Forged In Black – The Exodus

Forged in Black Online Promo Shot

Though UK heavy metallers Forged In Black is far from being a new band, they have found a new shift and exploration in their sound and thoughts which has led to a relatively recent name change, a renaming which reflects line-up changes and this progression in sound. Their new encounter is The Exodus EP, a release consisting of one brand new track and a couple of early demos of older songs. It is sure to be a tonic for all fans of adventurous classic metal, imposing riffs, and flesh scoring vocals, whilst for the rest it still has enough to stir attention.

The band began in 2009 under the name Merciless Fail, emerging with the intent to merge traditional heavy metal with a unique contemporary essence. The band swiftly earned a strong reputation for their live performances, playing both Bloodstock Festival and the main stage at Red Roar Festival in 2012 and going on to win Metal to the Masses and Band Quest competitions. 2013 was the band’s most successful to date, playing Metal Gods Festival 2013 alongside the likes of Beholder and Savage Messiah, supporting Skreamer and again Beholder, and re- releasing acclaimed debut album Forged in Black. As the following and similarly well-received The Tide EP, the album came out last year for its second outing, two years after the first appearance and under the new band name. It was the four-track EP which showed a suggestion of a twist in the band’s sound, something far more pronounced and exploratory now with the Romesh Dodangoda (Motorhead, Sylosis, Bullet For My Valentine) recorded The Exodus.

The opening melody of the title track is simple bewitchment, a potent lure reinforced by the emerging stride of imposing rhythms and climatic swipes of guitar. There is a definite thrash breath coverto the track once fully in view, an early Metallica essence to ignite imagination and appetite. It is swiftly infused with heavily toned riffs and the rich vocals of Chris Storozynski, his classic style standing eye to eye with the rugged elements of the track but matching the acidic sonic flames around him. A great bruising vocal backing from bassist Kieron Rochester badgers the fiery tones of Storozynski as they lie on the skilled weave set by guitarists Tim Chandler and Andy Songhurst. The track ebbs and flows with its driving torrents and dramatic crescendos, providing a fascinating encounter offering something for thrash, classic, and heavy metal fans and as suggested previously enough for even those not as enamoured in the genres to find intrigue in.

A 2013 demo of Accusations Of The Innocent is next, the original track having previously featured on album and last EP. Once again a thrash invention helps open up ears and focus before the track spreads into more classical metal scenery wrapped with a creative web of guitars and spicily delivered vocals. Again there is plenty to get your teeth into even if the track feels a little reined in compared to its predecessor. With a cauldron of impressing guitar craft and invention courted by the excellent punching rhythms of Joshua Moreton, the song before it makes way for the 2011 demo of the song Forged In Black, shows exactly why the band has inspired such a potent fan base and reputation. Its successor instantly reveals the rich seeds and bait which has been persistent within the band from their start. Comparisons to the likes of Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, and Black Sabbath come with the mention of the band’s name and it is easy to see why with the closing song. Muscular and sonically sultry, it has feet and neck muscles pumped whilst the operatic calls of Storozynski finds a welcome home in the rich melodies veining the incitement.

The Exodus is a release to put a smile on all heavy metal fans but as shown especially by its lead song, it also has the potential to awaken strong appetites in those less taken with its core breeding, a potency shown by it persuading our less than enthused tastes for classic metal and its vocal styling.

The Exodus is available through all stores from December 1st.

https://www.facebook.com/forgedinblacks

RingMaster 01/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

Warmblood – God Of Zombies

WarmbloodBand

There is something invigorating and healthy about being accosted with visceral sonic spattering and rhythmic brutality, especially when it is unleashed with a technical tenacity and dexterity which grips the imagination. Such a striking infestation is God Of Zombies from Italian metallers Warmblood. The album is a delicious adventure of sinew shredding barbarism and senses searing viciousness with the tendency to simultaneously seduce with rich melodic flames and unpredictable invention. It is a wrath of melodic death metal riding the hostility of thrash and temptation of groove metal into a blood drenched terrain of decay and ravenous intent. Oh, it is also one thoroughly compelling and impressive assault too.

