Maths and the Moon – Night Train Daydream

Maths and the Moon pic

As soon as the opening track of Night Train Daydream, the debut album from UK band Maths and the Moon, began its tantalising flight of persuasion and rhythmic dance a broad grin emerged pushing back lips in lustful anticipation. The track took mere moments to ignite an intrigue and hunger which was last rife back in 1977 when the albums Pink Flag and more so Chairs Missing registered their instinctive temptation upon the passions. As the band unveil more of their psyche bred sounds across the release thoughts of those album’s creators Wire whisper very loudly across the imaginatively hued, transfixing addictive journey Maths and the Moon skilfully conjure. There is plenty more to the spellbinding sonic travelogue of course, all of which only teases and thralls the senses and imagination into its tense and dramatic escapade.

Hailing from the New Forest area of the south of England, the trio of vocalist/guitarist Andy Fielder, drummer Luke Taplin, and bassist Matt Hirst formed Maths and the Moon in 2009 and made their live debut alongside legendary Can frontman Damo Suzuki the following year. Night Train Daydream and its startling contents were recorded and produced by the band across 2009 through to 2012, a journey of time and internal venture for the release which finally has its departure into the thoughts and you can only suspect hearts of the country September 30th. Already preceded by the single Old Days/New Daze which was released as  free download invitation, the album provides one of the most unexpected and thoroughly, greedily consumable treats of the year.

The provocative intensive dark charms of FFWD (Fly From Danger) opens up the dramatically imposing and scenic expanse of the album.a3240501242_2 It is a riveting first stop on the imaginative travelogue of sound and invention, a brewing rhythmic virulence emerging from a sonic mist to mark its first call. A cavernous breath calls from within that evocative chilled ambience as restrained whispered vocals tempt and coax in the passions further. Submission to the deliciously claustrophobic toxic fumes is unavoidable especially as voice and rhythms darken their presence and intensity to crowd and incite the imagination and emotions further. It is a staggering entrance of repetitive discordance which strongly pushes forth that Wire reference, which is confirmed and cemented in thoughts by the following On A Knife Edge. Another bait of rhythms beckons whilst a minimalistic bass and guitar call alongside the again reserved yet expressive spoken vocals seduces with ridiculous ease. Once the narrative sends the delivery of Fielder into a more mania bred uncertainty there is a sense of The Mae Shi to the song which merges with post punk chills of again Wire for a captivating almost nightmarish wonder.

The stunning start is next taken into a schizophrenic waltz of sonic and emotional discordance in Hekyll And Hyde which challenges its own psyche and the imagination of the listener; dark and light, peace and mania all conflicting yet seamlessly united provocateurs which explores inner turmoil whether emotional or physical. The great thing about album and songs is you can interpret things into personal potent landscapes as easily as sensing the band’s intent, their aural descripts guides without dictating which ensures each continued trip with the album is unique.

It’s Okay To Be Afraid continues the incredibly addictive and immense presence of the album, the track an initial caress of melodic warmth and tender comfort sculpted by sensitive guitar melodies and bass pawing which embrace the shoegaze glaze of the chorus, the mesmeric tone adding an extra reassuring kiss within the coarser shadows of the track. Another magnetic enticement which recalls the likes of House Of Love and My Bloody Valentine in many ways, it leads the senses into the mesmeric instrumental Recurring Dream Number 13. The chilling verging on sinister atmospheric piece is the continuation of the previous narrative of dreams and sleep within its predecessor, the track a hypnotic meditative embrace with imposing edges.  The outstanding Old Days/New Daze is the awakening from this track, its busy and feisty bass stroll and rhythmic rounding up of the senses and thoughts a forceful slightly deceptive lead into new fearful yet rewarding if faced, adventures. The guitars carve a sonic storm of riveting enticement across the sky of the song whilst the drum and bass bait make a perpetually enslaving inducement alongside the monotone but engaging vocals, again so reminiscence of Wire and the early solo work of Colin Newman.

