Dark corners and caustic intent: an interview with Varicella

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A maelstrom of ravenous intensity and demonic caustic caresses, the debut EP from US industrial band Varicella has brought an uncompromising destructive start to the year. Released through the impressive emerging underground label Bluntface Records, We Belong Dead was a predator of old school eighties style industrial which experimented with and pushed brawling sonic boundaries. Taking the opportunity to find out more about the project through founder Chris Bollinger and guitarist Chris Pasquarelli, we looked at the release, the origins of the band and horror movies…

Welcome to The RingMaster Review and thanks for talking with us.

Varicella – Thank you! And thanks for giving us the chance to talk with you! We appreciate the opportunity.

For the uninitiated, tell us about Varicella, its beginnings, and the inspiration for the project.

Chris Bollinger – Well this is going to be a “really” long story, and I will try to shorten it as best I can, LOL. Varicella is at the moment, a two person industrial/metal/electronic dance music/experimental band. And when I say at the moment, I mean, that we did have a bassist who also did some synth work. He was responsible for a decent amount of what the band sounds like now. But sadly, we had to let him go from the band, and that’s all I’m going to say about that. We do hope to add a live bassist and drummer at some point, but it is hard finding the right people who fit and so forth.

As for the beginnings of the band, well as it states in our BIO on Facebook or Reverbnation, I started the project back in 2008. I’ve always wanted to do an industrial type of band, even when I was in high school back in 2000/2001. I just never found anyone that was on the same page as me or liked what I liked. But anyway, I started this in 2008 and did a few things wrote a few songs, some are on our We Belong Dead EP actually. We just updated them. Then I had to put it on hold because of to many people coming and going. I mean, I think I went through 4 or 5 guitarists until I found Chris Pasquarelli. I posted several ads online and for about 2 years, I never got an answer or I did but their style didn’t fit my style, or they wanted to do the more aggrotech / terror EBM style of industrial and I don’t want to do that. So it was a super long time between people. And during that our old bassist answered one of my ads. We talked and began to work together over the internet with a site called Soundcloud. At the time he was working a job that was 3rd shift overnight and I work a standard 9 to 5 type of job. So our schedules were completely opposite. But I’m determined to do this so things got done! LOL. Then as I mentioned above I found Chris Pasquarelli, through Facebook no less, LOL. We both were clicking like on each other’s posts or comments, and then somehow he saw I did music and said we should jam. I was really impressed with him. That was last April and he’s been in the band ever since that first jam. Yes, he’s that good!

As for the inspiration, I’d have to say just my love of the old 80’s and early 90s industrial, bands such as Ministry, KMFDM, Skinny Puppy, and Frontline Assembly. And then on top of that I love White Zombie and Nine Inch Nails, and thrash metal type of bands like Slayer, Testament, Megadeth, Pantera and other hard rock or punk bands like Alice in Chains, Danzig, Tool, Filter, Misfits and The Ramones. So, I just wanted to do something that was in the vein of those bands/artists but not a direct rip off. I wanted to make heavy dance music. Songs that have a heavy dance beat that’ll make the girls shake their asses to it, but at the same time it has a thrash metal guitar part or groove to the guitars that’ll make the dudes head bang to it. Hopefully that makes sense to anyone out there. LOL.

What was it about music which you felt was missing and leaving you cold as a listener as well as a musician, when starting Varicella?

Chris B. – Pretty much as I said above, everyone was making the all synth based aggrotech / terror EBM type of industrial, and I didn’t want to do that. I have nothing against it and I like most of it. I listen to Combichrist, Psyclon Nine, Imperative Reaction, Wumpscut and other various bands that have that sound. It’s just not the type of music that I wanted to do personally. And I think that made it harder to find a guitarist too, because that style is really popular right now. The style we do is not popular. Which does make things harder but at the same time, we can transcend a few genres of music and play with different types of bands. Which I find pretty cool! LOL.

