Hessian/Primitive Man –The Abyss Stares Back #2

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Continuing their series of split releases The Abyss Stares Back which began with the impression union of Amenra and Vvovnds in May; Hypertension Records unveil the second instalment of dark consumption with a two track union between Hessian and Primitive Man. The second of a planned five splits, The Abyss Stares Back #2 brings again exclusive propositions from the two protagonists, a pair of tracks which drag the senses and emotions through cavernous, insidious landscapes but with the sweetest toxic lures which feverishly ignite the imagination and fears.

With future releases in the series to include Nihill, Scott Kelly, Drums Are For Parades, Mathieu Vandekerckhove, and Alkerdeel, Hypertension has already set a gripping standard and presence for the series through #1 and #2, the newest a startling and compelling onslaught of virulent hostile seduction. As all in the series it is wrapped in the artwork of Tom Vanuytrecht and with the photography of Stefaan Temmerman, but consumes and envelops in its own unique voracity with frightening intensity and ridiculously easy success. Both bands on the release are united in the devil’s oppression whilst providing an individual merciless savagery and invigorating violation to maybe unwillingly but certainly rewardingly bask in.

Having been rigorously persuaded by their debut album Manégarmr, appetite and anticipation for Hessian’s contribution to the release hessian (pic Stefaan Temmerman)was keen and swiftly satisfied by the Belgian band and their track Inward Dawn. Consisting of guitarist Levy Seynaeve (of Amenra), drummer Tim Bryon (of The Black Heart Rebellion), vocalist Bram Coussement, and bass player Kenneth Vanhoutte, the quartet threaten as they lumber in upon heavily punching rhythms and a sonic web of antagonism. It is a disarming sweep of sound and confrontation lorded brutally over by the vocal causticity of Coussement but one which swiftly enslaves the passions through the rolling and inciting drum enticement of Bryon. Like a puppeteer he directs and cages the imagination so the scorched sonic endeavour of Seynaeve can layer web upon furious web of deviously captivating and searing design. The repetitious lure of the track aligned to the rapacious rhythms is the prime bait though; it’s intermittent enticement the irresistible spine to which emotional enmity and aural chastisement explores their rich potency and hostile animosity. Gloriously insatiable and contagiously persistent, the encounter is a fall through the depths of organic persuasion, a sirenesque anthem come hymn to the primal core of body and emotion. The track is pure addictive venomous alchemy, Hessian reaching deeper into their rapacious ingenuity than ever before for a seriously hypnotic and ruinous triumph.

primitive man   Primitive Man swamps the senses in a darker corrosive tsunami than the pestilential but voraciously mesmeric suasion of Hessian, though neither you would trust with your soul. Their track Unable takes mere moments to invade and permeate body and feelings, its lumbering sludge tar coating senses and thoughts with suffocating efficiency. As shown on their impressive debut album Scorn, the Colorado trio of Ethan Lee McCarthy, Jonathan Campos, and Bennet Kennedy, venture into the lowest, base primal sounds and provocation, unleashing sonic swarms as lethal and disorientating as the destructive slab of slow rhythms and maliciously devouring intensity beneath. Similar to Hessian though, there is a potent lure of addiction forging enticement working away, warped grooves and anthemic rhythms breaking free just enough to entangle fevered appetite and eager passions with their riveting coaxing. It is often an understated but constantly infectious trapping within the malevolent corners of the song, a potent seducing for the same senses and psyche which are being unrelentingly worn away and viciously smothered by the doom entrenched pestilence. Closing on a brawling tempest of vitriolic energy and punk infused urgency, the track is a towering predator which easily draws submission for its hellacious fury.

Both tracks on the split are exhaustingly glorious, though of the pair Hessian has a toxin which steals body and mind for a truly lingering pleasure. Both also provide stunning introductions to newcomers to the bands and a raw hint of further things to come for fans, each breeding further waves of anticipation. Hypertension Records with their first two episodes of The Abyss Stares Back easily ensure the forthcomings offerings will be eagerly awaited, and with each split pressed on 180gr. vinyl for a one time only release of 500 copies, time procrastinating is the way to missing out on, certainly in the case of #2, one of the year’s finest essential releases.

The Abyss Stares Back # 2 is available now @ www.hypertensionrecords.com.

https://www.facebook.com/Hessianofficial

https://www.facebook.com/primitivemandoom

9/10

RingMaster 01/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Conjuring Noise: The Great Sabatini Interview

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Having inflamed like so many others, our passions with their blistering intensive and thrilling album Matterhorn, Canadian noise metallers The Great Sabatini returned earlier this year with an even greater mouthwatering proposition. Third album Dog Years is a masterful tempest exuding virulently destructive and invasive sonic devilry; an enthralling examination and manipulation of the senses. Not needing to be asked twice, we rifled questions at Sean from the band to discover the depths of The Great Sabatini, talking about origins, lyrical intimacy, musical magick and much more…

Hey Sean good to meet you and thanks for giving over some of your time to chat with us.

Tell us about the birth of The Great Sabatini and the time leading up to the uncaging of the band in 2007?

Hey, nice to meet you too. It’s our pleasure to talk a bit about our dumb selves. All of us came together when bands we were previously in collapsed. We all decided to start moving away from the kind of things each of us had been doing with past efforts, musically. It seemed to come together easily, naturally. We just kind of went with the flow.

How did the four Sabatini’s meet?

Rob and I have been playing music together since we were 15 or so. We’ve played in bands together since that time. We knew Joey from other bands around town, and even shared a jam room together years before we started playing together. We met Steve in Sudbury, 2004 at a really crappy weekend fest that both of our bands at the time were playing. We became fast friends, and the rest is history.

Did the band start out with a specific intent and is that still the same driving force now or has it evolved with your music?

I think the only intent really was to move away from our previous musical comfort zones. Rob and I were used to writing more technical metal things in standard tuning, so there was a focused effort to distance ourselves from that. We bought baritone guitars and started slowing things down naturally, due to the nature of the much lower tuning and feel of the instruments. You can’t be as busy sometimes when you’re playing in a lower register, so riffs start slowing down for clarity’s sake. In regards to intent, it’s the same as it was from day one; keep challenging ourselves to create music that subverts our own comfort zones as artists. It might not be a huge leap from record to record, but there is movement, and growth, with every new project we take on

You sound is a unique brew of noise, sludge, doom, progressive rock…and plenty more. How would you describe it to simplify things?

