Tyranny Is Tyranny – Let It Come From Whom It May

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Stark in tone and stark in its regard to the world, Let It Come From Whom It May the debut album from US post noise rock assassins Tyranny Is Tyranny, is a corrosive breath not only upon thoughts and senses but the capitalistic hold of society and man; the band name taken from title of the fourth chapter of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States. As with most bands a tag only gives one or two levels and sides of a sound and certainly it is the same with the Madison, Wisconsin quartet. Throughout the seven startling and demanding tracks there are coarse whispers of post punk and doom rubbing their toxicity into the caustic mix to help provide an extensive and exhausting confrontation which wears down and consumes the body from top to bottom, inside and out, whilst simultaneously invigorating the self-same victims alongside enforced thoughts and contemplation.

Tyranny is Tyranny rose from the demise and collapse of United Sons of Toil, guitarists/vocalists Russell Hall and Jason Jensen emerging as an unashamedly confronting and uncompromising fury lyrically and musically, but a tempest carefully and thoughtfully crafted for maximum provocation and success. With bassist/vocalist M. Guy Ficcioto and drummer Ben Aldis alongside the pair, the band creates an oppressive web of stirring and cutting narratives within a senses sapping smog of sonic sludge and rhythmic challenging. It is a bleak and suffering encounter but deviously addictive and impressively accomplished, with a sound and presence which seduces from its first spiteful note to its last threatening breath.

Opener Manufacturing Truth makes a tempting entrance, guitars casting a slow melodic beckoning within a gradually intensifying atmosphere. Soon a sludge heavy blanket lies down upon the energetically growing riffs and awakening concussive percussion, the brewing union flaring with belligerent sinews and rabidity drenched vocal squalls. Elements of Part Chimp and KEN mode stir within the track as arguably does a taste of Black Flag but more dominantly it is a fresh and rapacious provocateur insidiously but welcomingly working upon and seducing senses, thoughts, and emotions.

The impressive start steps aside for the following Owned By Thieves, another song which makes its introduction with a slow and smouldering embrace. The track has a tender hand upon the ear again from guitar whilst a sonic uprising is just initially hinted at, an expulsion further incited by the roaming predatory bass. Strangely there is an indefinable familiarity to the track which teases throughout, at times distracting from the quality and depth of its persuasion as thoughts try to grab onto a suggested name to compare the sound to, ultimately unsuccessfully. It is an immense and enthralling continuation of the opening plateau stepped upon by Let It Come From Whom It May, and a level soon elevated by the outstanding Down The K-Hole. With riffs and bass gnawing upon the senses from its first seconds whilst a sonic hook adds addictive intrigue, the song immediately raises thoughts of early Killing Joke, that same intensive and tight primitive lure and savagery at restrained but potent work. The punk scourges which unleash their bruisings throughout accentuate the ravenous snarl and disdain, adding to a storm of intent and Prong like metallic brutality.

The best track on the album is soon followed by the equally imposing and thrilling instrumental The Haze Of Childhood; the piece an evocative slow soar through emerging menace and elegant key bred emotive caresses into a loss of once safe innocence and consumption of a stark, bleak horizon. It flows straight in its successor Apostasy, the song accepting the set premise and building upon its presence with gentle vocals and a post punk sinister glaze, the track initially parading an invitation not dissimilar to one Wire would offer. Into its full body the forceful persuasive growl and provoking pressure of the vocals and intensity make compelling declarations and impressions on the passions, and though the song does not ignite the fires of earlier songs it is arguably the most powerful and skilful in creating an unavoidable reaction within the listener.

The album concludes with firstly the contagiously repetitive and droning call of The American Dream Is A Lie, its lure a hypnotic seizure as its oppressive nature steals submission for its deceitful sonic promises, and finally the equally mesmeric Always Stockholm, Never Lima. The track in its forceful and sonically scrubbing of the senses induces a total union from the listener to its demands and control, its aggressive but devious enticements another thrilling venture within the album.

Recorded and mixed by Russell Hall and Jason Jensen at The Dock and at The House For Wayward Boys, Let It Come From Whom It May is an outstanding introduction to a band which you sense will make a major impact on noise and caustic political rock for a long time to come. The album is certainly stronger in its earlier presence but only recruits a full hunger from start to finish with its somber erosive incitement. Tyranny Is Tyranny tell it as it is with a noise spawned majesty which is as controlling and merciless as those it rages against, but in a very good appealing way.

http://tyrannyistyranny.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 20/09/2013

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Her Dying Regret – Legacy

Her Dying Regret Promo 2013

Sometimes whilst listening to a band you just sense and get a hint of something special, even if the release or track you are in companionship with has yet to discover that unique element. That is definitely the case with UK metalcore band Her Dying Regret, though as their new Legacy EP shows that suggestion is much more than a hint or mild whisper. The second release from the Reading sextet is a stirring and exciting encounter which declares the band as one still in evolution but with such promise in their impressive release that you cannot stop thinking and assuming that this is a band poised to break into something quite magnificent.

