Toumaï – Sapiens Demens

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Creating what they term psyche-fonk metal, French band Toumaï is one of those encounters which send tingles down the spine as it teases and ignites the imagination. Unleashing a majestic psyche twisting bedlam in the tasty shape of debut album Sapiens Demens, the quintet from the south of France bewitch and tantalise with each psychotic note and every maniacal rhythm. Their album is a tempest of ideas and cracked invention presenting an adventure like no other and a pleasure which only turns lustful over time.

What little we can tell you about Toumaï is that the band formed in 2006 and consists of vocalist Antoine Flaven Hude, guitarist Julien Mahoudeau, bassist Christophe Applanat, drummer Clement Mahoudeau, and Célia  on keys and trumpet. That is about it, apart from the fact that their first album is irresistible and uncontrollably insatiable with imagination, mischief, and inventive hunger. The five-piece bring influences from the likes of Psykup, Infectious Groove, Primus, Gojira, Mr. Bungle, Primus Band, Rage Against The Machine, Tool, and Red Hot Chili Peppers into their fusion of funk, rock, and metal, but it is only one shade of the whole picture; the release a musical canvas which only the ears can truly represent not our simple words, though we will give it a go of course.

The opening track is Little Psycho, a title so apt for song and album. From an initial percussive tease the drums lay down a riveting frame around which the bass roams and leans on the senses with a menacing glee whilst the keys dance with energy and mischievousness over the ears as vocals explore their narrative with quality and equally enterprising rascality. The swagger of the song is a delicious bait alone within its ever changing gait and presence of the song whilst bursts of aggression make the perfect suitor to the elegant beauty which coats the keys and their melodic caresses. There is a similarity to fellow Frenchmen Mucho Tapioca at times as the song climbs and soars through its persistently shifting glory but also of System Of A Down in its latter moments and Faith No More across its stirring flanks.

The impressive start is immediately left in the wake of next up Madness in Mind, the best track on the album with ease. Vocal croons wrap the ears right away as the guitar and keys stroke attention to its fullest height, before the song settles into a ska kissed, reggae bred stroll within metallic walls which get their turn to intimidatingly press upon and please the senses. With its funk hips swaying leading to the raucous chorus, the track is like King Prawn meets Korn though when it slips into a beauteous wash of ever engaging keys and vocal harmonies punctuated by another striking bass line and rhythmic probing, the band takes the listener down a more alternative rock avenue. This is only halfway in though and the track only accelerates to greater potency and persuasion once it lifts its knees to romp into an infection soaked waltz of enterprise fusing the loco folk/pop of Mano Negra with the contagious unhinged temptation of Kontrust before thrusting it all through a Skindred bred causticity. It is crazy and completely enthralling, not forgetting simply sensational.

The following Petit Punk en Ut#m is no slouch in tripping the switch to the strongest satisfaction either, its more noise seeded rock and disorientating psyche funk tempting another feast of unpredictability and hunger breeding invention. Scavenging the senses for the weakest spot, the song flares over the opportunity with punk belligerence and metal sculpted antagonism as it works towards its climax, not before having seduced with dazzles of psychotic indie melody seeded teasing. Another highlight, the song is backed in strength by the less crazed Anachron, a track which admittedly does not quite reach those earlier set heights but still magnetises attention and appetite with its funk stepping vibrancy and contagious melodic smile.

Both Bankster and Wiki Puppies keep the listener on their toes physically and mentally, the first and extensive expanse of craft and imagination which lays down a pulsating quickstep of reggae spawned pop. This is then wrung through voracious cantankerous crescendos at certain moments which burst from the song’s wonderfully exhausting enticement which builds towards a dramatically powerful and aurally traumatic brilliant closing declaration. Its successor pounces and leaps over the imagination as if its notes and ideas are crossing hot coals. It is a tempestuous mix of jazz, rock, psyche, and avant-garde devilry placed in a maelstrom which seamlessly forges an addiction spawning triumph from it all, rhythmically, melodically, and vocally.

