Fahran – Chasing Hours

Fahran Online Promo Shot

Their second album but our introduction to UK hard rockers Fahran, the band easily gives potent reason to the busy acclaim around them with new album Chasing Hours. Made up of thirteen impressively accomplished and melodically fired tracks, the release awakens a rich intrigue for the quintet. It is not an encounter which manages to ignite a fire in the belly of passions, though it has moments where it takes them on a lustful dance, but certainly from start to finish it sparks and encourages a healthy appetite for the band’s potential and magnetically flavoursome sound.

Fahran was formed in 2012 after emerging from the ashes of Toxic Federation. It was not long before the Breaston five-piece unveiled their self-titled debut album to strong and keen responses from fans and media alike. Infusing inspirations from the likes of Queen, Iron Maiden, Shinedown, Alter Bridge, and Black Stone Cherry into their expressive hard rock sound, the band has also built an attention grabbing reputation with their live performances, which has seen them successfully play the Bloodstock and Download Festivals. Last year saw the departure of bassist Alex Stroud and vocalist Nick Whitcroft but the band swiftly bounced back recruiting Josh Ballantyne and Matt Black on bass and voice respectively, before creating the crowd funded Chasing Hours. With the pair alongside guitarists Jake Graham and Chris Byrne, and drummer JR Windsor, Fahran are poised to wrap up the attention and emotions of the nationwide rock scene with their second album, and it is hard not to imagine the band finding an intensive spotlight upon them from its release.

Chasing Hours is a refreshing treat for all hard and melodic rock fans but even if those genres generally are not the staple diet of ears the band offers plenty within the album to fire up attentive interest. Opening track Long Gone Fahran Cover Artworkinstantly flirts with the imagination through a delicious and slightly melancholic strum of guitar, its tone soon assisted by the darker breath of the bass and resonating swipes of drums. A sonic bred atmosphere rises around the masterful coaxing next to fill senses and thoughts with poetic drama and emotive suggestiveness. It is a fascinating introduction to the song which brews to a greater intensity before parting for equally enticing grooves and rhythmic enterprise to stake their claim on the passions. In no time the track is launching into a feisty and melodic striding of sound and intent which without the potency of that glorious beginning still inspires a highly satisfied and eager reaction.

Straight away the band’s songwriting craft and technical skills are open within the first song, showing a maturity and invention which belies their still young years. These qualities are right away reinforced by the next up Take This City Alive. Equipped with an eighties bred vivacity and infectiousness, the song bounces along with an absorbing weave of sonic endeavour and antagonistic rhythmic aggression. It leaps at the ears and taunts them to embrace the swing and boisterous familiarity of its body, which even with an aversion to its seed era is not easy to refuse. A Thousand Nights is one of those classically fuelled rock songs where again the band do not hide their inspirations as it flames around ears. It does not come up to the same levels of the first couple of tracks but with riveting guitar enterprise and ideation from Graham and Byrne locked within the intimidating rhythmic bait of Windsor, the track offers increasingly inviting bait within melodic rampancy.

Current single I Heard A Joke Once unloads a muscular and sonically alluring proposition with riffs a contagious beckoning across the track. It is a forceful suasion though again, for personal tastes, lacks the spark of the opening pair and many of the subsequent tracks on the album, including the following title track. A sinew sculpted slice of rock balladry with a whiff of country rock and classical seduction to its emotive narrative, Chasing Hours is a smouldering slice of enjoyment which maybe does not set emotions raging but has them simmering very nicely before making way for the boldly pleasing pair of Cased In Steel and You Could Be Mine. The first of the two finds more rugged scenery to soak in earnest vocals and melodies whilst the second is a similarly sturdy with a raw canvas of persuasion coated in evocative sonic hues and the persistently impressing vocals of Black. The song also reminds forcibly that the band really know how to cast enslaving grooves and rhythmic baiting.