Warmblood began in 2002, founded by vocalist/guitarist Giancarlo Capra and drummer Elena Carnevali. Soon expanding to a trio with bassist Ivan Marconi, the band released a demo the following year. It was in 2009 that debut album Necrocosmos Destination was set free on the world, the time between releases seeing second guitarist Davide Mazzoletti join the Lodi band but Marconi leave. Deciding to continue as a threesome without a bassist, the band continued earning attention and praise for their live performances across shows and festival appearances, with their first album drawing a keen spotlight at home and further afield. A year later the band signed with Punishment 18 Records and released second full-length Timor Mortis. Inspired by the films of Lucio Fulci, it showed further evolution and hungry invention in the band’s sound. Supported by shows with bands such as Asphyx, Infernal War, Kraanium, Antropofagus, Psychofagist, and Blasphemer, the well-received encounter awoke stronger attention upon the band. Now with the release of God Of Zombies through Spew Records (Punishment 18), it is easy to expect the broadest recognition coming Warmblood’s way.

Opening on the portentous apocalyptic Intro (Zombie Genesi), an dramatically orchestrated instrumental piece soaked in menace, the album flies headlong into ears with Post Mortem Transfiguration, riffs and rhythms a torrential provocation from its first breath. Equally there is a tantalising sonic endeavour coating the tempest, scorched melodic temptation which sparks the imagination ready for the full weight and brutality of the song. Driven by pestilential gut wrenching vocals, the track smothers and infects with toxic intensity. Every syllable comes with a dose of festering ire and decay whilst the trash seeded thrust of the song is as rabid as it is uncompromising. Entwining that though is an invention of sonic intrigue and enterprise which spellbinds in its skill and adventure. It is a hellacious and exhilarating start to the album and only matched by its successor.

Contagium Escalation consumes ears with an even more hostile and urgent predation before honing a heavily thumping stride from which eruptions of malice and invention snare attention. It is not as easily flowing as its predecessor WarmbloodCoverbut still a captivating maelstrom of technical skill and inflamed agitation. Though the band has no bassist, there is a heavy tone which at times is hard to define whether it is bred from four strings or a baritone guitar but relentlessly gives tracks a richer ravenous shadow and depth, as shown by Eucharist Dead Flesh. Swaggering with a thrash seeded intimidation and energy, the song is a hostile flirtation, teasing and tearing the senses with its cantankerous and scarring scythes of sound and malevolence, an attack at times swathed in some quite delicious melodic ingenuity. It is a blistering treat of a violation but only the start of an extended new plateau breached by the album.

The next up Unfaithful Celebrant immediately and virulently entices with its rolling beats before sultry grooves salaciously bind rhythms and passions with their flirty designs. The track writhes with tempestuous persuasion, grooves an irresistible and twisted temptation amongst which a low slung growl adds its own enticement as beats unload their spears with composed yet violent intent. It is a glorious and inescapably addictive creative fury, the pinnacle of the album and alone bait to ensure Warmblood comes under the radar.

Both the thrash fuelled title track with its melodic familiarity and the ruggedly feisty Replaced by Death keep thoughts and emotions fired up, the first an evolving landscape of sonic colour and swinging hooks which is as evocatively restrained as it is furiously uncompromising. The second of the two is more of an unrelenting predator than the previous proposition but still prone to releases of exceptional melodic and skilled enterprise which seamlessly merges into the raw causticity and intensive provocation of the track. Vocally too persuasion is an instant slavery, the bestial yet seriously infectious tones of Capra an unending nightmare you only want to immerse deeper into, much as the album itself.

Culmination of Final Transformation is arguably the least hostile encounter upon God Of Zombies but one of the most engaging with its thick weave of melodic and sonic drama whilst the following Zombinferno is the last chapter to the demise of the album’s narrative. Opening with a vintage cinematic sample, the track explodes into prime rock ‘n’ roll whilst its death metal toned flanks ripple with animosity and a merciless rhythmic badgering is without brakes in speed and malice.

Closing with Ite Missa Est, a peace restoring of guitar sculpted instrumental beauty, God Of Zombies is corrosively spellbinding. It has a familiarity to it at times but just as thick originality across it too which makes it trap and feed ears with consummate ease. Warmblood is a band ready to break into the keenest spotlight, whether extreme metal is ready for their creative bloodlust is another thing.

