Roxanne de Bastion celebrates her debut record release with a headline London show

RoxanneRoxanne de Bastion celebrates her debut record release with a headline London show at St. Pancras Old Church

Roxanne de Bastion is geared up and ready to celebrate the release of her debut album, The Real Thing which was released on April 19th  on Nomad Songs.  She’s played at St. Pancras Old Church a few weeks ago, which proved to be a sensational show, and she’s set to achieve the same spine tinglingly beautiful feat once again on Friday, May 3rd, with a little help from support acts Alice Phelps and Robert Marr.

The singer / songwriter teamed up with producer Gordon Raphael (The Strokes / Regina Spektor) to record ten of her songs in Roxanne’s town of birth, Berlin, which will be played live in a special live performance, to celebrate the release.

Her first single ‘Red and White Blood Cells’ is available as a free download and has already been picked up by Tom Robinson on BBC6, John Kennedy on XFM, Q Radio as well asMTV and Radio Eins in Germany.

Gig Details:
Support comes from: Alice Phelps and Robert Marr
Doors open at 7:30, Music starts at 8pm.
Tickets: £5 at the door
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/183429288472300/?fref=ts

Check out Roxanne’s latest video for track ‘Some Kind of Creature’ @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdkvtoBRpI0

The St Pierre Snake Invasion – Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion

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    The St. Pierre Snake Invasion is one of those bands which has the capacity to ignite an immediate rapture and lustful hunger for their sounds, something they certainly did with us with the release of their debut EP Flesh a couple of years ago. It was a startling and synapse twisting slice of devilry, a caustic brew of punk, garage rock, noise, and insatiable mischief, though to tag their sound is as easy as scaling the Shard on the back of Katy Perry, impossible but sheer fun trying. Now the UK band return…finally…with its successor Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion, a release which rips out the essences of the earlier EP and distills them with new imaginative additives for an even greater irresistible riotous slab of Satan spawn rock n roll.

The five track EP is quite sensational, realising all the selfish expectations and hopes placed upon the band and then some. The Bristol quintet band have unleashed their distinctive venom of noise since forming in the latter months of 2010, earning a devoted and passionate fanbase and plenty of acclaim through their wild and exhausting live performances as well as the first release, but the widest recognition still waits to be triggered, something Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion has all the potency, sonic armoury, and big boy balls to achieve.

Call The Coroner opens up the release with immediate demands upon the ear and attention, which both willingly submit to as942206_642406229109685_548624207_n chunky scything riffs and a scowling banshee cry split the air. Rhythms lay in wait as the intro lays its net with the vocals of Damien Sayell scouring the senses in expressive and tortured tones, their earnest and slightly maniacal embrace as incendiary as the hungry sounds. Into its stride the chugging riffs from Szack Notaro and Patrick Daly abrase and seduce whilst the bass of Mark Fletcher prowls with menace from note to note, the combination with the magnetic rhythms of drummer Sam Forbes chaining up any chance of escape, a deliciously bedlamic yet contagious maelstrom of energy and sonic virulence.

The following Encore! Encore! plunders the ear with raptorial riffs and mutual offensive rhythms whilst the impacting squalls of Sayell scar the air with his romantic violations. The raining down of muscular and intensive slaps from guitars and bass offer a little respite in one moment of mercy as they step back for the escape of melodies and harmonies before taking charge again and completing the face to ear incitement. It is a riveting explosion of glorious filth in tale and sound which seamlessly flows into U.S.S.A., a punk fuelled bruising riot of industrial lime like sonic scrubbing. The track strains itself and the listener with greedy glee, the growling broody bassline and insatiable riffs an unrelenting scourge with the rhythms of Forbes the ringleader to total subservience before the alchemy of noise, with the vocals a rodeo cowboy riding the rapacious charge.

Hey Kids! Do The Choke Stroke steps up next to continue the eclectic force of the EP, its reserved chain gang/gallows hung intro bursting into another punk brawl with irresistible aural theatrics and epidemic infectiousness. Like many of the band’s songs it does offer up one issue…the thing is too damn short, just as the passions and limbs, not to mention voice, are casting their additional help the track leaves them a lone voice in a big all eyes watching crowd… damn them.

