Sweet dances and psychotic episodes: an interview with Fede of Destrage

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Difficult to describe but very easy to enthuse vociferously over,  Are You Kidding Me? No. the new album from Italian metallers Destrage is easily one of the most thrilling and innovative albums to come along not only this year so far but over a long time. It is a fever of invention and imagination which confronts and seduces the senses through a maze flavours, styles, and experimentation. It is sonic and noise anarchy at its best, a psyche teasing triumph which declares its creators as the exhilarating maelstrom of adventure metal and music is always crying out for. To find out more about band and release we had the pleasure to explore the depths of Destrage with drummer Federico Paulovich, venturing into the creation of the album, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, tomato juice, audience sex and plenty more…

Hi Fede and thank you for talking with us.

Before we look at your new album would you tell us about the beginning of Destrage?

The current line-up has been consistent since 2007 and after their first demo, Self Id Generator, Destrage signed a deal with Howling Bull Records, Japan, and released their first full length, Urban Being, which also saw a worldwide release by Coroner Records in 2009.The second full length The King Is Fat’n’Old was released in 2010 by Coroner Records and Howling Bull, supported by European and Japanese tours and international festivals such as Heineken Jammin’ Festival, Euroblast and Mair1 Festival, The Bad Side Festival, MetalItalia Festival, MAV Festival and more. The eclectic festival run afforded Destrage the opportunity to share the stage with Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Every Time I Die, Lordi, Moonspell and many more. In 2012, we wrote and recorded our third album. The result, the band’s most focused and dynamic effort yet, Are You Kidding Me? No. led to a worldwide deal with Metal Blade Records.

What was the spark and intent of the band at the beginning and does that still drive the band just as potently today?

We simply LOVE to spend time together, playing together, laughing and making jokes or just hanging. If “millions $$$” are not involved in a musical project (like in our case) every member needs to enjoy every single moment of the “band life”, form the sound check to the time spent on the van. It’s about alchemy in my opinion.

Of course conflicts, like in every relationship, are part of the game. But that was intent at the beginning and nothing is changed at the moment 🙂

How would you say the band has evolved over the years musically and emotionally?

We believe that our evolution as musicians and composers fully reflects our personal growth in real life. You gotta experience something before you can say something; that’s the main reason why we are always evolving, and we’ll always be. So, expect something really different from the albums to come… About how we changed through the three albums, there are a couple reasons that can explain the process. At the time we were composing and recording Urban Being, there was a big change of line up, and all the songs were composed mostly by Matteo; only with The King Is Fat’n’Old we started working all together on the songs, so the main difference from Urban Being is the result that came out from a combined work. We had the same approach in composing Are You Kidding Me? No., but a few years passed, so we were more close-knit as a team, and above all, our music influences had really changed in the meanwhile, as well as we grew up as persons.

Italy seems to have a rather rich and expansive metal scene, how have you found it on the inside and has it becomes easier for a

 Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography


Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography

band from your country to break into a wider audience over recent years?

In Italy, being in a metal band is definitely not easy. Italian scene, especially on rock and metal music, can’t be compared to the German, UK, Scandinavian or American ones. Our scene is based on pop-folk authors. We have to face a pop and hip hop mainstream market which dominates our local music market, and you have to fight a lot to find, not only a good label deal or an honest booking agent, but also a decent place to play. I have to say that Destrage always met great guys on the road, who contributed to support local bands and this was a great luck for us. Nowadays for the first time we can see a metal scene growing in our country and that’s incredible.

You have just released your third album as you mentioned, the quite brilliant, and I am not just saying that because we are talking, Are You Kidding Me? No. Because of the album we described the band as ‘a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.’ The album must be your proudest moment to date recording wise, even over the achievement of making your very first release?

I think this album is what makes us really proud at the moment. The first Urban Being wasn’t even a team work, the whole band wasn’t even there. As much as it can be uplifting to see your first record see the light, we believe it’s much more precious to wait a few years and deliver something that really reflects what you are.

If Urban Being was modern metal with a touch of Destrage, The King was Destrage with some modern metal dressing, Kidding is finally the essence of Destrage.

Your sound as clearly shown on the release employs a maelstrom of styles and flavours crossing fields of genres. How would you describe it in context to Are You Kidding Me? No. for newcomers to the band?

We destroy, create, transform, sublimate. We worship enthusiasm and venerate the shake that it gives.