As a kind of inside joke, we refer to our sound as “swamp trench arithmetic”. Maybe it hints at a sludgy math-rock vibe… Usually I describe us as a sludge band, because for all the variety rolled into our songs, all of it is pretty grimy or sludge-based. The end result is sort of wrapped up in this sludgy package.

We discovered you through your second album Matterhorn, a startling and riveting treat to our ears. How would you say your music and 1964881_815898598424769_284230856_ncreativity has changed and evolved from your first days, through that great album and onto the just released Dog Years?

I think that, as songwriters, we focus on making things simpler; communicating ideas in a simpler way. Part of that is recognising our strengths, and reining them in. We want to include a myriad of ideas and influences into our sound but feed them through our creative process in a way that results in more a more cohesive end result. I suppose one might call it “nuance”… Not something that most folks associate with brutal, loud music, but I feel that there’s more and more depth and nuance to our songs as we go. Matterhorn was the first time I really felt like we’d accomplished a certain level of that in our music. The songs are relatively simple in structure and riffing, and seem straight forward production-wise, but there’s a subtle balance of feels and ideas stitched together throughout. I think Dog Years employs this much better. Taken at face value, it’s a loud, raw, angry record, but there’s a lot going on in the songs, in a way that isn’t like an overt genre mash-up kind of thing.

We feel the brilliant Dog Years, and it is, is less cruel and destructive than its predecessor but has a more intensive and precise examination of the psyche which makes it just as exhilarating and threatening. Is that something you would agree with?

I do agree. Matterhorn was about cruelty and violence and the harshness of life, ‘cos that’s what I felt when I heard the music we were writing. Dog Years, musically and lyrically, is kind of exploring the things that drove us to play music initially. It has some throwback moments with the punkier parts, and maybe it rocks out a little easier. I still feel like it’s a punishing, loud, angry record but maybe you picked up on the focus of the record. It’s hard to tell sometimes, as the creators of the music, how much of what we’re saying is obvious and how much is completely buried in the end result, but Dog Years is more of a look inside OUR heads and our history, to some extent.

Did you approach the writing and recording of your third album in any way differently to the previous release?

Well, we usually do a lot of writing together in the jam room but a few small bits were demoed separately and sent out via email to the guys, and then tweaked and moulded by each of us on our own time. The songs are totally malleable… they can change easily before we hit the studio. In the past, a lot of our material, especially the Matterhorn stuff, was played on the road a lot before it was recorded, so the songs adapted and changed a bit more, but almost all of the Dog Years material was written and then quickly recorded with less time to mutate. Maybe that gave it a bit more immediacy, or urgency.

I guess the studio and recording process is something always bringing new lessons and discoveries which can be used or avoided next time. Was there anything from Matterhorn which had that inspiration and any new things learned with Dog Years?

There’s always a learning curve. We’re always learning things and trying to apply them the next time around. I can’t think of any major things that happened with Matterhorn that wound up shaping Dog Years in an obvious way… we’ve always strived to make things sound more raw, natural or live-sounding on our records and Matterhorn was a nice step in that direction, but Dog Years, I feel, has a bit more of that raw thing going on.

How long was the new album in the making?

We started writing in earnest at the start of 2013. We spent a lot less time on the road that year and really just focused on writing. By December 2013 we were in the studio and by February of this year the record was mastered. It was a pretty quick turnover, for us.

Like a great many bands do you have to struggle and deal with obstacles of everyday life when it comes to creating and certainly recording a record?

Obstacles are always present. But we’ve been a band for almost 7 years and we deal with things together, in a focused manner, quite efficiently. Making records is something we’re always trying to get better at, but we’ve all been doing it for over ten years and our collective experience is constantly being employed to overcome any obstacle. Thankfully, we’re all really good friends, so we’re good at working together to accomplish our goals

There seems an intimacy at times to the lyrical side of your music which suggests inspirations often come from things close to home and personal experiences. Give us some idea of stories or situations to songs upon Dog Years.

Some of the songs relate to people or things in our personal history. Pitchfork Pete is about a guy Rob and I knew many years ago. Some of the songs deal with our rituals, our perception of our lives as romantic black-magick purveyors of the Almighty Riff. When the reality of being a penniless touring musician sets in, the thing that keeps us going is the magic. Music is total magic and we have fun projecting some kind of cartoonish self-importance onto the band. It’s much more fun to think of ourselves as traveling Riff-Warlocks spreading the unholy gospel of Satan through amplified guitar riffs than it is to see ourselves as the jaded, ageing heshers that we ACTUALLY are. We’re following our dreams. Dog Years is a glimpse into that world, we hope. Lyrically it’s all about that… the world we’ve created for ourselves, full of feral beasts, oracles, war-cries, Viking battle-lust and strange visions. But sometimes this kind of fantasy shit collides with the naked truth of our choices in life, and that’s where the “Dog Years” thing comes in. One day, maybe, we’ll be old men looking back on these times as our Dog Years, all that time we spent hammering away at our dreams.

487212_598817973466167_250606339_nHow does the creation of songs more often than not transpire in the band?

More often than not, Rob and I write riffs or ideas in our own time, and then, when we get together, the ideas are presented and everyone puts forth their own takes on the riffs and we arrange the structures together. There isn’t any one mastermind. Everyone’s fingerprints are on the end result.

Is there a particular moment or twist in Dog Years which gives you an extra inner tingle of pride or just satisfaction?

I think each of us probably has his own moment like that, but for me, Akela was one of those. I wasn’t thinking that would be on the record, but the guys heard my demo, and wanted it to be there. It’s a pretty naked thing, for me, to have a song like that on there. There isn’t any wall of noise to hide behind. I recorded that in my room at home and everyone agreed that to re-record it might ruin it. So, I feel pretty happy that Akela is on the final cut.

Tell us about the great ‘scary’ album cover.