The closing Say No To Stop Motion leaves one final slice of brilliance, the scuzz coated epidemic of catchiness a last stomp to lose the heart to. It rattles the cages with attitude and sonic spite, something applying to the whole release, and provokes with suggestions of who the aimless ears of today’s media led appetites should really be listening to, as well as certain artists, climaxing the track. The song leaves a lasting swipe with the final forceful recommendation of The Fall, a band which is more than a potent whisper in their sound.

It is a brilliant end to an equally sensational EP, a release which goes far beyond the assumptions from an already biased heart. As mentioned it is hard to truly describe the sound of The St Pierre Snake Invasion but at any time across Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion there is a mix from the likes of obviously The Fall, as well as Marc Riley and The Creepers, Gang Of four, Wire, Houdini, McLusky, Dope Body, Melvins and many other similar suggestions, though the band in as many ways does not sound like any of those either. A must have release from one of the UK’s most impressive and boundary splitting bands.

http://tspsi.co.uk/

10/10

RingMaster 30/04/2013

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The Old Wind – Feast On Your Gone

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    Feast On Your Gone, the new album from Tomas Liljedahl, the former vocalist of the legendary Breach, is a release which torments and challenges the psyche, emotions, and at times sanity. The seeds of the project The Old Wind grew in the mind of Liljedahl during a dark period in his life and mind, the project an avenue, in his own words “…to get these demons out of my system.”  It is a raw, ravenous, and cold consumption of the senses, a release which others might find an escape in too or just as easily find it sparks their own fight with the shadows. It is an impacting and corrosive confrontation, a caustic soundscape devoid of light and hope but equally it is hypnotically tempting, a dangerous challenge impossible to refuse.

The Old Wind initially a solo studio project for Liljedahl, with the artist writing and recording every instrument on Feast On Your Gone alone, soon provoked the need and realisation that the tracks needed to have a live declaration as well. Liljedahl brought in former Breach band mates Niklas Quintana (guitar) and Kristian Andersson (bass) as well as drummer Karl Daniel Liden and finally Robin Staps of Pelagic Records and The Ocean as third guitarist. It is a formidable cast for which anticipation and hunger for their live debut is immense, all instigated by the towering brute of a vicious album.

Stepping from behind a child’s spoken intro, opener In Fields immediately marks that this is not going to be an easy ride or a IMG_4607_smcomfortable listen, the overwhelming intensity of the guitars and rhythms prowling by a snarling predator of a bass sound instantly oppressive and intimidating the senses. The doom loaded gait of the track holds the emotions down for the coarse riffs and sonic fires to smoulder upon thoughts, the vocals of Liljedahl scarring with a maelstrom of spite and despair. It is an encounter for which the word intensive barely gives justice, the primal essence and breath of the track filling and twisting every atom and feeling daring to show its face within the listener.

The following I’m Dead suggests a less vile proposition at first though the carnivorous throaty leer of the bass is never less than dramatically intimidating and the atmosphere from the first note fanged. It is mere moments though before flesh and senses burn under the rapacious malevolence borne, the near funereal thick crawl of the track as invasive as it is expansive with the sonic abrasiveness feeding greedily on any weakness and emotive doubt before its tempest.

Through Raveneye and The Old Wind the ugly coaxing continues, the songs demanding and receiving a less than willing embrace from awakened shadows but one needed to be made before the enthralling leviathan of darkness. As they and subsequent tracks gnaw and savagely take control of the ear and beyond, it is very easy to lose track of which song is which, at what point in the provocation you are, especially in periods where the vocals leave the tortuous sounds to exploit  the darkness alone but this is not because tracks sound alike but down to the fact that the album is really one singular arduous nightmare being unveiled and dispelled. Certainly the tracks work individually but the reality of the full impact and massiveness of the work comes only in a full and continuous emergence from start to punishing finish.

As probably to be expected every aspect of the album is unquestionable, the textures and cavernous corners sculpted from the songwriting imperious through to the musicianship is second to none, the quality in sound as expressive and descriptive as the turmoil soaked vocals and lyrical evocation. It is hard to say that everything about the album is a joy to behold such its malevolent heart but in a time of so many sterile uninspired releases it creates a unique and grasping experience. As the final tracks in the sludge thick corrosive Spear Of A Thousand and the closing toxic instrumental Reign show though, happiness and joy has no place in this potent and painful ridding of inner devils.