Chris Pasquarelli – When I joined Varicella last April I liked the music, but I wanted to make it heavier and more edgy. Most of the songs had basic plug-in computer guitars which the typical computer programs use and I liked it but I didn’t like how noticeable it was that it was not recorded by real guitars as opposed to computer guitars. Within the last 9 months I’ve been in the band I can say that I am really happy with the overall sound our music has with my added guitar and bass tracks.

Was this music in general or more the industrial/electro genre you did not find a connection with?IMG_0014

Chris B. – I’d say yes, mostly in the industrial/electronic genre, but I’ve been a little bored with the rock and metal genre too. Not much is catching my attention in the rock and metal genre. There are a few “really” good bands in the all of those genres, but you have to weed through thousands of copies or clone bands to find the 4 or 5 good ones. It’s tough.

How do you feel about the scene and music now we stand in 2013?

Chris B. – Pretty much the same. Some things have gotten better. Like, it’s easier to spot the better bands versus what I call the “bedroom” bands. These are people that just sit in their homes, make and release music, but never play a live show. Ever! There were a massive amount of them back in 2007 to 2009. Maybe even before that. I’m not 100% sure. But now, it’s about 99% easier to weed through and see those types of bands. And I’m not knocking those people. Some make very good music. I probably own some, LOL. But it’s just not what I want to do. I want to actually see the fans and talk to them and so forth, not sit in my bedroom and stare at a computer monitor.

What are the biggest influences which inspires your sound?

Chris B. – Ministry, mostly the early stuff, Twitch, The Land of Rape and Honey, The Mind is a Terrible Thing to Taste and Psalm 69. Those 4 albums blew my mind and still amaze me. I can’t believe Al and Paul did what they did at that time. It’s amazing! KMFDM, almost anything they do is great! Same goes for Skinny Puppy. Got to love Ohgr too! And then White Zombie, La Sex and Astro Creep are two great albums that shaped my teenage years!

Chris P. –  Behemoth, Deicide, At The Gates, Cannibal Corpse, Cradle Of Filth, Children Of Bodom, Burzum, Darkthrone, Death, The Black Dahlia Murder, Cryptopsy, Anorexia Nervosa, Nine Inch Nails, Orgy, Deadsy, Psyclon Nine, Dimmu Borgir, Marilyn Manson, Static x, Old Mans Child, SOAD and many more!  As far as my sound goes I’m influenced by many bands, I just try to make the heaviest guitar and bass lines too fit our songs.

The early days were unsettled for the band I believe, through line-up problems? Was this the reason for Varicella going on hiatus or actually at the time was it the end of the band? 

Chris B. – They were. And I think I quit about 4 or 5 times. Gave up and stopped all together type of quitting. I was just really frustrated, and things were going nowhere. As I said, it was about 2 years before I found Chris Pasquarelli on guitar

Varicella reformed/re-emerged in 2011, what was the spark that made that the time to bring the project back to active life?

Chris B. – Skinny Puppy. Skinny Puppy came out with a new album called “HanDover” back in late 2011. Also Ohgr released another one of his solo albums early in 2011, called “undeveloped”. And I just said, fuck it, these are super good, I need to get my shit together, and get this project going! Especially “HanDover”! It’s over a year later and that album is still constantly on my iPod.

Chris P. – I was still in high school when I joined and I was in several other projects at the time when I joined Varicella. I’ve been serious about music for most of my life And I felt frustrated with a lot of the people I jammed with at the time because no one else was as into the band thing as I was until I joined Varicella, so I was really excited to be a part of a band which was serious about their music.

 Back to influences/inspirations, which predominantly spark and shape your songs and lyrics, the areas which ignite your ideas?