We wanted the cover to reflect our childhood in some weird way. We were aiming for an image that looked borrowed, from another time, not from 2014. I made the puppet, and he represents a certain aspect of our collective personality. Rather than actually steal an old image that may have worked just as well, we opted to create this thing ourselves and hopefully imbue that aspect into it in a subtle way. Really, I want people to see it, react to it, and fill it in with whatever feeling they think is best.

The album has been released on the great Solar Flare Records. How did that come about and is it true that the equally brilliant Sofy Major has some inspirational input?

We met Sofy Major first in North America when they came here to make a record and tour a bit and then later when we played with them in France. Sofy Major/Solar Flare are the raddest dudes on the planet, so their interest in Dog Years is incredibly flattering. Those dudes have been through a lot and suffered it all with a smile on their faces so that alone is a huge inspiration to us. Their music is incredible… I don’t wanna butter them up too much, but getting to work within that particular family is a huge privilege.

What is the Montreal metal and rock scene like right now and specifically in regard to your style of creative mayhem?

Montreal is always a hotbed of awesome music. In recent years, more of the sludge, doom, noise-rock and stoner rock stuff has been surfacing, which is nice, but I feel like everyone here is reacting to their surroundings, in a nice way… nobody is trying to sound like anyone else, I feel. Everyone that I know kind of does his or her own thing and tries to blaze their own trail. Sometimes it’s hard to be heard among all the amazing bands and artists, but we have our niche.

What comes next for The Great Sabatini across the rest of 2014?

We’re just about to get home from the first stretch of touring. We’ll probably do a few small things this summer but in the fall we head out again to do some touring in the U.S and then get ready to hit Europe in the spring of 2015.

Once again big thanks for sitting down with us; any final words for us to contemplate?

Thank you for your interest and support. Final words? Ummmmmmmmmmmmm……

And lastly give us an idea of the biggest inspirations on you musically and individually.

Take your basic 80’s/90’s generation stuff, all the grunge, punk, metal and hardcore, and throw our dad’s old Beatles, Zeppelin, Sabbath, and King Crimson records in there too. We’re all just disciples of this great tome of Rock. Finding a nice balance is the hardest part when starting a band, but ALL of that stuff is in our music, and album covers, lyrics etc. You could get real specific and say things like Melvins, Today Is The Day, Helmet, Jesus Lizard, Napalm Death, King Crimson, or what have you, but there’s just too huge a range of stuff influencing us to make for an easy answer.

http://www.thegreatsabatini.com

Read our review of Dog Years @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/02/the-great-sabatini-dog-years/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

 

Electric Taurus/Prehistoric Pigs – 12″ split

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Split releases are invariably a gateway into new striking adventures and intrigue drenched propositions, the awakening of attention to artists seemingly more often than not lying in shadows away from attention. They can be the beginnings of great sonic friendships and in the case of the Electric Taurus/Prehistoric Pigs split from Go Down Records, the announcement of important emerging forces. Consisting of three tenaciously imaginative and vivaciously inventive soakings of stoner/hard/psychedelic rock, the release is a mouthwatering encounter to invigorate the senses and stoke up the passions.

 

First up is Irish band Electric Taurus with their sixteen minute epic Behind The Sun, a glorious exploration through a space rock landscape with ever shifting and expanding scenery. Formed in 2010 as a recording project by guitarist/vocalist Matt Casciani, the Dublin trio went through numerous line-up changes before finding stability with the addition of bassist James Lynch, and drummer Mauro Frison. 2012 saw the band sign with Moonlight Records for the release of debut album Veneralia, a well-received encounter bristling with the inspirations of heavyweight like Black Sabbath, Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple with those of underground bands from the same era such as Buffalo, Leaf Hound, Iron Claw, Primevil, and Captain Beyond. It is only one shade of their sound though as evidenced by Behind The Sun, the sultry sizzling flavouring from bands such as Monster Magnet, Kyuss, Electric Wizard, and Orange Goblin, adding to what is a refreshingly distinct conjuring from Electric Taurus.

Their contribution to the split embraces ears in a sonic web, a spatial entanglement which teases and stimulates the imagination and senses. It is also an intimidating enticement but one with charm and bait to inspire a hunger to dive in deeper, especially when a flirty stride of rhythms burst out of the thick mist with mystique wrapped, fuzz kissed melodies riding their lure. Now within an evocative premise still revealing its intent with unpredictable twists and diversions, the track steadies its pace and experiment to slip into a potent blaze of stoner fuelled sonic endeavour and melodic blues acidity. Binding the ears in rich grooves, provocative rhythms, and a great doom groan, the song paints an emotive journey, which finds its strongest trap for the passions with the entry of guest vocalist Barbara “Babz” Allen of Irish blues rock titans Crafty Fuzz. With a delicious growl to her riveting tones, air and thoughts are brought into a sirenesque harem of syllables and melodic incitement. Her presence also sparks a stronger flame to the sonic thrust and tenacity constantly weaving through the track, resulting in one searing blaze. Again though it is just one turn in the emprise, the song continuing to colour and bewitch ears for a voraciously creative and thrilling escapade sculpted by the skilled and magnetic exploits of each band member. It is a stunning track setting a formidable task for its release companion to match.

Italians Prehistoric Pigs more than put up an enjoyment equalling effort with their two tracks, even if personal tastes does just plump for the previous track as the pinnacle of the impressive release. Hailing from Mortegliano, the trio of guitarist Juri Tirelli, drummer Mattia Pi, and bassist Jacopo Tirelli employ inspirations from the likes of Kyuss, Jimi Hendrix, Sleep, Black Sabbath, and Led Zeppelin into their instrumental incitements. Their sound is a sludge rock rich mix of bracing doom soaked psychedelic alchemy, an earthy mix which paints the imagination and strokes the emotions for individual sonic paintings, as presented on Wormhole Generator, their excellent album of 2012. The Perfection Of Wisdom presents the perfect evidence of their potent weave of sound. Starting with a lone bass lure beneath whispered calls of the song title, the track shapes a compelling ambience with precise melodic hues of guitar, their presence gentle and unhurried as they colour the increasingly smouldering breath of the emerging track. It is a seductive unveiling of the full weight and terrain of the ever impressing piece, rhythms gaining intensity as the sonic enterprise ebbs and flows in insistence before unleashing a voracious flame of imagination and ingenious texture.

