Shevils – Lost In Tartarus

Photo - Kamilla Kvamme

Anticipation for the new album from Norwegian hardcore band Shevils has been eager even bordering on rabid for us, especially after the temptation and hinting of impending glory which came with the already released singles from it, We Walk On Shattered Glass and Black Eyes. The songs showed perfectly why the band has bred a fervour clad following for their distinctive and adventurous sound and why Lost In Tartarus could be the trigger to the widest deserved recognition for the Oslo quartet. The ten track fury of invention and passion is a monster of a release, a brutal yet ingeniously sculpted confrontation which equals the heights suggested by the singles and surpasses the promise set by previous releases. The band has an adventure and exploration to their sound which not only sets them apart from most hardcore bands but puts them on the frontline of the genre, the evidence being rife and rampant within Lost In Tartarus.

Shevils first made a richly promising and attention luring entrance with their debut album The Year Of The Fly of 2011, the release coming a year after the band’s formation. It made a strong impression, receiving enthusiastic responses and acclaim, as did the following single Is This To be (Our Lives)? the same year. The foursome of vocalist Anders Voldrønning, guitarists Andreas Myrvold and Christoffer Gaarder, and drummer Anders Emil Rønning (expanding to a sextet live), continued to build their stature and sound through live performances, which has seen them to date play with the likes of Man The Machetes, Social Suicide, Overthrow, Barren Womb and many more, and the excellent Necropolis EP of 2012, that release receiving its uncaging in Indonesia early this year to incredible acclaim and greedy attention. As mentioned the two singles released in 2013 has triggered a hungry appetite for the band’s second album in a great many, all rewarded and more by the sonic riotous alchemy of Lost In Tartarus.

Opener Is This Where We Are At?, as maybe expected barges through the ear from its first breath, riffs and rhythms striking 1424384_730606523620529_1143928494_nhard whilst squalling vocals from Voldrønning and band bring a causticity which Shevils is so good at making distinct to themselves. The band brings multiple flavours and ideas to their songs, styles which flirt and run amok within the hardcore heart of their songs, and the first easily shows how effective and inventive it is. Grooves and hooks conspire to seduce whilst the energy of the band bruises with unrestrained intensity as an unleashed melodic acidity colours the fury. It is an invigorating and incendiary mix which with a want, maybe need within the band to experiment is irresistible.

Black Eyes is a trap quickly sprung by the passions, its rhythmic swagger and challenge an addictive enslavement  and the frame for the antagonistic vocals to launch their tirade upon. The guitars equally lure with virulent scythes of sonic temptation from the off which ignite into a burning fire as the throaty bass prowl and ferocious energy of the band explodes in hot crescendos of attack. The track is an intrusive and unbridled contagion, creating a stunning maelstrom of adventure best described as Coilguns, Kunz, Man The Machetes on a rampage with a lighter punkish feel of Baddies. That description applies to numerous exploits within the album but all tracks are pure Shevils in their potency and ultimate sound.

The heavy bass stroll provided by Marcus Forsgren brings Timelines purposely and pleasingly into focus  next, another rich enticement laid as the band combines to stomp and lurch around the ears with another epidemically riveting punk brawl. Offering a persistent stalking, the song ripples with attitude and antagonistic intent musically and vocally whilst the constant growl to the guitar riffs bring a primal intimidation which only reinforces the confident prowl.

Both Sorely Fucking Provoked and These Walls Are Coming Down exploit lustful passions for the album further, the first a rapacious tempest of rhythmic combativeness and sonic pestilence honed into a tantalising yet menacing aggressor, group shouts and energy driving it forcibly home whilst its companion led by a crawling bass examination expands into a ridiculously captivating fascination of spellbinding melodically touched grooves and scathing sonic imagination.