Chris B. – Movies, mostly horror and sci-fi movies. TV shows, comics and/or graphic novels. You wouldn’t think it, but Doctor Who is another spark that started two songs lyric wise. And one song music and lyrics, called “The Sound of Four”. And then there are some ideas that come from real life experiences. Like the song “Obsessed with flesh”.  The lyrics in that song can be applied to anything where a person feels they are being used and/or abused. But the major theme of that song comes from a person I wanted to date, but she didn’t want a steady boyfriend or a relationship. So we were just friends with benefits. After a few months of that she all the sudden stops talking to me. I can’t get a hold of her. She doesn’t want to hang out let alone do other stuff. Then a few weeks go by, and I find out she’s in a relationship and that’s why she just dropped me. I was fairly pissed off, and felt a little used. Same goes for the song “All Hail”, that’s sort of my views on brutal honesty with a little jab a religion. I’m a brutally honest person and a straight shooter. I just think we all spend too much time putting up a front or wearing a mask for certain people. It’s ridiculous.

Chris P. – As far as our music goes guitar and bass wise, I kind of do a Marilyn Manson, Nine Inch Nails, Static X guitar and bass meets extreme metal vibe. For example in our song Mind Fucked I wrote a melodic guitar rhythm that a stripper could dance to, and metal heads could throw down too and fuck each other up in the mosh pits too as well. This has been a huge influence in writing for me, and I’m not exaggerating at all. Every time I right new material For Varicella I always keep Strippers and mosh pits in mind.

TrayCard_OutsideYou have just released your We Belong Dead EP via Bluntface Records; does this contain all new tracks or material with seeds and feet from the earlier presence of the band as well?

Chris B. – A little bit of both actually. The songs Obsessed with Flesh, All Hail were written back around 2008. Of course they were updated to match the other songs that were new, specifically the song Obsessed with Flesh. There’s this sort of machine type sound going on with the guitars. That’s from the way Chris Pasquarelli plays the song. He bends the strings a certain way at a certain time to get that specific sound. That’s all him! So if we had a different guitarist that didn’t play it that way, it wouldn’t sound that way.

How long did the EP take to create and how far did it or songs evolve from the initial ideas?

Chris B. – It didn’t take too long actually. Most of the blue print was laid out in 2008. We just updated some things here and there as I said. We started working on these songs in late 2011 and finished in the fall of 2012. Obsessed and All Hail didn’t change much. Chris Pasquarelli just added his own style to them. The Sound of Four came together very quickly! Music and the lyrics. I think it was done in only a few months. We Belong Dead went through a few changes. LOL. The original idea came from our old bassist Tim. I just sort of took the synth sound, and remixed it adding in other elements. I went through about 4 versions of that song until we hit on a verse / chorus / verse pattern. But it didn’t become what it is now until Chris Pasquarelli joined, and added the guitar riff that grooves over top the synth part in the verses.

There is a cinematic feels to your tracks on We Belong Dead, a visual ambience beyond the lovely corruption of sound and breath. Obviously it has seeds in the influences to songs you mentioned earlier but has it been a natural result of your personal interests or something you have crafted intentionally?

Chris B. – Thank you very much. I would say this is not intentional, at least on a conscious level. I mean, I try to create songs that have multiple meanings on multiple levels to them. This is why I like to add in certain Movie or TV show samples. They help me to tell the story of the song better. Or they reference things in my lyrics.

What are your hopes for the EP in relation to opening up future opportunities for the band and is there a particular moment or track on the release which is Varicella at its purest, where its heart is most open?

Chris B. – Well first and foremost this EP is a stepping stone to our full length release that’ll be out something later this year, probably fall or winter of 2013. We also hope this EP will help us get any attention to tour or play more shows. We’d love to do a tour! Even if it is just a small 2 or 4 week local tour. Of course a bigger 2 month or more tour would be great too!

Varicella at its purest? Not sure. Obsessed with flesh is pretty personal. As I mention above, that one involves a bad relationship with a girl. The Sound of Four is about feeling like you don’t exist in this world, so maybe those two songs. They might not sound like it, but most of my lyrics are real and from the heart.

Chris P. – I’m hoping this EP will open more doors for Varicella by getting us more fans and shows etc. I agree with Chris I think Obsessed with flesh is pretty out there in terms of being us at our purest.

How did you and Bluntface link up and what have been the benefits already from their support and presence?