I think Destrage sound’s is spontaneously various and weird. It’s like we learned how to speak the “metal” language as kids, and then growing up we opened our ears to the world and learned so much more, and the process is still going.

Everything that inspires us, from movies to fine art to haute cuisine to love and sex, can be easily translated into hard music as it is our native language.

This said if you take a look to our Spotify profiles you’ll be surprised. Or disgusted ahahah…

I’d love to tell these newcomers: we’d love you to take what the album is actually giving, with a clear and naive point of view, not expecting this record to be something that is going in the direction you already have in your mind. We are not saying the album is a unique piece of music that doesn’t resemble anything else you’ve heard before, no, but it definitely has its degree of originality.

It comes to my mind a story: the first time i tried tomato juice I almost puked, since it is a fruit juice and I was expecting a fruit juice-like taste. My brain was ready to enjoy a semi-definite, predictable experience and was already projecting it in my mind as the glass got to my lips. By the time the liquid touched my tongue I was disappointed, disgusted. The contrast with what I imagined was just bad.

Now tomato juice is my favorite.

Let’s not expect cats to bark.

Simply listen, enjoy or not.

1978605_10153840599710104_1863836033_nThe songs on the album are almost exhausting in their imagination and ever evolving inventive anarchy, they border schizophrenic at times haha. They sound like a puzzle to excitingly decipher and it is easy to assume they are constructed in a similar way so how do you approach the writing and creation of your songs?

Ahahah you’re right. It’s a giant puzzle made by post-it! We love to use them to keep always in mind the structure of every song, and be able to get an overview on the whole album structure as well.

A Destrage song can start from a riff, a melody, or a drum pattern coming out from any member. Then we work on it all together…in the name of post-it !

!We just try to make music that makes us happy and that is fun for others. If this means diverse people will come to our shows then be it! Can’t ask for more. We believe a band is like a person. No human being is always angry, happy or introspective all the time and a project of five different people should naturally deliver many feelings and states of mind at once.

!Also it is easier to swallow a bitter pill if before and after you eat a spoonful of sugar, that’s why complex parts are inscribed in a creamy song with melody and apparently simple rhythm. It is then choice of the listener to enjoy the surface or dig to the nerdy core, it is our business to make both levels as enjoyable as possible.

We don’t want people to come to our gigs and take notes, we want them to come and jump.

Do songs organically grow from those initial seeds or is there a stronger element of deliberate sculpting in their creation from you?

It really depends on the song, but usually what we try to do is to start from an idea or concept that has its own soul and then decorate it with our craftsmanship, instead of putting together many different elements, that most of the times wouldn’t match very well. It is way easier to write very complex stuff for the sake of being technical, so we try to make it enjoyable by anybody. Once I’ve been told by a wise person that we should put sex in every single thing we do, so we put a lot of effort in doing so because we believe that having sex with your audience is way better than masturbating on your own. So even if our technique may result impressive sometimes, we think that music must come before sport in any case.

Did you approach the recording of the album in any different way to your previous releases?

I think every time is different because we change, we evolve as persons and musicians. It’s really a big mixture of feelings, emotions and thoughts. For AYKM?N. after a long period of composition and pre-production, everybody was really focused and motivated to give his best. Somebody was excited, but still worried about some parts here and there, because we didn’t have that much time to rehearse every song properly, so the trickiest parts were kind of scary. Obviously everybody wanted to have fun as well, so jokes and funny moments happened all the time; that’s the way we like doing things together. Every time we enter the studio we realize how much we love making records, and how stressful it is at the same time. Everyone wants the record to be “perfect”, so sometimes somebody loses his mind or goes crazy. Fortunately we have five very different personalities, and we know each other very well, so everything usually sorts out very quickly.

Tell us about the recording of Are You Kidding Me? No. Did the songs evolve further in that environment and did you learn anything this time to take into your next adventure?

The recordings were a bit messy, definitely a non-linear path. Even in the final phase of the production we were having new ideas and insights. Probably hiking in nature, getting lost in an unknown city, visit art galleries, alternate your perception are good ways to get inspired in the beginning of the process and recording is the best way to get inspired in the end of it. Even in its half dark, closed, silent spaces the studio itself is a huge source of inspiration. You are there, but you are not what matters. The album is all and you disappear.

Many of the songs made it to the record the way they were written, other didn’t and we kept changing them until the very end.

