Hungry Brains – Centre Of The Omniverse EP/The Mule EP

The Mule EP

The Mule EP

     The tail end of 2013 saw the release of two sister EPs from UK’s  Hungry Brains, a pair of releases which suggests that the Manchester trio and their impressive mix of stoner rock and progressive metal is a towering force in the making. Both releases spark the imagination and passions with skilful enterprise and mountainous ranges of riffs and sonic flaming. Think Monster Magnet meets Alice In Chains with plenty of Svolk and Red Fang bulging contagion involved and you get a big hint to the scintillating sound created by the band and as to why both EPs are leaving lips eagerly licked and anticipation rife for what is ahead from the band.

      Made up of Callum Armstrong, Paul Daly, and Orestis Papadopoulous, Hungry Brains first swiped at or rather barged into attention with the Centre Of The Omniverse EP last September. Consisting of three tracks which instantly enflamed the senses and imagination it was a commanding entrance soon reinforced by the December unleashing of The Mule EP. Alone either make a compelling introduction but together they enforce a declaration of intent from a band only a fool would refuse to keep a close eye and eager ears upon.

Centre Of The Omniverse

Centre Of The Omniverse EP

    Centre Of The Omniverse opens with Dawn Of A New Age and immediately is throwing heavy muscular rhythms at the ears whilst the guitar sears all their vibrating hairs in the face of its intimidating and refreshing tempest. Vocals are not slow in thrusting their persuasion forward either and soon the impressing dual delivery is seducing even further the already keen appetite awoken by the already contagious sounds. That AIC reference is soon bearing its suggestion, especially through the vocals which a carry a definite Layne Staley feel but also we would suggest there is a slight Metallica essence as well as Soundgarden and Kyuss to the song’s imaginative mix. It is a totally magnetic start with only the fade out to its finale a slight niggle.

    The following Unmade is a brief and rigorous brawl of sound with blues kissed psychedelia soaking the melodic adventure whilst rhythms again thump and career through the ear with firm and skilled provocation. Raw and fiery in sound and breath, the track is a combative yet seductive blaze of enterprise which produces and says more aurally in its one and a half minute than most bands manage in their epic soundscapes.

      The first EP is concluded by Crooked Eye, a tantalising blend of expressive and harmonically fiery vocals within a sinew driven rhythmic cave and heavy intensive riffs. Part stalking and part canter, the song entices the imagination with a steely sonic stare and evocative melodic embrace whilst never relenting in its dramatic persuasion or breath stealing craft. As with all the songs and those on the second EP, there is never a moment where predictability reigns or expectations are merely fed, every minute and flame of sound an invigorating incitement for thoughts and emotions.

    It is hard to recall many introductions to a band which has been enjoyed more and The Mule EP soon shows it is not a one off. Made up of one track in two parts, the release confirms and stretches further the potent temptation and presence of Hungry Brains with ease. Part 1 opens with a shamanic call of vocal chants which is instantly meditative but equally coaxing the imagination into thoughts of something dramatic and imposing pending. That hope is slowly realised as the track emerges, taking its time with rolling heavy cast rhythms and a sonic mist of almost antagonistic tempting within a relatively restrained atmosphere. The bass is a delicious tempter in the evocation, dark and menacing amongst the heated weave surrounding its throaty tones. The piece scores the air for a final time before evolving into Part 2 and unveiling a contemplative stroll of riffs and mutually determined rhythms. As a spiral of sonic sculpting from the guitar ignites the song’s sky, vocals again present the lyrical narrative in impressive and enticing style, once more only adding to the overall irresistible lure of the sound and release. Virulently contagious without losing its dramatic intensity and provocation, the nine minute track infests the passions to make its length slip by in moments and its potent suasion and that of the whole release rise with every passing minute.

      Hungry Brains is a band we are sure you will be hearing time and time again swamped in acclaim across the future months and years and with both releases available as buy now name your price releases on Bandcamp, only the foolish and lazy would wait until then and resist now the stunning toxicity of this impressive band.

http://hungrybrains.bandcamp.com/

www.facebook.com/HungryBrains

10/10 for both EPs

RingMaster 15/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Orion – On the Banks of Rubicon

 

orion pic

    It is fair to say that India is a potent metal scene still relatively untapped by the rest of the world. It is a shame and a little surprising as the amount of bands which thrill and impress there is a constant hint, especially in regard to extreme metal, of just how strong the scene is. Progressive death metallers Orion provide another enthralling formidable nudge with their EP On the Banks of Rubicon. Four tracks of riveting and persistently unpredictable invention, the release is a burning beacon of skill and imagination which should not be ignored.

     Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Vigneshkumar Venkatraman (also of Albatross), guitarist Ashwin Kulkarni, bassist Anshuman Bhattacharya, and drummer Pritesh Prabhune, the quartet from Mumbai was formed in 2008 and released their first demo Reverie Hours two years later. Taking inspirations from the likes of Death, Opeth, Necrophagist, Gojira, Periphery, and Protest The Hero into their blend of progressive and death metal with plenty of further essences to captivate the imagination, the band makes a compelling persuasion with On the Banks of Rubicon. Strikingly merging melodic and carnivorous intents into a landscape of provocation which startles and seduces from start to finish, the EP is a masterful exploration which sculpts a formidable declaration for not only the band but Indian metal as a whole.

     Opening track Oh Sweet Ebullition immediately seizes ears and attention with thumping rhythms and sonic craft, the guitars coverwrapping sonic tendrils around the senses whilst expanding a melodic enterprise through reserved but open grooves and instantly persuasive riffing. It is a magnetic entrance which lures thoughts and emotions into the heart of the melodic and groove metal mix brought with predatory energy and breath. A sudden dip into melodic elegance opens the door for a torrent of rapacious provocation, riffs and the heavy growls of Venkatraman spawning rabidity in the track as it goes straight for the jugular. It is an intensive evocation which commands the senses before without warning diving into a progressive and melodic stretch of beauty and mesmeric seduction. This is subsequently entwined within the sinew driven death bred aggression of before to ignite an even greedier hunger for the song. Only half way in and the encounter has taken the breath away with its power and invention, something which never relents up to the final second of the six minute plus tempting. Nothing on the song is repeated beyond the passage seeding any particular moment and along with the excellent vocal fusion of guttural vitriol and clean melodic deliveries impressively helps drive the song straight into the passions. Like a union of Motherjane, Bhayanak Maut, and Opeth but with much more uniqueness, it is a rigorously incendiary and thrilling start to the release.

    Devoured Existence enters next on a blaze of skilful sonic colouring which again ignites the imagination straight away, priming it for the harsh creative jaws of the track which scar and provoke. A thrash kissed surge to the riffing is tempered by the death metal spawned vocal delivery and surrounding imposing shadows but this itself is only subservient to the again outstanding guitar invention and menacing basslines which control it all. Predictability is once more completely absent in the creative maelstrom, classic metal spirals of sonic ingenuity descending to defeat expectations whilst the song niggles with almost pestilential efficiency enslaving the emotions as fully as its predecessor and the following triumph Astral. Almost eight minutes of simultaneously rampaging, crawling, and seducing adventure, twisting melodic and doom metal with a blackened wind over a progressive death metal, the third song is a scintillating encounter. Once more Motherjane comparisons spring to mind at times and certainly at the beginning, as does those to UAE band Absolace but it is only a small flavour in an ever evolving and shifting soundscape which entrances and violates with equal success and grandeur. The best track on the release it reveals and screams out all of the impressive elements and skills of Orion in songwriting and presentation. One of the best extreme metal tracks heard in a long time it can be the doorway to the widest recognition with a slice of luck.

     The EP closes with the most direct death metal track My Dying Prayer, but again there is plenty of invention unleashed to bewitch and wrong foot the ears for the richest satisfaction, everything from vocals to guitar mastery, bass snarling to rhythmic manipulation impressively addictive.  On the Banks of Rubicon is an exceptional encounter all should take a big chunk of time out to investigate. It will impress and thrill whilst maybe opening the gateway to an undiscovered world of invention driven metal in the band’s homeland. Be brave and go for it we say.

https://www.facebook.com/orionmumbaimetal

http://www.transcendingobscurity.com/

10/10

RingMaster 15/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Magenta Harvest – Volatile Waters

 

Promo_pic

     Like its title suggestiveness Volatile Waters from Finnish death metallers Magenta Harvest is an invigorated rapacious confrontation with aggressive and spiteful currents adding antagonistic intent to the intriguing proceedings. Also like an expanse of overbearing water the release ebbs and flows in potency and impact but is never less than compelling and persistently magnetic in its destructive lures. Building on the promise set out by earlier releases, the album is a sizeable slab of metallic contempt and vitriolic temptation and easily extends and stretches the potential which has slowly been gripping attention to date.