As good as those songs and the highlights before them are, they are mere appetisers for the true pinnacles of the album. First up comes the brilliant Some Kind Of Family, a storming stomp of a track which from its first riotous breath also entwines ears in emotionally coloured melodies and sonic adventure to enthral and potently feed the imagination. Hooks and grooves are short yet deeply entrenching whilst Black and band find their most mesmeric vocal strength yet, all within the ever spicy and gripping rhythmic web of Windsor and Ballantyne. Its magnificence is swiftly equalled by Are We Free, a fiery rampage of scorched grooves and menacing beats all honed into a blaze of seductively bruising rock ‘n’ roll with more than an air of Black Stone Cherry and Seether to it. The bass of Ballantyne stalks with predatory instincts across the song for his finest moment but again it is the pleasingly nagging grooves and their irresistible toxicity which seal the deal with a greedy appetite.

Back To Me with its wonderful almost folkish opening suggests it is a rival to the might of the previous pair, guitars and vocals a spellbinding union. But without admittedly losing its hold on attention and satisfaction, it does slip into a more formulaic hard rock offering, though with it continually flirting with those initial lures it finds a ready welcome anytime. Prison is similar in that success, its elegant melodies and emotive hues a transfixing enticing which gives the song its tightest grip on the passions yet the powerful and climactic expulsions, where Black shows his richest delivery in the song, despite making a striking impression still lose the early hold the track had. Nevertheless it is a potent and continually growing proposition but soon left pale against the metallic enticement and melodic rock invention of the outstanding Black Mirror. Another major moment of the release, the song proves the band can merge gentle caresses with raucous intensity for an exhilarating incitement.

Completed by the highly agreeable if underwhelming Storms We Ride, the album is a persistently engaging and rigorously captivating encounter. Chasing Hours has moments where it ebbs and flows in its success, though to be fair that is as much down to personal tastes as anything, but also dramatic moments where Fahran show they have the potential to take UK hard rock to a new world awakening level. It is hard not to be excited about the future of this band.

Chasing Hours is available from Monday 11th August through all digital outlets.

http://www.fahran.com/

8/10

RingMaster 09/08/2014

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Pop Evil – Onyx

onyx

Though its veins are not exactly bursting with originality, Onyx the new album from US rockers Pop Evil is without doubt a rigorously compelling and invigorating slab of fiery melodic rock. Every shrug of its sinews and each melodic flame exhaled soak ears with an open familiarity whilst every muscular blaze of emotion and searing of sonic enterprise leaves thoughts and passions greedily content. It is may be not going to set the year on fire but the band’s third album is definitely bringing it a thoroughly enjoyable stomp of aural temptation.

Still under a keen spotlight after touring across Europe supporting Five Finger Death Punch, the band hits the European market and ears with a mighty slab of potent contagion. Released via Eleven Seven Records, the album has a voracity and tempestuous passion to its body which along with inciting melodies and perfectly barbed hooks, simple enthrals the senses and imagination. Having already established themselves on their side of The Pond with their rich tempting sound and albums War of Angels and even more so Lipstick on the Mirror, as well as a clutch of attention grabbing singles, the Michigan quintet are setting their sights on a wider audience and it is hard not to expect a healthy success through Onyx alone. Having also impressively shared stages with the likes of Three Doors Down, Papa Roach, Puddle Of Mudd, Theory of a Deadman, Buckcherry, Judas Priest, Black Stone Cherry, and Seether since forming, as well as going through the obstacles music throws up including line-up changes, Pop Evil have found a fresh and determined tenacity which shines across their new release as powerfully as the craft and passion soaking it. Produced by Johnny K (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Megadeth), Onyx is an encounter which does not herald a torrent of surprises but does ensure satisfaction is fat to bursting.

The album gets off to a flyer with opener Goodbye My Friend, an instant attention grabbing encounter which from its initial guitar and bass coaxing awakens a potent appetite for what is to come. Nick Fuelling and Dave Grahs take little time casting a web of riffs and grooves to snare the imagination whilst bassist Matt DiRito brings a predatory growl to the mix to accentuate the immediate potency of the song. It is an enthralling mix to which vocalist Leigh Kakaty adds his impressive tones as the rhythms of drummer Josh Marunde punctuate and frame the thrilling enticement. The track also offers the comparisons which stand across the whole album, its sounds like a mix of Seether and Sevendust with the metallic rapaciousness of Spineshank, the emotive angst of Three Days Grace, and the anthemic craft of Drowning Pool. To be fair though that still only gives part of the picture as shown by the second song on the album.