The two parts of the title track almost come as a shock, the first especially subdued and restrained in its cinematic atmosphere and noir clad shadows and spoken vocals in comparison to the rest of the album, though the second part is soon climbing up the walls with scorching grooves and twisting melodic flames igniting the air around the again excellent vocal presentation. A relatively, and we say that with tongue slightly in cheek, straight forward heavy rock infused slice of metal with those continually entrancing keys of Celia enticing the emotions, the track is a deeply pleasing venture setting up the appetite for the closing mastery of  Prey of Birds.

The final song enjoyably plagues the ears with a kaleidoscope of sounds and challenging invention shuffled to an inch of its cohesive life, but as on all tracks it casts a proposition which is fully coherent and wholly. Sapiens Demens is a thrilling testament to endeavour and outside the box thinking but crafted with a knowledge nestling within Toumaï of how far to go and where to link everything for an innovative and breath-taking whirlpool of sound. Another to add to the must have list.

http://www.toumai-music.net/

10/10

RingMaster 07/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Colossus Of Destiny – In Lesser Brightness EP

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We have a tasty little treat to bring to your attention as the year opens up its arms in the towering form of the In Lesser Brightness EP. Six tracks of multi-flavoured metal veined by some mouthwatering fusions of heavy rock, the release from French band Colossus Of Destiny is a rigorously impressive encounter. Released last October but seemingly finding greater deserved attention over recent weeks, the EP is a riveting slab of enterprise and accomplished persuasion which should see the Paris band stepping into a wider intensive spotlight.

The 2009 formed Colossus Of Destiny consists of vocalist Adrien Guilmoteau, guitarists Julien Laville and Mathieu Miquel, bassist Guillaume Taliercio, and drummer Jérémie Le Formal. Taking influences from the earlier presences of bands such as Baroness, Tool, Kylesa, Unsane, and Taint into their distinctive sound the band has released two previous EPs, their self-titled debut of 2010 and Eden the following year. There is little more background info to be found but when a record like the Hellbound Records released In Lesser Brightness does the potent talking for them you do not have the want to know more. Bulging with rock muscles which flatten the senses and a metal bred intensity that shapes the imagination with predacious intent, the EP is an immense introduction for us and probably plenty more to a band which has over the past four years honed their persuasion into something quite irresistible.

Dismay In Empty Eyes sets things in motion, its emergence from a brief stormy ambience marked by thumping rhythms and a spiralling sonic coaxing from the guitars. The drums instantly impress as does the moody basslines and excellent vocal growls of Guilmoteau and as the track rises from its lumbering stretch without ever exploding into life, just continually loading layers of intensive textures upon the ears, the song becomes a compelling temptation to which the guitar casts rich spicery. A sludge borne weight wraps itself around the imposing track adding to its heavy potency whilst elsewhere vocally and musically, the song reaps varied flavours such as post hardcore and melodic metalcore to hard and post rock to make a striking start to the album.

Unleashed takes things to another level right away and with its successors takes In Lesser Brightness to a much higher plateau. Crushing rhythms and air scoring riffs spears the ears first, both soon ridden by scowling vocals as the song makes its impressive opening declaration. There is right away a much more aggressive urgency and force to the track compared to its predecessor, guitars niggling and combative whilst the bass holds a predatory gait and voice which urges on the bone splintering rhythmic attack. The song is pure contagion throughout, addictive without offering easy lightweight hooks and commanding without bludgeoning to achieve its success. With a punk breath to its metal/rock persuasion which not for the last time on the EP sparks thoughts of Fuckshovel and Gruntruck, the confrontation is a thrilling blast soon matched as the release strikes home its advantage on the passions.

The next up Get Lost also fuses stirring elements of punk, metal, and hardcore to sculpt another major pinnacle upon the EP. Snarling from vocals to riffs as rhythms slam with eager rapaciousness, the track is a voracious brawl on the imagination but one unafraid to slow its assault to merge strong melodic tempting and inventive twists into the creative raging. As soon as the song departs Heavy Loads leaps forward with ravenous riffs and sonic tantalising coaxing the senses to secure an early hunger for its potential offering which the track rewards with more distinctive and varied adventure in songwriting and sound. It is fair to say that some elements of song and release are bred from familiar territory but it is hard to think of anyone which sculpts and delivers those essences in the same dramatic way as Colossus Of Destiny.