God Of Zombies is available now via Spew Records

https://www.facebook.com/warmbloodband

RingMaster 30/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

Rise Of The Northstar – Welcame

PRESSE9

Like being bitch slapped by Godzilla, Welcame the debut album from French thrashers Rise Of The Northstar shows little respect and the utmost hostility yet still charms the frilly panties off the passions. Swiftly instilling itself as one of our lustful favourite releases of 2014, the release is an unrelenting brawl on the senses. Mixing thrash, hardcore, and varied strains of metal aggression in a binding of manga and Japanese cultural inspiration, sound and album is an exhausting thrill which violently bruises and angrily seduces at every turn.

Consisting of vocalist Vithia, guitarists Eva-B and Air One, bassist Fabulous Fab, and drummer Hokuto No Kev, Rise Of The Northstar go straight for the jugular on their Repression Records release full-length and soon has defences willing to be split and devoured by the hellacious fury of ‘manga-core’. Opener What The Fuck tears the senses from their comfort zone, the maniacal glint in the eye of the whole album swiftly and ruthlessly seizing ears once the first song emerges from its deceptive melodic coaxing, guitars opening up with a radiant lure veined by sonic enterprise. When it comes, the colossal wall of sound expelled by the track is a tsunami of spite and intensity. Riffs savage air and senses whilst beats pummel everything in sight. It is a vicious assault and quite irresistible especially as a death metal like malevolence aligns itself with rap cultured vocals and a charging thrash voracity. Everything about the song is raw, vocals and lyrics to riffs and rhythms all looming over the senses like a mix of Slipknot, Bad Brains, and Toxic Holocaust. Its open hostility is also equipped with a sonic temptation which rather than temper the raging seems to ignite it further.

The staggering start is matched within seconds by the predatory Welcame (Furyo State Of Mind), the track from its first breath stalking its victim. A Stuck Mojo like animosity rages in the midst of the storm whilst Cypress Hill like WELCAMEartsonic slithers adds a tease to the incendiary and contagious confrontation. That original slow crawl in attack eventually explodes in primal urgency to incinerate the climate of the song before relaxing back into its insidious stroll. The track is as uncompromising as it is addictive and followed by an equally ferocious and merciless assault in The New Path. Again ears and emotions feel like they are being hunted down by the intensive weight and fury of the track but also just as forcibly find themselves being serenaded by group harmonies and anthemic tenacity. It is a scintillating and pleasingly unpredictable incitement setting a new strain of hunger in motion ready for the excellent Samurai Spirit.

The album’s fourth song casts caustic sonic swirls and a bass probing to tenderise thoughts at first before vocals spew malice and spite with every syllable forced through clenched teeth. Riffs and chords hang around the song with intimidating effect whilst beats slap with increasing tenacity and muscle the further the track challenges the senses. Again though there is a vocal union which demands allegiance, another anthem emerging to push the heights of the album further.

Both Dressed All In Black and Again And Again keep things furiously compelling, the first a belligerent riot of craft and invention which uses every twist of its imagination to unleash another exciting and adversarial predation. It equally sets a web of sonic enterprise to captivate as it spills blood before its successor takes a music box simplicity and naivety into an imposingly rugged and jaundiced landscape. Though neither quite matches the brilliance of those before them, each impresses as they add new character and invigorating variety to the album just like the next up Tyson. A cloud of haunting ambience and sinister atmosphere smothers ears first before riffs erupt in carnivorous voice and intent. Hardcore driven vocals then fly at ears angrily from within in the brewing tempest around them. An infectious stride breaks out next, dragging thoughts and passions with its easily accessible yet nasty resourcefulness. The track matches its title in weight, strength, and menace, again not setting a raging fire in emotions but stirring them up to lively satisfaction all the same.

The ridiculously addictive Bosozoku uncages another storming treat; grooves and riffs in league as they bind ears and passions in their riveting anthemic bait to which rhythms administer their welcome brutality as vocals roar with rebellious relish. It is a blistering slab of rock ‘n’ roll pushing Welcame back to its highest plateau, a level maintained by the following cover of the Pharoahe Monch track Simon Says. Possibly the most brutal and imposing rap track you will hear this year, the band turns it into a storm of antagonistic destruction. There is no peace at its eye either, just more full-blooded voracity and malevolent intent.

The album is brought to a potent end through the fusion of rapcore and thrash infused hardcore uncaged by Authentic and the adrenaline fuelled thrash savagery of Blast ‘Em All, both tracks enthralling debilitating anthems no one could be unwilling to offer their bodies to. They complete a roaring triumph of a release, our introduction to Rise Of The Northstar, despite them apparently having a couple of EPs already loose on the world, and the start of a lustful friendship we suspect.