Legacy follows an equally impressive debut in The Siren EP which came out last year. Its successor though shows a big step forward in maturity and invention whilst as mentioned showing this is still just a step in their progression rather than a statement of content. Consisting of vocalists Scott London and Tom Melville, coarse and clean respectively, guitarists Craig Mayor and Dan Osborne, bassist Ed Bujakowski, and drummer Tom Cox, Her Dying Regret has equally impressed since their first release with their live performances earning themselves a strong reputation and eager following, the sharing of stages with the likes of Entropic Tide, If Heroes Shall Fail and Fight For Tonight only enhancing their reputation. Undoubtedly Legacy is their finest moment to date and you can only assume the trigger to another influx of acclaim and passionate new followers.

From the evocative and nicely composed and sculpted if slightly underwhelming instrumental of Intro, the EP bursts into stirring life with Her Dying Regret - Legacy ArtworkAshes. The track immediately falls upon the ear with thumping rhythms and eagerly enticing riffs and sonic caresses whilst the vocals of London squall with passionate intent and might across their bows. Another shift of intensity beckons as the track finds a more savage eye balling for the senses, gruelling riffs and scything beats compelling and the melodic persuasion emerging around the caustic attack magnetically tempting. The chorus has a certain familiarity to it as the melodic charms of Melville add their appealing narrative, but not a flavour which dismisses or defuses the potency of the song. It is a striking and riveting full start to the EP which has an appetite grinning greedily for what is to come, and a hunger which is only accelerated by the djent twisted guitar stabs and richly hued vocals of both extremes..

The following All Judge, No Jury takes a run at the ear from a distance, building up its intensity to unveil a tempest of vocal ferocity and rhythmic maliciousness upon again impressively enterprising guitar work. Holding a definitely more rapacious attitude than its predecessor with ‘gang’ chants raging in its background at times, the track has a serpentine malice to it but wrapped in an absorbing and infectious melodic venture which evokes the imagination and emotions. Not as virulently gripping as the previous song it still draws in strong and keen attention even with the slightly clunky switch to a tender melodic aside at its close.

    The Shallow takes little prompting to ignite those earlier and still alive passions, its start a restrained stroll which waits for ear and thoughts to settle before swiping their peace with deliciously twisted grooves and torrentially brawling acidic vocals. The return of clean vocals, absent on the song before, adds another dimension to the track and it has to be said the union of both impressive vocalists is as major a lure as the skill and sounds of the rest of the band. The track leaps from idea to idea with craft and fluidity; intrigue a constant leash to keep expectations at bay. It is probably fair to say that there is not much strikingly new at large on song and EP but in the hands of the band and their imagination, familiar charms and weapons are given a new and invigorating lease of life.

The title track next sparks the passions, antagonistic breath coated vocals and virulent grooves raging but tempered by the ever excellent clean attack of Melville. The song only confirms that this is one of the most impressive vocal pairings around today, not only in presentation but use of where and when they stand and rub off each other’s strengths. Musically the song has a menace and dramatic adventure which once more triggers the imagination to add its own premise and flavouring to the extensively hued narrative of the sounds.

The Last Lie is an instant flow on from the previous song Legacy, another confrontation which lashes the ear with insidiously venomous vocals and threatening riffs skirted by equally merciless rhythms. It is a tremendous challenge but one which only excels further as the melodic and clean vocals explore shadows before subsequently those dark aspects fight back with a predatory and stylishly addictive rabidity. To its end the song is like a battle between both extremes, but a bruising union where both know they need and feed on each other.

The release is concluded by The Filthy Truth, a song which is more of the pleasing same in its creative and aggressive intentions but just fails to get a grip on the levels previously set, though it is still leaves hunger for the band raging. Legacy is an excellent release, a provocation which gets better with each listen as you discover more within its thoughtful textures, and the next impressive marker on the rise of a very promising and exciting band.

http://www.facebook.com/HerDyingRegret

9/10

RingMaster 20/09/2013

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Borderline:FIRE – This Trojan State

Borderline Fire

     Borderline:Fire is a young rock band which is beginning to stir up quite a bit of a buzz around themselves which they obviously hope their new EP This Trojan State will add fuel to the fire of. Consisting of six songs which merge alternative rock to a heavier breath and rock substance, the release is an engaging and often fiery temptation which arguably offers more promise for the band than actual realised contagion but from start to finish leaves an appetite and positive thought towards the Reading quintet and their emerging presence.

Formed in 2010 and consisting of vocalist Jamie Boshier, bassist/backing vocalist Jonny Slevin, guitarist Ben Forsey, drummer Chaz Mayhew, and James Marshall-Stack on synths, Borderline:FIRE has drawn strong attention with their melodically fired rock creativity, inspirations from the likes of Enter Shikari, Biffy Clyro, You Me At Six, Kids In Glass Houses, 30 Seconds To Mars, Foo Fighters, and Muse amongst many adding essences to their invention. The single I Wanna Go made their first lingering mark on the UK rock scene but now with This Trojan State accompanied by the video for Chains, the first single from the release, the band is poised to make that first strike a mere opening tease to its greater persuasion.

