Deadfall – The First Harbinger

Band Photo

Us progressive metallers Deadfall has come a long way since their striking debut the New Light EP of 2011. Then the creation and duo of guitarist Eddie Kim and bassist Sean Dusoe, the band instantly impressed whilst showing a rich potential within their instrumentals which was realised much more with the following Sentinel EP. By then a sextet, the Massachusetts band pushed on their already enthralling potency and explored to great effect the elements which within its predecessor were still in its infancy. Utilising vocals and a fuller climate of invention and sound, the second EP set a benchmark for the band which their new album The First Harbinger emulates and at times takes to richer and incendiary levels. There is a rawer intensity to the release which roars through the accomplished fusion of progressive metal and djent rapacity but also a maturity and conciseness to the intricate weaves of sonic ideation and varied vocal incitement. There is arguably nothing ground-breaking on the album, an achievement you feel is within the potential of the band as The First Harbinger seduces and gnaws on ears, but few encounters bred from the same genre have left as lingering a temptation and pleasure this year.

As mentioned the Watertown based Deadfall initially was an instrumental duo taking inspirations from the likes of Periphery, TesseracT, Meshuggah, Cloudkicker, and Animals As Leaders into their invention but it was with the addition of vocalist Chris Greene that arguably their sound suddenly found its most potent substance. Whereas the first EP gave the imagination and emotions a hunger for the horizons of the band it was the fuller and rounded endeavour of Sentinel which set sparks flying. Completed by guitarist Kyle Brennan and drummer Marc Brennan, the band easily thrilled and set up an eager anticipation for their debut full-length. Created by the core trio of Kim, Dusoe, and Greene, The First Harbinger is at ease ripping and twisting chunks out of the senses or soaking them in a warm seductive elegance, at times succeeding in doing both at once. It is a loud declaration from the band, one you suspect to push Deadfall into the brightest spotlight within progressive/technical metal.

The release opens with the instantly intriguing Death Code. From its first second the track sparks in the imagination, an opening entwining of raw riffs honed into a magnetic groove enslaving attention and an appetite already lying in 10574487_876700945693086_3261663937080269052_nwait because of those earlier releases. Once it expels its muscular breath and explodes with a torrent of djent inspired antagonism and agitated sinew swinging rhythms, the track comes alive with contagious hostility and compelling bait. The vocals of Greene roar with angst and passion, squalling over every syllable yet hinting at the seductive mellowness he also processes in his delivery. With a great carnivorous throat to the bass and its gripping invention, and a similarly predacious temperament to the guitars, the track is a dramatic protagonist which intimidates and seduces with equal tenacity. That smooth vocal charm of Greene does make its appearance within the song, that moment offering Palms like enticement within the otherwise rigorously aggressive tone of the track. It is a scintillating start to the encounter soon backed up by Sentinel.

The second track is just as creatively imposing and skilfully imaginative with Greene soaring melodically over the jagged enticement of Kim’s guitars and the rawer captivating weight of Dusoe’s bass. Though in many ways the song is a kinder less forceful provocation than its predecessor it still carries a menace and flirtation which entwines to create a riveting and imposing adventure. It is hard to avoid references to Deftones with the song but also thoughts takes whispers of TesseracT and Meshuggah into what is nevertheless a distinctly fresh and thrilling encounter. The same applies to The Divergence, the following track kissing the senses with an opening shimmer of crystalline melodies and warm enchantment before sculpting a voracious spine of jagged riffs and incitement through their middle. The song flows and lurches with an enticing which bruises as potently as it seduces, Greene mixing up his outstanding delivery whilst his colleagues produce a severe and absorbing tango of hungry sounds.

Both In Death’s Path and Sirens ensure the album continues to find a new facet and twist to its provocative storm of enterprise, the first searing ears with a tightly wound binding of acidic and grooved animosity over which caustic vocal squalls roar and rage as rhythms prowl through the emerging scenery. It is a strong and appealing challenge but comes truly alive with the quirky melodic toxicity which weaves within the tempestuous onslaught. It gives the song a depth and invention which its successor takes to its heart, its emotive beauty and melodic eloquence living up to its title as it paints another distinct venture within the album.

Shades Of Inception works on synapses next, its opening knot of sonic manipulation and coarse vocals with a seeming intent to brawl an attention grabbing entrance. The cleaner approach of Greene amidst equally softening textures provides an attractive landscape though it is within unpredictable and turbulent walls of djent fuelled riffs and punchy rhythms. It is a skilful merger which lets both extremes flow and shine with clarity even though locked in each other’s determined arms. The track’s mesmeric ingenuity is emulated by Visage, its own fusion of both climates seamless and invigorating for ears and emotions. The bass of Dusoe again finds a dark presence which simply lures complete attention though not to the detriment of the crusading and battling opposites of sound created by Kim. Though it does not spark in the passions as rigorously as previous tracks, it still leaves a lust for more.

