Coursing struggles: an interview with Mike Haggerty of Krebs

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    Industrial/ebm is about to feel a new fresh breath of imaginative and caustic creativity with the debut release from Philadelphia band Krebs. The Cellophane EP is a potent and evocative treat with a metal apocalyptic breath riding the captivating industrial and electro snarls. The solo project of Mike Haggerty, Krebs is set to make an instant mark with its first release via Bluntface Records so we took the opportunity to find out more about the release, band, and Mike himself.

Hi Mike and welcome to The Ringmaster Review, thanks for taking time to talk with us.

First thing we have to ask you is to tell us about Mike Haggerty, as well as your background and musical history before Krebs.

Thanks for having me! Well I’d say I’m just an average guy who loves music, videogames and junk food. Music is really my passion, it relates to everything I do. Genres like punk and metal really captured my attention at an early age and got me into making music myself. I was in a band before Krebs with a few friends, we played grunge inspired hard rock. Then I discovered industrial/electronic music and that all brought me to where I am now.

Was there a specific intent when creating the project Krebs?

My intent was really just to try my best to make something fresh and hopefully capture the attention of old school and modern industrial fans alike and maybe even draw some new fans into the genre.

What are the inspirations which have most impacted on your ideas and sound?

To start, I always loved Front Line Assembly and the unique sound they have, so they are a big influence on my sound. Skinny Puppy’s ability to experiment and still sound like themselves is another thing that had an impact on me. Videogames and books also influence my ideas and song writing strangely enough. I love apocalyptic themes as well as futuristic themes that are explored, and if the two are brought together then I’m in heaven!

You are about to release your debut EP Cellophane, a release which captures the imagination with its varied and inventive mix of flavours. You can only assume your personal tastes incorporate a wide expanse of genres and styles.

I always try to find ways to make each song really stand out on its own and separate itself from the others. I always say that each Krebs song is its own animal and I do my best to give them all their own identity, if that makes sense.

Tell us about the EP, its creation and the songs within.krebs-cover-600 (1)

The EP was formed simply because I happened to have five songs that I considered finished and at that point Otto (Kinzel) mastered them for me. They were the product of several weeks’ worth of writing and recording. The songs themselves are mostly the product of what emotions I had at the time I wrote them. Other times I would have ideas that I thought were interesting, so I literally started writing thoughts down in my notebook and lyrics formed out of that. It’s basically poetry set to music. The album art was the last piece of the EP that was needed. My friend Jake Skalish created it at my request and I think it came out very well.

Everything comes from your ideas and craft on the release, but did you bring anyone else in for any aspect of the release or is it truly the complete solo release?

For this release I wrote and recorded everything myself, so it is a complete solo release; I did get insight from my friends Chris Pasquarelli and Chris Bollinger from Varicella. They really encouraged me and continue to help me get Krebs out there and I can’t thank them enough.

How do you write your songs and expand your ideas musically?

I usually have a melody or a rhythm in my head that I record right away, and then I figure out the structure. That’s when I create an atmosphere and layer more sounds. I compare it to starting with framework for a house, then gradually adding on to it, then decorating it and adding the finishing touches. Lyrically, as I’ve said, it’s usually the result of a strong emotion that I feel at the time or anything that I’ve read about that catches my attention.

Musically, I try to incorporate various sounds and instrumentation to expand the sound further. Things may sound strange upon the first listen, but strange is what I do!

Listening to the EP there is the sense that songs have an organic and continual growth to them. Do your songs evolve right up to the final mastering?

My songs do tend to go through multiple changes; it feels like my work is never done. The songs have all undergone change from the time I made the first synth line to right before I had them mastered. It varies between how drastically they change. I like to layer sounds and create hidden parts that people can catch. I also hope to invoke introspection in the listeners with each song.

Is there a theme or intent behind the songs on Cellophane and their lyrical paintings?

A theme that carries through most of Cellophane is the idea that people are always suppressed and restricted in some way or another, be it by government or by their own conscience. The themes oscillate between external and internal struggles and the goal of songs with internal struggles is to make something that people can relate to. It’s almost like letting the listener get to know who I am as a person.