We Walk On Shattered Glass soars to the highest pinnacles of the album next, the song still as scintillating as its first appearance as a single a few months back. Intensive rhythms barrack and massage the ears first, a bass growl their delicious companion to be soon joined by the sonic web of noise from the guitars and the ever impressive vocals. Incredibly hungry in its reserved yet ravaging voraciousness and unstoppably infectious in its maelstrom of ingenuity, the track is a titanic persuasion, easily one of the songs of the year and soon rivalled by State Of Regret. Once again bass and drums ignite the senses and passions to set up the frame for a canvas of vocal scowling and skilfully grooved sonic teasing to play out their intentions, the result another quite hypnotic creative frenzy.

The relatively straight forward hardcore attack of Blizzard Beach, which reminds a little of Irish band Gacys Threads, adds another brief but powerful element to the album whilst the excellent perpetually evolving Destroy All Villains and the closing storm of Young And Restless impressively concludes a quite exhilarating slab of breath-taking invention and adventure. Shevils offers hardcore something new and different and in Lost In Tartarus, an album which just sounds and gets better with each listen, one of the genre’s pinnacles of the year, of hardcore, punk, and extreme rock of any description to be honest.

http://shevils.com/

10/10

RingMaster 08/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Bog[~]Morok – Industrialypse

Band Photo 2

    Industrialypse is a confrontation which grips the passions from its opening moments and proceeds to enslave their greedy hunger through twelve inventive and explosive slabs of industrial/nu metal. The album is more than that though, a wealth of styles and essences laying seeds within its insatiable sound conjured and sculpted with craft and enterprise by Russian band Bog[~]Morok. It is a refreshing and thrilling release, a sort of merger of the essences of Fear Factory, Korn, Sybreed, and Dir En Grey, a blend which ignites the imagination and sets the emotions ablaze.

The band started as a solo project for Rybinsk musician Morok in 1997, his intent to create a death/black metal exploration. Debut album Azoic in 2003 drew good attention as at the same time the project expanded to a full band. A death/doom presence emerged but one honed by the influence of modern and industrial metal, a sound which has continued to evolve across the band’s five albums, Stadiae II of 2005 and Syn.thesis two years later the stand out highlights before Industrialypse, though Decadence of 2010 potently continued the expansion of sound and stature of the quintet. The new album is another plateau cast, a riveting exploit which shows Bog[~]Morok as one of the very best industrial metal cored bands still to be discovered by the masses, something which Industrialypse with luck can amend.

The title track opens the encounter, cyber sounds and industry the entrance for thumping rhythms and voracious riffing to Frontcover 1corrupt ear and air. Soon into full stride the track expels a rigorous rapacious charge ridden by the excellent expressive vocals of Morok. Swinging between aggressive and respectful, carnivorous and seductive, the song is an intensive industrialised slab of extreme metal with electro temptations and melodic persuasion. A mix of demanding rhythms and scything cuts of guitar wrapped in a warm melodic synth lure, the song easily persuades especially with its unpredictable and ever shifting attack as it grows into the first towering hook of the album.

The following Gliese 581d and Не вижу зла (Stadiae III) continue the powerful start, the first a rampant stretch of melodic ambience and senses staggering metallic brute force created with skill and imagination as is the synth spawned warm textures and enticements aligned to the stringent intensity. Its successor opens with compelling almost sinister electro bait, its person cinematic soaked in atmospheric intrigue. That lure leads the imagination into an inciting dramatically melodic narrative with an additional teasing within its sinewy embrace, which plays like a mix of Biting Elbows and Limp Bizkit. It is an absorbing provocation building an industrial soaked landscape that is simply irresistible and transfixing.

After the bruising challenge of the pleasing Neizbezhnost, the album provides another major pinnacle to match the starter in the toxic shape of Hellstarter. An initial reasonably gentle coaxing only hints at the imminent hellacious ravaging of the senses to come, a rabidity increasing the urgency and aggression of the guitars and rhythms whilst there is an insidious temptation to the keys.  As ever with Bog[~]Morok  there is no resting on singular assaults and the song soon twists and launches blackened violations and industrial causticity around a melodic and nu metal taunting. It is an ingenious torrent of inventiveness and addiction causing enterprise, a triumph only matched, after the contagious Fear Factory like Shapeshifter, by the sadistically tantalising Bloodsucker. It is another track to chew and seduce the senses whilst bringing an ethnic curiosity to its sonic acidity and adrenaline fired predation; simply a masterful ferocity of corrosive and magnetic craft.

