Dark realms and shadowed emotions: an interview with Déhà of We All Die (Laughing)

 

wadl 1

The union of musician and composer Déhà (C.O.A.G., Maladi) and vocalist Arno Strobl (Carnival In Coal, 6:33) for the project We All Die (Laughing) has resulted in one of the most extraordinary experiences and towering creative tempests of recent times. Consisting of a single thirty three minute track sending the listener on a continually expanding landscape of emotionally drenched progressive dark metal, the Kaotoxin Records released Thoughtscanning is a powerfully provocative and enthralling immersion for thoughts and emotions. Keen to learn more about the project we took up the offer to talk with Déhà, questioning him about the band and album as well as news on his other projects.

Hello Déhà and thank you for sharing time with us so we can dig into the creative world of We All Die (Laughing).

The first question is obvious, how did the union of you both come about for the project?

Just out of nowhere, Arno & I started to discuss with an artist/fan relationship because I am a huge appreciator of Carnival in Coal. I talked to him about my different projects and I sent him the first demo of WADL back then, he fell in love and we decided to make this true!

You both guested on The Deceit EP from Eye Of Solitude; was that actually working together or just happened to be both appearing on the same song?

Well… I kinda forced my appearance on that song, haha! I was recording Arno’s voice for this song and I was like “oh fokdatchit, I’m going to scream a bit and in any case, they can remove my stuff” and they liked it really much! Funny fact it was before we released the album so many people were just asking “what the hell is “wadl” ?” and that was someway a good thing.

So We All Die (Laughing) is the first time you have intensively worked together creatively then?

Exactly. And that was fantastic. We understood each other without a need to talk or else.

Was there a particular spark which brought the actual project to life and specifically determined its direction?

That “power” we have together was the sparkle that started the fire. This mood we had was just “the” stuff we needed.

A bit of a naughty question 😉 but has each other’s music been something which has thrilled and inspired your individual passions or has it been more an encounter which has artistically impressed without lighting feverish emotions?

As for me, despite everything you might hear on this album, I was not inspired by any other music at all. This is emotion, as cliché as it sounds…

 A quick mention about your other bands/projects if we may; 6:33 has been a lustful passion for us since discovering Arno and co through the Giggles, Garlands & Gallows EP in 2012 whilst admittedly it has been only recently with C.O.A.G and Maladi that we have been drawn into the imaginative aggressive fire of yourself, Déhà. For you is there anything from those and other of your projects which have helped spawn or inspire some of the We All Die (Laughing) sound?

Absolutely not. The most “influential personal band” on this album might be some “imber luminis” stuff (an own project of mine) but it’s not even that hearable.

You have just released the extraordinary Thoughtscanning, your stunning one track epic debut album. How have responses cover Artwork by Maxime Taccardibeen and have they matched your expectations?

We have absolutely nice reviews all over the world and this is really great! I was not expecting that much positive reviews as the music’s complex, but I am really happy and grateful!

I will be honest and we said so in our review that a single thirty minute plus track was a daunting and initially not the strongest lure…that was until we plunged into its depths for the first time.  Did you have worries about a similar fear and maybe assumptions about a single track album scaring people off or was that something which never crossed your minds?

It did, but I am used to composing long tracks for one purpose : the trip, the journey given by the music has to stop only when we state it. And this album, even if lyrically divided in parts, had to be one song because it’s a circle closing on itself. And we wanted to keep it that way.

Was the release always planned as one piece of music?

Absolutely.

Thoughtscanning is an enthralling, intimidating, and breath-stealing adventure, certainly challenging but equally a virulently stimulating and dramatic journey for the emotions and imagination. Tell us about the premise behind the album and its theme.

It’s emotion. I won’t say it’s the purest emotion I might release, since I have different projects and bands for my different emotions, but WADL is mainly this constant struggle between you and yourself, wanting to be healed and at the same time, you don’t want to be healed, you’re tired, or else. It’s a cliché, but to hell with it. People are all clichés.

How did Thoughtscanning emerge; did it grow and come to life as we hear it on the album or was it more like a movie, scenes created and recorded in random order to be shaped after into the sonic narrative we are confronted with?

From the beginning until the end, I would fuse your two metaphors : It’s a movie which was shot from start to finish

We imagined that the album evolved right up to its final moments, is that the reality or did you have it in a finished state before recording?

It was exactly like what you’re hearing.

How long did the album take to create?

The Composition took one year, the voices recording took 2 months of demo & 1 week for the final recordings

The first pressing of Thoughtscanning also included an Amy Winehouse cover; tell us about that and how you approached a song which is distinctively hers?

It was our label’s idea for this song, we had plenty of choices but we never really agreed. When Nico told us about this song we totally agreed in one shot, since we’re appreciating Winehouse’s music and it was a pleasure, since her lyrics went perfectly with our concept.

