G.R.I.M – Progtronic EP

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Provocateurs already renowned for leading the body and imagination into diverse and adventurous stomps soaked in a lyrical fervour and experimental voracity, UK band Great Riddims In Mind have nurtured a new steel and maturity in their explorations. It is a growth which provides a rich core to the band’s new Progtronic EP, an evolution as potent and gripping as their increasingly addictive sound. The upcoming release reaps all of the mouth-watering and riveting essences of its predecessors but develops them with the band’s most composed and striking ingenuity yet. Already a relentlessly inventive and incendiary proposition, the band has sculpted in the shape of Progtronic, a creative tempest where intrusive unpredictability, uncompromising imagination, and raw passion are an unrelenting norm.

Better known as G.R.I.M, the Manchester quartet began in 2011 and were soon stirring up attention and appetites locally with their raw and fiery fusion of dubstep, hip hop, rock, drum and bass, and plenty more. A wider spotlight was switched on by the release of the Sounds Like These EP last year, the acclaimed debut reinforcing the already potent reputation the band has earned for their live performances in their home city and beyond. Earlier this year the single Answers was uncaged, the track with its maelstrom of textures and bordering on psychotic invention strikingly hinting at the new step in the band’s evolution, something the new EP confirms and stretches even further.

Opener G.R.I.Mtro throbs with electro resonance in its first breath, the second bringing in an equally pulsating lure of vocals as synths expand their hues and beats darken their persuasion. It is a gentle but imposing entrance, the band almost leering into the imagination whilst holding a whisper of belligerence in every note and syllable shared. The track meanders from this point as if searching for its switch, which when found sparks a still restrained but strikingly colourful stroll, the rhythms of drummer Kyle Larkin a low key stalking alongside similarly predacious lines from bassist Nathan Larkin. Vocalist Lance Hargreaves dances mischievously over this web with the guitar of James Glenn almost egging on his revelry as synths flirt with magnetic and sinister persuasion. Though suggested the song never explodes; its tension simmering forcibly in voice and sound but holding check for the main, before evolving into the following Grill Me.

The second track emerges with a similar melodic tempting and structural baiting but is soon binding ears and thoughts with the impressive vocal prowess of Hargreaves and the sonic adventure brewing up in the rest of the band. There is aprogtronic gig poster1 sense of bands like Hadouken and the now demised Janice Graham Band, but whereas on the first EP these were loud comparisons they are mere spices for reference in the new vat of creativity and originality fuelling Progtronic. Badgering and seducing senses as well as thoughts with its bubbling tenacity and inventively lively canvas, the fascinating proposition whips up the appetite into a hungry greed ready for the outstanding Terrorisms, a lyrical and musically striking track which sways with seductive and rugged elements simultaneously. As with the previous pair of songs, there is a control to the intensity and urgency which embraces the frantic and deranged creative fervour of previous releases, but channels it into a just as invigorating and fascinating success and protagonist. Thickening its climate with funk and jazz seeded winds, the track enthrals and sparks the imagination with sublime ease, whilst ears and emotions are immersed in a perpetual and thrilling tantalising.

There had to be an outbreak of unbridled devilry at some point on the EP, and they come with the final two tracks. Metanoia comes first, its entrance also calm but within a tempestuous climate of stormy emotion. Vocals and bass riffs find a home in ska and hip hop planted fields whilst the caustic rub of guitars and keys provide an early agitation and inflammatory air to the building inflamed passion of the song. A midway breather of just a single melody and vocal is the spark to a flirtatious and reggae bred striding, this in turn firing up further the vocal melodies and pulsating adventure of the scintillating offering. A moment in time that surely nobody can resist, it has feet and moves soon enlisted and lurching with the pulse and temptation of its presence.