It is an enthralling provocative flight of sound and creativity swiftly backed by 79360 Sila-Nunam. Its entrance is subdued and slightly muffled in comparison it its companion but ready and eager from its reserved poise to escape into a climactic burst of intensive sonic wind and rhythmic demands. Grainy in its air and scorching in its touch, the track sizzles with the heat of a Karma To Burn upon Kyuss like desert rock, every note and riff igniting thoughts and emotions for a thoroughly captivating and somewhat corrosive treat.

Electric Taurus and Prehistoric Pigs come together for one of the best split releases in recent years and one of the most exciting psyche/stoner heavy rock releases in recent times. It is an essential doorway into the worlds of two extremely talented and imagination inspiring bands which deserve the fullest attention possible.

The Electric Taurus/Prehistoric Pigs Split is available now on 12″ vinyl format through Go Down Records @ http://www.godownrecords.com

https://www.facebook.com/electrictaurus

https://www.facebook.com/PrehistoricPigs

9/10

RingMaster 20/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Deep Desolation – Rites Of Blasphemy

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Casting a captivating web of sludge and doom drenched black metal ripe with fiery psychedelic grooves Polish metallers Deep Desolation make a very convincing argument for turning to the dark side with latest album Rites Of Blasphemy. The release is a venomous yet irrepressibly magnetic soundscape to a blasphemous occult driven world, an encounter which as the greatest evils has an irresistibility which says all is well as it infests with ruinous intent. It is not always a kind listen though and carries a few niggles which stops it making and even greater impact but from start to finish, Rites Of Blasphemy makes for a compelling and potential soaked enjoyment.

Hailing from Łódź, Deep Desolation was formed in 2009 and within a year creating their debut album. Released via Quid Est Veritas Productions/The End Of Time Records in the February of 2011, Subliminal Visions made for a formidable introduction to the band and its sound. A line-up change followed before the band provided two tracks for the split release Chapel of Fear with fellow countrymen Primal and Iugulatus that same year. From there the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Meriath, guitarist/vocalist Markiz, bassist Piorun, and drummer Wilku, set about working on their second album, a release which steals attention from the outset, never relinquishing its grip until the last note of its demonic fascination.

Rites Of Blasphemy opens with the epic persuasion of Between the Tits of a Witch. From a sinister landscape of disturbing DD coverwhispers within an intimidation ambience, thick predatory riffs and ravenous rhythms seize senses and thoughts as rasping venom fuelled vocals slowly squall over their brewing toxicity. It is an instantly striking and appealing mix which flirts wantonly as it worms around and into the psyche. Acidically sculpted grooves add to the captivating bait, their touch and enticement fiery as they sear air and ears with inventive design. Within the caustic beauty and at times seductive enterprise, there is a threatening underbelly of rabid shadows and merciless malevolence working away led by the raw vocal spite. All combined, the track makes an excellent beginning to the album, a constant trigger for the imagination to erupt from but it does push the limits of its stay at almost ten minutes in length with no major deviations in its concentrated languid prowl.

The following Searching for Yesterday emerges from a potent heavy metal coaxing into a darker rapacious but no less gripping provocation. Riffs and rhythms all carry a heavier intensive weight and throat to their attack and sound, as does the malice seeping vocals, though this is tempered by the spiteful grooves and great individual endeavour of the guitarists. The track has a bestial breathe to its body which is accentuated by the distressing landscape of the instrumental Intermezzo. The piece is a demonic insight into the stomach of hell, a maelstrom of lost souls and suffering sounds which is quite mesmeric and provocative before it leads to the doorway into Blasphemous Rite. Rich transfixing grooves entwine around ears as riffs, aligned to thumping and agreeably challenging rhythms, heavily consume the senses. The song as the album prowls and preys on senses and emotions, a creative predator happy to skirt around and intimidate its victim with riveting lures of sonic adventure and intrusive melodic toxins. Like many of the tracks and again fair to say the release itself, the encounter does not ignite and burn as ferociously as you hope and expect but that cannot prevent it making a sizeable impression and deeply satisfying proposition.

The expansive length and weight of Mroczny Hymn comes next and though it also outstays its effective suasion at over eleven minutes, the track does not fail in taking thoughts and emotions on an intrusive and in many ways a cinematically expressive journey which excites the imagination. The guitar craft is especially inciting and impressive within the tempestuous soundscape, as is the rhythmic stalking, but it cannot prevent the track losing its richest hold on attention more than once across the length of time it engages the ear.

Cuius Regio / Eius Religio offers an almost insidious tone and menace through vocals and the venom infused grooves and hooks which wind around the raw caustic rage of riffs and the just as exacting rhythms. The song’s thrilling slightly pestilential call is swiftly backed up by I Became Your God, a track from the start encroaching on ears with great abrasing ravenous riffs which are soon in league with devious grooves. The track moves through evolving gaits and changing strengths of rabidity as it hunts down emotions for just one more commanding pleasure.

The album closes with the exhaustive weight and predatory oppressiveness of Necromouth, a final track impressing whilst confirming the craft and might of the band’s songwriting and invention. With essences of bands such as Cathedral, Pentagram, and Carpathian Forest to their sound, Deep Desolation is a band fans of sludge, doom, and extreme metal should definitely be checking out.

Rites Of Blasphemy is available via Darkzone Productions now!

https://www.facebook.com/deepdesolation

8/10

RingMaster 06/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cokegoat – Vessel

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If an easy journey with scenic gentleness is the purpose of your musical intent then steering well away from Vessel, the debut album from Chicago sextet Cokegoat is advice to be heeded. The eight track release is a tsunami of imposing yet empowering sounds and invention; a tempest of stoner, sludge, and progressive metal which merges into a dramatically brawling and rigorously rewarding incitement. Riffs spew animosity and rhythms provoke with an even greater antagonism whilst vocals roar with eclectic venom across the consumption. It is a brutal and seductive onslaught, but one with equally ferocious veins of creativity and imagination which ensures every track ignites far more than just ears. The album is demanding from start to finish, often a punishing encounter, but mostly a tremendous debut roaring aloud the might and potential of these new provocateurs.