The band gives the listener a chance to catch their breath with brief instrumental Orca which is strong and enjoyable but not really adding much more to the release, before the next up Utopia reveals its transfixing soundscape. The bass instantly steals ears and passions with its bestially rapacious sound which is soon joined in success by atmospheric melodies and a caustic yet elegant range of ravenous riffs and immersive sonic hues. With thumping rhythms framing the gentle but forceful maelstrom, the song soars as it explores its glorious depths and the listener’s imagination. The track on its own shows just how far Deadfall and their sound has evolved, it a mighty proposition which envelopes and inspires with majesty and passion.

The album is completed by firstly New Light, a track which brings essences of Between the Buried and Me to its incendiary and breath-taking wash of melodic and evocative grace locked in a tempestuous and at times severe climate of aggressive artistry. It is followed by the nine minute long Harbingers: Dawn, a song which encapsulates and draws all the potency and qualities shown across the album into one unique and epilogue like conclusion. It is a formidable and thrilling end, if arguably a couple of minutes too long for personal wishes, which leaves The First Harbinger on a plateau just as lofty as it began and to be fair maintained for the main across its journey.

Deadfall are ready to join the big boys of progressive metal on the evidence of The First Harbinger, its sensational body as invigorating and exciting as anything the genre has offered this year.

The First Harbinger is released on August 5th. For more info http://www.facebook.com/deadfall1

http://deadfall.bandcamp.com

9/10

RingMaster 04/08/2014

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Betraying The Martyrs – Phantom

BTM Picture HD

As undeniably compelling as it is, Phantom the new album from Betraying The Martyrs is also a bit of an odd beast to digest and get excited about. At times it roars with an invention which sends tingles down the spine and in other moments inspires sighs of disappointment, yet for those lesser moments where its persuasion flounders, they are more often than not swiftly followed and consumed by twists and ideation which leaves the passions ablaze once again. It is a release which maybe too often leaves thoughts unconvinced but it also provides a deeply intriguing and insatiable satisfaction in its turbulent wake which is impossible to ignore or dismiss.

The Paris based sextet of vocalist Aaron Matts, guitarists Baptiste Vigier and Lucas D’angelo, bassist Valentin Hauser, drummer Mark Mironov, and keyboardist/vocalist Victor Guillet forge a sound reaped from the strenuous depths of extreme metal, djent, Metalcore, hardcore, and progressive metal, though that is still only a hint of their tempestuous creativity and sound. The success of debut album Breathe In Life pushed the band into an intensive spotlight especially in North America which you can only see Phantom fuelling further and to a greater spread across the metal scene. Released via Sumerian Records, the album is in many ways summed up by opening track title Jigsaw, not only in sound but in that tracks feel like their elements and ideas are slotted together, generally seamlessly but with the occasional piece in the wrong slot.

Phantom is also an open progression from its predecessor, reaching deeper into and expanding the essences found upon Breathe In Life whilst infusing new twists and imagination. Jigsaw instantly descends on ears with antagonistic rhythms and jagged riffs, their attack predatory and controlled within a brewing sonic rapacity. The song is soon releasing the handbrake though as guitars tear way at the senses with snarling riffs and scything hooks bleeding death metal malevolence and metalcore vitriol. It is a quick contagion which flourishes further with gutturally spawned vocals aligned to a cleaner suasion of voice. It is not a startling start to the album and though certain aspects like the coarse vocals and melodic respite is strained at times, the track is a thoroughly captivating encounter with flirtatious temptations within its smothering wall of sound and aggression.

The following Where The World Ends opens with a classically seeded piano caress aided by clean vocals and a dramatic ambience which is as suggestive as it is enveloping. It is an outstanding start which rises in weight and intensity Coverwith rolling heavy footed rhythms and the evolving growling vocals of Matts, already showing himself to be a formidable vocalist. In no time the seductive start is a maelstrom of viciously flung rhythms and sonic fever equipped with splinters of sonic spite and djent spawned hostility. Again, with a demonic tone to the vocals which easily slip into a cleaner lilt at times, the track ignites the imagination and senses potently as the album continues to grow and increasingly impress, though the fade-out is annoying and for personal tastes always lazy.

Walk Away swaggers in next with an agitated gait within evocative keys to make a strong and potent start, guitars and bass again unleashing their volatile sinews to skilled and resourceful effect. The soaring harmonies and orchestrated climb which emerges from the ravenous entrance of the track soon defuses the striking impact, leaving thoughts lost and unsure in the unexpected turn of the song. Though perfectly and fluidly infused, there is an unsatisfactory feel to the move with the returning animosity of sound eagerly welcomed, especially with its twisted hooks and senses scorching vocal causticity. It is undeniably a powerful track but one almost trying too hard to be different and exploratory which leaves it prone to an unconvincing offering just as with next up Let It Go. The band’s latest single is cover of the song from the movie Frozen, and epitomises the album in many ways. Its melodic start is soon under a carnivorous swamp of metalcore ingenuity and savagery which leaves ears and passions ablaze yet then proceeds with admittedly great clean vocals to temper its assault with a melodic balladry to which the hoarse vocals lose their potency. The track has proven a fan favourite it seems but left us cold and totally underwhelmed, though there were still elements which enthralled.