Chris B. – Johnny from Virus Cycle had an open call for bands on his compilation last summer. From there, I saw that Otto was doing another compilation through the Bluntface site. Otto remembered our song and dug our sound, and a few months ago he sent me an email. He said the label was expanding, and asked if we wanted to join up with him. It seemed like a really good offer that we didn’t want to pass up. So we agreed.

There have been a huge amount of benefits! We’ve had internet radio air play. The review of our EP from you guys, and a few other interviews, and we did a “live” on air interview on 13SRadio.com. We also have another one that we’re doing at the end of this month. Everything Otto said he would do for us, he’s doing! So we’re extremely happy.

How are you managing to promote the EP and are there live shows happening or planned?

Chris B. – We’ve been promoting it on the various social media networks, Reverbnation, Facebook, Twitter, and a few other sites. We’ve been playing shows since last October when we opened for My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult, Left Spine Down, and Panzer Division. Left Spine Down said we were loud and they liked our cover of Ministry’s Burning Inside. Since then, we’ve had a show every month, except for December, we played two that month. We’re taking February off to write and record some songs for the full length album. And we’re playing a show on March 23rd in Philadelphia at Motel Hell. Details are on our Facebook page

There are plenty of opinions from artists within industrial and its plethora of varied corners which say there is a current curse of IMG_0023_1backbiting and disrespect within the genre between musicians and those involved, how have you found the situation personally?

Chris B. – There are a few bands and people, not exclusively in the industrial/electronic music genre, that have been disrespectful to us. It does bother me at times, because it’s usually from bands/artists that think they’re bigger than they are, but they’re not. They have this ego trip and they act like you’re beneath them. It’s sad actually. And we try to not be like that. If you’re cool with me, then I’m cool with you, simple as that. But that’s just how it is, and it’s the same with the movie business. Everyone’s two faced. It doesn’t matter if you’re a local band or a huge touring band. You will run into a few that are like that.

Is there anything, band or releases, which have captured your imaginations recently and added extra flavour to your thoughts and ideas for your next compositions?

Chris B. – Wow, good question. Not too many “newer” bands. There are some bands that have been around for a little bit that are releasing newer albums. Dawn of Ashes, KMFDM, Skinny Puppy, Alice in Chains, Megadeth and Filter. I’m a pretty big Filter fan. Their last album “The Trouble with Angels” was really great! Still listening to that. Testament just released a very good album. Frontline Assembly and Tweaker also just put out newer albums. Even though FLA is more of a soundtrack, it’s still very good. Been listening to the “Tron Legacy” score by Daft Punk off and on for a few weeks. All of those keep my imagination going. Especially the “Tron Legacy” score. That CD just amazes me! It’s really good!

What is next creatively for Varicella?

Chris B. – We are currently working on our full length album. It will be all the songs from the EP plus about 5 or 7 more originals and maybe 2 or 3 remix songs.

Many thanks for sparing time to chat with us, any last thoughts you would like to share?

Chris B. – Thank you for giving us this opportunity. We appreciate it very much! Last thoughts…just check us out on Facebook or Reverbnation. Go to the Bluntface Records site and check out all the great bands there! If you haven’t already, please download our “We Belong Dead” EP. And thanks to everyone who’s helped and supported us along the way!

Finally, you said horror movies are big elements in your personal loves, so give us three films which are engrained in your passions to the extent you know lines off by heart.

Chris B. – 1) The Evil Dead films and Army of Darkness. Classics in my book and Army of Darkness just has so many great quotable line! 2) Almost all of the John Carpenter films, even the movies that are not horror movies. The Thing, Halloween, Prince of Darkness, Escape from NY, Big Trouble in Little China, In the Mouth of Madness, and Christine are some of my favourites of his. 3) Hellraiser 1 and 2. Those movies together feel like one really long awesome movie.

Chris P. – I’m right on board with Chris Bollinger’s horror movie tastes especially with the Hellraiser and Evil Dead Series. Some of my favourite horror movie quotes are Evil Dead 2’s “groovy” right after Bruce Campbell put a chainsaw where his possessed hand used to be, The priest’s quote “I kick ass for the lord” right before he fights zombies in the grave yard with his bare hands in Dead Alive and Lastly Chop tops “Oww my plate! My brain is burning nom flashback NOM FLASHBACK!!!!!!” from Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2.

