Type V Blood – Beastkiller

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As virulently contagious and destructively merciless as you could wish for, Beastkiller the new album from Russian industrial metallers Type V Blood is a confrontation which ignites and accelerates the heart of the dancefloor before turning it into an apocalyptic wasteland of sonically drenched carnage and delicious rhythmic mayhem. The release is an insatiable thumping on the heart of industrial seeded imagination, its power thrusting a fresh pulse and life into a greedy expectant genre. At times unique and in other moments wearing well used electronic armour, the album is a feast which is impossible to resist, a provocateur that leaves a breathless and rapturous satisfaction in its feisty wake.

Formed in 1999, the Konigsberg duo of Star (vocals) and Smith (guitar, programming, backing vocals) merged a core of industrial metal with black and death essences whilst infusing that with a flush of varied electronic incitement. Their sound took little time in awakening local support and ardour whilst debut album Dead Generation 77 successfully built upon the strong responses from earlier tracks and demos. Second album V.E.G.A. World Top 8 followed in 2004 but soon after the band came to an end, or as it turns out with its return four years later a hiatus of sorts. A trio of albums in Astra (2009), Warld (2011), and Penta (2012) followed as the band came back in strength and began evolving their intent and sound across the releases. The new, like its predecessor, Artificial Sun released Beastkiller sees the band moving away from the electronic core of previous records to explore and bring to the fore their metal flavoured roots. The result is an album which churns up and gnaws on the senses whilst leading the passions and imagination on a strength sapping dance of cantankerous electro animosity and seduction.

The deceptive opening teases of Eber Zzombie starts things off gently, cascades of electronic kisses sprinkling across the ear. It is a deceit as behind them lays in wait the carnivorous jaws of the guitars and a rhythmic lashing, all with a patience and predaciousness which is as intimidating as it is compelling. A mellow shift tempers the attack midway and even in its brief presence it almost throws things off balance but once the predatory instinct and intent is back the track again resumes its impressive introduction. After falling beneath the potent assault of the whole album the song in hindsight is a strong start but soon left in the shade of the rest of the release.

Rock The Dancefloor does exactly what it says on the tin though the title does not reveal the infectious brutality of rhythms used nor the hunger dripping from every enterprising note and thrust of sound. The track merges infectious melodic taunts and electro hooks into its swamp like thick atmosphere and overwhelming intensity which leads to the senses not knowing which way to turn but loving the hunt as explorer and prey. Its glory is soon lost in the haze as Shocksong marches militantly into view, its big heavy rhythmic boots stomping submission from the senses alone whilst the snarling vocal squalls and mutually venomous guitar riffs bring already awakened passions to their feet. Bestial at heart, the track pounds its beat across imagination and thoughts on the way to fully seducing the heart.

Both From The Heart To The Sun and Resistance tear off their chunk of the emotions next, the first with a voracious snarl to guitar and assault which is like being ravaged by 300 Spartans with sonic spears and industrially honed malevolence. Like its predecessor it stomps and prowls rather than going for the jugular but with the sapping aggrotech energy and intensive invention the result is the same, full submission. Its successor arguably has a lighter touch though it feels just as smothering and commanding whilst standing in front of its extremely busy and greedy presence. Like a maniacal puppeteer the track has limbs and passions indefensible before what is electro metal alchemy.

There is no let up from the album as first Awake storms the barricades with a tide of electro temptation split by blackened vitriol provided by shadow clasped sounds and serpentine vocals. Once again Type V Blood fuse extremes, light and dark forged into an epidemic of irresistibility which chews on the ear whilst stroking it into orgasmic bliss. Veined by catchy guitar hooks and melodic bait the song like so many on the release is the master of body and heart. Its triumph is thrust aside instantly by the rapacious Zero Tolerance, another song which twists and deceives throughout, its opening carnally wanting sonic narrative diving into a jazz funk swagger and enterprise with ease and then back again to continue the ravenous feasting upon the senses.

The diversity of the album continues in the brilliant wanton waltz of Sexyberia, a song with sultry flames and lascivious melodies which wrap tantalisingly around the listener as a blackened folk metal tasting romp runs up and down the temptation with eager rabidity and magnetic repetition. Like the album which leaves its strongest suasion to the second half of its bulk, the track is scintillating and breath stealing, open proof of the ever increasing strength of the release soon backed up by the final two songs. Right To Anger is a crunching weighty expanse of metal spawned corrosion whilst the outstanding closer New Nuclear World is electro punk at its most adversarial and inhospitable, a brilliant finale to a glorious tsunami of industrial metal and electro provocation.

Certain to please fans of the likes of Combichrist, KMFDM, Pitchshifter, Fear Factory, and Godflesh whilst simultaneously offering something unlike them all, Type V Blood and Beastkiller give industrial metal and music an addictive shot to the balls.

https://www.facebook.com/TypeVBlood

10/10

RingMaster 03/10/2013

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