Bringing a rich colour of Alice In Chains to its striking canvas of sound and gripping narrative, Deal with the Devil prowls and strolls around the senses like a warrior, the guitars and bass crowding ears with forceful intensity and ravenous intent whilst rhythms punch with weighty persuasion. The latest single is a stirring and climactic incitement, ablaze at times with infection soaked melodies and senses entwining grooves for a thoroughly exciting temptation. One not quite matched but certainly thrillingly backed up by previous single Trenches. Holding a defiant air to its body of sound and lyrical call, there is an air of antagonism to the song which only urges the sonic warfare of the guitars to blaze with brighter flames and virulence as additional keys and electronic bait bring extra charm.

The riotous charge of the album takes a break with power ballad Torn To Pieces, a magnetic song which goes exactly where expectations assume but still leaves a lingering and increasingly potent lure in its wake. Kakaty is a powerful and controlled vocalist throughout the album and shows his depth of expression and emotional quality masterfully here to match the strengths of the sounds caressing and at times scorching his words. It is a glorious emotive encounter which leaves the following Divide looking a little pale in comparison. To be fair the song is a feisty and vivaciously striding suasion but lacks the extra guile of say its predecessor or the punchy invention of other songs on the release. Nevertheless it makes a pleasing play upon the ears as does its successor Beautiful, another song which just misses the potency and success of others, but still leaves a flavoursome offering for a hungry appetite to devour.

Things return to the opening plateau with the outstanding Silence & Scars, a song which seduces and pressurises thoughts and emotions simultaneously with imaginative and emotion driven invention. There is a touch of Bush to the song, its grunge spice and melodic weaves absorbing whilst a cathartic essence to its whole picture offers a magnetic radiance. The track is bewitching as is next up Sick Sense, a furnace of a song which is as raw as it is mesmeric, as caustically charged as it is a resourceful seducing. Again it is like an instant friend, that familiar seeding inescapable bait but with a voracious fuel to the backing vocal roars and a nu-metal menace to the ingenious twists within the song, again that Spineshank reference coming forth, the track is an exhilarating proposition.

Fly Away and Behind Closed Doors keep the album burning brightly and at times ferociously, the first an eagerly striding charge of pop rock urgency across evocative textures whilst the second steps into a more formula yet forcibly appealing canter of melodic fire and vocal enticement. Both songs leave a smoking long term bait working away even after their departure, their heat and passion enough to override a slightly predictable design, before the more aggressive and excellent Welcome To Reality has it moment to ignite the senses. It again confirms that Pop Evil are masters at creating songs which might not break away from existing trodden paths but bind the listener up in feverishly addictive and irresistible anthems.

The album closes with Flawed, a striking dramatic and impressive end to Onyx which simply underlines the quality and exciting presence of band and release. Pop Evil is not inventing the wheel, or arguably even redesigning it, but it is giving it a breath-taking and often scintillating soak of explosive colour.

Onyx is available now through Eleven Seven Music with the standard European version holding 3 additional tracks whilst the deluxe version features an extra 5.

www.popevil.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/07/2014

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The Hunger Pact – Cold Woman EP

The Hunger Pact Online picture

Hailing from Reading, UK alternative rock band The Hunger Pact is continuing to emerge as one rather compelling and accomplished presence. Their self-titled EP released earlier this year triggered strong attention with its four track invitation to a new breath of inventive and richly promising multi-flavoured rock. Now the trio returns with its successor the Cold Woman EP to further the promise and reputation of a rather fine new band.