Welcame is available now on Repression Records.

http://www.riseofthenorthstar.com

RingMaster 23/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Dominhate – Towards The Light

Dominhate-Band

Born from the ashes of Italian thrash death metallers Esequie, Dominhate certainly make a convincing and impressive call their way with debut album Towards The Light. Formed in 2008 the members of Dominhate evolved from the sound cast their former band into a more death metal focused onslaught on ears and senses as new members joined the emerging force in the Italian underground scene. Breeding their own distinct if not yet wholly unique sound with inspirations from the likes of Morbid Angel and Incantation, the Pordenone hailing quartet have put down a strong marker with their first full-length. Released on The Spew Records, a division of Punishment 18 Records, it is not a startling encounter but one which pleases, lingers, and awakens a strong attentive interest in the band.

The title track provides an atmospheric entrance to the release, the album seemingly yawning as it wakes within a sonic haziness and intimidating ambience. It is fully alert and sizing up senses once The Light of the Last Legion spreads its inviting grooves and imposing rhythmic bait across the imagination. Soon into a muscular and intensive provocation, the song creatively stumbles through ears. The rhythmic attack is unpredictable and furious, corrosively matched by riffs and guttural vocal squalls as the track continues to intensify its weight and oppressive textures. An early representation of the album, the opener is not a dramatically striking provocation but undeniably one veined by skilled enterprise and creative intrigue for a richly enjoyable encounter.

Its potent offering is surpassed by the virulent animosity of In the Principle the Great Sleep. Riffs and grooves again align to create a contagious web punctuated by the feverish hostility and craft of the drums, they in turn skirted by a DominhateCoverthroaty bass predation. With the vocals shedding predacious intent and malevolence, the track is a voracious savaging of old school death metal with modern attitude and imagination. Its gripping presence is surpassed by The New Wave of Domination, a track developing an infectious violent swing to its persuasion once it has driven through a tempestuous ravaging of sonic hostility and rhythmic provocation. Like its predecessor the fury is as unrelenting in its ruinous attitude as it is in its inventive swagger, feasting on ears with insidious ferocity and corruptive relish.

Both The First Seed and The Essence of the Choice provide new scenery to the album, the first of the two spreading a sinister and slowly invasive atmosphere over ears and thoughts whilst guitars spin an evocative web of dark intent as restrained but firm rhythms punctuate the sonic narrative. It is a gripping landscape for the imagination to feed upon, the darkening and increasingly rugged terrain of the song only sparking a greater compelling lure to immerse the senses. Its successor explores a lighter adventure, compared to its predecessor, yet still energetically and feverishly soaking ears in blackened revelry and erosive death metal tenacity. The track is a torrential ravishing, arguably low on surprises but high on thrilling and skilful incitement.

Through Perception and Obscure the Call of Salvation, band and album continue to batter the barricades with accomplished craft and enthralling enterprise. The first is a steady but forceful stroll driven by fervour drenched riffs and anti-social beats. Clad in addictively winding sonic endeavour it makes way for the thicker pestilence of brutality and vocal rapacity from the second of the two. Both tracks fuel an already contented appetite over the album, if without reaching heights forged by earlier songs, though that is soon re-established by the ruinous might of King without Crown, a gripping tirade of waspish grooves and crippling rhythms under the demonic thrall of the vocals. It is an outstanding violation which alone makes Dominhate a band worth searching out.

Towards the Light closes with Redemption of One, an engrossing surrounding of the senses with antagonistic design to its raw and ravenous presence. Again intrigue and thought provoking invention spreads infectious toxins across the constantly growing and persuasive might of the track, another sizeable triumph the reward.

It is probably fair to say that Towards the Light does not offer any real surprises but equally it definitely does not give house room to predictability. The album is a richly pleasing and exciting encounter drenched in a potential which suggests that Dominhate is an emerging force of the future and a satisfying pleasure of the now.

Towards the Light is available now via The Spew Records @ http://dominhate.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/Dominhate

RingMaster 23/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

Krullur – Grounds For Termination

frontcover

Hailing from Houston, extreme metallers Krullur have recently linked up with Horror Pain Gore Death Productions and their first fury from the union comes in the blistering shape of the Grounds For Termination EP. Six tracks brewing up a raw and corrosive storm from a healthy collusion of death and thrash metal, the release is a tenaciously satisfying savagery. Not an encounter to roar outside of established templates it is fair to say but one feeding heavily all the wants of a slab of extreme provocation.

