Disappears: Era

disappears2013A_zoran orlic 2

Over their five years of existence, Disappears has continually delved deep into their creative thoughts and stretched not only their limitations but the listeners, their recent abstract and challenging Kone EP a prime example. With Era, the fourth album from the Chicago band, there is not exactly a less adventurous experimentation going on but certainly a stripped down one which has a core seed driving its breath and intent. The seven track album is bred from early 80ʻs post punk, admittedly given the distinct rapaciously dark Disappears touch and a modern voraciousness but openly spawned from a suggested passion within the band for that period and aural bedding. It is a stunning release which has a foot in nostalgia and another in current noise artistry as it takes the senses on a chilling venture into light exhausting realms and emotive provocation.

Sculpting the album through an almost psychotically oppressive merger of dub, psyched fuelled repetition, and carnivorous post punk cold, the quartet of Brian Case, Damon Carruesco, Jonathan van Herik, and making his debut drummer Noah Leger, immediately throw a caustic web over the ear with Girl. Its slow dawning soon coaxed into greater life by the lone bass croon, which itself is soon immersed in a harsh sonic wash of guitar and effected vocals. There is an immediate sense of Public Image Limited to the stark and hoarse glaze which appeals strongly whilst the persistent haze of noise only adds to the concussive temptation, the repetitious squalling of vocals and sound furthering its strength yet again as the climax of the track scorches the air.

The following Power has a clearer sky to its presence, the tempestuous air of its predecessor replaced by a haunted blackened breath KRANK182_5x5_300dpiveined by a compelling bass narrative and the drum beats. Instantly riveting in this insistent design, the guitars bring an additional expressive hue to the provocative persuasion, their sonic colour pushing a sense of The Cure from around their second and third album to thoughts whilst the steely ice embrace caging it all seems bred from the heart of Joy Division.

Two tracks in and Era has already secured full physical and emotional involvement but an elevation of ardour is soon forced as both Ultra and the title track enslave and appease the now rife appetite further. The first of the pair from the off niggles with a steely stare from the guitars with a rhythmic beckoning which only enhances the thick lure. As the vocals slowly coat the engagement with gelid reserve, the repetitious stance of the track becomes a greater temptress, its minimalistic encroachment bringing a sense of Wire and early Killing Joke into play with the uniqueness of Disappears. Its successor continues in the same teasing persistently nagging way, riffs and hooks on repeat until they seduce down to the instinctive core without ever verging on annoyance though this time they are accompanied by a richer melodic colour dripping delicious discord and wrapped in a polar climate. Carrying a sense of Artery and Gene Love Jezebel to it, the track accentuates the diverse and enriching depths of the release. It may come with a frosty nature but works with resourcefulness on every aspect of the body and mind.

The exceptional Weird House steals top honours with its scintillating stroll of noise pop and pop punk revelry. Holding a swagger arguably missing on the other songs and equipped with a melodic sun that glistens off of the metallic sinews of the drums and compelling bass temptation, the song is a virulent infection on the senses. Again loaded with a singular course for its intent and with vocals that seem to swing with relish simultaneously to the slight wantonness of the song, there is an indefinable familiarity to the scintillating offering though once more you can suggest Wire as a source.

As Elite Typical rolls firmly through the ear with an early Gang Of Four cold scold and invention, and the closing stark expanse of the Joy Division/Colin Newmanesque New House invades every pore with its arctic noir kiss, Disappears ensures that Era is as potent and invasive at its tail as its head. There is a clarity and uncluttered voice to the album and all of its uniquely offered songs which alone sets the album apart from their other releases, but mostly it is the merciless entrancing presence and intensive suggestiveness which leaves no thought and emotion untouched. Rich in the essences of the past but stood rigorously in the present, the Kranky Records released Era is a stunning and exhilarating slice of tender desolation and melancholic joy. A definite album of the year contender too.

http://www.disappears.us/

9.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/2013

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Glass City Vice – Waves EP

GCV - Promo

There has been a certain swell of excited murmurs and a keen buzz about UK alternative rockers Glass City Vice since their first appearance through debut EP No Direction in 2011, a year after the band formed. The Waves EP is our first introduction to the band and as its trio of tracks tantalise the ears and thoughts it is not too hard to see why they have excitedly caught the imagination of so many. There is an enterprise and distinct voice to its sound which instantly grabs attention but also a lure which less openly seduces the senses so that at any time the songs making up the EP can return in thoughts as a welcome reprise. Big things are suggested for the Brighton quartet and taking Waves as evidence it is hard to raise any real disagreement.

The foursome of vocalist/lead guitarist Josh Oliver, guitarist/backing vocalist Ed Lytton Cobbold, bassist Dudley Powell, and drummer Lawrie Miller as well as with their first release has equally built a strong reputation for their live performances which has seen them play alongside the likes Lawson, The Audition, The Xcerts, and Freeze The Atlantic during over 200 shows across the UK they have played over the past three years. The Waves EP is the next step in their rise, a major step one suspects, and a trigger which will recruit waves of new recruits to their already fervour driven fan base.