Both the atmospherically haunting instrumental L’abysse Des Anges with its beautifully sculpted melodies and grooves within a rising climactic breath, and the incendiary storm of Phantom (Fly Away) bring appetite and emotions back into the sturdy lure of the album. Featuring Gus Farias of Volumes, the second of the two is a bestial predator of a track, leering at and gnawing over the senses with uncompromising rhythms and ferocious riffery, both aspects sharp and antagonistic beneath the spread of vocals. There is also a maturity and in places a reserve to the song which sets it apart from most others on the release, and proves the depth of potential within the band.

What’s Left of You is another to stir up the imagination and a fresh breath of hunger for the proposition, its barbarous presence underpinned by a great swinging yet understated groove. Keys provide a delicious drama and adventure to the adversarial climate of the track, merging in the creative rabidity with radiant enterprise and unpredictability. Whereas the mix of extremes failed to impress within the likes of Walk Away and Let It Go, here everything fuses gloriously proving that when Betraying The Martyrs get it right they have the potential to set new standards.

From the ok instrumental Afterlife with its epic nature and melodic poise, the pinnacle of the album erupts. Legends Never Die is a monster of a track, crippling riffs and viciously swiping rhythms bringing body and senses to their knees whilst grooves wind tenaciously around the inhospitable spine of the savaging. The thrilling keys of Guillet provide misaligned colour to the fury at times whilst in other moments flowing, as the clean vocals, magnetically through the voracious predation of the track. It is a masterful brute of a song though it is another, and far too many on the album, which simply fades away as if the band do not know how to end its design.

The final quartet of songs on Phantom, ebb and flow in their success with firstly Lighthouse a track which alone thrills and deflates across its barbarous terrain though it is more the former to be fair. The following brief instrumental Your Throne leads into the sadistic and enthralling landscape of Our Kingdom, a full on tempest which at times loses its definition of elements such its corrosive assault but matches that with some rich flights of melodic and inventive textures to chain thoughts and attention rigidly. It is a track which leaves you wanting more which the final song Closure Found is happy to provide with its similarly structured and uniquely flavoured tsunami of intent and voracity. As mentioned earlier when the band gets it right they excel, and to be fair on Phantom they do more often than not come up with richly pleasing successes.

It is not a classic album or one to set the passions blazing consistently but Betraying The Martyrs is not a band to short change on imagination and brave exploration which makes Phantom for all its ‘issues’ an easy to devour and recommend encounter.

Phantom is available now via Summerian Records @ http://www.merchconnectioninc.com/collections/betraying-the-martyrs

https://www.facebook.com/WeAreBetrayingTheMartyrs

7.5/10

RingMaster 31/07/2014

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Idols of Apathy – Unheard Words

IOA Promo

Unleashing a sonic cyclone of unwavering hostility and technical victimisation, Unheard Words the debut EP from UK metallers Idols of Apathy is one formidable and gripping slab of creative savagery. As striking as it is vicious, the release explains with ease why there is a healthily buzz brewing around the band. It is not without aspects which prevents it making an even more major impact but with a raging potential and openly impressive craft to its sound and textures, it is easy to raise excited anticipation of big things for the band ahead.

Hailing from Essex and uncaged in 2013, Idols Of Apathy probably could not have made a more attention grabbing assault on the senses to start off their consumption of the country’s senses than with Unheard Words. Five tracks across a fifteen minutes furnace of sound and aggression, the release is a short bludgeoning shock to the system but one which does leaving a lingering impression and hunger in thoughts and appetite. It certainly takes work to explore and reveal the intricacies and superb skilled invention at play, its thick surface similarity to an arguably formula attack of songs already having fallen short in the opinion of some others, but dive into the eye of the storm and that is where songs and Idols of Apathy excel and surprise.