Consisting of vocalist/multi-instrumentalist (drums, bass…) Ed Rogers, his guitarist brother Ollie, and rhythm guitarist James Pierce, The Hunger Pact brings a parade of eclectic and potent inspirations into their distinctive sound, the likes of Eric Clapton, BB King, Flyleaf, Nirvana, Guns N Roses, Santana, Seether, and Daughtry amongst many spicing up their invention. Originally a solo project for Ed, with The Hunger Pact EP a strong first marker, the band expanded with Ollie providing the guitars for the release and beyond, and James linking up for subsequent live shows. Now with the release of Cold Woman you can sense another big step is about to be taken; their debut release the awareness nudging introduction and the new EP a potent reinforcement and you suspect sizeable trigger to a wider recognition.

The release opens with the title track, a slowly brewing song whose initial touch is that of raw brooding guitar and sonic coaxing as the The Hunger Pact Cover Artworkvocals of Ed opens up an emotive narrative with a strong expressive delivery. The song continues well into its body with the opening slow burn of a persuasion and energy, its presence a smouldering evocation with gently stirring sonic blazes from the guitar aligned to the melancholic laced bass prowling the scenery. As mentioned it is a simmering heat which simultaneously breeds a sonic temptation and intensity that without ever scalding the air spawns a fiery finale which flows seamlessly into its successor. The track is a mesmeric lure into the release and band making the perfect canvas for Alright to spawn its busier sinewed provocation from. The second track is a sturdier more classically rock bred encounter with an element of punk rock to its breath, and whilst not quite magnetising the imagination and emotions to the same potency as its predecessor makes for another deeply satisfying temptation. There is a simplicity which cores the track, and release, a straight forward lure which teases out stronger hunger but also a craft and invention to the guitar and the enterprise of everything on offer which screams out promise and adventure.

Cold Woman is completed by the predation coated and raw Alone Again, its sound coming with a causticity which suggests it was recorded as a live take and an unpolished attraction implying that on stage the band is as equally a formidable proposition. The track seems to finish too soon, well for the enjoyment and appetite anyway, it’s closing sonic dissipation expelled seemingly mid-chorus or certainly whilst the song is in full confrontation. To be honest whilst greed wishes it had held off, the moment works very well and indicates yet again that there is an invention and imagination to the band which will see them flourish with great adventures ahead.

The Cold Woman EP is a thoroughly captivating and exciting release, and though it is one spark short of a raging fire, it burns away with a creativity and charm that will surely only see The Hunger Pact excel and emerge as a potent force ahead.

http://www.thehungerpact.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/10/2013

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Superfecta – Self Titled EP

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Last year demo single She’s a Star attached itself to the ear with a richness of promise even if in a raw state. There was a craft and passion to it which made Superfecta a proposition to make note of. Now the band unleash their self-titled debut EP with the same song revisited making a stronger persuasion alongside a trio of just as impressive tracks, and the promise already embedded intensified and even more potent.

The London based quartet of vocalist Andy Urwin, guitarist Danun Todd, bassist Max D Pinto, and Bolivian drummer Junior, formed in the summer of 2011 spending the first year writing and honing their sound whilst impressing with their live performances. With a sound which is hard rock and grunge cored as well as melodically coloured, the band entered the studio earlier this year to record the EP, and a rather tasty larger introduction it has emerged to be.

The release opens with the new beefier and intensive version of She’s a Star, the song emerging from a tantalising and mysterious sonic Superfecta - Superfecta - The EP - Artworkhaze before the guitars twist away to create a thrilling clearing of sinewy riffs, firmly crisp rhythms, and the drawing vocals of Urwin. Immediately there is an air of Stone Temple Pilots and Soundgarden to the song, the smouldering heat of the sounds bewitching around the richly hued guitar suasion and throaty bass temptation. There is a familiarity to the song which the whole EP comes under it emerges, but a lure which though soaked in recognition only fires up the appetite further. Wholly infectious the track impressively reveals a band with strong craft and imagination to their songwriting and music, even if one still finding their truly unique sound and presence.