    Formed in 2005 as a two man project by guitarist Timo Kontio (Havoc Unit, O, ex-…and Oceans) and drummer Janne Manninen, Magenta Harvest was a testing ground for the invention and ideas of the pair at first before second guitarist Timo Hanhikangas joined up with the band’s founders in 2009 alongside bassist Jonas Frilund (Chthonian). With vocalist Mathias Lillmåns (Finntroll, Chthonian) joining in 2010, first demo A Familiar Room was released in 2011 with the second Apparition of Ending arriving the following year. Focus was swiped from fans by both releases but it will be the Inverse Records released Volatile Waters which will make the strongest breakthrough for the band you suspect. It is not one to file amongst classic first albums but attention grabbing and satisfaction giving it undeniably is.

     End and No Remembrance is the first incitement presented on the album by the Pietarsaari/Helsinki based quintet, the covertrack emerging from a battle scene on some storm drenched shore with destructive rhythms driving on rugged riffing and a sonic tempest of sound. Settled into its stride with those same provocations taking a steadier but no less impacting aggression, the guttural malevolent growls and squalls of Lillmåns unleash their venom on proceedings. It is a formidable and maybe expected attack but certainly richly pleasing and one soon twisted by the blaze of clean vocals which break out intermittently across the rest of the song. It is a great mix hardly used at all on the rest of the album sadly and an inspiring additive to the tempestuous enterprise soaking the great opener.

   The excellent start is backed up with the same predation and success by One Walks Down, a virulently malicious rampage which tears at the ears and chews the senses from start to finish but also entwines evocative keys and a core groove which easily seduces the passions into its pestilential presence. Not quite the equal of its predecessor the song is still a masterful tempting to eagerly immerse within and have its fevered sonic rapaciousness eroding the senses. The next up Spawn of Neglect is less successful and commanding though it is hard to hold much against it apart from the lack of the creative and appealing spark found on the first two offerings. The bass of Frilund as elsewhere is an undoubted  draw within the song and the craft undeniably strong but as afflicts a few songs on the album there is something missing to incite the emotions into strong reactions.

     The following title track starts a two track pinnacle for the album, its unrelenting drive and addiction forging grooves, not forgetting clumping rhythms and carnivorous riffery, infectious as a base and epidemically taunting at their height. The stalking predatory nature of the song is the overriding enticement though, a trait thrillingly used by its successor, the outstanding Apparition of Ending. Torrential with cascading intensive beats from a hungry rhythmic battlement falling upon the senses whilst riffs furrow deep within the passions, the fury is unrelenting . That is until it suddenly expands a rich and mesmeric melodic blanket of beauty over the whole scene with keys especially magnetic. The returning savage rampancy of the track brings its glory full circle and back to voraciously transgressing on the listener, a violation welcomed and ultimately stealing to honours on the album.

   Through the likes of the bestially hunting Interrupted Fleshwork , rhythms preying on its quarry with contagion, and the senses hounding Limbo in Rime the album continues its weight and appeal , even if both tracks struggle to match their immediate predecessors whilst Spiteful Beings to Earth Were Bound ravages with a bone splintering rhythmic punishment and jagged riffs which tear the senses for the ever insidious and enjoyable vocal delivery to lay its poison. It provides a returning step up in the undulating but constantly strong flow of the album, an elevation taken further by the excellent A Symposium of Frost. A ferocious storm from its first hardcore bred grazing of vocals and sound, the track shares its presence with a stomp of prowling aggravation and rhythmic invention laid within primal bait.

   Completed by Carrion of Me, a more than decent final scourge of accomplished and vicious sonic fascination, Volatile Waters is an album with plenty to satisfy death metal appetites whether bred in old school or from a more hybrid nature. Magenta Harvest may not set fires raging in the belly with their release but certainly they leave no one devoid of satisfaction and enjoyment.

https://www.facebook.com/MagentaHarvest

8/10

RingMaster 15/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Queen Elephantine – Scarab

 

Photo by Erin Dynamic.