The EP starts off with brief instrumental Rebirth, a piece which enthrals from its first seconds with a melancholic ambience and melodic wistfulness, soon graced further by a harmonic haunting. It seduces senses and imagination before Artworkthe staggered djent charm and tenacity of the guitars within viciously stabbing rhythms ravage the air. That initial mesmeric beauty still persists though as it settles seamlessly into the portentous tempest stirring ruggedly around it. That intimidating suggestion is swiftly realised with Death Row. The corrosive vocal roar of Jack Paul Dervish explodes in ears first, matched by the ferocious backing tones of Dean Chignell whose guitar, alongside those of Tom Johnson and Joe Gregory, collide in an ear splitting maelstrom of intensive and technical voracity. As much as the track seemingly is intent on annihilation of the senses, there is a swagger and a budding nest of grooves poised and hinting in the belly of the fury. It swiftly makes for an intriguing and riveting encounter, to which the returning melodic call from the instrumental adds a rich emotive hue . It is a stunning track which continues to reveal new corners and depths within its bestial rage; every breath and twist a punch and treat for ears but within a frame of less than three and a half minutes there is no time for excess and showing off, not that you ever feel the band has the urge to go into that kind of indulgence.

The dramatic and impressive encounter is backed up by the just as imposing The Devil’s Clock Tower. That earlier comment about similar touches of songs is evident here as the rhythmic and guitar enterprise bleeds into what came before without close attention, even with the evocative sonic coaxing in their midst. As it grows and digs deeper into its intensive heart though, the guitars sculpt an individual web of temptation whilst the bass of Elliot Black in league with the ear drum puncturing beats of drummer George, brutalise and seduce in equal measure as the vocals again provide a caustic challenge to sink teeth into. As all songs, it is not just about the maliciousness though, the atmospheric fire and melodic colour drenching the track being as provocative and imaginative as its inhospitable drive and passion.

The release is concluded by firstly Ventriloquist, a track which filters its predatory animosity through a maze of scything riffs and mouth-watering ideation. The rhythms refuse to have a veil of course, their crippling designs and hard fisted rabidity resourcefully vengeful and as irresistible as the sonic binding and aggravated riffery working away on the passions. It is a fine torturous confrontation which is matched by the closing Deceiver, which as the previous song comes from distant scenery but this time simply takes the senses in its teeth and musically and vocally flails and tears their security to shreds. It is a devastating onslaught with strangely a touch of Mudvayne to it initially before the track unleashes another creative blend of metalcore and technical metal to engross and violate ears. It is a powerful and viciously engaging protagonist bringing the EP to a potent end.

Unheard Words is a commanding and impressive debut which leaves thoughts in no doubt to the promise and quality of Idols of Apathy. For sure it has that to be honest minor issue of tracks sharing certain aspects of their identities and it is fair to say that their sound just now fails to really stand out against the best similarly styled, aggression clad bands pushing the genre. Idols of Apathy though easily stand in the company of most of that crop with all the potential to find their lone voice in the future with you imagine even more impressive endeavours.

The Unheard Words EP is available now as a free download @ http://idolsofapathy.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/IdolsOfApathy

8.5/10

RingMaster 25/07/2014

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Vile Regression – Empires

Vile Regression Promo 2014

Irish metallers Vile Regression are no strangers to acclaim, their debut release coming under eager praise but you can only feel that it was fore play for a much stronger and fevered attention once new EP Empires consumes ears. The release is a stunning onslaught of sonic voracity forged in the imagination of technical metal and ferocity of extreme metal in its broadest diversity. The band has inspired comparisons to the likes of Death, Opeth, and Gojira, and listening to Empires it is understandable but whereas at times other technically fired bands bewitch with their skills before falling into indulgences, Vile Regression sculpt real slabs of brutal invention. Their tracks are built on riffs and grooves which come with lethal hooks and melodic tempting, all aspects treated with the same love and attention as the technical alchemy at work. This is openly evident in Empires, a clutch of songs which leave ears gloating and passions bulging.

The seeds of the Dublin band began back in 2007 when brothers Barry (guitar) and Kenn Christie (bass) formed a band which went under a few names for early demos until settling as Visitor Q and releasing a debut EP to strong responses. 2010 saw the addition of drummer Robb Behan and the band name changing to Vile Regression. The Pattern Evolves EP was unveiled the following year to, as mentioned, keen critical praise, its success leading to the band landing support slots with bands such as Dyscarnate and Fleshgod Apocalypse. A line-up change saw vocalist Padraig Croke and guitarist Brian Brady joining the brothers and Behan in 2013, which was followed by a support slot with Unearth and subsequently the recording of Empires. It has been a strong rise for the band over the years but with the new release it would be hard to be surprised if the band now found itself to the fore of extreme metal such its triumph.

Ears are immediately challenged as opener Tides confronts their anticipation, thumping rhythms grabbing instant attention to which swirling sonic endeavour sparks the imagination. It is a potent lure which evolves into a fiercely front_coverrousing tempest as the swipes of Behan trigger a maelstrom of bass intimidation, raging vocals, and senses binding sonic causticity. It is a dramatic and feverish incitement which never loses its irresistible lure even under the cascading, creatively carnivorous technical exploration of the band. It is a seamless union, one as mentioned which feels united in every intent rather than elements trying to outshine others. Between the Buried and Me comes to mind during the track but only as a spice to something scintillatingly original.