As mentioned the EP is your debut release, is there any part, moment , or aspect of it which gives you the strongest thrill or tingle?

What really excites me is the fact that my songs will be out there and open to a broader audience, maybe not huge but it is something I always wanted. Just having an official release is something I always dreamed about and the fact that it’s actually happening gives me a euphoric feeling, it’s crazy!

krebs-2And any elements you wish you could have explored further or since have developed the appetite to investigate in future songs?

There are aspects of ambient music I hope to delve into for future releases. I also hope to bring in more elements of punk, like the speed and raw feelings associated with it. I feel it will be a very interesting mix.

Cellophane is released through Bluntface Records. How has linking up with Otto Kinzel and his label helped the realisation of the EP apart from the obvious of course.

Otto really helped this take off. He helped me realize that there is nothing wrong with self-promotion and that really helps gain confidence (and fans haha). As a side note I also started to realize that people have a different view of a band or artist when they see that they are on a label. Sadly, it’s almost like a lot of people have a bias towards bands on labels.

You have Chris Mattioni join you for live shows, how did you meet and is there a chance the band could expand further for your live performances in the future?

Chris and I have been buds for a few years. He expressed interest in doing vocals with me a while ago and he eventually decided to come on stage with me and do backup.  I do hope to get more friends to contribute to live shows in the future, a drummer hopefully *cough* Ryan Skalish *cough*.

How about in the studio ahead?

I have songs in the works already for a full length album. This one will be a concept album inspired by a certain game, but I won’t reveal anything else. I’d like to keep it a surprise. 😉

You are also releasing Peace Injection as the single from Cellophane. Can you tell us about the track and the single package it will come in?

Peace Injection is a song that was sparked by my thoughts on America. The fact that our country feels the need to intervene in affairs in the name of “Peace” and “democracy” is something that has bothered me and this song is a response to that. The single contains the original version from the EP and three remixes, by Virus Cycle, Otto Kinzel, and Varicella. They are all talented guys and it was really awesome to hear their takes on my song. It’s also free and is available for download now.

What is next for Krebs once the EP is out there?

Krebs will hopefully get to perform some live shows in the near future and work on the concept album for a not too distant release date! Stay tuned.

Once more thank you for chatting with us, anything you would like to add?

First, thank you so much for having me and for the review. I’d just like to thank Otto for arranging everything as well. It was a pleasure and I hope to talk to you again soon!

Cellophane is A FREE download available in the Bluntface Records online store at midnight, June 29th!

www.bluntfacerecords.com

Read the review of Cellophane @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/krebs-cellophane/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 31/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Milestones – Crutches

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Irish post hardcore band Milestones have announced they have a new release scheduled for later in the summer by unveiling a pair of songs from the forthcoming four track EP. The pair of brawling confrontations simply owns the ear and senses with an enterprise and aggression which declares the band at their most potent yet whilst transforming the appetite for the forthcoming Guys With Beards Records released Blight which will be released on tape/download only, to impatient hunger.

The Dublin quintet of vocalist Peter Kealy, guitarists Jack Marmion and Rafino Murphy, bassist Keith Fish, and Keith Davis on drums, first caught our ear and passion with previous EP Entropy released via Irish independent, Savour Your Scene Records. It was a raw and abrasive assault which bred a strong focus on and greed for the band’s insatiably provocative sound. Rising from the ashes of Out of Nowhere in April 2011, the band has been no stranger to attention, their three track demo Blood earning good praise as did following tracks The Boats and Gone With The Wind upon release. Live performances alongside the likes of Bury Your Dead, Betrayal, and Stick Around only enhanced their presence as did their own impressive shows but it would be fair to say the pair of songs just unveiled find the band at a new plateau of creativity and sonic brutality. When receiving contact about the songs from Keith Davis it has to be said our juices instantly rose up but even that anticipation did not imagine the might ahead of us.