Photo by Erin Dynamic.

    Intensively provocative and demandingly challenging Scarab the new album from Queen Elephantine is a release which it is not too wide of the mark to say will not be for everyone. Consisting of four experimental and expansive landscapes of doom clad laments immersing the senses in darkness bred funereal breaths and captivations, the album is a testing evocation to avoid or embrace, with little in between one suspects. Meditative yet disturbing, seductive yet exacting, engaging yet overwhelming, the album is an uncompromising intrusive dirge but also persistently compelling.

     Scarab is the fourth album from Queen Elephantine, a project formed in Hong Kong in 2006 and now residing in Providence, Rhode Island. With several splits also under their belts including releases with Sons of Otis and Elder, the Indrayudh Shome led band has earned a strong reputation with their impacting explorations to which Scarab adds another epically cast uncompromisingly delivered landscape. With bassist Mat Becker, drummers Ian Sims and Nathanael Totushek, tanpura player Srinivas Reddy, and slide guitarist Brett Zweiman alongside Shome and his guitar skills, the band steer the listener into bleak psychedelic threnodies which never allow a breath to be taken in hope or made without an intense melancholic soak.

     Opener Veil coaxes the ears with a rhythmic and percussive persuasion initially, an intriguing tempting with slight tanpura a1459832747_2caresses and sonic whispers watching on. Once the bass and throaty guitar enters though a shadow clouds over the tempting to chill and inspire the imagination with stronger potency. Taunts of repetition begin laying down their riveting seeds from this point but through a weave which slowly shifts and evolves as the first of the long winding tracks emerges fully. The song like the album has to be taken and assessed over numerous traverses of its heavy presence, it inducing a stronger persuasion and convincing with each taken endeavour. The droning breath of the track which takes over until the equally dragging vocals steal their moment nag and entice, but equally provide an irritant to fear or crowd in with mentally and emotionally. Though the shortest track on the album at a mere eight minutes it makes the listener work for its rewards, or that may be endure for some, but nevertheless it offers plenty for most to feed eagerly upon.

   The following Crone as good as emerges from the trailing wash of its predecessor, bass and again dark toned guitar making the first bait of the song. It is a demand on ears and patience at times especially in the first four minute stretch of the eighteen minute submergence into the darkest corners of the soul and emotional depths but a constant lure on thoughts as they unveil their interpretation and feelings on the slow resonating probing. Vocals with a mutually effective monotony to the sounds clasping them add a warmer hue to the narrative if without sparking any change and intent from the labour intensive persuasion being woven around the psyche. There is no respite to the emotional turmoil and restrained but merciless evocative droning, and the track certainly outstays personal limits with its length and full on provocation though within that blanket of sonic murmuring and discord kissed humming little twists and additives spark attention and appetite for the perpetually engaging enthrallment.

     The bass sound conjured across the album is a strong tempting alongside the guitar imagination and within the final pair of tracks Snake and Clear Light of the Unborn both make no exceptions in their entangling of the emotions. The first of the two casts ten minutes of minimalistic and progressive searching of those prevailing contemplations of the abyss. Admittedly a surface look provides a similar canvas to the songs around it and it is only, as with all the tracks, an intensive dive into the swallowing tenebrous climate that individual nuances and provocations truly unveil themselves. The song is the hardest most unforgiving listen on the release and often difficult to remain in the grasp of but still provides plenty to be stimulated and gripped by. Its successor from a mesh of chants around a spitting heat leads into an invasive swamp of textures and sounds similar to those which marked the previous track but also stirs up new caustic winds and sonic rubs as it develops its thirteen minute incitement.

     Stronger in its first half and a constant depressive questioning, the Heart & Crossbone Records (CD)/Cosmic Eye Records (LP) released Scarab is undoubtedly for a certain appetite but before that kind of hunger is a formidable and impressive progressive doom exploit igniting a wealth of emotions and instincts. Queen Elephantine does not make it easy but they never leave you short on satisfaction and adventure.

http://queenelephantine.clfrecords.com

http://queenelephantine.bandcamp.com/album/scarab

7.5/10

RingMaster 15/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com