Consisting of Jeff Wojtysiak (vocals/guitar), Ed Nudd (guitarist/vocals), Rebekah Brown (keys/vocals), Chase Bentley (guitar), Tim Baldwin (bass), and Jordan Schultz (drums), Cokegoat has built a formidable reputation with their live performances alone which has seen the band sharing stages with the likes of Church of Misery, The Skull, Early Graves, Electric Hawk, Order of the Owl, Jucifer, Indian, Mount Salem and many more. Vessel though is set to ignite the widest and probably wildest attention with eagerly accompanying acclaim you can only expect such its intensive proposition. Recorded with Andy Nelson of Weekend Nachos and mastered by Carl Saff (Unsane, Red Fang, Earthless), the impressive album may not end up heading best of lists come December but it is a release which is intensely impacting and unforgettable.

As mentioned earlier the album is primarily bred in a mesh of sludge and stoner metal but the eclectic textures and sound of the release CGvesselcover1600_1600are just as potent and instantly on show as opener Fear the Followers rages against the ears. Launching a sonic rabidity matched by vocal squalls and punching rhythms, the track is a furious brew seeded in punk and hardcore. It takes the senses and expectations immediately by surprise and once wrong footing their assumptions, unfurls infectious grooves and a melodic acidity seducing appetite and imagination. Twisting and swerving with almost vitriolic endeavour, the song evolves into a riveting landscape of warm climes and intimidating shadows as a doom kissed weight lies eagerly upon the forceful roars and senses entwining sonic hues. It is a compelling introduction explored to greater heights by the following pair of songs.

Buried in the City entangles the listener in a web of sonic design and predatory rhythms straight away, the guitars winding tight evocative sirens of sound round thoughts whilst coarse vocal abrasing works on emotions, their graze tempered superbly by the underlying clean vocals which coax just as potently. The ambience of the song is erosive from the start but brews and accelerates its intense malevolence and rapaciousness to trap and enslave before the outstanding destructive crescendo of a finale gets involved.

The following Dogs is a predatory treat, its dark throaty bass opening a wonderful distorted lure which seduces the senses ready for the annihilatory prowl and disorientating psychedelic manipulating brought by guitars and keys respectively. It is an alluring entrance which only increases in contagion as the track settles into a sinew driven stroll with a captivating mix of clean male and female vocals encased in carnivorous riffing and caustic hooks. It is a bewitching suasion, one which never loses its strength of bait even when a fiery energy and urgency washes through the heart of the song, vocals returning to grizzled scowls and riffs to their contentious enticement. A truly mesmeric encounter which is evolving its presence and narrative right to the closing seconds, the track takes top honours on the album though it’s persistently challenged by tracks like the two parts of End of Your Life. Part 1 is a venomous almost bestial challenge but a provocation which makes for riveting submission, its primal riffery and rhythmic angst perfectly aligned to mystical keys and subsequently roving, virtually rampaging melodic invention. Its slow to grip start is a raging infection by its climax, something Part 2, tries to replicate, it also beginning with a fully immersive and restrained opening. To be fair restraint to Cokegoat is still a raw abrasion which strips senses mercilessly and scores emotions permanently. The track does not match its partner in persuasion or the earlier tracks, but easily continues the invigorating ravaging provided by Vessel.

Fly by Night, Pt. 2 is pure aural pestilence, its opening second the cue for a corrosive swamp of guitar and bass to beleaguer the senses whilst rhythms lash the body with cyclonic intensity, a metallic punk voracity again coursing through sound and band. That hunger and animosity is held tight as sonic adventure with progressive insight spills across the distressed canvas of the song. It results in another thoroughly engrossing and intensive examination, one contrasted pleasingly by Fly by Daylight. Whereas the hostile climate of the previous track devoured, the mellower seducing of melodies and warm enterprise here soothes the wounds, though a mix of charming and abrasing vocals continue to stand and at times scream face to face as keys bring a celestial spattering to the strenuous soundscape.

The track swallows the imagination with ease, a success matched by the closing Glorious Dead. The song is spellbinding, a sirenesque envelopment aligning to another barbarous though more respectful intensity which unveils and expands a weave of sonic adventure and melody kissed enterprise. It is a towering end to the album, alone unleashing all the might and riches of the band in songwriting, passion, and experimentation.

Vessel is not without minor issues, primarily the lack of variety to the predominate abrasing vocals, though that is more to do with personal taste, and at times a lack of toxins to make some songs a lingering venom away from the release. They are small nags though and cannot stop album and Cokegoat providing an impressive and exciting debut.

Vessel is now available digitally from http://cokegoat.bandcamp.com/ and on red vinyl from The Path Less Traveled Records

http://www.facebook.com/cokegoat

8.5/10

RingMaster 30/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Imbroglio – The Struggle in Pursuit

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There is an overpowering beauty in something which is intensively tormented and destructively passionate, equally a compelling attraction in the most vicious inner struggles of man and their corrosive shadows, and that beauteous temptation does not come any more irresistible than the new album from US metallers Imbroglio. Returning from an obviously potent hiatus, the band has unleashed the ravenous The Struggle in Pursuit, a breath-taking slab of creative savagery which will leave newcomers to the band reeling and bring existing fans their most richly absorbing and imaginatively consuming presence yet.

It was a surprise when the Ohio band announced it was going on a hiatus on the eve of the release of their previous acclaimed full-length Declared Self Hatred. It was something which was desperately needed as band founder and  guitarist /vocalist D.J. Gilbert revealed in an interview with Exclaim!, where he stated “I no longer felt a fire burning inside because with Declared Self Hatred I felt like I finally wrote my final piece, my suicide note. I knew I was on my way to the easy way out. I literally expelled every ounce of hate for myself on that record. So it was either put it on an indefinite hiatus for a while or just allows myself to self-destruct.