The following Raze the Complexity similarly needs little time to inflame the senses, guitars dancing seductively and with agitated endeavour across ears as the grouchy growls of Croke spill hope linked animosity. It is increasingly magnetic bait which only increases its toxicity as the guitars flirt with the imagination through ingenious designs and craft. Just as masterfully contagious though are the merciless and adventurous rhythmic incitement of Behan and the corrosively riveting riffs of bass and guitar. Not one note or twist in the song comes without scintillating creative tenacity but it never dips into the realms of excess either, every alignment of savagery and technical enthralment a gripping and easily accessible drama.

The brief instrumental Dream of the Red Chamber allows a breath to be swallowed, though its melodic beauty then takes away the next before moving into the outstanding predacious storm of Thought Replication. The new track lurches with a sonic tempting which swiftly enslaves appetite and emotions. Sinew driven riffs add ravenous shadows to ever grizzled and compelling vocals, whilst the emerging creative emprise spreads elegant and mouth-watering tendrils. Not as intensively aggression as the first pair of tracks, the song bellows at and charms the senses in equal measure, their fluid union a through captivation from ear to passions.

It is hard to relay the skills at play and the even more impressive merger of that brilliance into the grooving almost bestial rapacious heart of this and other songs, that ridiculously thrilling success repeated and enhanced with The Abstract. For all the references which flirt with thought across the release, this song also imposes a veining of inhospitality which could be Ferium or Killswitch Engage bred , this again showing the broadness and depth of the band’s sound. The track continues to gnaw on and subdue the senses, its ferocity coming with a rabidity which is flirtatious and speared with staggered and jagged unpredictability and ear teasing sonic fascination.

Another mesmeric instrumental sooths next, Down to a Sunless Sea as radiant as the previous piece, before final track raises its rhythmic ire and sonic fire to sear and assault with glorious invention. The Empyrean Divide explores thoughts and soul with a rich Opeth/Death spiced, heavily shadowed breath. There is an even more menacing darkness and imposing grudge to the proposition but again it’s devouring only leads to brighter prospects echoed by lyrics and the melodic maze of invention veining and entwining the raw onslaught.

The final track is a thunderous close to an exceptional encounter, one which puts Vile Regression firmly on the frontline of progressive/technical extreme metal releases this year. Empires declares the band a new emerging leading light, a proposition the metal world has unknowingly been eagerly waiting for.

The Empires EP is available now!

http://vileregression.bandcamp.com/album/empires

www.facebook.com/vileregression

10/10

RingMaster 21/07/2014

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Beneath Dead Waves – Inertia

Beneath Dead Waves Online Promo Picture

There is a storm brewing within UK metal and it comes in the thrilling shape of London based quintet Beneath Dead Waves. The quintet has just unleashed debut album Inertia, a thunderous and magnetically diverse slab of modern antagonism which is one of the most potential soaked exciting introductions to a band in a long time. It is a monster of a release, an encounter mauling and gnawing the senses but equally seducing with a technical craft and striking imagination which ensures swift allegiance to its call. There is also an undefined vein of familiarity to the proposition which brings a kinship to the unpredictable and ruggedly inventive exploits unveiled. Inertia is not the greatest album this year but right on the frontline of the most thrilling.

Beneath Dead Waves was formed in 2007 in Dorset by vocalist Joey Draper, guitarist Doug Cartwright, and drummer Leigh Costanza, the trio bringing the inspirations of band such as Between The Buried And Me and Tool into their creative whirlpool, as well as varied styles from thrash to groove and nu to progressive metal. The result as evidenced by Inertia is a rigorous persuasion which though holding familiar aspects, is still a unique incitement. The band relocated to London spending the next few years writing and recording before finding guitarist Matt Reeves and bassist Chad McCamlie, whose recruitment brought the band a new depth and potency in sound. Last year saw the band igniting stages and playing with the likes of Monuments, Intronaut, and Scale the Summit, and before its end the single Imperfect released to acclaim and eager appetites. Inertia is the next mighty step in the ascent of the band, one impossible to ignore or not find a forceful hunger for as well as what comes next from the five-piece.

The release opens with Nemacyst, the song taking mere moments to intrigue and fire up attention with its initial swirling graze of guitar Beneath Dead Waves Cover Artworkswiftly joined by dramatically textured riffs and demanding rhythms. Setting down its frame, the song erupts into a thrash fuelled rampancy driven by the raw vocal squalls of Draper, his tones an appealing irritant to match the nagging surge and intensity of the guitars. It is a stirring start which only strengthens its lure when Draper switches to clean a delivery, the frontman showing impressive prowess in both his attacks, and a weave of technical resourcefulness from the guitar. Admittedly on first listens the impressively skilled flourishes felt out of place, walking the wrong side of showing off within the rapacious turmoil, but though here it still does not quite convince, across the album the stunning skills and invention only warm a lustful want for more. The song continues to twist and flirt with ears and thoughts as it crosses it’s almost eight minutes of compelling adventure, painting a startling landscape of expressive ingenuity across an aggressive canvas. It is a stunning start straight away backed up by its successor.