Final track Him Without Sin is an immediate blaze of vocal rapping and sizzling sonic endeavour which in turn brings in a ridiculously contagious swagger of riffs and hooks, all diversely spiced and virulently enticing. That earlier mentioned frenzy within the band is a rampant toxicity in the song but again under a precise and impressive measure. It does not stop it, as all tracks, being irrepressibly anthemic and ferociously incendiary but allows the just as hard hitting lyrical commentaries to firmly place their potent grips too.

Another ravenous treat, Progtronic is a new turn in the emergence and sound of G.R.I.M, a milestone on their increasingly certain and creatively inflammatory ascent.

The Progtronic EP is released on December 2nd.

G.R.I.M will be holding the EP launch party @ Joshua Brooks in Manchester on December 2nd with sets from special guest MC’s, and supported by Eyes Like Twenty

For more info check out the band’s official website @ http://greatrhythmsinmind.wix.com/grim

RingMaster 21/11/2014

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Dirty Thrills – Self-Titled

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It is fair to say that the release of the Growing Young EP easily put UK blues rock band Dirty Thrills on the landscape of emerging potential soaked propositions. The band’s 2013 debut was a richly enjoyable slice of dirt clad rock ‘n’ roll with only the lack of a truly distinct voice the issue. It was a potent base though from which the London quartet has impressively blossomed and matured, the band realising the promise of that moment and then some as evidenced by their new self-titled album. Stretching all the richness of the previous release and unveiling even more depth in songwriting and sound to be explored ahead, Dirty Thrills has evolved from an emerging prospect into a rigorously compelling incitement.

Formed in 2012, last year was a potent year for the band, Dirty Thrills drawing strong acclaim and attention with not only the Growing Young EP but a live presence which has left venues like London’s 100 Club, O2 Academy Liverpool, and Shepherd’s Bush Empire sweaty and rocking. Consisting of vocalist Louis James (the son of ex-Moody Blues singer Nicky James), guitarist Jack Fawdry, bassist Aaron Plows, and drummer Stevo Corrigan, each bringing experience and open craft with youthful tenacity, Dirty Thrills have bred a sound which merges blues and heavy rock for an incendiary stomp of old school and modern, dirt encrusted rock ‘n’ roll. It was an intriguing temptation on the band’s first release but now a roaring blaze on their self-released album.

As soon as the first flame of guitar winds its lures around ears in opener No Resolve, there is a sense of something spicy and flavoursome in store, a prospect soon brought to fruition as the deep bass lure hailing from Plows adds its Dirty_Thrills_Coverflirtation to the crisp beckoning of Corrigan’s swings whilst Fawdry’s magnetic designs only broaden their persuasion. It is a thick weave of blues soaked sound brought further to life by the impressive tones of James, his voice a fire all on its own. The song proceeds to swing with a slow stride, its pungent sounds somewhere between The Black Keys and Bad Company with a healthy dose of Rival Sons, a suggestion fitting the whole album. The impressive start is swiftly surpassed by the outstanding Burning Bridges, a song tempting with salacious grooves from its first breath before finding a melodic and suggestive swagger to a contagious stride of resourceful enterprise and magnetic revelry. As elsewhere, it is a track which is unafraid to switch around its pace and creative gait, a fluid invention which brings fascinating unpredictability yet easily accessible twists. The familiarity which was rife in the previous EP is still hanging around on song and album but now has an indefinable source and a fresh adventure with every recognisable and suggestive moment.

From one major peak on the album another strolls in straight away with the lively stomp of Rock n Roll, a track more than living up to its title. Bouncing with virulent infectiousness and raw melodic temptation, the song becomes a saucy temptress within seconds as rhythmic bait with anthemic potency and the inflammatory craft of the guitar enslaves imagination and passions, all lorded over by the increasingly stunning voice and delivery of James. The tempestuous revelry is given a slight breather with the easier going but certainly just as pleasing Resume Regret, a song with a less imposing style and an eighties hard rock flavouring offering plenty to be enticed by, adventurous grooves and hooks laying down a captivating invitation for ears too.