Formed in 1989, the band is no newcomer to unleashing ravenous hostility. From early demo Enormity in 1990, the trio has drawn attention through the Godvomit Compilation, a split release with Tumorhead in 1996, and debut album Open Ass Surgery in 2001, amongst a handful of releases. As evidenced by the new encounter, the band uncages as proposition which blends the darkest contagious and hostile elements of thrash and death metal with a further blackened intent and punk predation. Grounds For Termination is their new assault, and though the threesome of band founders Jay Langston (drums) and Marty Langston (guitar) alongside Diego Garza (vocals/bass) who joined the band in 2009,has not uncaged a game changer, it is a release to turn new heads their way and offer a thoroughly enjoyable violation.

Krullur take a chunk out of ears straight away as first track Bringer of Destruction flails with viciously swinging rhythms and similarly driven riffs to set off the onslaught. It is just a grabbing of attention though as once in control the song uncages an infectious stroll of bass hooks and scything beats aligned to caustic scythes of guitar. It is potent thrash bred bait which strides antagonistically over the senses and into the imagination, the punkish vocal growl of Garza adding to the raucous brawl of sound and energy. An abrasive and raw confrontation, the song makes for a captivating start with its Toxic Holocaust meets Sarcofago like ferocity and intensity.

Necromancer of Death follows, building on the appealing entrance of the EP with its classic heavy metal furnace of aggression and enterprise. The guitar spins a web of sonic intrigue and melodic craft which manages to be pleasingly vocal and open within the otherwise oppressive and ferocious weight of the track. To this drums and bass sculpt a demanding yet catchy suffocation, increasing the violent lure and grip of the song. Its success is surpassed by the outstanding Designed for Failure. From its first second, the thrash fuelled tempest strides over and tramples the senses, its gait launching from a predatory stalking to an unbridled assault before combining both for the remainder of its impressive fury. Vocals and guitar steal attention with their punk and melodic enticement respectively, but overall the track is a punchy rage which leaves satisfaction full.

Both Pay by Pain and No Holds Barred provide a distinct and unrelenting savagery, the first a carnivorous monsoon of energy and malevolence but a tempest veined by riveting guitar invention whilst its successor ventures into a more punk rock seeded inhospitality. The song is an exciting blaze of sonic endeavour and rhythmic sadism but again a track which manages to be addictively catchy, its thrash swing an invigorating temptation in the merciless and corrosive rampage.

The EP comes to an end with Infestation, a slower spiteful proposition compared to earlier tracks which preys on the senses and gnaws on the emotions with its vehement coated frenzy of rhythmic incitement and sonic causticity. It makes a fine end to a strongly pleasing release, and though Krullur is not opening up new avenues with Grounds For Termination, the band is definitely putting itself in a bigger window with its enjoyable attack on the senses.

Grounds For Termination is available now via Horror Pain Gore Death Productions @ https://hpgd.bandcamp.com/album/grounds-for-termination

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Krullur/154413801249768

RingMaster 17/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

Possessor – Electric Hell

a0454880539_2

Hailing from London with a penchant for occult metal and with already the Wings of Fire EP under their belt this year, UK metallers Possessor have unleashed a rather tasty and impressive debut album in the stormy form of Electric Hell. There is not much more we can tell you about the band except that if you like a cocktail of sludge and stoner metal with thrash and varied metal rapacity, then this is an ear rioting album to whip up the juices. Consisting of nine tracks which simply flirt with the imagination whilst rigorously fondling the passions, Electric Hell is a treat for all fans of bands such as Black Sabbath, Slayer, and Fu Manchu through to Black Tusk, Gruntruck, and Kyuss with plenty more on offer. There is one band though which came to mind again and again as the release set to work on ears, and that is early Therapy?, the album vocally and in its predatory sounds holding a highly agreeable and uncanny essence of the Irish trio about them.

Unique in its own presence too, the album is a gloriously raw and irresistibly cantankerous encounter which makes an immediate and appetite igniting impression through the first rugged swipes of opener Chasms of Malice alone. From the first breath, sinew clad strikes of guitar courted by the bestial throaty charm of bass crowd ears to spark swift attention, the imagination following suit as an acidic groove and caustic riffing emerges to consume the senses. There is a punk vitality to the track too, especially once the effect surfaced vocals join the now rampaging stride of guitars and the punchy rhythms. It is a glorious enticement with the snarling bass stealing the limelight, but only just from the toxic groove and insatiable swagger of the song.