Both Crutches and Doldrums chew up ear and senses, their caustic mix of hardcore and punk blistered into a fresh and predatory sonic acid with complimentary lyrical and vocal burning. Crutches instantly stakes a claim as the best thing the band has ever brewed up in their destructive invention, the track raging with sonic spittle flying from every riff and melodic teasing whilst each syllable finds a mutual toxin of biting venom. Across its demanding gait the song unleashes a fury of energy and merciless intensity but with ease also slows it to a prowling rapaciousness at times which is arguably even more menacing and corrosive than when things reach maelstrom proportions. Kealy ravages words and senses with his expected unbridled spite but finds more expression than ever before and framed within the outstanding rhythmic attack of Davis, as the guitars and bass unleash their viciously licking flames across their bow, it is a contagious yet overwhelming ferociousness of sheer joy.

Doldrums equally sends the body into cowering shock before its demanding and shifting abuse, the bass of Fish especially threatening and absorbing with its throat tearing growl. The track into its stride is rock ‘n’ roll at its nasty best, the band employing much more than that original post hardcore tag suggests. It is a savage and invigorating onslaught which leaves the listener a wasted grinning shell, its scintillating violence seducing and sucking forth the life from their energy but igniting stronger passion.

Milestones already suggested they were a cut above the other similarly sculpted bands but these Ciaran Parnell produced songs set them well apart and sets Blight on a suggested pedestal which you just know it will rule with ease. Roll on the summer is all that is left to say.

https://www.facebook.com/milestonesdublin

http://milestonesdublin.bandcamp.com

9/10

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

RingMaster 31/05/2013

 

The Rattlin’ Doors – In A Tree House

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With their debut single, UK rockers The Rattlin’ Doors stand before us as a compelling and scintillating piece of devilment, a band with a sound which it would not be a surprise if it was claimed by the devil or any wickerman ceremony bred by pagan worship. In A Tree House is a riveting and thrilling shadow stomping slice of aural mischief, a song born of folk rock and cultured in a psychobilly, hillbilly, and garage punk vat of caustic revelry. Imagine the mutant offspring from a union of Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux, The Cramps, The Fall, and especially The Dancing Did, and you get a whiff of the psyched out rock ‘n’ roll of The Rattlin’ Doors.

Consisting of guitarist and vocalist Andy Teece, bassist Phil Elt, and drummer Leeroy Evans, the Worcester trio bring a fusion of rockabilly, punk, and blues into a unique recipe of their own and already have made a strong impression in the UK and over the pond. In A Tree House will only accelerate and enforce their striking and imagination capturing presence, their first introduction to the widest audience a tantalising almost niggling seed of triumph which truly ignites the passions.

The first of their ‘tainted tales of country life’ to be unleashed, In A Tree House charges up to the ear in a blaze of intense 582219_193591974104886_1351463910_nstrumming before breaking into a hungry stroll of expressive and sinisterly grinning vocals alongside slide guitar teasing and rhythmic prowling. It is an immediate recruitment with a sonic hook which seduces the passions instantly. Around that barbed lure the bass of Elt romps and crawls over the ear with a rapacious greed, its menace bringing dark corners to bear upon the country rock lined stomp to find a dark union with the equally nightmare seeded lyrical narrative wonderfully expelled by the vocals of Teece.

In A Tree House is an exceptional treat with the skills of Evans caging its contents and the ear in an inescapable and irresistible encounter of sacrificial caustic beauty, village life taken to extremes for a delicious dance of picturesque malevolence. The Rattlin’ Doors is destined to find a legion of eager victims for their startlingly fascinating cause as they take over UK rock, we are already a willing conspirator so come join the burning with us.