We made a documentary of the whole recording process, it will be published soon.

As the album teased, seduced, and thrilled us we laid numerous comparisons at its feet; moments in the eclectic alchemy which Destrage 1reminded us of bands such as Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, Faith No More Kontrust and French bands Mucho Tapioca and Toumai, even at one brief point Ugly Kid Joe. It shows the diversity and expanse of your sound. Are there any specific inspirations which have really influenced you if not for the band as a musician?

All those that you mentioned played a crucial role in our inspirational feast, but not more than Michel Gondry, Quay Brothers or Paolo Barnard did. And they don’t release albums.! !

Are You Kidding Me? No. sees a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal of Guns’N’Roses on its title track, How did that union come about?

We all are Ron’s big fans. When we finished the track Are You Kidding Me? No. we felt something was missing in the end. In fact, a Bumblefoot solo was missing. Since we had no connection with him, Mat emailed Mattias “Ia” Eklundh, who played on Jade’s Place (in our previous record The King Is Fat’N’Old) and became our friend (he’s such a cool guy!). He asked him for an address, a number, some contact to get in touch with Ron. Mattias as usual answered very politely, but didn’t give Mat what he wanted (he’s a very respectful person). So Mat was left with no choice other than going on Bumblefoot’s website and write to the general mail address. And surprize, Ron answered immediately telling us the song was super good and he’d do the collaboration. He told Mat he was touring with GnR in that period, so we should wait for a month or so. We thought it was his way to refuse. Instead he actually wrote back when the tour was over, asking what we wanted exactly, and we answered “we want you to do whatever you want for 32 bars”.

Few funny private messages followed and we got our perfect solo in 3 days. Smooth. The song seemed to be made for him, as he also said later in an interview. So, good experiment, and when we got to meet the guy in person we liked him even more. Ron is rad.

That track is also the most, can we say creatively and thrillingly psychotic on the album, probably our favourite song though it is hard to choose just one. Can you give us some insight into its creation?

Are You Kidding Me? No. is one of our favourite tracks too, for two main reasons: its origin and its content. The song was born randomly, as Mat sang what became the trumpet melody while going around on his red Vespa.

So, in the beginning we only expanded what comes after the trumpet, all that gipsy-sounding part. We wanted to make it a bonus track and leave it as it was. Then with no reason or precise plan, we wrote all the rest around it, putting no limits and setting no borders, following the lyric concept “Everybody does all kind of shit, I’m sorry that I’m sorry, I had to do this”.

The content came along in exceptional short time, and surprisingly our mindless creation gave birth to some of the most cerebral and psychotic parts of the whole album. !

As you said earlier the album is also your first with Metal Blade Records. How has the link up impacted on the album so far?

Being signed with such a great label is a dream come true for us! Definitely it’s giving us way bigger exposure, and much more people are listening to the new album because of this. But on the artistic point of view it didn’t have any impact, simply because we could sign the deal with MB because we already had the new album finished and ready to go.

Destrage is a band never slow in hitting the road and stages, the same again for 2014 I can assume? Any details you can reveal?

Absolutely yes! Everything is “work in progress”, our goal is to play these songs live, touring as much as we can, bringing our music everywhere…we’ll see what happens! 🙂

We can’t wait to be on the road again!

Once more thank you for sharing time to chat with us. Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for your attention! Our new album Are you Kidding Me? No. will be release on March 3 in Europe through Metal Blade Records. More music and videos will be released soon, so stay tuned though our official pages http://www.facebook.com/destrage, http://www.youtube.com/destrage andwww.twitter.com/destrage!

Thank you so much for this interview guys! 🙂

Read the review of Are you Kidding Me? No. @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/destrage-are-you-kidding-me-no/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/03/2014

The Written Years – Self-Titled

 

 Photo by Steven Toews


Photo by Steven Toews

    The Written Years is a Canadian band which we feel confidence in suggesting you will be hearing a great deal of over coming years. The reasoning for that comes with their self-titled debut album, an emotionally and melodically fuelled release which mesmerises ears and potently inspires the imagination. Consisting of eight songs which bring an original blend of post and alternative rock with folk and melodic inspirations, the album is a compelling flight of what the band calls “Winter Music”.