Released via Pelagic Records, Feast On Your Gone is not for the faint hearted or maybe even those with their own battles to be fought, but it is a release which leaves long lasting ‘pleasure’ and permanent marks, a barbarous merciless treat.

https://www.facebook.com/Theoldwind

8/10

RingMaster 30/04/2013

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Howl – Bloodlines

pic Andrew Fladeboe

pic Andrew Fladeboe

 

Following their for the main impressive debut album Full Of Hell of 2010, anticipation for the follow-up release from US metallers Howl as they hopefully built on the promise ignited with the first record was certainly fuelled by a level of eagerness. This was a band which showed a sludge/stoner/doom mentality and strength which suggested major things from them ahead. The release of Bloodlines via Relapse Records, certainly shows the Providence, Rhode Island band as having evolved and expanded their sound though maybe to the detriment of real clarity of their direction but then predictability has no place in music so there is no problem with the stance of the new album in that respect. It does though leave a sense of missing its target. Bloodlines ravages the ear with accomplished potently sculpted aggressive sounds and an undoubted passion but it fails to ignite the passions and fervour their earlier promise suggested possible,  it is simply a release which just has not anything truly new to say.

It should be said right away that Bloodlines is a thoroughly enjoyable and commanding confrontation, the release showing the band evolving and honing their immense power through their relentless touring ethic which has seen the band alongside the likes of Saint Vitus, Kylesa, Pentagram and numerous others. Recorded with producer Zeus (Hatebreed, Crowbar, Terror), the album is a muscle bound predator with intimidating rhythms, malevolent riffs, and devious sonic acid combining to be an undeniably satisfying aggressor. It has hooks which carve lingering moments and a prowling snarl that has the measure of the defences and appetite yet at no moment does the album light a fire, something its predecessor was more successful at.

Opening track Attrition makes a rich and attention grabbing entrance, the early flames of guitar a sonic beckoning upon chewing 4pnl_folderurgent riffs and firm rhythms. Into its stride the track prowls and stomps with sinews pressing the ear and vocals scowling like a bear in heat, Mastodon and even more so Black Tusk references rearing their head quite soon on. Bass and drums provide a sturdy cage around the enterprising guitar teases and sonic cuts, and by its departure the song has lit a definite appetite for the release which the following Midnight Eyes with its rampaging drums and scything melodic blades alongside persistently niggling riffs has the fight for. A carnivorous death metal breath marks its charging metal gait whilst the song twists and turns on its feet, a thick stoner persuasion emerging from the savage intensity before changing into a doom lined finale.

The Devildriver like Demonic leaves an exhausting and enterprising if familiar onslaught upon the ear with a sonic wind from the guitar spiralling within the brewed raptorial intensity, whilst the likes of the excellent Down So Low and the equally impressive With A Blade reach higher pinnacles for the album. The first of the two emerges from a chilling sinister ambience, a heavy malevolence in vocals and energy wrapping its leering presence around the ear with devilish intent within a mesmeric yet muscular stoner embrace. The track soon brings thrash elements in to press thoughts and emotions to their limits before returning to the almost crawling insidious invidiousness. The second of the two again finds a compelling union of nastily aggressive intensity and a melodic touch which sears with acidic might and craft. The tracks standout with their inventive intent and ready to shuffle up their pace, energy, and directions, though again neither dramatically or effectively unveil anything new of enough potency to open up ardour or feisty passion. Of War is one song though which is close to doing both things, and though it like the others is delivering recognisable weaponry, the track is an anthemic and contagious storm from which its Lamb Of God toned voice makes a familiar but tempting call.

The Mouth of Madness with its vindictive bass sound and the closing rapacious Embrace Your Nerve complete the album with strength and notable craft if failing to find the lure of the bigger triumphs on Bloodlines. Maybe it is being unfair to expect the band to immediately fulfil the promise previously suggested and without doubt the album is one which gets the job done and makes for a pleasing hour or so but the feeling of a lost opportunity and a tinge of disappointment does accompany the release. With emerging bands such as XII Boar and especially Desert Storm finding original and far more heady heights with their new album, Howl have some evolving still to do to persuade ears and passions to go their way.

https://www.facebook.com/HowlHeavyMetal

7.5/10

RingMaster 30/04/2013

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Voodoo Highway – Showdown

VoodooHighway1

The album Broken Uncle’s Inn when released two years ago set Voodoo Highway apart from many other similarly clad heavy melodic rock bands, its acclaimed appearance drawing excited responses from fans, media, and notable exponents of the genre such as former Rainbow/Black Sabbath/Gary Moore bassist Craig Gruber. It was a thrilling and hungry release which ignited strong interest of people beyond the confines of classic rock. The Italian quintet now returns with the follow-up and it has to be said that Showdown takes all the great things on the debut to greater accomplished heights. Again it offers so much to lure in and keep the passions of the widest appetites alive just this time with even more devious craft and magnetic enterprise.