Its striking start is swiftly followed and matched by Invisible Face, again riffs setting down predatory bait which is coloured by stoner-esque hues and infectious grooves. With a haunted tone to the vocals and grumbling voracity to both bass and drums, the track bulges with rabid riffs and spiky hooks to inflame an already greed bitten appetite. It is a hunger soon fed a tasty morsel by Limb from Limb and spoilt by the outstanding Castle of Bastards. The first of the two is a more slowly intensive proposition, its acidic binding of sonic enterprise as restrained and flavoursome as the gentler expression of the vocals. It is deceptive though as at its core, the song is primed and driven by an incessant nagging of riffs and the ever incendiary bass sound. It is an underbelly which is fuelled with rabidity, a lure as potently predacious as the sounds around it are magnetically reserved. It is a fine encounter but soon left looking up at the might of its successor. Like most tracks on the album it is driven by thrash bred tenacity and muscular urgency which makes for a familiar and easily digestible spine, upon which the rest of the song expands and brings its creative devilry. Castle of Bastards is no exception but to this insatiable bait it unleashes a bestial breath and inventive sonic unpredictability which simply bewitches. The track is where that reference to Therapy? is first bred, though earlier tracks hint at it at times too. Far too short at less than two minutes long, the song is pure hostile drama and quite magnificent.

The sultry stoner grooving of Strange Summoning over a garage punk and heavy metal blended canvas makes its own sturdy claim for top track honours. Again brief in presence but rich on irrepressible adventure with riffs and grooves the prime addiction, it soon makes way for the Sabbath-esque Heavy Dreams. It is a song intensive in weight and primal structuring yet veined with a sonic intrigue and melodic causticity which would not be out of place in a Torche or Melvins treat. It is followed by the virulent contagion of the instrumental Skeletal Form, a corrosive dance of scathing riffs and inhospitable rhythms with an impossibly addictive groove, one again related to anything the previously mention Irish band uncaged on the Shortsharpshock EP or the Troublegum album. Equipped with sludge oppressiveness and acute stoner seeded sonic enticements, the piece is a deliciously enslaving encounter which reinforces the depth and devilish character of the band’s exhilarating sound.

The album is concluded by firstly the sonic grazing of Face the Possessor, a track which fails to find the same eagerness of reactions as its predecessors but still with intimidating jagged riffery and entrancing guitar endeavour leaves ears richly satisfied and the imagination enticed. The final song of the album is its title track, a hypnotic and unrelenting persuasion of doom spawned pressure and bordering on insidious temptation. It is a demonic slice of instrumental alchemy which shows that if ever their frontman lost his voice the band would not disappoint on stage thanks to their absorbing and spellbinding, not forgetting ingenious sonic adventure.

As Electric Hell seduces time and time again, it is hard to imagine that Possessor will go unnoticed for long by fans, media, or even label interest. Now is the time to submit to their diablerie we say, this raw and unpolished gem of an album a thrilling ticket to the start of their inevitable ascending ride.

Electric Hell is available now @ http://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/electric-hell

https://www.facebook.com/possessorband

9/10

RingMaster 10/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

The essence of greatness: an interview with Franky De Smet Van Damme of Channel Zero

CZ Franky

The recent release of Kill All Kings, the new album from Channel Zero, comes after one of the most tragic and devastating times a band or anyone can experience. The death of drummer Phil Baheux left not only the Brussels band but metal itself distraught. After time to recover the band decided to continue and to record the album Phil was set to record with them. What emerged is an encounter which makes for a thoroughly enterprising engagement and makes a fitting tribute to their friend. We had the pleasure to talk with vocalist Franky De Smet Van Damme who kindly shared memories of Phil, as well as telling us about the impact of his sad passing, the new album, approaches to recording and much more…

Hello Franky and thanks so much for sharing your time with us.

You have just released your new album, the irresistibly enjoyable Kill All Kings; it must be an exciting yet also a sad moment for the bad with the album the first release since the loss of colleague and friend Phil Baheux. What are the feelings as the album makes its first steps into the world?