The gentle croon of Is This Home adds another varied flavour to the release, vocals an expressive protagonist over precise melodies and sultry emotion before the song erupts into a hazy and impassioned smoulder. It does not ignite ears as previous songs but has thoughts alive and involved with every emotive note and syllable shared, before being followed by the raw energy and instinctive dynamics of Reign where again grooves and riffs come clad in blues rock humidity and vocal vivacity. It is further proof of Dirty Thrills’ strength at writing and letting loose pure rock ‘n’ roll, here a straight forward yet creatively inflamed encounter and in tracks like the next up Wolf In Sheeps Clothing, a more aggressively inventive and hungry proposition. Driven by the riveting agitated rhythms of Corrigan, matched by the heavy and hearty voice of Plows’ bass, the track feverishly romps with sinews stretched and sonic enterprise afire, harmonies an additional irresistible spice to the glorious festival of sound and passion.

     The Man Who Lost His Way is a similarly sculpted encounter, its muscles flexing with eager intent whilst the guitar of Fawdry brews up a sizzling tapestry of sonic intrigue and temptation. It has relaxed moments around the vocal roar of James which lack some of the fire of the song’s imposing twists but still add to the blistering enticement which thrills ears in its company though it fails to linger around like other songs on the album once departed.

The release is completed by the conflagrant charm and craft of Follow Me Home and lastly the Southern rock grooved and blues aired Sigh, both songs further climactic spicery to the album with especially the final song an inescapable enticement warranting further plays before putting a close on the album for the day.

Dirty Thrills set down a potent marker and base with their last encounter, one sprung from in impressive and distinctive style by their album. As suggested you still feel there is more to come from in imagination and uniqueness from the band but they seem to be heading right to the forefront of European blues rock.

The self-released Dirty Thrills is available now digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/dirty-thrills/id907284883 and on CD via http://dirtythrillsclothing.bigcartel.com/

http://www.dirty-thrills.com/

RingMaster 19/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Snaking adventures and confrontations: exploring Medusa with band founder Julian Molinero

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UK rockers Medusa are one of those provocations it is impossible to lose an appetite for especially when they unleash creative tempests as impressive as new album Headcase’s Handbook. The successor to their acclaimed second full-length Can’t Fucking Win, the new album is punk fired rock ‘n’ roll which explores a new maturity and inventive ferocity to the songwriting and sound bred by founder and vocalist/guitarist Julian Molinero. Having been seduced by the excellent incitement we were eager with thanks to Julian, to find out more about its breeding, recording, and look back over the history of Medusa.

Hi Julian and thanks for sharing your time to talk with us.

For those new to the world of Medusa can you first of all just tell us about the band and its origins?

We formed in 1998 in Blackburn, Lancashire as a punk band while I was still at school and over the years, it’s had a lot of different members and varied in style but the band is still as passionate and obnoxious as ever.

We all have a band, a song, or moment which makes music from something which is just there, to being as essential as carnal endeavour; what was it which flicked the switch for you?

Just the punk and rock I discovered as a teenager, I just absolutely connected with it and it made everything else make sense.

From that moment was a band always the destination?

There wasn’t a moment but I did gradually slide more and more down that path and it felt right.

Is Medusa the only creative adventure for you or were there other exploits before its formation?

Aside from a couple of jokey cassettes I made prior, Medusa was the first and only band I’ve ever been involved with.

I believe Medusa has been around in two parts with a couple of years as a ‘hiatus’ in between. What brought about the gap and in turn what sparked the band’s return? 15264114200_e1e89dfc64_z

I was living with the other members of the band and it all turned really horrible and eventually ended. The level of drama on a day to day basis was the absolute maximum imaginable. Up until that point we were a punk band and then I started becoming very interested in flashy guitar solos and also some heavy metal music, so for one or two years there was no active band and I was purely interested in developing as a guitarist. When we re-emerged it was with the debut album and that has a definite influence in there of the type of heavy metal I was into at that time. The fact it was recorded so fast, under very tight, difficult circumstances is what gives it its punk edge and I guess that combination makes it quite unique but it definitely wasn’t how it was intended to sound.