Initially with the intent of starting a new band when ready to return to creating music, Gilbert was persuaded by new band member Bret Newland (drums/vocals) that the project had to stay as Imbroglio; that whatever Gilbert wrote and performed it would sound like the band anyway. Original band member Josh Deeter (bass/vocals) returned to complete the line-up with the trio setting about making returning EP which they recorded with Bobby Leonard. Featuring the contribution of keys and synths on a couple of tracks by Devon Robillard, who had played bass in the band at the time of the Sleep Deprivation album, The Struggle in Pursuit takes little time in smothering the senses and imagination in aural causticity and lyrical ravages incited by the struggle in the pursuit of happiness in today’s social climate. The songs rage and stand defiant against the wrongs and obstacles in life but with a triumphant and provocative stance promoting a broad and personal freedom.

The inventive tempest of grind, sludge, and doom metal from the band is veined by their most exhilarating and rigorous experimental TSIP_Album_Coverexploration to date; exhaustive and captivating invention immediately paraded on opener Full Speed. As its title implies, the song races through ears from its first breath, rhythms thundering down upon the senses and riffs immediately abrasing and flailing everything before them. Vocals need little coaxing to sear the air with vitriolic suasion as the bass darkens the imposing and strenuous maelstrom further. It is a disorientating treat, sonic spirals of invention and searing toxicity enflaming the imagination and an already drooling appetite for song and release. The track continues to lurch over and rip through the senses with sabre flung sonic twists of sound and a rhythmic predation which intimidates and commands full submission to its inciting call simultaneously.

The outstanding start is matched by the thick intensity and equally rapacious antagonism of Approaching, the track soaked in a passionate rabidity and driven by an anthemic enticement within a maelstrom of noise and intrigue. The track roars and rages as it engages and recruits the passions, every second a ferocious protagonist and every twist a mouthwatering intrusion of cutting sonic endeavour and enterprise. There is little time to concentrate on a single moment, the voracious attack and invention of songs a turbulence which needs numerous exploits to  explore fully which this and the following Gravity are perfect thrilling examples of. The third song of the release barracks and engages thoughts and emotions from its first touch, riffs and rhythms tenderising the senses as the guitar spurts potent sonic toxicity throughout the provocative landscape. It is a riveting furnace of emotion and sound which reaches a new height when solemn darkly toned clean vocals duet with the coarse squalls of voice and sound beneath them.  It is a tremendous sprawling and suffocating embrace of harsh and invigorating endeavour leaving the body a broadly smiling wasted mess.

Day Break gives no time for a breather or respite as it leaps straight at the listener, drums puncturing every inch of the psyche into which the guitars and vocal lay their vicious irresistible bait whilst the bass looks on with a dark hearted yet seductive lure. There is a hardcore violence to the track also which only accentuates its almost visceral predation leaving emotions smouldering and senses bruised. Its primal insistence makes way for Desolation, another track where the title reveals all before any sniff of the suffocating ambience and emotional suffering can soak the ears. It is a glorious cloud of despair and intent; one speared and split apart by unpredictable sonic imagination and skilled melody inspired shafts of scorched light. A towering conclusion to a quite brilliant encounter, the return of Imbroglio has given metal a new proposition to wax lyrical over, The Struggle in Pursuit deserving all the acclaim destined to come its way.

The Struggle in Pursuit is out via The Path Less Traveled Records now!

10/10

RingMaster Review 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Memories Of A Dead Man – Ashes Of Joy

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There is always something appetising about releases which make you work and really listen to their intensive offering before truly reaping the rewards their exploits offer. Ashes Of Joy the new album from French metallers Memories Of A Dead Man is one such impressive encounter. An exhausting venture into thick emotive climates and exhaustive imposing soundscapes, the twelve track journey challenges and intrudes upon senses and imagination respectively for a continually emerging and enriching experience. Certainly a release which needs extensive time to devour fully, though it makes a more than compelling first impression, Ashes Of Joy is a masterful confrontation which gets better and better across its length and to even greater effect over each traverse of its riveting body.

Formed in 2006, Memories Of A Dead Man has evolved their sound over time into a thoroughly absorbing and enveloping persuasion, their albums Beyond the Legend and V.I.T.R.I.O.L. drawing strong and acclaimed responses, but with Ashes of Joy the band has reached a new height in songwriting maturity, provocative presence, and intensive imagination. The melancholic breath which envelops from within the dark shadows and imposing structures of the songs borders on suffocation at times but only in their soaking of every twist and shift of the narratives, musically and lyrically, within the demanding and inciting provocation which in turn intensifies the oppressive intensity and emotive atmospheres brought to bear. Crafted by a new line-up which has been in place from 2012, Ashes Of Joy is an exacting and simultaneously compelling adventure, not one for the faint hearted but certainly one for all those who like to sink their teeth into an incendiary slab of extreme invention and passion.

The opening Prélude (Solemn Requiem) immediately encases ears in a fiery sonic embrace, the guitars of Ben Debrun and Tony Garcia memoriesofadeadman_covercasting a scorching initial smoulder of melodic enticement which calls on the imagination with its evocative lure straight away. Heavier stalking riffs follow thumping beats in joining the molten coaxing as the track increases its intensity and stature; all the time the irresistible grizzled tones of the bass and bear like vocals intimidating and taking thoughts into the  darkest menacing corners in preparation for the impending drama.

That dramatic experience is soon upon ears and emotions with the following Aurora, the track a tempestuous testing of the senses with rampaging rhythms from drummer Jef Ertle powerfully badgering the senses as the guitars squall imposingly around them as vocalist Pierre Duneau ravages syllables and air. With the bass of Herve Osmont similarly enslaving attention, the song evolves in gait and attack throughout, the demanding onslaught at the start drifting into an emotive and thickly atmospheric consumption driven by a more hardcore rapaciousness from Duneau. The twists never relent in their potent and aggressive immersion of the imagination, every second and note a new adventure to fear and equally devour. This variation and that of the vocals is a thrilling and increasingly addictive proposition in what is already a thoroughly intensive and demanding but excitingly rewarding entrance.

