com/lizzyspit

http://www.soundcloud.com/Lizzyspit

8.5/10

RingMaster 01/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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