The mix of English and Russian sung songs adds to the frenetic allure of the album, especially with when the likes of Свет В Конце Тоннеля, another track which brings thoughts of Korn to mind this time in collusion with The Browning, and the melodically enticing Звездопад sound so good and convince a greater appetite to come play with their individual and unique gifts.

IDDQD unleashes another intensive metallic fury of rampaging riffing and equally pungent violent rhythms whilst Undream brings the album a melodic slowly burning treat, its smouldering and emotive beauty a delicious wrap for the imagination and heart. It is part of a great ending to Industrialypse , a finale completed by the blackened ruinous interpretation of the Fantomas’ song, Der Golem. Heavy, dark, and dirty, it is an extreme storm which maybe hints at the earlier days of Bog[~]Morok. Industrialypse is an outstanding release, one bringing metal and certainly industrial metal an invigorating excuse to get excited, and one all should take the time to search out and enjoy.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bog-Morok/126796064065588

9/10

RingMaster 08/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Starsoup – Bazaar Of Wonders

band

An adventure which coaxes emotions and imagination into expanding its evocative narratives, Bazaar of Wonders the debut album from Russian progressive rock band Starsoup is a richly engaging and intriguing encounter. It is a release which maybe does not ignite a burning fire in the passions but certainly leaves them smouldering with an appetite to explore enthusiastically the excellently crafted and skilfully presented songs. The album is an enticing proposition, a colourful weave of heavy metal and progressive invention merged with additional varied flavours, a mix which captivates from start to finish.

Started at the tail end of 2011, Starsoup is the studio project of vocalist/guitarist Alexey Markov (Shadow Host, Distant Sun) who has keyboardist Andrew Gryaznov (Timesquare) alongside him. Their album, which evolved around the compositional foundation of a quartet of songs written and melodically composed during Markov’s time in the band Crime Of Passion where he was the vocalist and Gryaznov played keys, took over a year to emerge as other projects and the involvement and time of guests upon the release extended its ‘birth’. With a presence and sound which sparks thoughts of a diversity of bands from the likes of Dream Theater, ArcticFlame, and Stone Sour to Rush, Fates Warning, and Avenged Sevenfold, the album is a striking declaration of strong impressive vocals and melodic exploration within a senses inciting keys sculpted grandeur.

The Moscow duo open the Sublimity Records released album with the band’s first single Angels, one of the previously mentioned coverfour songs which bred the album and as the others re-recorded and evolved for the album. With the impressive piano skills of Gryaznov making an emotive invitation, guitars and bass soon ignite the air around a firm and commanding rhythmic frame from by Alexander Vetkhov who provides drums and percussion across the whole of Bazaar of Wonders. As the strong and expressive vocals of Markov start unveiling the lyrical narrative, his delivery across the whole of the album diverse and potent, the track mixes up a power ballad like stance brewed with a feisty energy. It is a welcomingly introduction to the album and a clear portent of things to come, keys and vocals the brightest beacons within creative songwriting and striking musicianship across all aspects.

The following Ain’t No Superman confidently idles in with a jazz funk like swagger, its heat accelerated by melodic guitar flames. Into its stride the song is a more straight forward heavy rock encounter but one with a wealth of additives which keeps it unpredictable and intriguing, if less successful than its predecessor. Nevertheless there is plenty for the ears to get excited by, as also with Try. An acoustic guitar and piano resourcefulness wraps the ears before Markov fills the ballad with his fine voice backed with good harmonies. As it walks into its fullest height there like in all songs, is a fire in its belly which empowers the passionate bursts which erupt from within the melodic canvas. If aggression is the want the song, and ultimately the album are unlikely to suffice but for melodically spawned emotive adventures the release is a refreshing offering.