The following The Fall Of doG – Maelstrom Involution swoops in on a tide of voracious riffery and sonic enterprise around firm rhythms to instantly seduce the appetite. The again diverse and expressive vocals add to the already captivating and savage sounds throwing their creative and passionate weight against ears. It is a more immediate track than its predecessor but no less involving and steeled in startling textures, and with once more that hardcore causticity to the two toned vocal delivery, it simply ignites senses and passions. The turbulent antagonism and contagiously enterprising confrontation of the track makes way for the shadow grasping emotional beauty of Melancholia. The song floats in on a dark poetic breeze of melodies and a shimmering resonance which drifts from the classically structured and emotively sculpted canvas of the encounter. Two minutes in and the song erupts with a fire of passion and angst coated hunger which drives both music and vocals across the senses like a ferociously lapping tide. Not far short of ten minutes in length, the track is a tumultuous toxin raging and surging through the veins of itself and the thoughts of it’s intended.

The raw and assertively vociferous Touched With Pensiveness steps in next to inflame the passions, inventiveness and unpredictable rabidity to the evolving intent of the track exhilarating. The track did not impress as others first time around but as with the whole album given plenty of time and attention emerges as one intriguing and impossibly enthralling pleasure, the soaring sirenesque female vocal lures just some of the clawing rocks to get willingly snagged upon. Its rich glory though is small in comparison to the triumph of Wounded Knee, a blistering tsunami of crippling rhythms and bestial riffs led by the animalistic predation of the bass. If that was not enough to fire up the passions, a virulently seducing groove ensures the track catches every passing thought and emotion, taking them on a towering severe ride to which ardour is the willingly given price. It is hard to pick out any predominate specifics which make the songs so successful across the album, but certainly here the mix of vocals, the barbarous stride of the rhythms, and that ever belligerent bass sound stirs up a lustful attention.

The short evocative instrumental From Mud To Heaven leads into the acidically flavoured and sonically crusading La Nausée, its breathless emotional pressure and dramatically powered presence holding a strong essence of bands such as Tool and Porcupine Tree to its throbbing breast. The track is a transfixing furnace of emotion and oppressive strength which enthrals with its adventure and ideation, the same that can be said of the distinctly different yet similarly sculpted Draft Of The Second and Going Out With The Whore’s Saliva. Though the first never manages to reach the heights of those before, its grunge/Nirvana like impassioned fervour and coarse imaginative temptation still leaves a greedy appetite in place to be fed by its outstanding successor. Leaden stomping rhythms and scarring riffs steer the menacing intensity and vocal demands of the track whilst caustic flames of melodic abrasiveness and scathing vocals incite thoughts and emotions for another continually gripping peak within the album.

    Ashes Of Joy is concluded by stoner fleshed uncompromising intimidation of The Fall of doG – Erase My Eyes and the extensive explosive landscape of The Swan’s March, both tracks employing scything melodic swipes within primal turbulent atmospheres and permeating ambient causticity respectively. They are both immense provocations to match the exhausting and scintillating weighty persuasion of the album. Ashes Of Joy takes no prisoners but feeds them with the most scintillating and potently demanding emotional investigations. As said Memories Of A Dead Man make you work with their album but pays you back with one of the best encounters this year so far.

Ashes of Joy is out on April 14 via Send The Wood Music/Season Of Mist

http://www.facebook.com/memoriesofadeadman

9/10

RingMaster 13/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sunsmasher – Hell/Noise/Church

sunsmasher

A sonic suffocation and intrusive adventure which smothers the senses whilst igniting the imagination, Hell/Noise/Church the new EP from Scottish metallers Sunsmasher, is one of those exhaustive violations you can only welcome hungrily.  The three track release is not a comfortable listen but certainly a compelling ravaging to which addiction is an easy option. A merger of doom, crust, sludge, noise and plenty more, the Glasgow trio’s sound takes no prisoners and shows no mercy ensuring that their new EP is an inescapable predator, one fuelled by a thrillingly corruptive toxicity.

The Glasgow quartet was formed in 2010 with the intent to create ‘claustrophobic, intense, and violent music’ with essences bred in the member’s background in the Scottish grind, crust, and hardcore scenes. Debut release, the Mammothian/Loud/Cult demo a year later drew good attention and helped the band to a potent following which was accelerated as Sunsmasher exhausted stages alongside bands such as Conan, Dragged Into Sunlight, Monarch, and Wormrot. The last couple of years saw a few line-up changes in the band and a stronger crust and noise inspired sound emerging through their original doom seeded invention, the result as evidenced by Hell/Noise/Church, a not exactly unique but certainly a hellacious proposition individual to the band. Mastered by James Plotkin (Khanate/O.L.D.) and recorded with Kevin Hare (Black Sun), the new release easily pushes Sunsmasher into a greater spotlight, one deserving to reward as much as the band thrills.

Axe To Grind emerges from an increasingly intensifying and swirling sonic incitement, though the emergence is more a vicious launch at Sunsmasher - Hell-Noise-Church - coverthe ears with guitars and drums carving chunks from the senses and synapses whilst vocals squall with a razor sharp edge and malicious savagery. It is a brutal abrasion of hardcore and noise voracity which within seconds has ears ringing and emotions cowering. The band soon teaches though that they are unafraid to experiment and wrong foot as the track suddenly stops and drops into the thick embrace of an oppressive sludge prowl. Bass and drums find a restraint to their onslaught, though not their bestial intimidation, whilst the guitars merge a melodically hinting sonic tempting with a deeper guttural growl. It is a riveting enticement which consumes and invigorates simultaneously; a droning bait veining it all to captivate infectiously as a stalking low slung groove seduces. With vocal and atmospheric torments searing the air, the track is hypnotic slavery which grows stronger and more compelling over time.

The following Redeemer is just as rapacious but uses a ‘lighter’ sonic toxin to master senses and passions early on. There is a discordant lilt to the guitar call which immediately adds a tempting edge to the opening crawl whilst the lumbering rhythms and heavy throat of the bass provide a formidable canvas for the evolving stature and incitement to ravage. The best track of the three, the song worms its way into the psyche for a long term and intensely lingering chastisement.