Founded in 2010, Voodoo Highway has been showered with eager recognition, even being called “the new Deep Purple”. Their stage presence and destructive stage tendencies has left a trail of acclaim across Italy and their sounds the same throughout the radio veining of Europe, South America, USA, and Japan, with Broken Uncle’s Inn the focal point until now. Showdown is another big step forward, one which again can be argued is not setting new boundaries for classic rock but undoubtedly is invigorating it with a heart and energy it has debatably been long missing.

Released via Dust On The Tracks Records, the new album stands proud as it storms the ear with opener This Is Rock’n’roll, CD BookletWankers!, riffs rhythms, keys, and vocals rousing up the senses with anthemic might and infectious melodic temptation. It is exactly what its title declares, a riotous brawl of middle finger poised rock with flames of precise fiery guitar enterprise and equally transfixing organ weaves within a bruising yet passion igniting confrontation.  The track has a swagger and balls to the wall intensity which recruits limbs and voice for a full engagement, a triumphant and irresistible start to the release.

The following Fly To The Rising Sun with its heavy bulging basslines and thumping riffs continues the compelling call of the album whilst Midnight Hour builds on the already impressive start by soaking the ear in seventies cloaked melodic persuasion and an imagination capturing intensive groove flanked by the ever growling bass of Filippo Cavallini. It is an excellent piece of familiarity entwined within inventive mystique and compelling aural adventure, the guitar of Matteo Bizzarri, as throughout the album, continually changing the face of the song whilst the drums of Vincent Zairo snap the head back on a well-used neck with a firm and hypnotic provocation or beckoning, usually both simultaneously.

Both Could You Love Me and Wastin’ Miles secure thoughts and hunger with their accomplished bodies, the keys of Alessandro Duo’ especially making enticing suggestions in the first though he again is never less than mesmeric across all tracks, and the continuing to impress vocals of Federico Di Marco driving the heart of each song with masterful expression and passion. Neither reaches the heights of those before or of the following pair of Church Of Clay and Mountain High, but never have less than a strong grip on attention and the ability to satisfy. The first of their successors is the biggest highlight of the album, the song from resonating heady bass prods and ambience stirring guitars stalking and ravaging the senses with greedy riffs and predatory rhythm whilst keys and vocals light the surface with melodic blazes which smoulder and burn alternately. Playing with and upon thoughts and emotions, the track paints a colour rich picture with the lyrical and melodic narrative whilst the sounds soundtrack its arrival with skill and contagious imagination. Mountain High follows with similar intent, its sinews making a target of the ear whilst the keys and sonic endeavour eases the scarring. As with most tracks its touch is easy and from a familiar well but it just adds a warmer addictive hook to be caught upon whilst the ingenious extras like the gothic occult rock like wash of the keys in this song throwing an wonderful unexpected spanner in the works of assumption.

From this point in many ways the rest of the album does lack the same punch and attention gripping strength already attained but certainly tracks such as the insatiable Cold White Love and A Spark From The Sacred Fire only give full pleasure and high octane fuelled adventure. Completed by the very decent Prince Of Moonlight and two bonus tracks in the shape of Till It Bleeds and the ever brilliant Broken Uncles Inn, you have an album sure to exhaust the passions of all melodic rock fans. Showdown is an excellent storm of rock n roll which from within the art work wrap of graphic designer Storm Thorgerson, brings an impossible to resist rampage to the year, the claws of Voodoo Highway digging deeper than ever.

https://www.facebook.com/WhoDoHighway

8.5/10

RingMaster 30/04/2013

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Watertank – Sleepwalk

watertank-sleepwalk-promopic

Though having graced music for ten years, the just released album Sleepwalk from Watertank is their long awaited debut full length and a monster of a release it is too. As rhythmically and dynamically intrusive as it is melodically addictive and compelling, the thirteen track album from the French quintet is a masterful conjuror of pure addiction. With muscles and intensity which ensures an intimidation of the emotions from their powerful and potent force and equally a lover’s seduction at times from a mellow resonance which is mesmeric enough to calm a raging beast, the album is a passion instigator of the purest temptation.