Was there anything different in your thoughts and intentions sound wise for the band when you resurrected it? Did you see Medusa as the same band as when it started second time around or something entirely new?

The new direction and debut album were intended initially to be a platform for my guitar solos but I wasn’t able to get my amplifier to the studio and my guitar broke beyond repair the night before going down to record so these factors sent the album in a different direction and, as I say, more like punk than was intended.

We discovered you guys with the excellent Can’t Fucking Win album, a striking attention grabber certainly for us. It in many ways was just the appetiser for your new full-length Headcase’s Handbook which came out a few weeks ago. How do you see the evolution and differences between the two releases?

Well, I feel I’ve developed more as a songwriter and it’s possibly more of defining album. It has the same kind of sound throughout so it’s less confusing to people as to what the band’s style is. To me though, I don’t think either of them is better than the other, they just have different appeals. Can’t Fucking Win has a more epic quality where the drama is greater and the songs are longer and then the new one is more simplified and concentrated. I see it as almost kind of patronising, like a ‘for dummies’ version.

It is easy to say and hear your previous two albums are not short on passion but Headcase’s Handbook seems to have tapped into an even greater fire in that aspect; what do you feel has sparked that new burst?

If that’s true then it’s something I’m oblivious to because if anything the dramas in my life that I was writing about were much less extreme and intense for this album. I see the albums partly as a continuing autobiography of whatever happened in my life at the time of writing. There were definitely things that I was really pissed off about for this one but I just remember the intensity being much bigger for the first two. Maybe I’m communicating it more effectively now or maybe it’s the production value… or the fact we were trying to make it more concentrated? Who knows…

I have also felt an intimacy in the lyrical side of your songwriting; what sparks that side more often than not, is it experience or observation?

It is honesty and my experiences but the focus is on emotion. The lyrics are only there to serve that.

coverTell us about the new album’s title and is there an underlying theme across tracks?

Well, the theme is insanity and feeling lost. It does spread across the tracks, the album’s sub-heading in the liner notes says

“a guide to living for the confused, lost or mentally disturbed [those who see things as they really are]”.

The artwork is tied up in it too and there’s a conclusion to it all at the end of the album, if you look out for it.

Headcase’s Handbook was recorded with producer Lee Batiuk, compared to Can’t Fucking Win which was partly with Romesh Dodangoda. How did the link up with Lee come about and what did he bring forth in your songs which you had not foreseen or imagined?

Only two songs on Can’t Fucking Win were mixed by Romesh, we didn’t really have a producer for that one. For the new one, I just eventually came to the conclusion that a polished type of sound is what the album needed. I was thinking about it in terms of the discography as a whole and that it would be good to have one album that had that obvious type of production that gives focus to the songs. Lee did have a few changes he put in place, to make the arrangement more powerful in places, for example. With him being a perfectionist and me being a perfectionist too, but in a totally different way, it really helped to refine it but it didn’t make it easy.

Tell us about the recording process of the album.

We travelled to Wisbech in Cambridgeshire to record it. It was tense but fun in places. We would drink beer and play cards at night and then fully focus on recording during the days. It was filmed on high quality equipment which will become part of a documentary on the band, at some point.

Are you a head to the grind kind of band in the studio or like to let things evolve in a gentler energy; is it possible nowadays to record without an enforced urgency because of time and finance restraint?

Well, I think the sense of urgency is needed for this type of music to work. We were sleeping in tents the whole time while recording and I absolutely hated it but at the same time, I planned it like that so it wouldn’t be too comfortable and I specifically wanted to be pissed off and at the end of my tether when doing the vocals, which I was. The vocals were done in two days, both ending early and in the morning before the first, it had rained so hard during the night, that the inside of my tent was soaking and my shoes fell apart like soggy paper on the walk to the studio. We had to get a taxi to a supermarket so I could buy some new shoes and socks.