Well it’s a hard step … when you see how much pos vibes we have for that new album … Phil should have been here with us … sometimes it’s hard to get what life brings you … happiness and sadness can be so close together …

 

Phil

Phil

Can we briefly talk about Phil before concentrating on the album. He was a well-loved and rigorously respected musician and man by fans and the metal world, and of course a brother to you guys. Could you give us some insight into the man and his craft?

Well first of all he was a tall man …6 foot …a giant with a heart of gold … when he had it for you… he would have died for you … he had that comic thing in him … he was an 24/7 entertainer … when he was around us we were always hearing him goof around with everybody … it’s so quiet now in studio and on shows … we really miss him so much as a friend, there was no way you missed him when he was there … it’s still hard to get …

It must have been touch and go whether the band continued after his passing. What gave you the strength to continue and push the band on again, which we all know is what he would have wanted?

Well at first it was a hard time, we were so much in shock because he was really in such good shape … and then the next moment you can hardly believe what’s going on … his son of 5 years was always there with us … so much drama. I was out of options … we were about to record the new album 2 days later and as most of you know … that always starts with drums … so we were devastated. One month later we still didn’t know what now … we were still in that hanging phase where we didn’t really knew what, when or where … meanwhile we had had a message through a Belgian fan that met Lars Ulrich who made his condolences to us … and he also said … what happened was so tragic but please move on … Phil would have never want you to stop here … and pretty soon after that we also got that reaching hand from Roy Mayorga (Mikey’s good friend from in Soulfly ) who said if you want to make the album in memory of Phil I want to help you guys out, I’d be happy to do this for you …so we decided to make the album and see from there on, since there was no intention at all that Roy would play drums in Channel Zero. That’s how we got back on the rails.

As mentioned you have just released Kill All Kings, a fiery contagion of thrash and groove infested melodic metal. For us the album sits somewhere between modern thrash and its origins whilst adding its own individual twists. How would you describe its potency?

I think it’s got that look back and respect for the metal machine build-up of riffs and power and at the same time I’m always the guy that looks forward … that combination of Mikey and my pulling forward in ideas works well. It’s the second album now and we start to make things really work together … the music match is also very strong between Mikey and me, so it’s all about vibe and hard work.

I’m always concerned about … what is now … what should be the vibe now … 2014/2015 … I’m not the kind of person who looks back to much …

It is a fair old time since the band’s formation in 1990 of course, a time which included a decade or so long break, so how would you say your sound has most powerfully evolved since those early times and Kill All Kings? Channel Zero - Kill All Kings

That new impact comes from Mikey … he was highly needed in pos vibe and power to make this happen … so I found a music soul mate and a brother at the same time, destiny I think … sometimes things happen without a reason … this had to happen … I call it Channel Zero 2.0 ;-)

Did you have reservations going into the album’s writing let alone recording because there was no Phil to drive the rhythmic provocation?

Well this album was already there before Phil passed away so the songs were created with Phil’s impact … in demo writing we use drum computers to write since we don’t have budgets to record whole demos in studio. What happens is that when songs come together, Phil always kinda followed the drum tracks so we were sure it was something he could go for … it would have been crazy to try to program things that we could not play later on live. So here we were totally there, all songs were chosen to record with Phil …

There was a deeper personal element to songs, lyrically and musically, than ever before on a release this time for you?

Well the impact of Heart Stopped, the song that was kinda of rewritten in „ Angel „ acoustic, was a hard one … Brothers Keeper too … these songs now refer so hard to what happened so that’s really emotional … on the other side I have always written lyrics that have a deep impact or feeling to me …

I have that thing where I want to wake up people’s conscious … always been my intention in writing lyrics.

The recording must have been very hard especially but it sounds on songs that emotion rife in the studio went into a stirring and anthemic passion which soaks the release. Do you feel that too?

Well we want to make songs that kind of stick to the brain … we wrote about 40 of them and when you write more songs you always have more good ones in the end … that’s a thing that probably made all the ones on the album have a certain strength … which they should have.

Impact and dedication … lyric wise and song wise …

Tell us about the songs on the album, Phil’s involvement if at all, and the inspiration for the majority of their themes.