Formed in 2003 and hailing from Nantes, Watertank has earned strong and eager acclaim with their live presence which has seen them play alongside the likes of Torche, Kylesa, Baroness, Capricorns, Lair Of The Minotaur, and The Ocean. The EP Sub in 2004 sets things off recording wise but it was with the following six track EP Fairy Crimes five years later that there was a concentrated wider attention bred around the band. Such its appeal and the continuing strength of sound and live shows from the band, that the anticipation for their first album has arguably outstripped the hunger for most others.

The Solar Flare Records released album immediately starts gnawing on the senses with the heavy ravenous riffs of Where It All watertank-sleepwalk-2013-hdBegins. It is a towering presence with crisp rhythms matching the intimidation of the guitars and bass whilst weaving in between the excellent melodic vocals of Thomas B. caress the wounds. With a laboured sludge gait and rasping intensity the brief but heavy track opens up the ear and beyond to the suggestion of something major impending, an assumption soon realised through the likes of Giant Heads and Pro Crook. The first of the pair is a noise rock sculpted engagement with teasing sonic grooves and pulsating cavernous bass riffs whilst again the excellent vocals and harmonies press their advantage home with ease and expressive craft. The second of the songs again steadily chews upon the psyche with carnivorous riffs from bassist Vincent A. and enterprising and equally scarring guitar invention from Bojan A. and Julien G. Riding a core of post hardcore and melodic rock with a doom seeded spine, the lure of the song is total and magnetic, as is the album to this point.

There are only highlights upon Sleepwalk to be honest but at times it just excites beyond legal allowances such as with Fear Over The City. A metronomic beckoning of its percussive finger leads in riffs which are prime bestiality, their snarling seduction joined and elevated by the following caustic and twisting guitar invention all framed by the punchy beats of Jocelyn L. With a groove as insidious as it is contagious and a raw squalling edge to the vocals, the track is a brute of a track, its sinews flexing at every turn and sonic abrasion igniting the passions.

The likes of the fiery Ants In Suits with its stoner/melodic rock presence holding aloud whispers of bands such as Alice In Chains and Quicksand, and the riveting title track with its wonderfully infectious yet niggling sonic scythes of sound within another stoner/grunge flavoured expanse, only cement and push on the strength of the release whilst How Fast recruits the passions with its uncomplicated yet carefully involved persuasion. Within this clutch of songs is another pair of the loftiest pinnacles upon the album, Far From Low and Holy Tranquilizer. The first is a thrilling heavy rock soaked encounter with more than a Thin Lizzy whisper about it especially in the blazes of melody flamed crescendos and the overall anthemic call of the song. The track actually reminds of nineties UK band Skyscraper a lot and that is definitely a good thing. The second of the two is the best track on the album, though that decision does fluctuate with each listen to be fair. Entering into view with again riffs which corrode upon touch, the song steps into a sinister ambience with the bass opening up its deepest inciting shadows whilst the vocals hold sway with a haunting embrace and narrative. Before the track presses harder onto the senses and thoughts with a rapacious greed and intensity, the song has the feel and sound of the first Comsat Angels album Waiting For A Miracle. It is outstanding, a sonic animal with a siren call.

Sharp Beaks Strike Back is another exceptional piece of sonic alchemy and the closing Six Days a progressively clad kaleidoscope of beguiling and captivating invention and colour rich imagination. It is the perfect melodic flourish to a fascinating and thrilling album. Watertank is one of the most refreshing and musically ingenious bands around so let’s just hope they do not take another ten years to unveil the follow-up to Sleepwalk, though more EPs will suffice too.

http://www.facebook.com/wtrtnk

9/10

RingMaster 29/04//2013

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Melvins – Everybody Loves Sausages

Melvins Everybody Loves Sausages hi res

Bands doing covers is always an intrigue if only to see what one assumes has inspired them but when it comes to whole albums of bringing forth hopefully re-invented versions past experiences usually show it is just a lead to disappointment. So many bands just produce the original in their own voice without seemingly using a thought to actually making the songs their own. Approaching Everybody Loves Sausages from the Melvins though there was only excited intrigue with doubts given no breathing space just because it was the Washington band, a group who has never just painted by numbers.  Of course there could still be a chance they would fall the way of so many others but the thirteen track triumph soon puts that notion to bed. The album is magnificent, a window into the as vocalist/guitarist Buzz Osborne explains, “This record will give people a peak into the kind of things that influence us musically.” Melvins do make the songs theirs and even those they approach using the template of the original it still offers twists and seditious creativity which only leads to lustful wonder.