Through the likes of the air blistering menacing WWYB (The Demons March), the acoustic and starkly elegant Anxious Cats, a song which launches upon a larger intensively dramatic stance midway, and the deceptively hypnotic Monochrome which finds an invention and roving stance that is pure post punk toxicity, the album takes the passions and imagination through strikingly and intensely coloured emotive explorations which stretch not only thoughts but the boundaries of the songwriting and album.

From the slightly industrialised instrumental Lolocomo, Night Train Daydream heads to the completion of its absorbing dark ride with firstly the exceptional Light At The 11th Hour, the track a fiery garage punk infused slice of rewarding fun for the traverse of so many exciting dark stops on the journey, and lastly the electronically propelled Polychrome. The song is a scuzz driven dance of bright sonic lights and heart spawned celebration, though as now expected it does not come without dark corners and shadowed distractions to ignite even greater rapture and intrigue.

 Night Train Daydream is a brilliant debut, a mesh of droning seduction, fire drenched corrupted melodies, and uncompromising imagination. Maths And The Moon almost make you believe in musical reincarnation because though they are not the new Wire they are surely the kings of their legacy.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Maths-and-the-Moon/168962103158259

www.mathsandthemoon.bandcamp.com

10/10

RingMaster 25/09/2013

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Miss Vincent – Creepy

Miss Vincent pic

After getting over the disappointment that Miss Vincent was not a psychobilly band, their debut EP’s cover and title as well as the band name all the clues adding up to that deceitful assumption, the UK pop goth punk band turned out to be a rather enjoyable proposition which in Creepy they have a release which is more than a decent ride of melodic persuasion and feisty energy. Emerging as a hybrid of Alkaline Trio and Fall Out Boy with some healthy genes of NOFX, AFI, and Social Distortion spliced in for extra flavour, the Guildford quartet have introduced themselves with a release which without lighting fires leaves  a wash of satisfaction and promise behind which cannot be ignored.

Formed in 2012, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Alex Marshall, guitarist Lawrie Pattison, bassist Owain Mainwaring, and drummer Jack Donnelly has earned themselves a solid reputation and potent fan base around the southeast of the country. The Creepy EP has all the charm and infectious persuasion to send the band into passions much further afield. It will not be lighting new pyres of adventure for pop punk certainly but should place Miss Vincent in the watch closely column of the media and future fans alike.

The release opens with Deadlock, a firm and well-crafted invitation but one which leaves the passions a little underwhelmed. From the 998130_579896398741788_2057771635_nstrong vocals to incisive web of riffs and sonic invention, the song makes an appealing companion with hints of unique imagination whispering from within, but ultimately it lacks the spark to ignite anything more than a passing interest and respect for its predictable but accomplished offering. The following I Don’t Want This has no such problem, the temptation from its opening charge of jagged riffs and contagious groove is an instant awakening for ear and thoughts. True there is little new to devour but the song has the fuse and fuel to grip full attention and breed an equally keen appetite. With a strong whisper of Green Day and slighter spice of Against Me! to its stomp, the encounter is a vibrant and energetic persuasion, the bass of Mainwaring a prowling throaty shadow which seduces whilst the great harmonies of the bassist and Pattison make a great backdrop to the delivery of Marshall.

Planning To Fail, with the rhythms of Donnelly crafting out a sinew framed cage for the song to wrap around, lies somewhere between the opening pair, at times leaving a lack of fulfilment on the taste buds and in other moments showing an invention and imagination which adds a hearty confidence to their promise and future creativity. It has more than enough to light a deeper intrigue over their horizons though as does its successor Carry On, a track which surges from the start with a magnetic fire of riffs merging into virulently infectious melodies and hooks. It is an excellent romp which takes best track honours on Creepy and leaves the emotions keener and greedier than before.