Read the review of We Belong Dead EP @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/01/07/varicella-we-belong-dead/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Varicella/310239362321042?fref=ts

http://www.bluntfacerecords.com

The RingMaster Review 26/02/2013

RingMaster 26/02/2013

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Deathfix: Self Titled

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    Listening to the self-titled debut album from Deathfix is like watching a fire, the shimmering breath it engages with a warm mesmeric touch to the senses and the vibrant melodic flames it strokes thoughts with a seductive irresistible provocative dance. Released on Dischord Records, a label renowned for its quality punk and hardcore releases, it is instantly an unexpected surprise, its breath-taking blend of rock pop, shoegaze, psych-pop, and psychedelia an unanticipated magnetic wash of sonic beauty.

Deathfix is the coming together of founding member and drummer of Fugazi and Rites of Spring, Brendan Canty (guitar, lead vocals) and singer/songwriter/producer Rich Morel (keyboards, lead vocals), the pair starting the project in 2009 having toured together in Bob Mould’s band. Spending two years writing songs the duo brought in Devin Ocampo (drums, backing vocals), a founding member of Faraquet and Medications, and Mark Cisneros (bass), a multi-instrumentalist who is currently playing drums in Medications, guitar and Saxophone in Chain and the Gang, and drums in Shortstack, their addition bringing further ideas and avenues which enhanced the music already imagined. Recorded at Brendan Canty’s warehouse studio space in Washington, D.C, the album is a hypnotic tease and kiss upon senses and thoughts, an elevated heat to immerse within and be inspired by the tempting sunrise and bewitching sunset it offers.

The release opens with Better Than Bad, its sizzling chords the first beckoning before a tide of delicious melodies and inviting deathfixlogoslightly acidic sonics play upon the ear. The union of vocals from Canty and Morel, each providing seamlessly fitting distinct elegances and lures, is a masterful coaxing as is the refreshing and invigorating summer of guitars and harmonies. The sixties voice of the song is a mischievous plaything for the seventies psychedelic stroking and both wrapped in the charm of progressive pop makes for a compelling and fascinating venture.

The following Low Lying Dreams brings a sinewy gait and sturdy atmosphere behind the rays of vocal and melodic sunshine which cascades down upon the ear. It has a more muscular intent than the opener but just as rich an entrancing weave and persuasive swagger to leave again the listener licking their lips in satisfaction and pleasure. From its on-going heated captivation the track opens up darker shadows to stalk the ear and gently stomp around the senses. The wonderfully grouchy bass of Cisneros resonates throughout, a mix of intimidation and sexy roguery which constantly abducts the attention, whilst the guitars sizzle with a scintillating grace and sonic finesse. The keys add further temptations to the ear and as the song brews up into a bedlamic suggestion the fires are lit musically and emotionally.

From the evocative Hospital, an absorbing glow of a song which offers its own lyrical darkness to push boundaries, the album moves to the wonderful and slightly disturbed Dali’s House, the song stepping forward to take things to another avenue and level. The song is an enthralling maze of ideas and lyrical devilry which baffles as it intrigues, whilst perpetually thrilling and igniting the passions. A meandering disco sway with licks of funk and electro whispers, the song just consumes the heart. Lyrically is a travelogue of wishful thinking which namedrops constantly like a stalker and a teasing companion to the infectious and irresistible brewing of stewing melodic alchemy.

Playboy and Mind Control both continue the manipulation of the senses and passions, the first a full flush of majestic thick pop and the second a merger of psychedelic brilliance around a progressive melodic candle. Both songs spark a continued enticement which is impossible to deny though arguably they suffer slightly from following two such impressive songs.

The album ends on the senses addling Transmission, a mix of sinister ambience, glorious melodic combustion, and an aural slight-of-hand, the guitars laying a feast of riveting emotive and skilful embraces diverting attention from the mesh of other delights going on. This combines to make the epic track a continually giving treat with each encounter and the perfect way to close the album and sum up the band in one glorious shot.