Delirium similarly comes out with all guns blazing, riffs and rhythms crowding senses as a sonic toxin coaxes the imagination. Establishing its intent, a step into a slower predatory stalking ensues, guitars and vocals prowling ears whilst bass and drums draw an intimidating bait to further the seduction. As its predecessor the track swerves into unexpected detours and inventive asides, all seamlessly sculpted and each imposing new narratives and textures to contemplate. As all songs those earlier mentioned influences add spice to the maelstrom but equally here and more so through other songs, you can hear slithers of bands like Dillinger Escape Plan, Korn, Lamb of God, and Exodus at play, though ultimately it is something individual to Beneath Dead Waves.

Both the compelling Deliriant and the title track grip the tightest hold of attention and appetite, the first a hypnotic mesh of dark seduction and rabid hostility which bewitches and violates simultaneously. It is a glorious and exhaustive tempest of merciless attitude and creative intensity, riffs scything across senses whilst rhythms badger and pummel their walls further. It is a formidable provocation to which the again dual vocal incitement of Draper, alluring shadows, and a searing solo cast rich tempting hues. Its successor soothes the bruising with a gentle opening, guitar and keys a warm caress courted by the darker but no more intrusive tone of the bass. With clean vocals adding their tender touch, the song is an elegant breeze though soon prone to eruptions of expressive causticity and sonic abrasing. Again there is a web of technical resourcefulness holding the imagination, taking the listener deeper into a storm gathering weight and passion within the alluring terrain. Eventually that pressure breaks for an equally tempting flame of thrash bred suasion veined by sonic spires, though one bred with melodic and stoner-esque colouring. It is another forcibly convincing emprise of sound and thoughts, the album growing with every breath and song into a mighty marker for the band.

Next up You Were Nothing pushes into a heavier rock fired premise, the vocals of Draper clean but equipped with a great growl which easily slips into his caustic side whilst the guitars groove and court the passions with a smoothly evolving and changing intent. Not the strongest song on the release compared to its companions, the track still pleasingly shows the potent and richly pleasing diversity of the band in songwriting and sound as it makes way for the outstanding Imperfect. It is easy to see why the single lit fires in so many people and the media. From its first Korn like bait, the track just grows and towers over ears with a bitterness soaked antagonism and harsh smothering of riffs. As always it is just a moment in a constantly moving onslaught, clean vocals and melodic crooning worming in on the persuasion as technical enterprise fires up its invention. It is a scintillating encounter, the band merging styles and flavours with creative alchemy so that the song alone sparks determined interest in its creators whilst within the context of the album it shines like an anthemic beacon within a raging fire.

Inertia is completed by firstly the virulent and emotive hurricane of A Life Worth Taking and lastly the excellent fiercely yet seductively impacting Suppressional. The track brings hints of Josh Homme inventiveness into a melodic rock embrace which itself is encased in an agonizing swamp of metallic and vehement kissed voracity. It is a stunning end to a striking release, a last showing of the already impressive and sure to grow to greater heights, craft and invention of the band. They and their sound can only get better which is a thrilling thought, one you suspect a new army of fans will also have for Beneath Dead Waves from now on.

Inertia is available now via Nemacystem Records through all stores.

http://www.beneathdeadwaves.com/   

https://www.facebook.com/beneathdeadwaves

9/10

RingMaster 30/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Room Colored Charlatan – Primitives

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Every now and then we come across a release which certainly impresses and is very easy to recommend but at the end of the day just does not excite as much as it should and that is just the case with Primitives the new album from US metallers The Room Colored Charlatan. Musically and emotionally the encounter is glorious and technically bewitching but for all the moments which have thoughts basking and imagination captivated without reserve, for us it fails to light a fire in the passions. It is still very easy to suggest exploring its stylish merger of progressive and technical metal filtered with the voracity of extreme metal aligned to soaring ambiences, as it is a fascinating and striking adventure.

Hailing from Indiana, the quintet has been compared to the likes of Between The Buried And Me and The Contortionist, two bands which indeed have inspired The Room Colored Charlatan along with the likes of Painted In Exile, Born Of Osiris, Veil Of Maya, and Animals As Leaders. Listening to the new album you can see what breeds those references though equally there is plenty about the release which sets the band apart. Building and increasing their reputation live, playing with bands such as TesseracT, Veil of Maya, Born Of Osiris, and The Contortionist over the past years, the band brought concentrated attention upon themselves with debut album Between Mirrors: The Quantum Immortality in 2012 which was released, as the new album, on Subliminal Groove Records. Primitives take all the qualities of its predecessor into new expansive dramas and evocative climates, across sceneries which roar and claw at the senses whilst seducing with a melodic and atmospheric beauty. Inspired by the theme ‘that humankind is not as civilized or as modern as we like to think’, the album is an epic imposing journey broken up into individual musically poetic chapters.