The following Paradox is as equally compelling, the guitar of Todd drawing an enticing beckoning which the rest of the band feed from and accelerate until the track is striding confidently and engagingly through the ear. There is a classic rock lilt to the riffs stretching the variety of the release whilst the chorus is another magnetic call on voice and passions. Like its predecessor there is a catchiness which only recruits full and eager attention whilst feet stroll keenly alongside the rhythmic stomp, it all resulting in another very easy to enjoy and succumb to offering.

Inside caresses the ear with a gentle elegant narrative, acoustic guitar kissing the senses at the start as the drums and bass respectfully pace its croon. Vocals too are reserved but powerful especially in the small crescendos of intensity and passion which climb from the simmering heart of the song. There is a whisper of Alice In Chains and Seether to the track which adds extra evocative spice and though it fails to find the same heights of the previous pair, the song is again undeniable evidence of a rather promising and skilful band.

Final song Pendulum kicks up the gears to charge with a rock ‘n’ roll predation, hard and classic rock whispers fuelling its feisty enterprise and ravenous breath. The choppy riffs and melodic colour flowing from the muscular energy only feed the emerged hunger whilst the sonic flames licking at its sides from time to time bring greedy rapture to the boisterous revelry.

Whether the song or EP is offering anything new or unique is debatable but with the accomplished presentation and passionate  delivery not forgetting thrilling enterprise, the EP is a refreshing and deeply satisfying encounter which has anticipation for the future on full alert.

www.facebook.com/Superfectarocks

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/10/2013

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Resin – Embrace The Fall

Resin Online Promo Shot

Not to be confused with the excellent US alternative rock band of the same name (though they may not be going anymore), rockers Resin are stepping forward to find their place in UK rock with new album Embrace The Fall. Nine tracks of accomplished and adventurous grunge and alternative rock, the album is a strong and enjoyable piece of honest sounds and thoughtful invention though not flawless and at times not equipped with enough to have the passions firing on all cylinders compared to other bands and releases. The album nevertheless is overall an enjoyable slice of musicianship and imagination.

Formed in 2006 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, from the meeting of guitarists Mark ‘Chez’ Roseby and Sime Yarwood, Resin was soon a trio with the addition of vocalist James Botha, who had just relocated South Africa. After a search the line-up was completed by bassist Dave ‘Sev’ Seville and Mark Abbott who plays drums, cajon, and cello. 2010 formerly introduced the band to the public soon backed by a wealth of live shows and numerous festival appearances. Since then they have shared stages with bands such as Voodoo Six, Fearless Vampire, I am Giant, and Dr and the Medics, whilst honing their sound and craft. With inspirations worn proudly on its sleeve, the music of Resin has loud whispers of bands like Seether, A Perfect Circle, Alice In Chains and more to it, whilst coincidently also reminding of the other Resin mentioned previously and smaller US bands such as Damsel Down.

Listening to the album the qualities and skill of the members of Resin is undeniable each offering an intelligent and intriguing narrative Resin Cover Artworkwhich many bands could take note of. This makes each song a passage of emotive and personal discovery wrapped in sounds and imagination that strengthens the musical drama and lyrical potency. From the opener Entropy onwards you feel every song comes from the heart and every note and word is bred from reflective passion. The song opens up the release with an introduction of almost melancholic guitar paced by the excellent call of the cello from Abbott. There is warmth to the slowly emerging atmosphere being cast by the track, a heat accelerated by the joining vocal harmonies and tight guitar flames. Into its heart the track ambles nicely along with enterprise and infectiousness but also immediately shows the weak points of the album. Firstly as with the majority of the songs there is a too close a familiarity to others which influences have sprung from for the band, then there are the vocals of Botha. His voice and delivery is great it has to be confirmed but within the song and album, and primarily down to the third issue of the cloudy production, there is a missing snarl and depth to ignite the songs further. For all of that though the track makes a pleasing start to the album and ensures continued participation of its course.