The title track shifts things again, slowing the gait but adding some progressive invention to the imagination invading suasion superbly crafted by band and song. An absorbing merger of intensity and melodic expression it is an evocative and mouth-watering incitement, as the whole release, to devour greedily whilst the closing Naked & Unbound provides a final thrilling union of muscle, infectious grooving, and melodic fire to reinforce the impressive stature of In Lesser Brightness.

It is hard to imagine on the evidence of In Lesser Brightness and a retrospective look at their previous EPs that Colossus Of Destiny will not become a potent name and presence in forceful music so joining their certain rise right now makes the only sense. A stunning release from an outstanding band, you read it here!

https://www.facebook.com/colossusofdestiny

http://colossusofdestiny.bandcamp.com/

9/10

RingMaster 07/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.audioburger.com

Tapewyrm – House Of Cards

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Barely has the New Year had time to open its eyes and UK noise master Tapewyrm has crushed its arrival in a tempest of spiteful corrosive hostility with the House Of Cards EP. Consisting of five sonic scourges which fry the senses and obliterate the psyche, the release marks the closure of the first creative act of the project whilst possibly hinting at the new opening scene of its intensive imagination. It is vicious, merciless, and definitely not for everyone but for those finding beauty in aural destruction the release is a fascinating and riveting end of a chapter for a sonic protagonist who has already made a lingering deep scarring mark on noise and industrial provocation.

Tapewyrm is the studio project of Oxford musician Michael Drayven which from its emergence in 2010 took little time in drawing eager attention from the following year. Two digital demo EPs marked the cards of fans, media, and industry alike, before the release of debut CD Misanthropic Noize last year cemented and sparked new awareness for the presence of Drayven’s sonic infestations. The release was a masterful and disturbing intrusion which bred fear or rapture and House Of Cards is no different in effect, potency, and quality; just more demanding and punishing in many ways and if it ticks your boxes, ridiculously captivating.

The title track opens things up and instantly has the senses under a tsunami of sonic vitriol and industrial debris. The track intimidates and scores the ears within seconds but equally there is a haunting nightmarish temptation which partially distracts from or tempers the thick rasping tempest to seduce attention and imagination. Featuring the disturbed almost childlike vocals/utterings of Tiffanie Wells from Beinaheleidenschaftsgegenstand, the insidious coaxing is an unrelenting oppressive washing of the psyche which incites and scores thoughts and emotions into spellbound submission.

The following Chasing Ghosts is said to hint at the new direction of Tapewyrm in its second era and there is certainly a shift on the evidence of the piece which tantalises and catches the imagination. Like a moment from the soundtrack of Love Story if played out in the belly of a hell set industrial mixer, the excellent short sonic narrative is an emotive caress by inventive hands with the coarsest skin and hellishly intriguing. Its taunting is followed by the outstanding Careless, another permeating of the skin which infuriates like a sonic itch and seduces with a virulent addictiveness. The rhythmic stalking of the track niggles with an insatiable hunger whilst within the cloud of noise contagion melodies dance and blossom with a sexual wantonness and absorbing elegance. The impressive and enthralling encounter is like attempting to listen to a joyous carnival procession through the thickest swamp of tinnitus whilst a jackhammer nags mercilessly away face to face.

The release is completed by two remixes of tracks to be found on the previous Misanthropic Noize album. Firstly there is the Ruinizer remix of Save Yourself, a track which twists and rotates with a vibrant and understated presence but still licks potently with every repetitive note and electro clad sonic expression. It is succeeded by the Dirty K remix of Rebirth, a harsh caustic smothering of the ears which erodes and grates the senses to whimpering submission but holds back enough to create an addition forging aural treat.

From the Juggernaut Media Group released House Of Cards it is hard not to add a little impatience to the anticipation of what comes next from Tapewyrm as you sense it will be something to shake and disturb mind and emotions. This is a project which will leave a great many cowering and running but if noise is your masochistic treat than here is one raw and minimalistic fury which just has to be investigated.

https://www.facebook.com/Tapewyrmofficial

http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/house-of-cards

8.5/10

RingMaster 07/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Nigromante – Black Magic Night

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Initially breeding uncertainty about its presence, Black Magic Night the debut album from Spanish metallers Nigromante emerges as a rather captivating confrontation. It has flaws and at times struggles to make the fullest persuasion but equally it earns an appetite from the emotions which means it will be no stranger to regular attention. Unapologetically standing in the midst of N.W.O.B.H.M. and eighties US metal, band and album create a proposition which holds no surprises for fans of that era but plenty for them to get their teeth and neck muscles into.