     Hailing from Kelowna and now based in Vancouver the trio of Wade Ouellet (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Kodie Krogh (guitar, vocals), and Kane Enders (drums), The Written Years has built a strong and well-followed presence with their inventive and original sound as well as acclaimed live performances. Casting tales of affection, belonging, loss, and nostalgia, their first release has all the potential and beauty to inspire the same reactions further afield, awakening new hungry appetites across the rest of North America, Europe and beyond. Aided by the talents of numerous guest musicians, the album is a masterful persuasion of open and smouldering temptation; one where resistance is unlikely to make much of an attempt to fight.

    Opening track It’s Not Your Fault emerges from a shadowed yet crystalline ambient mist with jangling sonics teasing ears twycover-largebefore a firmly placed stroll of guitar and keys bred melodies and colour breaks out. It is an immediately magnetic offering, especially as the song expands its evocative suasion to embrace the strong and expressive vocals of Ouellet. Steady punchy rhythms keep a dark edge skirting the warm touch and gait of the song, whilst harmonies fly with charm and energy across the sultry sky of the encounter. It is an infectious introduction with a tinge of the anthemic persistence Doves place in some of their creations.

    From a fly on the wall like studio link, second song I Would Miss My Home If I Knew Where It Was bounces into view with broad rhythmic shoulders and sonic tenderness to the fore. There is a wonderful folk expression to the indie spawned narrative as well as a creative revelry which dances with the imagination and passions. With wonderful additional vocals provided by Julia Huggins alongside those of Murray Ash, the song is a delicious romp with heady edges and darker depths. Already The Written Years show themselves to be unique to most, their sound a fresh mix apart from any other yet discovered but certainly for European readers there is a comparison to Irish band Knots which you could draw to give a sense of the invention at play.

     Homesick Dirge is a slow invasive treat, its title a just description of its sound though the track never reaches into the darkest funereal realm which might be assumed. Pungently emotive keys wrap equally passionate vocals whilst guitar and bass craft a web of intrigue and provocative colour to fill the heavy hearted yet refreshing canvas laid by lyrics and voice. A slower burn on the passions than its predecessors, the track over time is just as potent and challenging, as is the next up The Phone Is Ringing. Apparently the chord progression of the thought caressing song was the first element of the album, its creation six years ago the spark to the album which was completed with its final master in 2013. The track simply croons and lures the emotions from start to finish, every note and syllable drenched in enveloping melancholia.

     An elevated pace and urgency returns with You’re Too Kind, strumming guitars and lurking basslines entrancing ears whilst keys and vocals get to work on the senses. There is a sixties pop energy to the song, and element of sound which dare we say has a touch of Walker Brothers to it. The track is a masterful charge of inventiveness and emotional incitement, mini crescendos and resonating melodies flaming highlights in the outstanding proposition.

    Both Hospital Rooms and Are You Okay? keep satisfaction and full enjoyment high, even if the pair do not quite match the heights already set. The first is another with a punchy gait to its canter, rhythms crisply punctuating flames of melodic poise whilst its successor like most tracks is a weave of intimately touching and evocative feelings, the pair only increasing the greed of ears and passions for band and album.

   The release is closed by The Station, the song a glorious hug of hypnotic rhythms and bass persistence entwined with mesmeric melodies and thought caressing vocals, which reminds a little of Scottish band, Letters. It is an engrossing end to a similarly riveting release. With the bridging studio fiddling between songs the only negative thing on the album, their presence more a distraction which at times disrupts the flow of the release for personal tastes, The Written Years’ debut is just irresistible, an attention enslaving introduction to a band we are destined to be wrapped up in time and time again.

http://www.thewrittenyears.com

http://thewrittenyears.bandcamp.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 19/03/2014

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Shameless – Guilt

 

12 Picture Disc [GD30PD]

    With its well-received unleashing in Europe through Bords de Seine, Lion Records, and Last Rockers, and an even more recent uncaging as a 500 strong Limited Edition Picture Disk in the US via Rebel Sound Music, debut album Guilt from punks Shameless is an impressively solid and potent introduction to the French band. A feisty attitude drenched mix of old school and oi punk, the Lyon based quartet’s sound hits the spot forcibly and honestly, no overblown sonic theatrics or candy coated hooks cluttering their straightforward anthemic antagonism. Guilty is an album which does not hold many surprises or always gets the blood boiling but it certainly rouses and incites a healthy appetite for the promising sound and future provocations from the band.

    The seeds of the band go back to 2009 when vocalist/guitarist Pépito moves to Lyon and meets bassist Nico of the Rude Gones. They talk of getting a band up together, a suggestion which is given an opportunity to be realised when the Rude Gones split in the October of 2010. Writing together, the pair then recruit ex-Urban Gones drummer Scooter into their English Oi! inspired project. The band’s second gig saw them opening for La Souris Déglinguée, West Side Boys, and Warrior Kids to eager responses, a spark the band took into the making of their first full-length. Six months in the making the album came out to strong reactions swiftly followed by equally potent responses when the band around the time of its release played a show to celebrate the anniversary of the band Bad Gones with La Souris Déglinguée, Booze & Glory and Wayne Barrett of Slaughter and the Dogs. Unveiling second guitarist and ex-Urban Gones Gilles, who had already played as a guest with them on stage previously, as a permanent addition to the band at the show, Shameless show themselves ready and poised to take their DIY bred sound and presence to the punk passions of the world. A quest you feel if not with this album is a certainty within one of their near horizons.

    The title track arrives on sirens to open things up, public disorder soon sound-tracked by stirring riffs and crisp rhythms soaked in anthemic weight. The vocals of Pépito, gruff and slightly antagonistic, join the charge as the song stomps with addictive grooves and equally compelling hooks. Its prime bait has an essence of The Sweet meets Suburban Studs to it, the song as a whole an excellent and infectious doorway into the release.

     The following Friday Night Losers backs up the starter with its own incitement of riling rhythms and caustic riffery driven by uncompromising but welcoming vocals. There is little to surprise in the song though it avoids real predictability with ease, as does its successors 30 Years Tomorrow and Bastard!. The first taunts ears with a great throaty bassline and a quietly riotous stance around an irresistible chorus whilst the second instantly eyeballs senses and thoughts, bawling them out with another potently contagious chorus within abrasing sounds and vocals. As with most of the songs there are very few really striking hooks that viciously grip but it does not stop tracks like this from becoming a lingering and memorable pleasure.

    Both the unruly chant fest Oi! For My Nation and the outstanding We Are the Boys keep attention hungry for the release, the second of the two one of the major highlights of the release. With a delicious twang to the again predacious bass sound and a swagger to the vocal inducement, the track is a fiery encounter though like all the songs it is fair to say it does not explore or antagonise enough for personal tastes, almost holding itself in check for some reason.

     Men With Ties is a raw graze for the senses, its threatening to brawl approach a magnetic lure to spark up another flame of excited satisfaction whilst the next up Vote For Shameless has a reserved but definite Angelic Upstarts feel to its rebellion, a fight which is veined by a Buzzcocks like great hook and the only really attention seeking one on the album. From the pleasing recruitment drive Disappointing Friend steps in next to make a strong and enjoyable statement if without rivalling anything before its appearance. It is a decent enough song but lacks the spark and infectious suasion of others, though that toxicity is soon back fuelling the passions through Fashion Week. The track is a commanding and confronting bruising with the primal rhythmic combativeness and scolding riffery all the great punk songs unload on the senses. The best track on the album it is an invigorating barracking bringing the heart of the album to a close before final track provides an epilogue through its live version of Virage Nord, the Oi! hymn of Urban Gones.

     Guilt is a great rage parading the potential and punk voracity of a band it is easy to keep an eager eye upon. Once Shameless find their distinct voice and unshackle their reserve you can expect major fireworks ahead, whilst right now they simply provide a thoroughly pleasing and rousing experience…something never easy to refuse.

http://www.shamelessoi.com/

8/10

RingMaster 19/03/2014

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Ringworm – Hammer Of The Witch

 

pic scott schumacher

pic scott schumacher

    I think it is safe to say that the ferocity and sonic viciousness of metallic hardcore protagonists Ringworm has not abated or diminished over their twenty plus years brawling with the senses. The indisputable evidence comes with new album Hammer Of The Witch, a towering and vindictive slab of destructive raging and antagonistic creativity. Packed to the brim with thirteen vitriol spewing tracks that just as venomously unleash a range of uncompromising riffs and addictive grooves, the album is a commanding onslaught of spite and animosity, simply unadulterated hardcore excellence.

     Formed in 1991, it is fair to say that Ringworm has left an indelible mark with their fusion of metal and hardcore, debut album The Promise in 1993 setting the Cleveland band as a sizeable proposition before a hiatus of sorts was ended by the unleashing of the critically acclaimed Birth Is Pain on Victory Records in 2001. Subsequent albums like Justice Replaced By Revenge four years later and the following The Venomous Grand Design of 2007 reinforced and strengthened their grip on passions and scene. Scars three years ago continued the stretching of the band’s creativity and power, the same pleasing accusation you can throw at Hammer Of The Witch, the band’s debut on Relapse Records. Recorded with Ben Schigel (Chimaira, Walls of Jericho) producing, the album is a merciless tempest chewing up and spitting out everything from ears to emotions.

     Opener Dawn of Decay emerges from a cinematic intimidation, a sense of epic danger spawning a weave of carnivorous 12 Jacket (3mm Spine) [GDOB-30H3-007}basslines, rapacious riffing, and combative rhythms, all honed into a prowling entity which sizes up its victim before exploding into  fire of musical causticity and vocal threat, the tones of frontman Human Furnace as always living up to his moniker. The song stalks the senses from start to finish, the guitars of Matt Sorg and John Comprix abrasively ravishing air and ears whilst drummer Danny Zink gives them a further mighty battering.

  The excellent start is potently backed up by the corrosive wrath of Bleed and the nastily venomous Leave Your Skin at the Door, both individual tirades of inventive riffery and precisely sculpted contagious grooves courted by the deliciously dark hearted tones spawned from the bass of Ed Stephens, his opening of the second of these songs a mouthwatering provocation. Each track is also marked by keen sonic endeavour from the guitars; theirs an acidic play within the riot which even in brief colours raises the potency of the anger.

    The toxic Exit Life rails against ears next, its narrative and approach singular in venom and hatred but fully magnetic, before Psychic Vampire belts and engages the senses with rhythmic violence and a deceptively seductive groove which winds around and recruits the passions. The track is a maelstrom of vehemence, lyrically and sonically, and rich infectiousness. It is an intrusive antagonist that is hard to have enough of, the same that can also be said of King of Blood, another unbridled onslaught which savages and ignites the emotions with dramatic grooves, temper driven riffs, and bitter rhythms. The track in many ways is similar to its predecessor, the one trait you could lay against the album with a regularly familiarity across some songs, though it does not reduce the pleasure and power of the release one iota.

    Through tracks like the torrentially consumptive I Recommend Amputation and the predatory We’ll Always Have the End as well as the raging causticity of One Of Us Is Going to Have to Die…, band and album abrases and sears with compelling efficiency and enterprise even if each lacks some of the spark of previous songs, though amongst them the title track takes its victims on a hellacious ride of physical and mental ferocity which simply ignites the passions, it’s almost demonic poisons irresistibly and dramatically enthralling.

     The final trio of tracks starting with the flesh and synapse scorching Vicious Circle of Life lift the album back to its opening plateau, the fearsome slice of tempestuous hostility scarred with great guitar acid soon thrown under the shadow of the brilliant Die Like a Pig. The bass of Stephens digs deep for its strongest guttural growl whilst HF soaks every syllable and rage spewing sound with bile spawned malevolence and passion to match the creative rabidity of its partners of dispute.

     The album closes with slab of prime hardcore/punk jaundice in the riveting shape of Height of Revelation. The uncivil and rigorously inciting melee of sonic and rhythmic rancor is a thunderous and thoroughly incendiary last triumph for passions and album. Hammer of the Witch is a breath stealing, bone splintering furnace of acrimony and virulent contagion. It is masterful and thrilling assault on the ear which if not the pinnacle of Ringworm’s career is certainly right up there. Hardcore has never sounded better in the hands of the ‘veterans’, and they show no signs of losing their devastating anger and invention either…Happy Days!

http://www.ringworm13.net/

9/10

RingMaster 19/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Parachute For Gordo – Ten Metres Per Second Per Second

Parachute For Gordo

   The most rewarding explorations are those which challenge and push your limits whilst covering them in a simultaneously organic and deliberately sculpted seduction. One such testing experience comes in the striking shape of Ten Metres Per Second Per Second, the new release from self-penned noisybastard instrumental rock band, Parachute For Gordo. The trio from Aldershot in the UK take senses and imagination on a helter skelter of adventure and emotions, through a tempest of noise and melodic invention which persistently immerses and antagonises senses across its numerous evocative soundscapes. It is also a collection of tracks which are as much at home providing fun fuelled revelry as they are at inciting shadows and dangers within sound and emotions. The band does not provide a necessarily easy passage into the depths of their imagination and sound but boy is it thrillingly rewarding.

    Parachute for Gordo consists of guitarist Laura Lee, bassist John Harvey, and Johnny Somersett on drums. Formed in 2012 the project initially was simply a live provocation, one soon drawing acclaim and a greedy following across Hampshire and Surrey. Ten Metres Per Second Per Second is the band’s second EP/album, following the five track debut Eight Minutes Of Weightlessness of 2012. The new release was recorded live across a mere three hours bringing the heart and intense presence of the band in person powerfully into the tracks making up the proposition.

   The opening Bandage Of Scat instantly wraps the ears in a dark ambience, haunted vocal hums and distressed harmonies coveradding to the brewing shadows. The track fully envelops and smothers the senses before a rhythmic dance of schizophrenic beats and unpredictable urgency adds its bait to the darkly mesmeric piece. It is a sinister and slightly uncomfortable start which immediately awakens the imagination and an intrigued appetite for the impending ventures. That brewing hunger is instantly given a compelling feast of noise and experimental rock with the following I Offered You A Small Dog In The Kitchen. A rhythmic and vocal ‘chorus’ makes the first invitation before the clean and impressing guitar intrigue of Lee casts a melodic and descriptive sonic design, one elegant and precise but not lacking a sense of punk seeded incitement either. The bass of Harvey brings a darker throat to the stroll of the song whilst the rhythmic contagion of Somersett grips and leads instincts to embrace the developing creative drama with extra relish. The first two minutes of the song sees the band weave in jazzy and punk essences into post rock and noise soaked influences, that adventurous stance taking on more intense melodic metal and progressive traits the further the song flirts and romances with the imagination.

     10,000 Bay Leaves In A Koala Bears Mouth slowly unveils its emotive narrative from a slowly materialising ambience of lonely whispers and stark textures. As the guitar casts its evocative web with grace and skill and the bass skirts with its own distinct shadows, the song evolves into a stronger forceful picture upon a sinew built rhythmic canvas. A spoken sample adds to the noir kissed breath of the piece, whilst sonic endeavour lights the fuse to mental and emotional interpretation. All the tracks inspire self-visualisation and reflection for their often meandering but always controlled and thoughtful suggestiveness, with this one of the most inciting as melancholic and starkly lit scenes are conjured within a similarly colourful wind of hope and scenic expression.

    Decoy Octopus is easily the best track on the release, its eager stomp of rhythmic agitation and sonically hued flirtation an infectious and impossibly irresistible flight. Awash with colour rich melodies and watching dark shadows provided by the bass, the piece is a festival of movement and thought, musically and emotionally. As the post punk like dance of the song raises its temptation and intensity, the heady and impossibly appealing mix sparks thoughts of KingBathmat meets eighties instrumental funk/indie band Mouth? to spring up.

     The release is completed by The Labrasaga, a sixteen minute soundscape of enterprise, mischief, and adventure made up of two parts which flow together for one expansive journey. Part I: Labrador Deceiver also takes its lead from a searching ambience before a dialling tone marks the springboard for a concussive belt of riffs, drums, and bass provocation. They then relax for vocals to add their bait, their rare appearance on song and release as ever providing texture and colour. Across its length and through Part II: LabraDoodlebug, the scenery musically climbs mountains and prowls valleys, taking ears and thoughts on an inspirational and satisfying investigation. The whole piece is a little too long to be honest though there is never a moment where mind and attention wanders away.

    Ten Metres Per Second Per Second is released physically via Rose Coloured Music, including a special limited edition 12” red vinyl wrapped in the fine artwork of an artist local to the band, Karina Fraser. It is also digitally available from the band as a name your own price offering, providing two extra tracks, Give Up, Break! featuring Alyx Jones and Entropy Is Not What It Used To Be. The pair are both appealing, acoustically driven songs with full vocals; folk bred tracks which add another aspect to the creativity of the band. Parachute For Gordo and their counter is an at times demanding proposition but equally a richly promising and mightily enjoyable one, a challenge all noise and rock fans should take an intensive look at.

http://www.parachuteforgordo.com

http://parachuteforgordo.bandcamp.com/album/ten-metres-per-second-per-second

8.5/10

RingMaster 19/03/2014

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