The following pair of Carpe Diem and Fallen flounders a little in the wake of the opener but again do enough to keep attention firm, the first a Pearl Jam like blaze of sonic and melodic empathy with thoughts and the second an inventive breeze of strings alone caressing the delivery of Botha whilst adding their own emotional hues. Both though suffer from the production of the album which defuses their potency and impact. Their successor Fake does finds good company in the dulled sound, riffs and bass carving out a formidable presence veined by crisp beats, but equally the surface production tempers the success by blunting the cutting edge of vocals and guitars with a seeming lack of understanding. It is a shame as the song itself is full of promise.

After the fiery Instinct the album’s pinnacle opens up its declaration. Beskadig, meaning damage, injure, spoil, is sung in Afrikaans by Botha and in its acoustic delivery offers a charm and deep emotive presence that defies producer and mix to create a real gem of a song. Acoustic guitars and touches have a ready and welcome place on Embrace The Fall but nowhere else is it as impressive and thrilling as upon this enthralling song.

The highlight is followed by the Nirvana bred Clouds, a song which again has all the attributes to satisfy and leave the listener hungry for more but its close proximity to the Seattle band in sound ensures it fails a little flat especially when it opens up the burners. The raucous aspect of the song has no definition to its fire but with the smouldering croon which surrounds the expulsions offering strength and seductive temptation, the song is another showing the potential of the band and the wish with no disrespect to those recording the album that Resin finds understanding hands ahead on their releases.

Completed by the very decent and melodically vibrant Poison and an acoustic version of Clouds which fairs stronger than the full version to be honest, Embrace The Fall is a pleasing album but one which could have been much better, a lost opportunity in many ways. It does make for an encounter that marks the band as a rising proposition and one hopefully finding a studio able to exploit their certain talent.

www.facebook.com/resinonline

7/10

RingMaster 04/08/2013

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RESIN debut ‘Embrace The Fall’ released 5th August‏

Resin Online Promo Shot

ECLECTIC UK ALTERNATIVE CREW RESIN REBOOT DEBUT ALBUM THIS SUMMER!

Brit riff beasts ‘Resin’ stake their claim as rising alternative rock newcomers, armed with their new album ‘Embrace the Fall’, out in stores from Monday 5th August.
Channelling from acts such as Seether, A Perfect Circle and Alice In Chains, UK alt-rockers ‘Resin’ pack a formidable punch and are blessed with thoughtful song-writing abilities and a range of musicianship and diversity that is rarely seen amongst today’s current glut of metal/metalcore bands. Expansive, eclectic and brooding, Resin will rise to the surface this year.
Formed in Hinckley, Leicestershire, the early beginnings of Resin can be traced back to a happenstance meeting in a bar between Guitarists Mark ‘Chez’ Roseby and Sime Yarwood. Soon after the duo crossed paths with vocalist James Botha, who had just moved to the area from South Africa. The trio started to rattle out cover versions and hunted for a suitable drummer and bassist to fulfil their true potential. After a relentless search, the three piece finally uncovered Dave ‘Sev’ Seville on Bass and Mark Abbott who plays Drums, Cajon, and Cello. With a full line-up in tow, Resin were unleashed to the general public at the tail end of 2010. A constant bout of shows throughout the heart of England followed, as well as numerous successful festival appearances throughout 2010. And during the last twelve months, the band have stepped it up even further, snaring a series of shows supporting everyone from Voodoo Six, Fearless Vampire Killers and I am Giant, to Dr and the Medics.
At the end of 2012, Resin turned their attention towards recording, and the quintet marched into the recording studio to work on their debut album. After a series of intense recording sessions and another six months of writing and re-shaping, the band emerged from the studios with their debut record, ‘Embrace The Fall’, and it’s a triumphant record that is not bound by fashion. The beautifully bleak ‘Entropy’ opens proceedings and clearly lays out the band’s manifesto amidst grinding hard riffs balanced with subtle acoustic tendencies and capped with pertinent strains of nihilism. As the record moves on, the quintet tip their caps to Cornnell and Co with the Soundgarden-esque drive of ‘Fake’. The album then swings back with the acoustic laden “Beskadig’, which, sung in Afrikaans, is a homage to Botha’s native South African roots. The record continues its sweeping journey with the majestic and flowingly anthemic ‘Poison’. Now, armed with a growing fan-base and their debut album set for a re-launch, the scene is set for the band to kick on and break out to the nation.
Resin Cover Artwork