Released July 1st, In A Tree House will be available as a free download from The Rattlin’ Doors website.

http://www.rattlindoors.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheRattlinDoors

Upcoming The Rattlin’ Doors gigs:

15th June @ Flapper & Firkin – Birmingham

16th June @ Himbelton Cricket Club – Himbelton

10/10

RingMaster 31/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Snarling with varied weaponry: an interview with John Robb of Goldblade

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Punk has been treated to some exceptional albums so far this year and none any better than the new album from UK giants Goldblade. Their sixth album, The Terror Of Modern Life, is a masterful, openly diverse, and ferocious strike of irresistible and inciting riots of invention and enterprise. One of the most thrilling releases to unleash its triumph upon 2013 so far, the thirteen track brawl snarls and provokes thoughts and senses with pure imaginative craft. Seizing the opportunity to talk with band founder and vocalist, John Robb, we charged up our questions to ask one of the genre’s biggest creators about the album, punk itself, and his own history.

Hi John and welcome to the site, thank you for sharing time to chat with us.

Album six, The Terror Of Modern Life, has just unleashed its confrontation on the world; does the feel, thrill, and anticipation change from release to release?

Of course…and it gets to be a bigger thrill.  It’s a mixture of thank fuck we are still doing this and surviving in the collapsing music business and still have enough inspiration to still want to make music!

With this album we felt really excited. We knew we were onto something good with this record a long time ago. We got the sound we wanted from the start and we worked hard to get the songs right. We wanted a variation of styles- from fast kinda hardcore rushes to anthemic punk to dark tribal stuff to droning post black metal apocalyptic pieces. It’s like a collection of all the various strands of punk and its off shoots – we wanted something people could dance to at gigs, something full of hooks but also fuck with things a bit as well. We wanted to make a record that reflected the underlying darkness and unease of these times, times where the word ‘terror’ is the key word like the word ‘clash’ was the key word in the punk times and caused the classic band to name themselves.

We immersed ourselves in the album and pushed ourselves to the brink. We then made the sound the way we wanted, in a way we never got close to before. We wanted something darker and heavier- we wanted the bass to sound right- I had reformed my old band The Membranes for a few gigs and played bass again and it reminded me of the fundamental power of that instrument if you stick it though a rat pedal and play it with a direct venom- this cross pollinated into Goldblade and infected the album and it really places us back into the place we wanted to be- that twisted end of punk occupied by Killing Joke, Dead Kennedys, Stranglers, Black Flag, whilst continuing the great quest of the Clash but updated to a 21st century feel because we have never stopped listening to new music.

The year has already seen the outstanding new UK Subs album XXIV provoke and impress and now your scintillating encounter, it feels like the ‘old brigade’ is still driving and leading UK punk, does it feel like that for you?

There are great younger bands around- Dirt Box Disco album is stuffed full of great songs- I think it’s a case of older bands not giving up in their dotage- with discipline and concentration you can make the best and most urgent history of your history. Punk, by its nature, doesn’t have leaders- we just operate in our own space! The UK Subs album is great and Charlie is an inspiration to anyone, there have also been great albums from Killing Joke, the Stranglers and other bands from that generation- it’s like those bands have found their teeth again- maybe they also feel the urgency of these times…

The Terror Of Modern Life is as with your previous albums a collection of songs which steer through, challenge, and stand eye to Goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life-296x300eye with injustices and social wrongs, but your most potent and venomous yet?

I think things are getting a bit helter skelter out there and it’s hard not to reflect this, the last ten years has seen things get very unsteady in the world and that’s bound to get into the music- we have no interest in lecturing people, we just reflect what’s happening- people can make their own minds up or just dance to the music- it does not concern us what people think of the words, the world seems to be in a fast forward towards several different conclusions and out album reflects this tension.

Do you feel the impact of politically fuelled songs whether on the personal, social, or world level is still as strong as it used to be within not only punk but music as a whole? Do people and especially the latest generation of young people listen to songs and music the same way as those before them?

To be honest the impact has lessened in some ways and yet in others it’s got stronger- music, the music discourse is no longer driven by the counter culture and there are many strands of thought out there, but that’s inevitable because people don’t have the time and the impact of being a political song is less than when it first came about in modern culture. I don’t think young people are less political than they were years ago- that’s a bit of a myth. Not all of punk was political and it didn’t have to be- punk was many things- it could be comic book like the Ramones or political like Crass and both were genius for me. I think people sometimes feel overawed by the world these days and feel detached from the political process and that’s creating dangerous vacuums. We don’t claim to have all the answers but we have definitely have all the questions.