The closing Testing Times is bred from the same seed box as its predecessor, the opening riot of rapacious melodic flames and taunting riffs veined by crisp rhythms is irresistible as it leads the ears into the again impressive vocals of Marshall. There is a sense of Billy Talent to the construction of the song, hooks and sonic barbs littering its passage to ensure no one escapes the song’s addictive claws and adventurous enterprise, which actually leaves the previous tracks seem lacking. It is a great conclusion to a release which sets down an opening marker for Miss Vincent that should see them as they evolve take to loftier plateaus and recognition.

It may not provide anything to get your teeth of originality into but as the ground floor of something with all the possibilities of major things rising from within, Creepy is well worth a slice of your time and enjoyment.

Grab the Creepy EP as a buy now name your price release at www.missvincent.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/missvincentband

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Desolated – Disorder Of Mind

desolated pic

There is no compromising from or with Disorder Of Mind, the five track EP from UK hardcore band Desolated. It is a release which instinctively you go for or turn the other way from before it permanently fouls your psyche, but for those it does find a welcome the fiery release is one bruising satisfying challenge. Certainly the Southampton quartet has not broken down walls or riled up new pastures for the scene but it is a constant enjoyable provocateur which at times is quite compelling.

The EP is the fourth release from the abrasive foursome following on from last year’s album Verse of Judas. It continues the slow but open evolution of the more simplistic and predictable sound they started life with as shown on debut release The Birth of Corruption into something more diverse and adventurous. Undeniably ferocious and mercilessly vindictive, Disorder Of Mind  takes little persuading in unleashing its full weight and antagonism, the opening Year Of The Snake allowing a sonic mist to brew before stalking the ear with one of the most carnivorous bass sounds heard this year and equally rapacious riffs. Vocalist Paul Williams is soon adding his vitriolic abrasion to the now intensive almost labouring sludge empowered crawl which traps and suffocates the ear. It is a potent introduction if no danger to the supply of breath, which is most notable for that throaty rabid four stringed croon of Dan Ford.

Death By My Side is equally predacious and eager to consume the senses, rhythms from Mitch White splintering the ear whilst guitarist desolated-disorder-of-mind-album-coverRich Unsworth scars the air with a sonic blaze which is undefined but corrosively demanding. The vocals of Williams with great gang back up from the band rip through the caustic smog of the song to excite the most, the prime US seeded hardcore delivery a strong temptation within the destructive coaxing of the sounds. At times there is a groove sneaking around which is never truly unleashed but makes for an appetising hint if ultimately a chained up one.

The following Suffering is a heavier slab of savagery; a seeming metalcore bred fury with an opening gambit of vocals and intensity before it twists into another exciting hardcore contagion, again full of suggestions and taunts of an explosion to come but never quite finding the trigger to go the whole way into a seismic furnace of attack and sound. Despite that the intensive poaching of the senses is an appealing and richly promising confrontation, which epitomises the EP as a whole, a release which provokes and infers to bigger things but never really manages to go through with it even though it leaves a definite appetite for their hopefully future confirmation of these aural insinuations.

The acidic opening of Strung Up is immediately enthralling, its insidious touch the portent of another titanic weight of rhythmic crippling and senses scything riffery ridden by belligerently in-your-face vocals. Once more the song joins the queue of tracks which push to find something virulently infectious and dramatically imposing but fail to unlock that door, yet still holds a strong enticement over appetite and thoughts, if not quite as much the passions.

The closing Delusions like the opener does not impact as impressively and distinctly as the three tracks being bookended, but with that continuing to impress bass sound amongst riffs which never lose grip of satisfaction, the track still provides a sinew clad assault to find strong promise and expectations for the future within.

Desolated with Disorder Of Mind, show that they have the passion and armoury to become a major hardcore cored force in the UK and beyond but they just need to find that spark to make their incendiary promise a realised creative tornado which no one can refuse.

https://www.facebook.com/desolateduk

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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