Both Cradle of War and Rumors of Better Life continue the ballad seeded attack, though the first of the pair from its elegant first third with a glorious flame of saxophone to its breath explodes into an intensive and muscular persuasion which constantly flirts with the passions throughout its impressive venture. Its successor is a mesmeric sunset of seductive melodies and evocative charm, a caressing wash of beauty which without enflaming emotions feeds them and thoughts skilfully.

The album’s best track Past Bites bruises the air with a fine array of sinewy riffs and crisp rhythms, a Metallica edge and essence seeping into the boisterous elements whilst again inventiveness fuels the triumph of the track and the intense hunger for its presence. It is the pinnacle of the release which makes the likes of the following The City and the Stars and Voices of the Wind seem pale in their balladry, though both again are impressively crafted. Between them though there is the excellent instrumental Bazaar, a piece of composing and realisation incendiary to imagination and emotions brought with a sonic mastery  which simply seduces from start to finish; guitar, keys, and bass exceptional provocateurs in its mystique clad temptation.

The closing trio of songs, Road to Sunset with its great sultry sax calls and anthemic vocal mixes, the heavy metal bred Perfect Loser, and the closing piano conjured instrumental Rain in the Desert ensures the album ends on an enterprising and enjoyable stance, each individual and additional lures to a fine album. As said earlier, Bazaar of Wonders does not leave fires raging in the passions but certainly makes Starsoup worthy of close attention.

https://www.facebook.com/Starsoup

7.5/10

RingMaster 08/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

King Prawn – Done Days/A Solemn Man

KP

The return of King Prawn for us, like for so many, was an over excited thrill matched by lustful anticipation of new sounds from the UK punks. The band has forged themselves as one of the influential greats with their anthemic ska/punk fusions and authority antagonising lyrical confrontations, so much so that their split in 2003 left a big hole in hearts and punk itself as fans mourned with the band’s classic albums and songs as company. The announcement of their return earlier this year set passions aflame once again, live performances equally so, but new recorded material could only confirm it was not just wishful dreaming that King Prawn was back to challenge and ignite the country . The two track single is that confirmation, Done Days/A Solemn Man a thoroughly pleasing encounter and an extremely promising hint of the band’s next album, due spring 2014.

Reuniting 4/5 of the original line-up, vocalist Al Rumjen who recently had a successful stint with Asian Dub Foundation, guitarist Devil Hands, drummer Nikoli, and trumpeter Dr Nelly coming together once again, the band is further joined by new bassist Zac Chang (taking the place of the non-returning Babar Luck) and an expanded live horn section. The single combines two songs which have little difficulty in igniting the emotions, one an intriguing suggestion of things to come and one prime King Prawn, its company sparking the passions as if the band had never been away.

Done Days opens with enticing guitar strokes of the ear soon joined by buoyant vibrant brass calls and the distinctive tones of a1735681834_2Al Rumjen. It is an enthusiastic and vibrant introduction which captures the imagination and sparks thoughts of last album Got The Thirst whilst having an undefined element which points at an even greater wealth of inspirations in the songwriting and experience in its realisation. The bass of Chang has a prowl and throaty resonance which adds depth to the song whilst the brass and keys create a wash of warmth and enterprise which excites with a fresh suggestiveness from the band. It is fair to say that the track never explodes into the hinted eruption, especially the chorus which does not quite catch fire, but with feet stomping in unison to its beats and emotions lit from its adventure, the song is an undeniable satisfying and potent return.

The AA track of the release is a simply glorious slice of King Prawn invention. A sultry guitar enticement stands side by side with a brass flame of evocative heat to open up A Solemn Man, their beckoning soaked in Latin seduction and sweltering persuasion. There is a sense of a call to arms to the entrance of the song; it offering anthemic bait which settles into a transfixing ska saunter which itself evolves into a rock powered chorus.  With added gypsy punk spice and those ever spellbinding fiery brass temptations a persistently contagious and inventive persuasion, the track is King Prawn at its irresistible best creating a sound and encounter which is unafraid to attack and seduce whilst providing the most addictive groove bred punk. Not much left to say, King Prawn is back!!

http://king-prawn.co.uk/

8.5/10

RingMaster 08/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com