You obviously grew up with and were inspired by the birth of punk and the bands sculpting its first mighty wave; do you still see and feel the same essences politically and musically in today’s punk bands outside of yourselves and the still provocative bands from back then?

First wave was important for me but I don’t wallow in there for ever- those records always sound magical and powerful but I love lots of new music as well even it affects me in a different kind of way. Modern punk bands are as varied musically and politically as any bands were back then, it has changed in many ways as well- even if it was a business then as well it seemed to be a bit more haphazard and suicidal- now it’s a long term operation and band’s gigs are very different. In some ways punk has become a tradition like jazz or blues and a way of making music or dressing- and that’s understandable – the music and the style are very attractive and create a cool- the only danger is getting trapped which is a contradiction of the punk spirit!

For those unaware of your intensive history within music could you give us the history of John Robb between say ’77 and the emergence of Goldblade?

Wow, that’s long and complex!

Born in Blackpool, formed The Membranes in the punk period and also started a fanzine called Rox. The Membranes became a big underground band with noisy records inspired by the dark zone in the middle of punk and post punk- we toured the world and were critic and John Peel faves. At the same time I started writing for Zig Zag and then Sounds and covered all the fallout of the punk generation from the goth to grunge scene to Madchester to baggy to punk itself- being the first person to interview Nirvana and also coining the phrase Britpop, formed Goldblade in the mid-nineties to fly the flag for rock n roll in the middle of the non-rock n roll decade! Wrote books on punk and the Stone Roses and the eighties underground scene as well as doing TV and radio stuff…and that all continues now with Goldblade playing all over the world etc…

As you mentioned your writing, something you are renowned, has that experience and aspect of your life impacted or brought a view upon your music lyrically and in regard to creating sounds which brings something different to Goldblade, something other bands might lack?

Of course, even for the simple reason that I hear lots of music and it also keeps me fully engaged in the culture and keeps me interested and investigating everything. I’m a compulsively creative person who keeps making, creating and writing stuff. Apart from hearing so much stuff I think the impact on Goldblade is more minimal as that is a very instinctive thing, we make the music that entertains us and the songs are kicked about in the rehearsal room till they sound and feel right to us and not to fit in with anybody, anywhere!

Listening to The Terror Of Modern Life alone, one has the sense inspirations are far wider than just the early days and sounds of punk. What does give you food for thought musically?

You got it- some people think we operate only within punk but we have a far wider listening base than that- even punk was originally about dub and other musics- it’s good to mess with things but keep the focus and the energy- sometimes it’s great to switch to fast and furious punk rushes just to get that adrenalin fix, sometimes it’s good to find a different rhythm or atmosphere- it could be from black metal or from dub reggae but it must always be put through the Goldblade mangle and made to sound like us.

Goldblade 5Did you approach the new album any differently to your previous releases?

We wanted something a bit more extreme, more heavier, and rawer; we felt the last album had been too tame and too much click track and production- we wanted the record to sound live and if the songs speeded up towards the end then great! Because they speeded up with excitement- ‘rock n roll should speed up’ as Guy Stevens told the Clash during London Calling recordings…we had to record the album twice because of a fallout with the label but the second time we recorded it in two days flat and mixed it in 2 days- the urgency was vital to the album, it gives it an edge and we are addicted to the edge…

The songs on the album strike hard lyrically and deliver them with some of the most deviously addictive hooks and grooves, which comes first in your songs as a generalisation?

It can be either- we can have songs and bash them out in the rehearsal room and work out a vocal melody or it can be a phrase or some lyrics that come with a tune and we build the song around it- it’s a very varying process.

Is there any particular moment on The Terror Of Modern Life which gives you the strongest satisfaction?

I think the playing by the band is amazing, brother Pete’s guitar is fantastic- every time I listen I hear something new, even on the songs I mainly wrote! And getting the bass sound the way I wanted it to be- as heavy and raw as it should be- that made a big difference- when we finished the album we were really happy with it, I listened to it over and over- normally you feel a bit down when it’s finished but this time I could actually listen to this as an album and felt really excited by the sound and the reaction we have got so far with all the great reviews has proved this.

And anything you would have changed or like to have evolved further in hindsight?

That’s for the next album!

I would change the way people consume music- I think it’s getting almost impossible for people to record and release music now unless they are rich- the download thing has killed it for small underground labels and studios and everyone is really struggling out there- this is our first release where most of the people listening will have not bought the record but downloaded it from the internet and from the pirates- it doesn’t make me angry as technology is part of music- but it may mean that making another album may be almost impossible for us and lots of other bands. We will have to think of other ways of making and releasing music in the future.

The late seventies and punk gave freedom and realisation to bands and people that they could make music as they wanted, on their own terms. Do you think that freedom or realisation is still as potent, has the internet and the digital world given back that belief?

In some ways yes- you can get heard more now and the consumer has the power which we love- cult bands can be heard now and don’t have to grovel to the mainstream media for attention- that’s been very important to the underground and made a real difference- this is coupled with the real problems that many studios, labels and shops are having because of the pirate thing- we felt that if you want to give your music away for free that’s up to you and not someone else but we realise that there is nothing we can do about it- the internet is young and its effect on culture cannot be measured yet- at the moment its chaos out there and like the wild west- and as punks we love that aspect of it but we are not so servile that we want people we don’t know to make money out of us!

There has always been a unity and kinship between punk bands, certainly in its origins, do you still think it exists, can you feel that Gold Blade Smallunity now?

Yes we all know each other, some bands are more friendly than others but there is a unity- I think we all face the same problems!

You have just come off a tour with the Misfits, and a band we love and feature constantly on our podcasts The Bone Orchard and The Ringmaster Review, Dirt Box Disco who you mentioned earlier. How was the tour and did you have to put those punk n roll freaks from DBD in their place 😉

DBD are good people and a great band and there songs are killer- I think they will be one of the biggest bands on the scene by the end of the year and we can then go and support them. It was great to tour with them and I had to chuckle when we played with them at the Manchester Ritz when their stomach problems were quite loud back stage. 🙂

You have toured all over the world it seems, any particular places other than the usual countries which you enjoyed and surprised you with their knowledge of your sounds?

Algeria was amazing- we were the first band to play there for 20 years and yet people knew our songs – that’s the power of YouTube for you- the songs that were on YouTube they were singing along- we have played all over- we have played Russia a few times and there is talk of going to China…

Once more a big thanks John for talking with us, anything you would like to add?

Join our Facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/goldbladeband

Review the review of The Terror Of Modern Life @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 30/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

IMMENSION unleash ‘The Enemy Within’, on 12th August.‏

Immension Online Press Shot

RISING METAL HEADS IMMENSION UNLEASH SPANKING NEW EP!

 
Emerging Metal Crew ‘Immension’ stake a claim with the national release of their sophomore EP ‘The Enemy Within’, out in stores from Monday 12th August.
 