Final song Perdition lets a great bass line draw in the imagination first, guitars soon joining it’s tempting with magnetic riffery. The initial premise of the song is almost gentle in comparison to that of the previous tracks, a caustic yet embracing abrading. It is not for long though as the weighty intensity of the track smothers all to enclose and consume the senses. Confirming the invention and exploratory heart of the band, the new thick doom clad swamp of sound is speared by a heavy swaggering groove right out of the Pantera songbook before merging all essences into a choking and enlivening strangling. As all the songs, it twists and turns with enterprise and malevolence, employing all the flavours announced at the start of the review into a mouthwatering and contagious destruction.

Obviously Sunsmasher and Hell/Noise/Church are not going to be for everyone but for noise corruption and feral sonic sculpting within a sludge/doom landscape it is hard to recommend much better.

https://www.facebook.com/sunsmashermlc

http://sunsmasher.bandcamp.com/album/hell-noise-church

9/10

RingMaster 26/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Conan – Blood Eagle

 

Conan_1

    Conan’s second album Blood Eagle parades all the musculature and primal intensity you would expect from their literary namesake, its body a rippling drone tempest of doom dressed metal. The new six track leviathan from the band sculpts the heaviest ravenous riffs and ruggedly intimidatingly rhythms, aspects expected from the band after the casting of their debut album back in 2012, but brings it under a swamp of brutal oppressiveness and voracious atmospheres which sees the band at its most destructively creative yet. It is an album which tests and seduces the listener simultaneously, leaving emotions exhausted and satisfaction bloated.

     Formed in 2006 as a duo, Conan has seen numerous line-up changes across the subsequent years but it is fair to say that the trio of guitarist/vocalist Jon Davis, bassist/vocalist Phil Coumbe, and drummer Paul O’Neil has driven the band to its most impacting and vicious adventures as evidenced upon Blood Eagle. The band has persistently barged and demanded attention through their releases, the Horseback Battle Hammer EP of 2010 and that first album Monnos two years later notable onslaughts, whilst splits with Slomatics and Bongripper in 2011 and 2013 respectively, has only increased the presence, and certainly in the latter, the expectations of their second full-length. Released via Napalm Records and as their previous album Chris Fielding produced, Blood Eagle certainly feeds those needs and more, its battle field of sludge tarred monolithic riffs and threateningly captivating rhythms aligned to an exceptional dual vocal provocation, dangerously irresistible and ruinously enthralling.

    The initial breath of first track Crown of Talons instantly offers an intimidating presence, the near on ten minute journey NPR527 Conanthrough cavernous climes and thick textures not exactly laboured in its emergence but certainly taking its menacing time to envelop the senses. Riffs slowly entwine around the ears securing a ready submission to their bait before darkening and intensifying their immersive swamp of sound with firm rhythms punctuating every evolving twist and corner of the journey. As leaden and bulky as a mountain bred avalanche but with the centuries worth of patience within any kind of erosion, the track is a mesmeric pestilential consumption, an insidious rapture which simply seduces from start to finish.

    Its successor Total Conquest brings an even greater intimidating predation to its structure and touch, an almost visceral essence coating its every moment whether again smothering the senses with a steady trudge or raising its energy to scavenge with forceful voracity. The gruff vocals equally gain a richer growl and seeming impatience to accentuate the threat whilst rhythmically the track deceives with a hypnotically irresistible contagion which leads the listener further into the jaws of the ravaging.

    Foehammer is next to abrase and snarl against the ears, its excellent vocal offering an anthemic call within the less welcoming barbarous scourge of sound, both elements insatiably magnetic even with the bestially harsh and intensively weighted squall of the track around them. The shortest slab of ferocity on the release it leaves just as many lingering agreeable scars before the excellent Gravity Chasm unleashes its particular venomous waltz of exhaustive severity and vehemence. There is a swing and groove to the provocation which simply traps the passions, taking them on a hellacious dance of primal intensity aligned to captivating vocal rapacity, before throwing them to the always waiting carnivorous appetite of the behemoth sound. The best track on the album is followed by the masterful and enthralling heavy hum of Horns for Teeth, the track another to skilfully merge a catchy swagger and infection into a suffocating drone sculpted canvas of doom incitement. It is a glorious sonic dreadnought with a tempestuous suasion rivalling its predecessor for that top beast honour.

     The album is completed by the transfixing Altar of Grief; an almost shamanic rhythmic coaxing setting things off whilst being courted by a distorted nagging sonic drone. The entrance of the track infests and infects with impossible ease paving the way for the corrosive squall of sound that washes over and permeates every thought and emotion. Like the first song it is a demanding and unrelenting pillaging of the body, content to strip the senses layer by layer with its slow sandblast as it brings Blood Eagle to an immense conclusion. Conan makes you suffer and face multiple trials to get to the heart of its releases but as here the rewards are constantly worth every wound and scar.

Upcoming Conan Tour Dates:

14.03.14 UK – Nottingham / Stuck On A Name Studio

15.03.14 UK – Bournemouth / The Anvil

16.03.14 UK – Birmingham / The Asylum 2

17.03.14 UK – Glasgow / Audio

19.03.14 UK – Manchester / Kraak Gallery

20.03.14 UK – Cardiff / Full Moon

21.03.14 UK – Brighton / The Prince Albert

22.03.14 UK – London / Electrowerkz

09.04.14 BE – Liège / le Hangar

10.04.14 NL – Tilburg / Roadburn Festival

11.04.14 DE – Würzburg / Cafe Cairo

12.04.14 DE – Leipzig / Doom Over Leipzig

13.04.14 DK – Copenhagen / KB18

14.04.14 NO – Oslo / Revolver

16.04.14 FI – Jÿvaskÿla / Lutakko

17.04.14 FI – Helsinki / Kuudes Linja

18.04.14 FI – Tampere / Klubi

19.04.14 FI – Oulu / Nuclear NightClub

21.04.14 SE – Stockholm / tba

22.04.14 SE – Lund / Hemgarden

23.04.14 DE – Berlin / Jaegerklause

24.04.14 DE – Wiesbaden / Kulturpalast

25.04.14 NL – Groningen / Vera

26.04.14 DE – Hamburg / Droneburg Festival

27.04.14 DE – Cologne / Underground

21.06.14 FR – Clisson / Hellfest

http://www.hailconan.com/

9/10

RingMaster 04/03/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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