Quite simply Deathfix, band and album, is sensational and a treat all should bring to their ears and hearts as soon as possible.

http://deathfix.com

9/10

RingMaster 26/02/2013

 

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Crest Of Darkness: In The Presence Of Death

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    Norwegian black metallers Crest Of Darkness has been setting impressive standards within European extreme metal and blackening the hearts of fans for eighteen years now and through six releases. They return with their seventh album in the insidious form of In The Presence Of Death, a record which gnaws and poisons the senses for one fully rewarding confrontation.

Formed by vocalist/bassist Ingar Amlien in the mid-nineties, Crest Of Darkness has explored and expelled sonic brutality and vicious lyrical blood-letting mythology and Satanism which has earned the band a formidable and acclaimed reputation. Completed by Rebo (guitar/keyboards) and Kjetil Hektoen (drums), with additional contributions from Kjell Arne Hubred (rhythm guitar) and Stian Aarstad (keyboards) upon the album, the band has unleashed a furnace of ferocity and accomplished imagination on the new album which continues to set the band to the fore of extreme metal. Released via My Kingdom Music, the follow up to their impressive 2007 album, Give Us the Power to Do Your Evil, is an alchemy of evil and violation which demands and grips a captivation for its sadistic menace with skilled malevolent craft.

The senses pervading Intro lures the listener into the album first its dawning sinister ambience a full wrap before opening up to Crest_Of_Darkness_coverchoral harmonies and bedlamic menace which in turn leads its eager victim in the intensive title track. A raging fire of bone snapping rhythms and jugular threatening riffs lay a thick mesh of black and incendiary intent and sound across the ear whilst the vocals of Amlien and their serpentine corrosion scar and exhaust the defences, to create a dramatic onslaught. It does not necessarily make the immediate hook of the passion as other songs on the release but with its merciless onslaught of devious rhythms and understated yet involved guitar weaves emerges as one of the most lingering and nastiest compelling antagonists upon In The Presence Of Death.

The following Demon Child expels an avalanche of crippling beats and ravenous riffs entwined by a blistering sonic groove which survives and seduces from within the tempest of intensity whilst Redemption and The Priest From Hell both badger and brutalise the passions to a further submission and pleasure. The first of the pair ripples with the hungry sinews of the bass of Amlien whilst Rebo enflames the skies of the track with searing melodic invention. It is a contagion not to be denied as is the second of the two, the track a rasping caustic brawl of again unsympathetic merciless drum antagonisms from Hektoen, tightly lashing guitar sonics, and the perpetually intrusive and acidic vocals. Though the track fails to ignite the fire in the belly as did its predecessors it just rumbles within and defaces the senses for through satisfaction.

Welcome To My Funeral brings the greatest moment of the album to the ear, the track an infectious seduction of heavy strolling metal grooves and barbed melodies alongside a squalling rich ambience of corrupting fervour. As throughout the release, the guitar of Rebo scores the emotions with defined yet tart sonic enterprise to blister upon the listener but equally leave them smarting with bliss.

Further tracks like the savage Womb Of The Wolf with its rabid energy and vitriolic sonic web of persuasion and the snarling Vampire Dreams which bares its hellacious fangs within seconds of its punishing presence ignite further subservience to the striking and immense album. The latter of the two also scores with spirals of guitar flame and sonic vehemence to offer sweet pain whilst the bass finds the surliest repine voice of the whole album.

Completed by two more ferocious and unbridled of deranged spite in the excellent additive From The Dead and the mutually virulent in its own treacherous way The Day Before She Died, In The Presence Of Death is a stirring raptor of intense and impressive mordancy. Black metal has been once more been ignited by Crest Of Darkness.

www.facebook.com/crestofdarknessofficial

http://www.crestofdarkness.com

8/10

RingMaster 26/02/2013

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Faster Pussycat: The Power & The Glory Hole

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    The Power & The Glory Hole is the first release of new material from Hollywood sleaze rockers Faster Pussycat since its return in 2001, and a release which despite its flaws just leads to mischievous satisfaction. The band is one which for many is a love or hate relationship whilst for others like us their earlier presence largely was ignored due to a lack of connection with their glam/sleaze flavoured hard rock. The new album though finds the band evolved into a heavily spiced industrial rock n roll which points to the likes of Dope and Marilyn Manson, and on certain points on the album, Jane’s Addiction.