Hailing from Madrid, Nigromante began in 2003 and over the years has become a sizeable proposition in Spanish metal if not yet breaking into a wider arena. Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Angel Muñoz and drummer Jorge Serrano and taking influences from the likes of Black Sabbath, Megadeth, Witchfinder General, Anvil, Motorhead, Venom, and Barón Rojo into their invention, Nigromante has bred a strong live reputation since forming and shared stages with bands such as Grim Reaper, Paradox, Midnight Priest, and Virus. Now after a trio of demos between 2004 and 2006, the band finally unleash a full-length encounter courtesy of Shadow Kingdom Records and though it is not exactly going to blow you away or set a new marker for old school heavy metal, it taunts and lingers long enough after the event to stand out and tempt a regular rampage with its accomplished rabidity.

It is fair to say that Black Magic Night does not start off with a bang, the first couple of tracks getting the job done and setting a2300647838_10the scene without raising any sparks in the imagination or emotions, though as it progresses the album addresses that with contagious enterprise. Nevertheless both the opener Heavy Metal Age and the following title track trigger and grab enough interest to allow the release to expand its presence. The first of the pair slaps the ears with heavy duty rhythms and charged riffs from the start, and though arguably forges a formula engagement satisfies as sinews ripple and sonic craft whips around the ears. The vocals of Muñoz also take a little time to adapt too, his grizzled tones strong but wandering with notes at times but again like the album they seem to blossom as the record progresses. The second track stomps in with nostrils flaring and riffs lashing the air whilst the rhythms of Serrano firmly steer the song. Like its predecessor it satisfies without leaving a lasting impression but it is impossible to deny its presence as again it does the job needed to ensure the listener stays on course with the album.

Things move up a level with In Nomine Pater, the initial melodic coaxing instantly soaked in strong potency whilst the familiar but infectious groove teasing behind the coarse vocals soon has the imagination and feet playing with its lure. That familiarity covers the whole song eventually but to a positive effect with comparisons to Anvil a definite overriding but not displeasing thought. The track twists and tempts with the guitar and bass almost wanton in their appetite to thrill and seduce the imagination. Muñoz is a skilful musician and though he like Serrano never gets or takes the song into intricate areas it is easy to see the craft and potential at work.

     Saturnalia of Blood with its predatory riffs and preying basslines provides an appetising moment similar in appeal to the opening pair before making way for the moments the album excels, starting with False Idol. The track is a masterful prowl of ears and imagination; guitar and bass stalking from the start whilst the drums punctuate their goading with forceful probing. It is a mighty start which explodes into greater heights as ridiculously addictive grooves and rapacious energy swarms all over the senses. Again there is something recognisable to the song, if indefinable, but with not for the first time a great breath of thrash urging on the intent and a magnetic cast of melodies and hooks lining up to incite the passions, the song is a scintillating provocation. It is immediately matched by the following pair of Syndicate of Crime and Soy Un Macarra, the first equipped with a Cape Crusader like toxicity and antagonistic predation plus a more than punkish snarl whilst its successor takes those same elements in a different guise and to greater infectious intensity to create a punk/metal track which would not feel completely out of place in a playlist from Fuckshovel or the Ruts. The songs steer the album to much greater heights whilst showing that the band has the capability to fuse plenty of elements into their classic metal assault.

     Satan Death Squad is another to walk the release’s highest plateau, the song a more standard old school metal slab of muscle but one with riffs and sonic intrigue which continues the hold on the imagination and emotions forged by the previous encounters. Definitely the quartet of songs takes the album from being an ok release into a beast which demands continued attention. Closing on Summoning Spell an underwhelming short instrumental, Black Magic Night from a shaky start turns into an album you just want a little bit more of again and again. It is not a classic or likely to threaten your favourite aural tipples but its pleases and entertains at times as if it reads your every want from a metal release and that is always well-worth checking out.

www.facebook.com/nigromante.heavymetal

8/10

RingMaster 07/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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