Dzyen – Self-Titled EP

 

Photo Debbie Todd

Photo Debbie Todd

Providing impressive food for thought, UK progressive metallers Dzyen unleash their debut EP to instantly thrust themselves on the genre radar but equally with a rich blend of flavouring to their potent sound it has plenty to draw in a wider expanse of metal fans from groove through to alternative.  The five track encounter is a feisty and inventive riot of sound and energy suggesting that the Stanley, County Durham hailing band is a proposition to keep a close and eager eye upon. Their self-titled EP is striking without being startling, imaginative without being ground-breaking but certainly is one thickly flavoursome and captivating release which sparks imagination and emotions.

     Made up of vocalist/guitarist Scot Goodrum, bassist Bryan Tulip, and drummer Niel Linney and formed in 2011, the band takes influences from the likes of Tool, Periphery, Sikth, and Trivium into their thoughtful and enjoyably crafted adventure. With 15 years of experience behind them from roots which began in death metal, the trio has evolved into a progressive/melodic metal persuasion which has been earning good attention and acclaim from fans and other artists such as members of Tesseract, Monuments, Novallo and Skyharbor, some of whom appear on the EP funnily enough. The release of first single Digital Senseless last December sparked an eagerness and appetite to find out more about the band which their EP feeds whilst confirming all the promise previously suggested.

    The single opens up the EP and features guest vocals from Daniel Tompkins (Skyharbor, White Moth Black Butterfly) as well as a0975414611_2Novallo guitarist Gino Bambino.  A collaboration written by band and guests, Digital Senseless is an instant forceful rub on the ear with a contagious bait of djent seeded riffery and an intensive rhythmic scouring of the air to open up its presence. The mix of vocals between Tompkins and Goodrum is a fiery mix of clean and raw which works a treat and one which at times the sounds struggle to keep up with in impact. Nevertheless the pleasing track strides confidently and powerfully with a compelling veining of melodic enterprise through its bulging muscular body as well as a thoroughly infectious chorus.

     From the strong start things only get tighter and more contagious, Beneath The Surface stepping forward next with progressive nostrils flaring and grooves writing within the instantly appealing temptation. From opening scratchy guitar strokes the track expels a heavy commanding breath, again djent sculpted riffs and crisp sinew driven rhythms plus a great throaty bass sound leading the way into the heart of the song. With a melodic and mellow caress accompanying the chorus within a still rigorous metallic pressuring, the song sparks thoughts of Mudvayne and American Head Charge. It is a healthy mix which the band explores and filters into their individual expressive endeavour for a deeply satisfying and thrilling portrait of sound and enterprise which easily twists the emotions around its infectious enticement.

      Neurosis next keeps the lofty heights going. The best track on the release, it is a voracious impact with thumping rhythms and carnivorous riffs driving its intent whilst the vocals of Goodrum create a fluid blend of raw surfaced attacks and ever agreeable melodic clean tones primed to seduce. The song like most always seem to stomp midway between clean and aggressive, never leaning too far into either despite often hinting a preference but always finding an impressive union which never fails the band. In saying that there is no doubt that this is the most combative track on the EP and shows with ease that the band can create corrosive rampages quite easily and skilfully if they want.

    The good times keep coming as Dzyen offers up an accomplished and thoroughly satisfying cover of Just So You Know, the aforementioned American Head Charge classic. It is fair to say that the band does not stretch or reinvent it in any dramatic way instead providing a faithful and ravenous version which easily hits the spot and with the song already a favourite it just cannot fail to add another big positive to the EP.

   The closing Dualism Part 1 took longer than other songs to fully convince with numerous plays unveiling its rich depths and thrilling textures in their complete persuasion. Featuring and written with Sam Gitiban, the vocalist of US progressive metallers Novallo, the track is an eight minute expanse of gritty rhythms, twisted grooves, and melodic tempting which has a Slipknot feel in their mellower moments. It also comes with an unexpected and unpredictable want to turn in on itself with additional styles and progressively bred imagination evolving into a resourceful provocation which alone shows the richness and expanse of the songwriting and adventure within the band.

     With a Lee Jackson directed first music video in the immediate future soon followed by a debut album and touring, as well as this inspiring and promising entrance, Dzyen look like making 2014 a breakthrough year to remember for them and us. A definite must check out release of the coming year.

www.facebook.com/dzyenband

http://dzyen.bandcamp.com/album/ep

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/01/2014

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Categories: EP, Music

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