Rhyme: The Seed And The Sewage

Rhyme

Bring to the boil a strong measure of nineties metal, a heavy dose of hard rock, and a liberal helping of varied classic spices, whisk it all up with imagination and enterprise and  what emerges is a thoroughly satisfying slice of sinew rippling rock n roll, or more specifically The Seed And The Sewage, the second album from Italian rockers Rhyme. Whether the release offers anything distinctly new is debatable but its ability to excite and please is beyond question, the band unleashing a stomping confrontation of high grade attention grabbing muscle which leaves deep satisfaction.

Released through Bakerteam Records, the release builds on the already strong reputation garnered by the Milan quartet through debut album Fi(r)st and their impressive live performances. Since forming in 2008, the band has taken no time in grabbing attention, their first EP, Rhyme2009 drawing strong responses and play from radio shows across Italy and the US. With a new and settled line-up set the following year, the band recorded their debut album which upon its release January of 2011 received eager responses and acclaim. Combined with successful tours with Papa Roach and Misfits in Europe, an impressive appearance at the Rocklahoma 2011 festival alongside the likes of Staind, Seether, Whitesnake, Motley Crue and Black Label Society, and a multitude of their own energetic shows around Italy, Rhyme has built a formidable reputation which The Seed And The Sewage does nothing to diminish.

Consisting of eleven well-crafted and pleasing slices of passionate rock, the album takes one on an easy to digest but thrilling ride of 304414_10151301835285993_1823377093_nenergy and invention. At times the band walk well-worn paths as many others but never without bringing a fresh and vibrant presence and ability to the landscape to bring an endeavour which is honest and impacting. It is also a release which the more time you spend with the more it unveils and persuades the passions, ultimately an experience which inspires participation physically and emotionally.

Opener Manimal steps up to the ear with open riffs and senses caging rhythms but a less than forceful breath, though the energy of the song is muscular enough. The guitar of Matteo Magni is immediately a fiery and enthralling proposition which never relinquishes its magnetic appeal from first note to last whilst the beats of Vinny Brando thump with aggression yet restraint. The bass of Riccardo Canato at times has to be sought but is a constant predatory presence within song and album bringing depth and intimidation alongside Brando. Vocalist Gabriele Gozzi completes the line-up with a delivery which is impressive and engaging, his Chris Cornell like tones a mix of might and melodic skill to match the sounds perfectly.

The great start is soon built upon by the equally powerful tracks The Hangman and Blind Dog. The first is a furious encounter which leaves an abrasion upon the ear and heat in the heart, riffs and rhythms a senses raging thrill veined by compelling sonic skill from the guitars. Lyrically the album is inspired by world and social issues, the intent brought with an array of inciting emotions, and none as potent as within this track. Musically the band match the anger and strength of the words to deliver an uncompromising and rage inspiring statement. The second of the two songs opens up deeper shadows to bring a heavier emotive engagement which though not quite finding the impact of the first two is a provoking pleasure. Influences for the band include Audioslave, Deftones, Stone Sour, and Soundgarden, and where other tracks have essences of say classic metal and rock bands this track is distinctly inspired by the former names.

In an album which is of a strong level throughout other extra highlights come with the outstanding Slayer To The System, a track which throws you in a brawl of scorching energy and riotous musicianship brought with open imagination, Party Right a song which says what it is on the label, and Brand New Jesus. The last of the three is a delicious slab of metallic soaked rock n roll which leaves one breathless and smiling.

Closing with an impressive cover of the Depeche Mode song Wrong, The Seed And The Sewage is an excellent release which offers plenty for fans from all areas of rock and melodic metal. It does not lay out a new road for rock music but interprets and improves on existing directions with accomplished skill and infectious enterprise.

https://www.facebook.com/rhymeband

RingMaster 03/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright