WVM – The End Is Only The Beginning

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    The End Is Only The Beginning is the upcoming album from multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, performer, programmer, and visual artist WVM and also the EP which is an appetizer to the imminent album. We are taking a look at the five track EP and it has to be said that the album simply cannot come soon enough. Bringing together a stirring and enthralling mix of industrial, metal, gothic rock, and fiery electro, WVM has created a sound and release in The End Is Only The Beginning which incites only the hungriest appetite and passion. It is a tremendous force of invention and invigorating creativity which is as accomplished and as happy to caress and seduce as it is to ravage and violate, both extremes greedily welcomed when fused together this impressively.

The EP we assume is the recording debut of the Los Angeles based artist, but is a release showing the craft and touch one would expect of someone well-endowed in experience and know how on how to bring the strongest potency to his armoury. Whether his history is one of numerous endeavours or actually is his first appearance in any form, the stature of the songwriting and its stunning realisation is immense. Mixed by Sean Beavan (Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson), whose private studio Blue Room Studio WVM was given access to for the recording of the vocals, the EP can be best described across its length as Nine Inch Nails meets Gary Numan and The The with additional flames from Marilyn Mansion, Depeche Mode, and Fear Factory, individual tracks offering different permutations.

The opening pair of tracks on the EP immediately exploits the appetite for muscular enterprise and resourceful melodic persuasion 3461690930-1with expressive and riveting creativity. When Universes Collide, one of three tracks featuring Josh Freese (Nine Inch Nails, A Perfect Circle) on drums, instantly chews on the ear with raptorial riffs and exhausting rhythms before expanding its sinews to allow the emergence of scintillating electronic washes and equally excellent vocals, the tones of WVM clean and expressive yet with a steel to match the forceful sounds. Into its stride the track is a mountainous march of epic atmospheres and impacting intensity which engages an anthemic breath to its incendiary presence. It is an adrenaline coursing encounter in contrast to the slower more deliberate prowl of The Echoing, though both tracks are equal in their potent impact and invention. The melodic and vocal embrace of the track has a smouldering heat to their contact whilst the heavy stance of the track alongside a Ultravox like electro inducement, consumes with a weight which devours and rewards with mutual greed.

The outstanding Black Sun makes its entrance upon electro affected vocals and a brewing ambience which is warm yet provocative of something larger to come. What does rip from its expanse is a thrilling weave of electronic elegance and ingenuity forged to a heavy rock spine complete with metallic lures and hooks. Across its sizzling twisting invention and unpredictably shifting stances, the track reminds of John Foxx era Ultravox with the ravenous energy of Pitchshifter and further magnetic sonic temptation of Celldweller, whilst the guest appearance of Chris Vrenna (Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson, Tweaker) on drums only drives its vigour deeper.

For A Better Tomorrow steers its presence towards electro pop with a definite eighties lilt, though again the rhythms and vein of the song still holds intimidation and weight to charge up the desires of any metal favouring fan, the beats of Freese showing no interest in taking it easy on the listener. The melodic caress of the synths is bewitching and with the compelling menace courting its charms, the likes of Trent Reznor, Numan, or even Thomas Dolby spring to mind.

Closing song Escapism, again with Freese adding intense bone to the sublime industrial encircling of the senses, roams around and preys on the passions with the strongest NIN influenced presence on the release whilst aligning those flavours to its own carnivorous snarl and persistent sonic taunt. It is an exceptional end to a tremendous EP in quality and endeavour. WVM is on the path to great things one can only surmise with this outstanding release whilst the full album of The End Is Only The Beginning cannot come soon enough.

https://www.facebook.com/WVMOfficial

http://www.wvmmusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 15/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Horse Party – Back To Mono

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Stomping with mischief and anthemic invitation whilst holding hands with melodic enterprise and expelling a fiery breath, Back To Mono the debut single from UK band Horse Party is an intriguing and thrilling introduction. A mild riot with reservation to its still vibrant energy and potent temptation, the song immediately marks the band as an exciting new tease for the passions with a matching confident swagger.

The Bury St Edmunds trio ventured forth in September of last year after guitarist and vocalist Eleanor Lou (Ellie) was ‘badgered’ into joining the band set up by drummer/vocalist Shannon Hope and guitarist/vocalist Seymour Quigley, which according to the band bio happened having got drunk together in a church and sending ‘abusive messages’ to Ellie ‘ordering her to join a band whose primary goal would be to make or lose a million pounds.’ With a mutual passion and inspiration from the likes of Bjork, Fugazi, Cat Power and terrible films fuelling their creativity the threesome released the song Clarion Call at the beginning of the year as a free download, a track which drew the attention of BBC Suffolk Introducing and support slot offers, including one with Dingus Khan.

Release through Sturm Und Drang Recordings, their first official single instantly lures the listener in with an opening Beatlesque hook1317436922-1 of fuzzy guitar strokes and mutually resonating bass entrapment and once the great vocals of Ellie add their warm beckoning, Back To The Mono has a firm grip on the ear and emotions. The almost lo-fi touch of the song, its breath raw yet perfectly defined as a persuasion, brings a delicious organic feel whilst the blues soaked guitar hook and magnetic chorus only furthers its claim to the passions. A track which has no desires to create a tempest of evolving textures but instead offers a continual and solid prowl of the ear, it still manages to bring a heat and absorbing adventure which rivals and more often outshines the majority of similarly gaited and clothed indie tracks erupting out this year.

Standing somewhere between the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Morningwood, and Cradle, band and single inspire such promise that the wait for more from Horse Party is going to have a taste of impatience about it.

www.horsepartyparty.bandcamp.com

www.facebook.com/horsepartyparty

8.5/10

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RingMaster 15/04/2013

 

Runaway Orchestra – Self Titled

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Approaching the self-titled album from Runaway Orchestra it would be fair to say eager anticipation was not really in abundance. The thought of a collection of cover songs was not off-putting but certainly did not fire up any real excitement or strong intrigue. The ten track album proceeded to take barely two songs to slap any doubt or lethargy towards it down to the floor and firmly transfixed and mesmerised thoughts from there on in.  Certainly not every track found the same strength of passion towards it as did others but the album as a whole was one shapely and magnetic pleasure equipped with a powerful and lingering lure to re-join it often.

The album is the work of Tam Nightingale who enlisted the sultry tones of solo artist Sophie Madeline to explore and bring sirenesque radiance to the re-imagination of classic songs. Also featuring musicians from The Divine Comedy, UNKLE, and Cinematic Orchestra, the result is a delicious warm stroll through the charms of an aural sun and its seductive warmth.  Released through Mr Bongo, the album brings the melodic beauty of Madeline and the folk caresses of the music in a summers day worth of luxurious luminance, the release basking and offering a full journey of hazy elegance from its vibrant sunrise to its dreamy sunset. It certainly emerged as a real surprise, a mouth-watering treat easily putting those earlier thoughts in shameful exile.

The release opens up with its potency fully unrefined from the start through the stunning tracks Happy Together and Life’s A Gas. The first, a re-working of The Turtles track, is simply irresistible, the song instantly mesmerises with the bewitching voice of Madeline and the stringed emotive kiss securing an immediate ardour upon impact. Opening up its arms to a full orchestral embrace with compelling textures coaxing further rapture, the song is wonderful and overall steals the show despite the mighty efforts of the other tracks. From its magnetic presence the song passes on to the following T-Rex song and yet another irresistible temptation. The acoustic touch of the guitar and as proves to be a permanent pleasure, the heart thrilling vocals, make an invitation impossible to decline before the track expands into another feast of orchestral light and melodic enterprise with vocal harmonies and the throaty bass shadow adding yet more unbridled enticement. Whereas its predecessor for these simple preferences easily outshone the original, this song does not surpass the richness of the Bolan version, but comes so close it is dazzling.

After such a start there had to come a point where the album loosened its grip but with next up For Lovers the time was not ready, the striking and thrilling cover of the Wolfman and Pete Doherty 2004 hit injecting an energy and vivacity into the tune without losing the originals emotive depths. Within three songs the release shows artists who do even singular covers how to make songs engrained in the heart of the world their own with craft and imagination without losing the seed and core which gave them their stature in the first place.

Tracks like the take on Bob Dylan’s If Not For You and the Lisa Lougheed/ Racoons theme song Run With Us do slip below the immense plateau already reached though both still leave a full pleasure especially with the ukulele craft of Madeline in the second of the two, whilst splitting the pair is a great version of It’s A Beautiful Day, another senses grasping wash of melodic grandeur with a restrained heat but wholly seductive charm from voice and sound.

The next major highlight comes with a storming cover of The Beat Goes On, the band turning the Sonny and Cher song into a hypnotic alchemy of primal beats and angelic glamour, its melodic reserve and celestial harmonies eager conspirators with the pulsating heart of the track to total submission of the passions. It is stripped down mastery elevated into something more powerful and impacting through imagination bred craft soaked in whispers of longing.

The final trio of songs do not quite live up to what came before though again it is just the brilliance of the likes of the just mentioned track which confines their appeal rather than any shortcomings. Nevertheless songs like Daniel Johnston’s True Love Will Find You In The End and the closing Two Of Us with a full dual vocal presence for the first time only ensure the album ends on a satisfying high.

If you have any doubts about Runaway Orchestra project or album allow us to say dismiss them and enjoy one impressive musical attraction.

8/10

www.facebook.com/RunawayOrchestra

RingMaster 15/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sam Thomas – I’m Gonna Be A Witch

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The debut single from multi-instrumentalist Sam Thomas, is a song which from its first play right through numerous others, and even now, brings a provocation to thoughts and emotions as well as opening up visions and imagination to go along with its evocative sounds and ideas. The initial lingering thought is do I like it to just how good or impressive is it and in some ways that question is still in the air but the bottom line is that the song is a wonderful piece of composing and realisation incorporating a rich soak of invention and thought. Yes it still niggles at the passions for undefined reasons but in the best kind of way pushing doubts ultimately aside.

Thomas, the son of a former Opera singer, was soon learning the craft of percussion at the age of four which inevitably brought the drums into sight for the youngster. Attempts to learn more classical instruments were not as successful due to, in his assumption, his dyslexia but moving into his teen years Thomas was teaching himself guitar, piano, and bass whilst playing in his school’s swing band and orchestra as well as singing in the choir. Growing up on a diet of classical music for his ears as well as Elvis, Beatles, and Beach Boys through his mother’s record collection, Thomas has evolved the perfect merger in his music on the evidence of the single, the song alone forging a classical touch in a hungry union with rock power and energy as well as pop flavoured warmth. From school Sam undertook a commercial music course at the University of Westminster, learning about the music industry. It also gave him free access to its recording studios which Thomas embraced and eventually composed and recorded an eighteen minute track to which he recruited folk/grime duo iAm1 to add vocals; a piece they played live for a while under the name Samandiam. Further projects for Thomas included a 3-piece heavy instrumental group called Saiga and composing a 27-minute solo instrumental piece. Using the track as extra temptation the musician applied for jobs within the music industry, sending out cut down slices of the track with applications to over 200 people. He received just one reply, that of studio owner and Barber Shop production company honcho Chris Smith which led to an unpaid work experience, which in turn led to meeting Just Music’s John Benedict who fascinated with Thomas’ highly-individual style gave a go for him to record an album, this was just the second day of the work experience. Placed alongside producer Mark Sutherland, work began with the single the first emerging results.

     I’m Gonna Be A Witch begins with a dawning of evocative piano and brewing ambience, its voice haunting and ominous. The track though soon settles into a gentle caressing of the ear with a sample of a child talking about what he would do if he became a witch with his friend. It has to be said the sample takes some time to get used to within the potent and descriptive sounds wrapping it, the guitar flames scorching the sky around and above the children whilst the bass and drums cage all with a firm yet unimposing presence. The guitars dominate the middle section enflaming and riling the intensity of the song to smother everything else but it only goes to spark a stronger imagery and reaction. Eventually with continued listening everything slips into place within thoughts and though still that sample leaves unsure intrigue at times its childlike innocence and imagination within the burning skies of the music is powerful and evocative.

The strong lead track is a single edit and it has to be said the following album version is a far better encounter, the fullness of the piece revealing the whole intent and depth of the invention with an equally fruitful result. The opening to the track is far longer than the single version and perfectly paints an enveloping scene for the sample to lie within and feel organically part of. The playground sounds within the classical piano canvas as well as the female (mother like) vocal caresses broadens the emotive and almost nostalgic air of the music, finding a crescendo of passion right before the children open up their imagination. The latter explosion of guitar invention and fire also brings a more dramatic impact and almost furnace like intensity to elevate the track beyond that initial powerful encounter. Though almost nine minutes in length our suggestion is bypass the single edit and head right for this stunning version to truly find the riches of the song and the invention of Thomas.

The final track on the release is North; another piece of music rising from a distrustful ambience with a phoenix energy and enchantment to unveil another openly emotive and accomplished piece of musicianship and aural narrative. Offering a new imagery with each play the track is a stirring and thought coaxing delight with its orchestral breath simply seductive and as dangerous and evocative in textures as the rhythms and sonic painting alongside.

Sam Thomas is destined to make a major impact, his creativity transcending and inspiring so many genres and flavours, and I’m Gonna Be A Witch an impressive start.

http://samthomasmusic.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 15/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Mice Parade – Candela

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    Mice Parade has never created music which feeds the unadventurous and lazy, and has always conjured up sounds to stretch and inspire the imagination as well as in many ways challenge the senses with its diverse and eclectic use of aural ideas and textures. New album Candela is no different, the seventh full length release from the band being in their own words their ‘pop’ album, and one which certainly takes time to make its full persuasion but rewards richly for the extended effort in exploring all its shady corners, inviting shadows, and thrilling light.

Essentially the solo project of New Yorker and multi-instrumentalist Adam Pierce for which he additionally recruits musicians of equal vision and inventive mind set, Mice Parade is again a release which explores a multitude of sounds globally and in style for an impacting experience which can seduce or equally trouble the senses, both extremes equally rewarding and magnetically pleasing. Released via Fatcat Records, Candela is named after a late-night bar in Madrid which is renowned as a flamenco guitar players’ Mecca. As with previous releases the album has a hunger to investigate and develop not to forget share, numerous rhythmic and melodic world searched aural discoveries re-invented into unique and compelling new shades and voices. The band has never been an immediate persuasion for personal tastes and Candela is no different but as is generally the norm once asked and given that extra attention and time it unveils another enjoyable flood of inspiring and intriguing enterprise from the band.

One essence of the band which has always found an inexhaustible acceptance here is the veining of discord which either whispers ortimthumb prowls amidst their music and none more so than in opener Listen Hear Glide Dear. The track is a caustic wash of sonic unrest and folk invitation coated in an unsettling distrustful ambience which intrudes and permeates every atom of the senses to disrupt their ease and open the doors to provocation. Dirge like in its gait and abrasive in its embrace, the track leaves the emotions ringing from its jangly rub allowing the following Currents to slip in to its place with ease and bewitching temptation. From its restrained start big bulging rhythms and a lovely throaty bassline saunters across the ear whilst the fiery touch of the guitar ensures that there is still a sinister element at play. The delicious vocals of Caroline Lufkin (Temporary Residence) lay a siren like hand upon the passions to temper and equally feed the now agitated formidable rhythmic dance which almost bruises the listener within the rising and coarse sonic embrace permeating the air. It is a tremendous opening to the album, the two tracks in their distinct individuality uniting for a startling and inciting introduction to the release.

Next up This River Has A Tide continues the potency with further intensity and beauty which rival and complement each other. It starts with a continuation of the rough handling of the ear with the rhythms as punchy as ever and the bass developing a carnivorous appetite to its great corrosive sound matched by the guitar. Either side of their first appearance though there is a flamenco whispering elegance which is just irresistible, the spiralling melodic keys and soft guitar beckoning the scalding snarl mentioned and regaining their control on the other side with further  magnetic weaves of melodic enterprise and that vocal mesmerism. The merger of the two is a towering wall of almost savage intensity and greed veined by elegant and transfixing melodic beauty. It is a masterful merger and thrill aided by the dual switching vocals of Pierce and Lufkin.

Across the lively funk appetite of Pretending within a more reserved cage, things take another pleasing turn of variety and adventure. As the twin vocal attack take their turns to express the narrative things brew up in energy and stance to explode in a rumbling rhythmic and feisty dance of pop excitement. As the album, the song twists and offshoots into further engaging looks and exploration whilst holding clinging to its spine driving destination. The track does not ignite the same strength of fires as previous songs but still enthrals and opens up a well of thoughts and emotions with its invention and unpredictable ingenuity.

Through the wonderful instrumentals of The Chill House, a piece which is as meditative as it is an itch upon the senses and Look See Dream Me with its immersive temptation the sun of the album discovers its easiest yet warmest hold whilst the folk swagger of Las Gentes Interesantes is like the rising sun, hot, enchanting, and easy to bask within without any resistance offering objection. Admittedly the ‘quieter’ latter half of the album does not quite inspire the height of ardour as the first but with songs like this there is never a moment not to acclaim.

With a final highlight in Contessa and a return of those big sinewy rhythms framing the ever stunning vocals of Lufkin as well as a sonic tango of riveting and interplaying melodic expression and invention, before the pulsating closer Warm Hand in Narnia, the album is a striking and deeply satisfying endeavour. It takes and needs time to reveal all of its glories and purpose but Candela makes sure the rewards far outweigh the effort.

https://www.facebook.com/miceparade

8/10

RingMaster 15/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com