With influences spanning from ‘Metallica’, ‘ In Flames’ and ‘Arch Enemy’, Immension have forged an extremely attractive and inventive take on the metal genre.
Coming at you from Sheffield, Immension were born back in 2008 by founding members vocalist/guitarist Jake Kearsley and lead axe-man Tim Dolan. The early days of Immension were plighted due to a series of unreliable members serving as their rhythm section. All of this changed though when the duo recruited bea-tmaster, Jonni Sowter, and bassist, Hasan Ahmed, who both came into the fold in 2011. Since then, everything has finally fallen into place for the ascending metal combo.
The aspiring metallers proceeded to play a number of shows throughout the whole of the UK, and in passing, gathered an impressive underground following before releasing their self-titled debut EP which racked up critical acclaim in Terrorizer Magazine and Rocksound, as well as notching up widespread radio airplay from Total Rock Radio and extensive online coverage.
Now after the successful release for their self-titled EP, the band are set to release their new EP ‘The Enemy Within’. The record is a mighty impressive piece of modern metal that is captivating and original —no easy task given the current climate. The EP oozes four spanking new tracks of galloping metal merged with melodic passages and inter-woven guitar lines. Immension drop ‘The Enemy Within’ this summer and it’s destined to drop you to the floor.
Look out too for the band live throughout May and June.
IMMENSION LIVE: 31/05/13 – Regents Bar – BARNSLEY; 21/06/13 – The Dove & Rainbow – SHEFFIELD; 27/06/13 – Pit & Pendulum – NOTTINGHAM; 29/06/13 – The Maze – NOTTINGHAM; 27/07/13 – Coalfields Festival – BARNSLEY
Immension Cover Artwork
 
 

Death By Ki unleash new video‏

Death By Ki Online Promo Shot

UK riff-slingers ‘Death By Ki’ have just unleashed their enticing debut EP ‘The Right Of Might’ and new video ‘Control (In A World Of Free Will).

 
Bursting out of Bridgwater, Somerset, Death By Ki bond together a formidable sound, lifting from the rampant power of Slayer and Lamb Of God and the old school riffery of Metallica. The South West road warriors, comprised of Josh Ayerst (Guitars and lead vocals), Chris Chamberlain (Guitars and backing vocals), Will Robins (Bass and backing vocals), and Nick Cope (Drums), pack together a heady blend of pummelling hooks laced with Slayer-esque vocals, set with layered riffage, and complemented by sturdy bass and rock solid beats.
The band’s new video for ‘Control (In A World Of Free Will)’, which was filmed in the crypt beneath St. Paul’s Church in Bristol, can be seen here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyPOpSCam44 .
Hit up the band for show updates at www.facebook.com/deathbyki

THIS DEVASTATED FAN set to reveal some ‘Plot And Debauchery’, on 12th August.

This Devastated Fan Promo shot

UK ALT-CREW THIS DEVASTATED FAN REBOOT NEW ALBUM THIS SUMMER!

Taking the artistry of Manchester Orchestra, the emotive drive of Alexisonfire, and the glowing diversity of Coheed and Cambria, This Devastated Fan showcase a sound that pitches impressive dynamic variation with earnest song-writing. The band are now set to plough their way to the upper echelons of the UK music scene with the re-release of their new album ‘Plot And Debauchery’, out Monday 12th August.
Hailing from the North West, alternative foursome This Devastated Fan were originally formed back in 2006, but the current and now permanently stable line-up consists of blood brothers Robbie and Jamie Cavanagh on Vocals/Guitar and Drums, respectively, Will Rogers on Guitar and Steve Alday completing the band on bass. Based at their very own rehearsal space and office in Wigan, endearingly titled ‘TDF HQ’, the band work diligently to perfect their craft and it’s started to reap its rewards. The diligent quartet are making new friends and pathways, and for the past 18 months have launched a savage attack on the UK and Europe, playing shows from the North to the South and chalking up supports with ‘Public Image Limited’ and ‘The Birthday Suit’ along the way.
This Devastated Fan also have a steady recording output and are now poised to reboot their latest album. Recorded at TDFHQ studios, the band’s third release, ‘Plot and Debauchery, encompasses TDF’s live energy whilst maintaining a superior quality complete with a polished sound. From the chugging rhythms and dynamic flavourings of ‘Shoulder The War’ through to the animated angular rock of ‘Bambi Woods’, and to the ambient beauty of ‘Heathen Rage’, the rising alternative crew have put together a record that packs thirteen killer cuts. The band are now braced for nationwide recognition as they tour for the remainder of this year and beyond!
This Devastated Fan Cover Artwork
== THIS DEVASTATED FAN RE-RELEASE ‘PLOT AND DEBAUCHERY’ ON MONDAY 12th AUGUST ==