Recorded with Mercury nominee producer Jag Jago (The Maccabees, The Xcerts), the release opens with its title track and takes a mere Artworkmoment to draw in full attention and appetite as the guitars stroke the ear whilst rhythms create a firm web for them to play within. As the vocals of Oliver enters into the brewing mix of energy and passion there is a definite Reuben feel calling out thoughts and emotions. From a bright melodic blaze for its chorus the song settles into an energetic but restrained stroll which easily recruits feet and focus to its imaginative cause. Infectious and strikingly composed to merge elegance and a feisty breath, the song is a stirring and potent start to the release though soon eclipsed by the new single.

Have To Say also finds a catchy depth which makes it impossible to turn away from, the opening rhythmic dance covered by the acidic guitar kisses and vocal expression a contagious start which is built upon and accelerated in effect by thrilling guitar work and invention courted by equally accomplished drum and bass persuasion. Sabre strikes of guitar crash across the almost predatory grizzled bass line and caging drum taunts which mark a twist in the song bringing even greater temptation whilst the fiery climax is seeded in a passion and energy which leaves senses and thoughts subservient to its call.

The closing Just A Position ensures the release ends as impressively as it began; the song an undemanding yet fully engaging wash of melodic and enthusiastic enterprise which impresses more and more with each listen even if it does pale slightly against its predecessors.

The Waves EP accompanied by a great video for the single filmed at Knebworth House with upcoming director Dean Sherwood, is the clear marker for a band on a definite rise musically and in recognition. Glass Vice City could very well soon be a name on the lips of the country or certainly a sound in their ears.

Get the Waves EP as a Name Your Own Price @ http://glasscityvice.bandcamp.com/

http://www.glasscityvice.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/2013

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Atlanter – Vidde

atlanter pic

Norwegian band Atlanter creates a brew of rock which in the words of the accompanying promo is ‘inspired by desert blues, by German krautrock and by old delta blues. All this is done with a Norwegian twist and point of view, and is perhaps best described as Norwegian mountainblues.’ This may be so but the most important and accurate description you need is that their sound is a warm and vibrate dance on the senses and imagination which is at ease with either a muscular or melodically seductive gait, and even more so at combining the two in a blaze of inventive and inspiring enterprise.

Atlanter was formed by vocalist/guitarist Jens Carelius and guitarist Arild Hammerø, two artists not strangers to acclaim and success with their solo work; Caerlius with his albums The First Songs (2008), The Beat Of The Travel (2009), and The Architect (2011), and folk singer Hammerø through his releases Dagen Som Gryr of 2008, Flåte of 2012 which saw him alongside Daniel Herskedal under the name Hammer & Hersk, and as part of the electronica duo Ost & Kjex. Joined by drummer Jonas Barsten Johnsen (CCTV, Frøy Aagre, Disaster in the Universe) and bassist Morten Kvam (Jens Carelius, Siri Nilsen and a number of jazz ensembles), the Oslo quartet has in new album Vidde created a sultry fire of folk rock and progressive seduction which transports the listener into the arms of a blues and desert rock expanse. It is a powerfully persuasive release which lays down a landscape also employing a wind of American country rock which shows how varied and full it is, especially when you add in the darker tones of shadows found in Helldorado and the spiritually psychedelic whispers of Spirits Of The Dead which also place a rich caress on the impressive release.

From the opener Tree Song there feels a freedom and loose spirit to the release which makes each encounter a new venture and one 485978_323451297764154_1100044288_nassumes live a continually evolving proposition. From its undefined intro a guitar begins coaxing the ear though soon joined by a moody and vibrant bass call and instantly exciting drum temptation. Vocal harmonies reservedly add to the ambience soon after to charm out full attention which is then rewarded by the catchy imaginative shuffle, drums and bass remaining in their already hypnotic stance, and the joint delivery of Carelius and Hammerø making for a richly pleasing combination vocally and musically. There is constantly little and larger things going on in the song, every second an adventure within an adventure which intrigues and captivates from start to finish. It is a scintillating beginning which leaves a flavour enriched appetite fully awoken.

Both Aye and Kaktos continue to feed that emerged hunger with ease, the first another different but near riotous folk clad boogie through the ear with an energy and passion that fidgets magnetically throughout driven by the again outstanding rhythmic temptation of Barsten Johnsen. With the guitars teasing notes into picturesque descriptions to paint thoughts and the vocals equally as potent, the track is an immense imaginative lure to which full involvement is inevitable. Its successor then wraps a shimmering rich western tone to its body, that Helldorado reference coming into play as the tale unfolding engulfs thoughts into a sultry picture of emotive and reflective intensity. As its predecessors the track is a glorious creative and infectious fire to dive often for an ever expanding experience.