A chilled breeze around a lone guitar opens up the album and Instinct, and it is a beckoning soon full of melodic intrigue and rhythmic Primitives-covresonance as the song grows into full view. It is a hypnotic entrance potently luring in attention before the grizzled vocal delivery of Jared Bush brings a raw imposing into the creative elegance already cast by guitarists Justin Seymour and Brent Edelson, his presence seemingly a spark for an expanding intensity which stalks with djent seeded stabs, oppressive breaths, and rapacious shadows. The weave of melodic enterprise becomes more acidic but still seduces within and tempers the more vocal tempest of sound. It is an enthralling proposition, the composing and craft of the band alone gripping as the soundscape of the sonic narrative consumes the imagination.

The starter evolves into the brief and invigorating instrumental Native Habitat, guitars and drums sculpting a mouthwatering terrain for thoughts to explore before it then flows into the following Apex Predator. The rhythmic enterprise of Adam Dixon swiftly has its heavy skilled hand on a definite appetite for the impending adventure as a sonic web spins an absorbing and perpetually shifting picture, one nicely courted by constantly dark and agreeably imposing bass hues from Michael Miller. As the track permeates thoughts the aggressively caustic growls of Bush fail to sit easily but to be fair it is just down to personal taste, just like eyes maybe lack a kinship to the colour green, at times his delivery fails to persuade our ears. It is no reflection on his presence and attack but to our loss it does defuse some of the might of what is an impressive track, especially its vivaciously ravenous climax.

The intensively bruising emergence of the title track has senses rocking back on their heels next rugged riffs and similarly predacious rhythms badger and assault before an entrancing melodic mesh wraps the heart of the song, caressing and soothing the sores spawned by the formidable and pleasing storm. The subsequent body of the track does not quite inspire as its entrance but again the individual skills combine for an almost romantically colourful view of an intimidating premise.

Keys make another potent and important texture to the album, none more so than within Questions of Origin, their vigorously simmering dazzle impregnating another virulently aggressive, almost rabid exacting landscape. With guitars searing as they simultaneously entwine the senses in melodic beauty, the track is one which lights a fuse to more keen ardour alongside again nothing but impressed respect for the album so far; oh and note Bush is exceptional too, his bordering vicious snarl resting very nicely in the ears, yes we like to be contrary.

The sweeping synth grandeur within the following Survivalist Notion soon captivates whilst beneath riffs grind and chew through ears, the fusion a riveting endeavour which is only accentuated by the first appearance of clean vocals, something the band should definitely explore more ahead. The bass of Miller has its finest hour here, though maybe it is just it is allowed a little more space to enslave away from the smothering tempests it so richly helps create. Like many of the songs, there is very little to criticise or question, though for a still indefinable reason, as the album, it does not ignite the heat of passion it probably deserves.

The Atlas Artifact from its first touch floats and rigorously pursues an epically honed expansive progressive flight, though it is soon perpetually buffeted by clinging almost hostile eruptions and vigorous creative rabidity. The song again unveils exceptional harmonious vocals which once more impress thoroughly whilst the guitar invention and imagination between Seymour and Edelson is breath-taking at times; everything combining for a gripping and highly enjoyable emotively driven conclusion to the main thrust of the album.

Closed by the outstanding bonus track Nexus Point, which as good as steals the album’s pinnacle moment, its voracious enterprise and outright creative aggression savaging and firing up ears and emotions, Primitives is a fine album which only offers impressive bait to acclaim and eager recommendations. The Room Colored Charlatan is potentially a major force in the making, the album makes that easy to say and who knows they might even get us over excited at some point too.

Primitives is available via Subliminal Groove Records and @ http://theroomcoloredcharlatan.bandcamp.com/album/primitives

https://www.facebook.com/TRCCBand      

8/10

RingMaster 23/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Exist Immortal – Darkness Of An Age

Exist Immortal

Build a majestic beast of a proposition from the predatory instincts of Meshuggah and Scar Symmetry, the rapacious technical instincts of Periphery, and the melodic poetry of Circles and you will most likely come up with UK metallers Exist Immortal, though this is not to say that the London quartet does not have its own distinct voice as superbly evidenced by new album Darkness Of An Age. The imposing release is a monster of an encounter, a gloriously adventurous and imaginative journey unafraid to align the darkest vicious shadows with the most radiant mesmeric beauty. Cast over ten explorations, the release alone makes the most compelling reasoning as to why the London quintet is so highly thought of.