Formed in 1985 and taking its name from the Russ Meyer cult film Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill!, the quintet of Taime Downe (vocals), Greg Steele, (guitar), Brent Muscat (guitar), Kelly Nickels (bass), and Mark Michaels (drums), soon grabbed attention with their self-titled album of 1987 and two years later gold album, Wake Me When It’s Over. The band subsequently split in 1992 with Downe forming the Newlydeads. In 2001 though he resurrected Faster Pussycat with a more rock driven sound and the band soon released Between The Valley Of The Ultra Pussy, a collection of industrial remixes of the  early songs produced by Downe, and spent the next years touring and thrilling audiences. With a line-up now of Downe, Xristian Simon (guitar), Ace Von Johnson (guitar), and ex- L.A. Guns members Danny Nordahl (bass) and Chad Stewart (drums, percussion), the band has stepped forward with further evolved material and sound and it has to be said it is quite a blast.

Released via Full Effect Records in the US and City Of Lights Records in Europe, The Power & The Glory Hole takes no time in FasterPussycat_cover20making a convincing persuasion with opener Number 1 with a Bullet. The track introduces itself with bulging rhythms and scything sonics from the guitars which immediately lures an interest in its offering. Settling into a sinewy gait and fiery energy, the vocals of Downe dance over the ear with a gruff devilment whilst riffs and basslines tease and incite boisterous responses. Wholly infectious with its acidic groove and undemanding chorus, the song is easy meat for the ear to revel in, recognisable rascality which is irresistible. That also about sums up the album, there is nothing new or adventurous to it just sounds and ideas plenty of others have exploited but Faster Pussycat make it an aural shenanigan you do not want to avoid.

From the terrific start the equally addictive Gotta Love It with its repetitive pawing riffs and cyclonic grooves continues to excite the senses, the tempting chorus and unbound flurry of hooks virulent and again impossible to resist adding voice and agitated limbs to. Two songs in and there is not much more convincing needed to make the album one which will make many returns before the ear and even though it does ebb and flow in success across its twelve tracks, there are no actual disasters waiting to loom into view. The following slowly strolling Useless is one of the moments though where things hit a lull, the admittedly easily assessable and enjoyable track failing to hold or ignite any fire with its presence. It is arguably the most industrial toned track on the album and wins on variety and intent but just does not spark like some of the other tracks.

Something the songs Sex Drugs & Rock ‘n’ Roll and Hey You do not have a problem with achieving.  The first is one which brings rich essences of Jane’s Addiction to a hard rock swagger for another transmittable aural contagion whilst the second rampages with a grinding abrasion and snarl to its energy, riffs, and baselines whilst the drums create a frame of jabs and crisp uppercuts any middleweight would be proud of. The guitar flames add extra heat and transfixing persuasion to the song and again it is hard to tear oneself away from its eager and easily satisfying clutches. Splitting the pair Disintegrate and a cover of These Boots Were Made for Walking play nice without again raising any temperatures but are still decent enough songs to catch a lingering stay.

Completed by the wanton blistered seduction of Porn Star, the biting title track, a fiery cover of the Betty Blowtorch song Shut Up & Fuck, and a closing tribute to the late Bianca Butthole, a close friend of Downe, called Bye Bye Bianca, the album makes for a dirty brawl of a party, a sonic binge you are welcome and will want to gate-crash. For sure The Power & The Glory Hole takes easy familiar routes in songs for the main and lacks uniqueness but it still makes a more than appetising encounter which gives voice, feet, and mischief an excuse to riot.

www.fasterpussycat.com

7/10

Ringmaster 26/02/2013

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