All songs are written by Mikey musically and then I come into the game with feelings … vocal lines … and that is where it moves on … sometimes it falls really fast together, sometimes it goes slow in writing. When things start to pop up at the surface it means it sticks to the brain … so we learned to take time …

We must admit we expected to feel or hear something missing in the rhythmic part of the album, no disrespect to Roy Mayorga who joined you in the studio, but the man nailed it in a different way to Phil but as potently…

I think that’s normal … Roy really listened hard to the demos and he wanted to put his heart and soul into it but off course Phil and Roy have both different playing styles We tried to find that sweet spot with Roy in the studio … to make it work in such a way that Phil would have loved it … we really worked hard in that vibe or direction and it was not easy for Roy to step into someone else’s shoes but he really did such amazing job and impact … all in the memory of Phil … we can’t thank him enough for that …

Having been one of the most notable driving forces of European thrash in the nineties have you felt the need to twist your sound to bring it ‘up to date’ with modern sounds within the genre or has it organically simply evolved for the new album and its predecessor Feed ‘Em with a Brick?

The change was obvious … we had a new guitarist and automatically we moved on to something different but the impact we wanted to give was still a metal impact and sound so Mikey was a dream scenario, even if we didn’t have many things in mind when he joined. The new album has evolved to better songs and also we thought about it way more that F W A Brick … I think that’s an evolution you owe to your fans and yourself also…

There seems to be two camps in regard to modern thrash and its varied flavoursome design, old school fans who hate it and those who devour it eagerly. How have you found responses with a sound which embraces both aspects?

Well as I said before, Mikey embraces that old school metal vibe which he understands really well as a metal guitarist … and on the other side I’m always open for new things …and the mix was important too, I made some decisions that had to be done and I think we made a move that kinda made it work … I mean by work it gets accepted really well so I hope we can surprise people with our 2014 album ….

Channel Zero - Band Photo 2014 #3 - Photo Credit Tim TronckoeWith plenty of albums under your belt, have expectations over the way you approach recording new records changed over time?

Yes it has … bands have less and less budget and ways to record without making any comments on the downloading thing …

With no income anymore for most bands out of the fact their music gets copied … it gets more and more complicated to bring it on.

I always say … if you have 3 months time or 3 weeks time to build a house … which house will be the most finished? Working on music still brings in the fact it will probably be stronger as a song …

I still believe that producers make a big difference also, their knowledge is inevitable but who can still pay a decent producer and pre-producer so all these things matter. The band has to have a certain strength but on the other side the people that work on your music also have their talents and qualities so I still believe in the strength of working together … not in making an album in your living room and selling it on your own. A couple of exceptions out of the world-wide market maybe make it work like that but 98% of the majority of the bands they only work like that …

Do you still get the same buzz?

Well if you write good songs you hopefully get good reviews etc. … if the music talks the rest walks, I still believe in that…

You released Electronic Cocaine as the first single from the album, strong bait to the album for sure; tell us about its background and creation.

Its lyrical content is about the addiction we all have on the social media and internet … it’s a American term for people being hooked on internet and the fact that our brain needs the dopamine of getting tickled, when we receive less messages our brain is disappointed … it’s a typical human reaction but we can’t live anymore without the net and that’s where that lyric goes all about, about the fact we all are hooked without realizing it anymore. For me the song has that strong verse pre-chorus chorus impact … I really love that song personally, it is a favorite for me …

Roy Mayorga was only involved in the recording of the album, so what is ahead in the rhythm department for the band?

We are not going to replace Phil … we will play with drummers that will take his seat; we are not ready to have a fixed drummer on Phil’s seat. It’s too emotional ….same for band pictures with someone new … it’s a bit more complicated than you should think

And for the band as a whole, live shows?

Well in the meantime … Seven Antonopoulos plays drums live and he is making a great job helping us out. He is a great drummer and awesome person, we are so grateful he is there for the moment. We hope we can get on tour any time soon with Kill All Kings; we get really great reviews everywhere so when we are getting the possibility to tour … we will get on that bus…

Thanks again so much for chatting with us, any last thought you would like to add?

Thank you for checking us out and thank you for taking a spin on our new album … and if we convince you, come to a show to see Channel Zero live … and thank you for all your messages of respect for Phil .

Looking back at the writing and making of Kill All Kings, is there one overriding aspect or emotion which marks its moment in time for you?

Phil’s passing should not have been there … life is precious … keep that in mind, live your life to the fullest because it can be over before your realize. Happily Phil lived his life at 200 M/Hour … I’m happy he did, he was a great person and awesome brother.

Read the review of Kill All Kings @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/channel-zero-kill-all-kings/

www.channel-zero.be

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 23/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/