Released via Ipecac Recordings, Everybody Loves Sausages as expected has a mischief across its length though also an open respect for the sounds and artists which inspired them. It is impossible to imagine the original creators of the songs being anything other than impressed and thrilled by the release even when some of the tracks actually outstrip the originals. The album sees the full line-up of Osborne, Dale Crover, Jared Warren and Coady Willis on the album though there are a trio of tracks with the Melvins Lite incarnation of the band on Osborne, Crover and Trevor Dunn.  It also sees plenty of guest appearances to add extra texture and riveting enterprise to the release.

The release opens with Warhead, the band faithfully brewing the seeds of the Venom black metal classic with the bite of Scott Kelly of Neurosis rearing its might on vocals and guitar. It is an immediate lure into the potently eclectic album, its abrasive snarl as anthemic and tempting as the original setting the senses off on a rush of anticipation as the following Queen track (You’re My) Best Friend steps forward with a surprising Nintendo like 8-bit beckoning. With Caleb Benjamin from Tweak Bird handling the vocals wonderfully, the song is a mellow caress with the veins of Mercury and co wrapping the ear from within the seductive and fiery touch of the Melvins. Though not as flamboyant as the original though with a broader pop invitation, it still brings a grandeur and showy embrace forth which leaves the listener warm and energised for more.

After the impossible to disapprove of take on the Ram Jam track Black Betty, the album breaks out its real glories starting firstly with Set It On Fire, an excellent track of The Scientists revived and given a fresh growl with Mark Arm of Mudhoney adding his ever outstanding vocals. It is an excellent aural scowl upon the ear which is then pushed into the shade by the stunning Station To Station. Already haunting and experimental in the hands of Bowie, Melvins turn it into a deeper more intimidating corrosive beauty. The opening industrial malevolence of everyday intensity stalks and congests the ear, a sonic ambience stinging the senses within the restrained yet bedlamic shadowed fuelled wash enveloping the listener and thoughts. From within a lone melodic figure steps forward accompanied by a carnivorous bass provocation before the guitars send sonic flames across the roof of the psyche bending track. With vocals from JG Thirlwell of Foetus bringing the narrative to vibrant life within the scuzzy cavernous texture, the eleven minute song is wonderful, its busy snarl a step into everyday life torture never investigated in the excellent original.

Further intense highlights to rival the pair come in the likes of the punk grazing Attitude with Clem Burke of Blondie joining the band on the Kinks song, the excellent Timothy Leary Lives, one of the tracks with the Melvins Lite line-up and a song which plays like a mix of Stan Ridgway and The Dickies, and an abrasive punk version of The Jam song Art School featuring Tom Hazelmeyer (founding member of Halo Of Flies and the proprietor of Amphetamine Reptile) on vocals and guitar. The last of the trio borders a Spinal Tap moment but pulls it off brilliantly with the fake cockney accent coming over like Danny Dyer playing Jimmy Pursey but recruiting the passions and sending them off with the devilment of the closing almost valid piss-take. To be honest every track is a gem, the choice of material and its re-working contagious with even tracks which held no place in the passions before now finding an elevated status in the arms of the Melvins.

Two more great moments come with the closing take of Throbbing Gristle’s Heathen Earth, the band re-inventing its existing brilliance and the stunning In Every Dream Home A Heartache. The Roxy Music track features Jello Biafra and ex-Melvins bassist Kevin Rutmanis, and is a delicious dark entry on the album and psyche. Opening on a funereal doomy entrancement with Biafra adding an irresistible psychotic lilt to the already shadowed provoking song, the band ignites further sonic flames and intense energies to stretch its chilling presence.

Everybody Loves Sausages is pure joy and an album to set standards for all others contemplating covering other’s material, with first key being do it with passion, something Melvins do everything with.

http://themelvins.net/

9/10

RingMaster 29/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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