Can we assume We All Die (Laughing) is an on-going project or will you be disappointing us with little or no more releases?

On-going.

Portraits by Maxime Taccardi.What comes next for We All Die (Laughing) and for you individually?

An EP, at some point, and more stuff at some point. We’re not stopping. As for my side, you can expect releases for Merda Mundi, COAG, Imber Luminis, Maladie and Clouds.

Once again thank you for talking with us.

Any thoughts or last words to inspire or provoke the readers?

Act.

www.facebook.com/wealldielaughing

Read the Thoughtscanning @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/14/we-all-die-laughing-thoughtscanning/

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

The RingMaster Review 11/03/2014

Insain – Enlightening the Unknown

 

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     First the good news; we can present to you one of the most brutal and exciting death metal releases you are likely to hear this year. Sadly the bad news is it is from a band which recently decided to call it a day. French metallers Insain had already announced themselves as one of the more promising and impressive emerging bands with their debut album Spiritual Rebirth which from a self-released unveiling was given a world wide release through Kaotoxin Records in 2012. It is fair to say though that their new EP Enlightening the Unknown thrusts the band into a greater intensive spotlight, one which they will not be seizing the opportunity of which is the only negative thing about the voracious release.

    Also released via Kaotoxin, Enlightening the Unknown sees Insain reaching and delving into deeper pits of black pestilence and unbridled brutality, its six tracks and intro throwing off what little restraints crept into the previous release to uncage thick torrents of pure death metal maliciousness and inventive savagery. Every aspect of the release finds the band at a new dangerous intensity and level, from their skill and hunger to the lethal impact and vicious craft of the songs. It is a stunning beast which bellows deep from its guts, announcing not only a final swansong but the loss of a band capable of making an enduring inspiring mark on death metal.

     The ruinous affair is begun by Abyssum Invocatis, a brief atmospheric introduction featuring guest malevolence from Eye 760137621423_TOX033_Insain_Artwork_600x600-300Of Solitude vocalist Daniel Neagoe. It is a portentous if slightly underwhelming scene setter which still ignites intrigue for what is ahead, that something going straight for the jugular in the thunderous form of Absorbing The Masse. From its first second, riffs are scorching skin and sonic insidiousness squirreling through the psyche like a predatory cyclone, both David Schonbackler and Nicolas Becuwe merciless in their rampaging intent. Equally drummer Jonathan “Sangli” Juré unleashes a rhythmic rabidity which injures and compels the senses. The EP also features the musician’s final staggering performance of rapacious craft and blistering energy, Juré having fought for more than a year in the hospital to recover from a violent car crash which subsequently ended his musical career. The track consumes and suffocates in a thick tsunami like assault but as equally effective and dramatic is the contagious toxicity which brings even stronger temptation before the passions.

      Vocalist Louis Lafitte provides an almost scourge like persuasion with his irresistible guttural scowls and roars, a rage which continues to savage ears in the following The Faceless One; the diversity of the vocals as gripping and vicious as the sounds squalling around them. The bass of Benoit “Bono” Jean brings a throaty spite to the ferocity too, building on the snarl bred in the first song to coax guitars and drums to breed an almost pack like mentality to their ravenous onslaught. The track proceeds to prowl, stalk, and pounce as it plunders emotions and corrodes synapses, raising another rapture of pain and satisfaction with only the fade-out end a small niggle.

    Both Beyond Stellar Remnants and The Scourge take up sonic arms to continue the increasingly impressive and enthralling album, the first a ridiculously addictive and hellacious violation. Juré as usual is sensational, his arms and feet flinging beats and rhythms like lassos around the senses whilst the guitars scythe through the air and ears with a punishing intensity and ingeniously vindictive enterprise. The track swaggers and sways within its primal pillaging, igniting body and soul with a virulent infectiousness to its barbaric provocation. The track provides a mountain top in a heady range of peaks whilst its successor is a just as brutal and invigorating pestilential bombardment, grooves and vocals the perfect protagonists scavenging the beleaguered senses within a rhythmic threat just as intensively hungry and clad in animosity.

     The title track, with Neagoe adding more of his distinct venom, ensures there is no let-up in the epidemic of violence within the new level of searing causticity, its cruel vehemence and fearsome energy a tornado of noxious endeavour. As with all the tracks, it needs numerous ventures in front of its sonic sand blast to reap all the excellent skills and rewards on display but well worth every scar and wound incurred. The release is concluded in similar style by Apex, the song as groove laden and nastily uncompromising as its predecessor and the EP as a whole.

