The Kings Of Outer Space – How To Fly A Rocket

KoOS

There is not a great deal we can tell you about UK rockabillies The Kings Of Outer Space, but one thing we can declare with loud confidence is that their new album How To Fly A Rocket is one exhilarating trip you will just want to climb on board with. Hailing from Bristol, the quintet has earned a fine reputation for their live performances, invigorating sound, and their impressive debut album Cosmic Debris. Released via Western Star Records, as its predecessor, the new album offers thirteen riotous dances of irrepressible and addiction causing temptation, rockabilly brought with passionate mischief and riveting enterprise. There is no pretence to be what it is not; the album and its tantalising contents just honest fun driven rock ‘n’ roll at its exciting best.

Themed from the likes of science fiction sexual teasing through to shadow draped mysteries with numerous energetic exploits in WSRC073_300between, How To Fly A Rocket takes barely seconds to have ear, senses, feet not forgetting emotions engaged and belted up for the soaring journey of opener P.G.I.T.U. Introduced with a galactic announcement, the song instantly cups the ear with a delicious melodic tease of guitar with swipes of muscular rhythms drawing in the excellent upright bass croon brought by Greggsy and the great vocals of Giggsy. Straight away you know what you are going to get from song and album, the uncluttered and precise devilry of the guitars and their irresistible hooks matched by a rhythmic seduction. Feet and voice is the song’s plaything pretty much from its opening and chords too, whilst the track impressively manages to have a familiarity to it but also a fresh originality. Not for the first time on the album the band offers essences of other genres with a subtle craft, punk and country just two spices which add ingenious individuality to tracks and release.

The next up 44 opens with an accordion dance provided by guest Ian Norrys, a Parisian breath toying with the opening romp of beats and guitar coaxing from Mickey and Matt. Straight away it offers a distinctively different treat, the variation continuing across the album with each song having its own character and personal toxicity for the heart. From the canter of the second track the album next steps into the menacing mystique of Fall From Grace, the shadowed romance of danger embellished with an excellent harmonica flame from another guest musician in Paul Lynch. Paced by equally heated guitar craft and the rhythmic stepping of drummer Steve, the union makes for a countryesque slightly Cajun invitation which only stokes the fires all the more.

The following Daggertrap twists around the senses with a psychobilly and surf rock mix, the instrumental one of those pieces which has feet hoofing across the floor and emotions in close attention as it lingers welcomingly long after departure, the same which can be said of the excellent Monkey Alarm. Impossibly contagious the track is an old school rockabilly cored slice of rapacious recruitment of the emotions. With an impossible to resist joining chorus and a rampant energy to its stomp, the track is another infection drenched pinnacle with the diablerie of King Salami & The Cumberland Three and the punk grit of Guan Batz.

Both Watch Me Burn and Creepy Crawl keep the release on the highest plateau, the first with a more antagonistic attitude to vocals and its darker but still magnetic sound whilst its successor is a tantalising prowl of sinisterly goings on brought to the imagination upon a gliding shadow and brooding almost taunting seductive tones. There is no decline in thrills with the easy going Cochran like Haunted Man or the smouldering Smilin’ Eyes either whilst the brilliant Cosmic Thrust just climbs up another rung with its rhythmic shuffling and melodic fascination embroiled in more rockabilly enslavement. The warning groove which erupts halfway through sends the track into the deepest reaches of rapture, its Buzzcocks like toxin pure discord touching manna.

From the enticing country twanging Long Dry Summer the album bows out with the space dwelling glories of     Moon Buggy Baby and Rocket Ride, the first a planetary crossing love affair with Gene Vincent guile, and a touch of cheesiness   which just works, and the final song a simple but energised contagion again merging vintage rockabilly and surf rock into a potent fascination. How To Fly A Rocket is nothing less than pure joy, a release which also touches thoughts of band such as The Stargazers, Mickey & The Mutants, The Ghastly Ones, and The Phenomenauts but stands distinctly as The Kings Of Outer Space at the end of the day…a great album for good times.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Kings-Of-Outer-Space/110452709023793

9.5/10

RingMaster 10/09/2013

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Devilzwork – A Dead Horse

the devilzwork pic

Australian industrial metallers The Devilzwork set senses and fears cowering last year with their album Floodlights, a carnivorous sonic pestilence which gnawed and seduced the emotions with lethal  yet compelling severity. Now the band returns with its successor A Dead Horse and another tempest of virulent devastation hell bent on consuming and reshaping the synapses.