Formed in 2011, Exist Immortal have taken little time in establishing a rigorous reputation for their mature and inventive sound as well as their ferocious live performances which has seen the band play UK Tech Metal fest alongside the likes of Textures and Sylosis, as well as making inroads across the UK, Europe, and Asia. The band first stole our eye and attention with their mini-album Dream Sequence at the tail of last year, a tantalising and incendiary fuse for the passions which left thoughts reeling and emotions full. Darkness Of An Age takes the imagination on a heavier and darker exploration than its predecessor, one so intense that first impressions asked questions in its success against the sensational previous release. With every listen revealing new depths, triumphs, and temptations within the brutally seductive offering though, Darkness Of An Age has proven to be another dramatically masterful treat from one of Britain’s most seriously inventive metal bands.

The album emerges through an evocative breeze of keys as opener Insanity Project makes its initial play for ears and imagination; the ei-artwork-hd-2engaging entrance swiftly joined by an equally inviting guitar coaxing. It is crystalline bait which continues to tempt as rhythms punch their rigorous weight within an expanding squall of intensive riffs and a portentous bass sound. Vocally raw growls align to excellent clean tones, the voice of Meyrick de la Fuente ably assisted by that of guitarist Tom Montgomery, just as uniquely impressive and expressive as on the last release. The track continues to twist and spread its inventive toxins around senses and thoughts, immediately feeling angrier and more venomous than those found upon Dream Sequence. The new release sees the band exploring new territory emotionally and lyrically in an impacting move which takes thoughts aback at first but only adds weight and intrigue to the immense start of the album.

The following Legions lays jagged riffery and sonic scythes across the air next, its entrance an acidically fuelled wall of barbarous intent. It soon evolves into a fiery prowl though, clean vocals taking over from the vicious roars as the guitars of Montgomery and Kurt Valencia sculpt a captivating design of uncompromising predation and sinew framed seduction. Flailing with strict muscles and caressing with sultry keys, the track brews a contagion which is as fearsome as it is virulently addictive for the first major pinnacle of the towering adventure. The finale burns like a raging fire before elegantly relenting and making way for the similarly crafted In Parallax. Though ultimately different in character the song is similar to its predecessor at its beginning before worming its way under the skin to develop its own identity with niggling and delicious sonic toxicity beneath potent clean vocals. Skirted by the animalistic voice of David Billote’s bass and the rapier thrusts of Fergus Gardiner’s rhythms, the track emerges as an irrepressible enticement.

There is a heavier involvement of the dark caustic vocal delivery on the album than upon Dream Sequence, a more fifty-fifty split with the mellow soars which works well but whether it brings the same success as the higher clean vocal percentage of the previous release, such the excellence of de la Fuente in that style, is still under debate. Darkness Of An Age has a more malevolent darkness across the board though so it is an understandable move which really shows its potential in the excellent Edge Of Infinity, the track a captivating swirl of progressive investigation within a tortuous metalcore causticity coated by a ravenous voracity speared by djent bred stabs.

Both the enthralling Imperator and the immensely riveting Desolace seize the imagination next, the first sparking greed in an already eager appetite through synths which bring perfectly orchestrated emotion and colour to the tempest before them. Its successor casts a warmer more temperate climate to its storm allowing de la Fuente to sing from the first breath as keys and melodies reinvent the scenery with beauty and startling ideation. It is a mouthwatering invention which courts perfectly the ever poised rabidity of guitars and rhythms which take their share of the plaudits on the album’s highest pinnacle so far. Vocally too, the mix of seduction and violence is spot on, bringing the heart and rich landscape of the song to bear on the listener.

Like a trigger the song seems to ignite the release to stronger adventure, The Participant next unveiling a maelstrom of sonic and vocal ingenuity which thrusts numerous styles into one tempestuously inventive tsunami. The track whips up the passions to an even greater pleasure with its explosive and intelligent ravishment, the song standing side by side with hands on the best track title with the previous glory, though both are soon under pressure for the honour from the excitingly abrasive Embrace The Cycle and the corrosively appealing Liberator which features Sam Rudderforth from The Colour Line. Neither manages to quite live up to the demands but still leave bloated satisfaction in their creative wake whilst the closing brilliance of The Omen Machine ensures the album leaves a final peak foraging senses and emotions with its suitably toxic and endlessly invigorating inventive ferocity.

Though Dream Sequence still just has the edge on the two albums, Darkness Of An Age is a dramatically refreshing and thunderously inventive incitement from a band easy to assume that will have a major say on the future of certainly progressive and technical metal in Europe. Exist Immortal has all the potential to be a major player; the evidence is all there in the album.

The self-released Darkness Of An Age is available now @ http://existimmortal.bandcamp.com/album/darkness-of-an-age

https://www.facebook.com/existimmortal

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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