After the brief acoustic call of Air, an ok track but pale compared to what came before, the album re-grips full attention with the excellent guitar twanged and sculpted mystique of More Juice Than Zeus and the exotic almost Eastern climes of Pike. Both tracks steer emotions to the door of the place the opening trio of songs forged, if without crossing the threshold, whilst the pulsating melodic and sonic kisses of Waking push emotions that little further into rapture.

Completed by the elegantly shaped instrumental Ling and the rawer countryesque Desert, the album is a thrilling companion to ear and thoughts. Admittedly its first half outweighs its second in irresistibility but from the opening poke of the ear to the last expressive note of Vidde, Atlanter immerse the listener in spellbinding enjoyment. Hopefully the Jansen Plateproduksjon released album is just the start for the band as it could be very easy to get used to this type of aural escapade.

https://www.facebook.com/atlanternorway

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/2013

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For All The Wrong Reason – We’re Not Losing, We’re Just Not Winning EP

For All The Wrong Reasons Onlin Promo shot

For a band barely into its eighth month, debut release the We’re Not Losing, We’re Just Not Winning EP from For All The Wrong Reason, is all the more impressive with its collection of anthemically energetic and infectiously lively songs packed full of vibrant promise. It is not exactly the fact that the band is so young in its formation and with such accomplished sounds that makes the release so exciting but that their blend of pop punk/power pop still suggests there is so much more to come ahead which thrills. As the EP teases and dances riotously with the senses through five cuts of melodic contagion the feeling that this is the dawn of a potent force in their chosen genre is inescapable whilst right the band stands as an extremely accomplished and invigorating encounter.

Consisting of vocalist Alex Statham, guitarists Jacob Pointing and Chris Dunn, bassist Aiden De Ruiter, and drummer Lou Coe, the Lincoln quintet immediately set to work on sculpting and honing their sound and songs from day one, the intensive work and craft openly apparent on We’re Not Losing, We’re Just Not Winning. Clad in hungry riffs and guitar enterprise within a rhythmic frame which engages at a primal level, the songs making up the release are the kind which are fresh and inventive yet seemingly no strangers to the ear and emotions. Fuelled by adrenaline and filled with melodic flames and imagination which seep virulence, the tracks refuse to take no for an answer from the passions with their potent persuasion. Arguably, though probably fair to say, For All The Wrong Reasons are still on route to finding their own distinctive presence, the EP rife with familiar and easy to compare to others moments, but such the skill and strength of the songwriting and its realisation it is a minor issue at this point.

Vocals and guitars with a rhythmic coaxing press on the ear to set the release and opener These Past Few Years Haven’t Been So Kind offFor All The Wrong Reasons Cover Artwork to a good start, the blend respectful and undemanding but a strong welcome into the EP. Into a pacey yet restrained stride the track does not try to over load the senses with  a blaze of invention, just a resourceful and easily accessible stroll of sharp hooks and melodic caresses which would not be out of place in Blink 182 songs. With the bass offering a darker throat to the sound and fine guitar flames licking around the excellent vocals of Statham, it is a steady and appealing start almost like a sighter before really reaching for the resources and invention of the band.

Who Died And Made You King Of The Zombies? rustles up a raw and gritty tone to its riffs before erupting into an again instantly connectable charge of eager energy with imaginative guitar sonic hues laying down an emotive narrative alongside the continuing to impress vocals and firm commanding rhythms. A further step on from the starter itself, the song is then surpassed by the excellent It Always Rains (Except When It Snows). From its first breath the track is invitingly brawling with the ear, riffs and drums courting intimidation without going for the jugular and the vocals riding it all with a caustic touch not seen previously. With the bass stalking it all with seductive mischief, the song begins to switch and twist with a keen groove littered with rhythmic and melodic hooks gripping tight whilst the vocals take on a cleaner welcome with Pointing backing up Statham potently. It is a heady mix which like the EP just gets better the further into its length you go before delivering a striking delicious finale.

    It’s Not Me With The Problem, It’s Everyone Else and Worn Out finish off the release, the first conjuring another fire of irrepressible infection filled fascination which evolves and shifts throughout for a thrilling mix of bordering on aggressive confrontation and sirenesque enticement which embraces greater unpredictability the more it offers. Its successor brings a passion fuelled stomp of melodic and sinew driven enterprise to conclude the fine release. An anthem for the emotions and senses, the song is a fiery triumph which leaves hunger and anticipation of even greater things to come ruling thoughts as the sounds inspiring them with the same strength guide the passions.

Keeping a watch on For All The Wrong Reasons starting with the  We’re Not Losing, We’re Just Not Winning EP is a must as they have all the makings of being something quite special upon future horizons.

www.facebook.com/FATWRUK

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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