Hailing from Australia’s Capital Region, the 2009 formed quartet of guitarist Whiskey (also in Chud), vocalist/bassist Tobias, guitarist Kvlt and drummer Postal, has built an incendiary reputation across the regions of Melbourne and the Australian Capital Territory with their impressive live shows which has seen them stare stages with the likes of Voices of Masada, MzAnnThropik, Tim “The Ripper” Owens, and Mnemic. The self-produced demo Bad Moon Rise equally sparked concentrated attention though it was the eight track release Floodlights which stretched the bands presence much further afield as certainly an online presence and temptation. Now A Dead Horse is primed to accelerate that growing awareness. You suspect such its harsh and caustic devilry that the release will send as many running for the hills as finding those unable to resist its scourge driven charms, but if unbridled spite coursing corrosion is your idea of a treat than The Devilzwork has a nasty rewarding one lying in wait.

Opening track Obey The Worm… immediately scorches the ear with a sonic piercing before riffs and rhythms conjure up a death metal 1016963_626992130646833_1762260211_nseeded malevolence. It instantly has the hairs on flesh wilting before its vicious blaze of noise rock/industrial ferocity with the great duel vocal attack driving the aurally scurrilous fire of sound to greater depths. From the first track alone you can openly see the evolution in the songwriting and intent of the band. Whereas Floodlights was one carnally bred lime pit of intensity and noise soaked irreverence its successor has a more defined purpose and invention to its claws. A strong spicery of metal and rock adds further potency and imagination to the song and as it emerges, A Dead Horse as a whole.

The outstanding Kalifornia comes up next, its confident swagger and teasing wantonness leaving a tasty flavour of horror rock to the Ministry sounding torch of sonic animosity. A twisting feverish taunting on the senses and imagination, the track despite its too soon coming departure is the first of the major highlights on the album and ultimately the best track.

The Godflesh/Marilyn Manson lilted Prick, a track with labour to its attack but captures the passions at a glance without any resistance, and the more electro venomous Big Man follow to continue the strong start of the release if without quite matching their predecessor whilst the insidious corruption that is Hardware suffocates and invigorates simultaneously to ignite the mind and emotions. Bringing an acidic blistering groove which would rest easily in a Kyuss/Queens Of The Stone Age rage, the track pushes the diversity of the album yet again. Admittedly some work is needed to unveil some of the unique rewards to be found within the songs beneath the surface severity and taking that plunge head first only rewards all the more. The previous album was debatably short on individuality between songs in hindsight but there is certainly no issue with A Dead Horse as each track reveals given close attention.

From the pernicious Corrosive, a more than decent track which is as its title suggests, and the dark intensive exploration Vast, the album reaches another pinnacle with Insect. Thumping rhythms open up a cage of virulent toxicity, a wash of sonic itching wrapping the skin whilst vocals and restrained electronics rattle the bars and another epidemically addictive groove frequents senses and passions. The track will have you scratching the brain and emotions for hours after whilst the short burst of instrumental after its departure soothes the sore need.

Enthralling expels a raucous heavy rock fury, vocally and melodically, within another breath and atmosphere of poisonous sonic mercury to again push the envelope of invention whilst Virus Installer is just a rapacious pathogen of angry and malicious noise honed into a riveting protagonist. Both leave the senses exhausted and wondering what hit them yet thoughts alive with interpretation of their magnetic intensity.

Concluded by the tender, well in comparison to what came before, Push Yourself Around and the sinister soundscape Desolate, the album leaves a hunger for much more. The first of the final pair has a scintillating toxic swing to its pestilential might whilst the closer is just an evocative passage of sound and menace which leaves the mind exploring its own black corners. Both add further absorbing ventures to A Dead Horse, an album which shows no mercy but strikes with an intelligently sculpted persuasion offering depths of melodically spawned venom. With only the shortness of some of the most enthralling violations a niggle, the album is an impressive leap forward for The Devilzwork and a must investigation for all fans of the likes of Ministry, Godflesh, Rammstein, Marilyn Mansion and those of industrial and death metal… though are they brave enough though?

https://www.facebook.com/thedevilzwork

8.5/10

RingMaster 10/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com