     Enlightening the Unknown is quite irresistible, a dangerously addictive venture which brings a sigh at the loss of a band once probably destined to be a giant of metal. There is obviously great anticipation of what the members of the band turn to next, expectations of notable things easy to build but it will not be Insain and from this release alone it is a major loss. You should always end on a high they say and Enlightening The Unknown is all that and much more. Available digitally and as a limited edition 1,000 strong MCD, this is one violent act not to be missed.

https://www.facebook.com/insaindeath

http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/enlightening-the-unknown

10/10

RingMaster 11/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Monsterworks – Universe

 

Universe Band

   It feels like just a mere breath ago that New Zealand metallers Monsterworks released the outstanding Earth, an album which took the listener on an enthralling journey through time and a continually expanding sound, in flavour and textures. Now the London, UK based quartet push the adventure and theme found on the last release to further absorbing depths with Universe, a seven track epic which assaults, seduces, and envelops the imagination.   

  Whereas previous album Earth took on the concept of our planet and its flight from birth to death, Monsterworks takes the next epic step and explores the lifecycle of the Universe in their new incitement. Vocalist/guitarist Jon gave a richer explanation about the release recently, “This is our follow up to Monsterworks :: Earth from last year.  We wanted to top ourselves conceptually, so how to surpass an album about the life cycle of Earth from birth to death?  It could only be an album about the life cycle of the Universe from birth to death.  At least it started out that way with lyrics exploring big bang to heat death, but it gets a little philosophical along the way considering the path mankind might take in its evolution.  It is a bloody long time until the last black hole evaporates.”  Like its predecessor the album provides a thick and complex presence and with each trip unveils more levels and corners to immerse within. Equally like Earth, the new release reaps the essences of a wealth of metal and heavy rock styles to create a tapestry of unpredictability and intrigue around a similarly creative narrative. Whether Universe rivals Earth’s triumph can be debated but as a sister companion in an epic adventure it leaves the imagination alive and passions engaged.

    The Eat Lead and Die released album opens up the journey with its title track, its emergence from a distant realm gentle and Universe Starchildinviting as the guitars unwind sonic tendrils and beats provide a forming heart for the piece. The vocals also come in a mellow and harmonic breeze which washes over and wraps around the ears until an explosion of passionate energy and rhythmic penetration brings everything into intensive focus. The vocals subsequently veer with almost wild abandon from clean to a Rob Halford like wail and then into a bestial predation, twisting and evolving from there on in like the music around them. As mentioned each song reveals more of its depths as numerous encounters are embraced, the first track seemingly having patience in its declaration to offer a fresh aspect to every immersion into its impressive flight. With the wealth of styles employed in its maze of invention and sound, song and album fluctuates in success depending on personal tastes, but never relinquishes the strength and potency of its initial temptation across the vast landscape.

    The following Grandiose is a tempestuous storm from its first seconds, guitars and rhythms a bruising enticement driven by equally rapacious vocals. As the first, it also flares up and twists with demonic efficiency to leave expectations a wasted exercise and imagination enflamed. The progressive core of the track provides a magnetic canvas but it is the almost carnivorous fire and heat of the cosmic hues which thrill as they lure the emotions on a provocative and satisfying plunge into celestial turbulence, even if the fade-out at the end is less pleasing though it does help suggest the unlimited expanse of the scenery.

     The touch of man brings a more intimate aspect to Voyager, its gorgeous entrance with beauty clad guitar and vocal harmonies mesmeric in its tempting. The imaginative hooks and twists of guitar invention add to the mystery and exploratory intent of the song as it soars through peaceful and more intensive realms. It is a scintillating ride bringing the album to a towering pinnacle which is never surpassed though The Bridge gives it a formidable go with its raw and fiery venture into the unknown. With a blackened air to its voracious malevolence, the track threatens and entices as it treads into new spatial waters. At times it is an uncomfortable but always a thoroughly riveting investigation which is as thrilling as it is intimidating.

     The collision of thrash and heavy metal at the first bluster of Extropy makes an instantly contagious ride, a rhythmic recruitment irresistible as guitars and bass carve a sinew driven torrent of enterprise and intensive endeavour. It is a song which at first pleased without much more, but given the time and companionship it turns into another major highlight which simply exhausts and scintillates. Its successor Heat Death is similar in that it too was not as instant in its persuasion compared to the earlier tracks but equally worked away to convince and excite, though not to the same potency and depth as the previous song. At ten minutes it is a slightly demanding coaxing but with elegant keys and melodic flames which lick at the senses with tenderness and hope reaped caresses, the song seizes keen attention and emotional companionship which never wavers especially as it expels acidic sonic scythes across a caustic energy in its latter half.

   The excellent Outside Time brings the album to a mighty close, its multi-flavoured ever turning body of sound and adventure pure captivation. With a skilled manipulation of thoughts and emotions, it is a towering incitement concluding another outstanding exploit from Monsterworks. Though personally the album misses igniting the depth of passion as Earth achieved, Universe is undeniably a piece of sonic alchemy which leaves the listener involved and excited on numerous levels; another journey from Monsterworks impossible to enthuse loudly over.

http://www.supermetal.net

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/03/2014

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