The release immediately has the ear awoken through Mark Up and its initial electro beckoning, a call soon joined by strong riffs and aBWy3dIbvVrCSeHAGfNMFGQyGSgrhythms around the equally engaging vocals of Boshier. The song soon has some of those mentioned influences searching thoughts as the mix of feisty guitars and crisp beats are flanked by the reserved but open synth temptation from Marshall-Stack. There is arguably not a lot to push boundaries at play within the song but for adventure and ideas presented with accomplished and imaginative enterprise the track cannot be dismissed or ignored. It is a stirring and pleasingly rowdy start to the EP soon matched by Chains. Similar in many ways to its predecessor in structure and energy, the song is soon revelling in the melodic exploits of the songwriting with the keys holding a stronger impacting voice this time around. The shifts in gait are seamlessly achieved with passion from the atmosphere and vocals soaking every note and syllable to again show the strength of the band in all departments. Like the first it is an easily accessible and bordering anthemic encounter which puts a wide marker of promise upon the band.

Both Nicki and Trojan next explore the slower creative depths of the band, the first a richly hued melodic blaze with an alternating mix of gentle temptation and rigorous energy to its presentation and its successor a slower emotive endeavour with good use of effects and tantalising teases. Neither song match the heights of the previous pair though the first of these two has high enjoyable levels of enticement which the second comes close to matching with its evocative musical narrative and brief vocal harmonies.

Speak For Me also has a more reserved approach to the ear but with an intriguing synth weave at the start to spark the imagination and a healthy sinew clad body to its Biffy Clyro like presence, the song is another which holds firm attention and satisfaction if without sparking any little fires in the passions. That is left for the closing Brainwash, a fiery electro rock track which merges Enter Shikari pungency with the melodic synth crafted rock of a My Extraordinary. The best track on the release, the song has a snarl and darker shadow to its challenge which is missing elsewhere on the EP and certainly gives a strong and distinct edge to the band compared to earlier songs and other bands.

It is a potent end to a very appetising and promising release in This Trojan State which stakes a claim for Borderline:FIRE as a band to keep a close eye on. You sense there is something bigger, more unique, and possibly impacting within the band’s future; time will tell.

https://www.facebook.com/borderlinefire

7/10

RingMaster 20/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Shevils – Black Eyes

Photo by Kristoffer Skjæringrud Photography

Photo by Kristoffer Skjæringrud Photography

On the back of their last single alone We Walk On Shattered Glass, Norwegian noise rockers Shevils ignited a strong anticipation and hunger for their forthcoming new album. Now just to seal the deal the Oslo quartet unleash the second single from the November released album Lost In Tartarus, a song which shows that the band has been holding back on us as it turns that hunger into a lustful impatience. Black Eyes is sheer sonically crafted devilry with a rhythmic trap to match in seduction and mischievous enslavement. If you thought its predecessor was the best thing the band had conjured, than you have heard and felt nothing yet.

Consisting of vocalist Anders Voldrønning, guitarists Andreas Myrvold and Christoffer Gaarder, and drummer Anders Emil Rønning, the band expanding to a sextet live with the addition of Kristofer Staxrud (bass) and Marcus Forsgren (guitar, synth, bass), Shevils has built up and earned a strong and evolving reputation for their fusion of hardcore, noise rock, and more flavours touched by a psyche mischief. They first made a good declaration after forming in the October of 2010, with debut album The Year Of The Fly the following year and subsequently the single Is This To be (Our Lives)? 2011 also saw the release of the Necropolis EP, which had another outing in Indonesia this year to again great acclaim and fervour. Each release showed the moving creativity and body of the band’s sound which came to a head with the exceptional We Walk On Shattered Glass, or so we thought. Black Eyes shows it was just the start to another thrilling and riveting twist in the invention of Shevils which only accelerates the almost rabid appetite for the impending full length release.

Recorded, mixed, and produced by Forsgren at Engfelt Forsgren Studio in Oslo, Black Eyes immediately confronts the ear with sharp single_option3teasing riffs punctured by instantly addictive beats, their crafty hypnotic persuasion the lead into a submissive slavery soon secured by the short tempest of sonic fire and punk brawling which proceeds to switch and interchange with that ridiculously virulent staggered temptation. The vocals of Voldrønning squall and demand attention as effortlessly and enjoyably as across previous songs whilst musically the track matches his demanding stance, guitars and drums creating a psychotic tango of compelling invention prowled by the gloriously predatory basslines. With a swagger and diablerie to its intrusively enthralling gait, the song offers a riot which is as much Baddies/We Are The Physics like in its stomp as Coilguns and Man The Machetes in its corrosively epidemic persistence.

Black Eyes is a brilliant exploit and teaser leading up to Lost In Tartarus, the pinnacle of the band’s alchemy so far, though I doubt this will be the last time that claim is made.

www.shevils.com

10/10

RingMaster 20/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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