There is an open eighties rock and punk inspiration to your sound as evidenced by Headcase’s Handbook. How has the sound shifted since those early days of the band?

I think on this album, it’s kind of gone back a lot more to how we initially sounded in 1998; simple punk songs. The eighties influence was definitely at its peak on the first one.

Has it been an intentional changing or simply organic?

Intentional but that was just the formula for this one album. I don’t see any need to make another album like this one, that would just be repeating ourselves. The current vision for the next one is something very different.

Before we do that, I just want to go with the flow of life and see what happens. I think it’s important for your life to be different and to have new experiences before you start working on a new album. We never use old songs from before that era when we do an album so that’s why I feel each one is a document of those years.

As with any album certain tracks stand out over others and hit the listener’s sweet spot. For us the pinnacle comes with the consecutive and distinctly different pair of The Sweetest Elixir and 15072752751_fe2ca517ca_zBlack Snow. Can you give some background to the two adventures?

The Sweetest Elixir seems to be the song most people compliment at the moment. I think we just eventually found an arrangement that worked for it, mainly with the drum parts, which was really difficult. If we hadn’t found the right arrangement, I can just as easily imagine it being the least liked song on the album. As far as what that song’s about, as with a lot of the others, I already said way too much in the lyrics! That was one of the aims of this album too, to make it confessional and autobiographical in places, in a slightly more obvious way than the previous albums. Black Snow is a little bit different because that’s kind of about life after the bomb. I don’t know how obvious that is to people but if you look at the lyrics once knowing that, those references should be pretty clear.

Is there a particular moment or twist on the album which gives you personally an extra tingle of satisfaction or excitement?

Maybe but I view the album as more for other people so I think their relationship with the album is more important and hopefully the messages and ideas I was trying to put across, did come across.

I can assume Medusa will be thrusting the album out live at some point? Where can people catch you next?

We should be playing Nambucca in London, before the end of the year.

Thanks again Julian for sitting down and chatting with us. Any last thoughts you would like to share?

Our first music video to the Headcase’s Handbook album will be out in a couple of months, to the song Sid and Nancy and should be a cool video. We just cast 2 ten year old kids to play the lead roles.

Thanks!

Read the review of Headcase’s Handbook @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/02/medusa-headcases-handbook/

http://www.medusaworld.co.uk

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Ringmaster Review 17/11/2014

New textures and explorations: talking Wovenwar with Josh Gilbert

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The background and events leading up to the creation and emergence of the San Diego quintet Wovenwar have been well publicised as since has also been the might and thrilling adventure of the band’s self-titled debut album which was unleashed by Metal Blade Records a few weeks back. It has been a busy time for the band but kindly bassist Josh Gilbert took time out to talk with us about all things Wovenwar including its first steps, the excellent new album, and responses from fans of their previous band.

Hi Josh and welcome to the site, thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Before we talk about your new album but without going into the well-publicised controversy around your former band mate in As I Lay Dying, can we look at the beginnings of Wovenwar and the decision the rest of you had to make about your musical horizon thereafter? Was the continuing of the four of you from As I Lay Dying in some form a no brainer with only the decision in what direction to be made or was there a serious chance you all would have gone your separate ways?

About a month after Tim’s arrest, we all got together to discuss what our future would be. The decision was unanimous that the four of us wanted to continue on, specifically as a new band. Most of us joined our previous band directly out of high school, so it’s the only thing we know how to do…write music and tour!

How long did the talks and decision to form Wovenwar go on between you all?

It was a one day thing. We met at Phil’s place to hang out and talk about the future and the decision was made that day.

This was obviously an intensive and turbulently emotional time for all concerned, do you feel that has brought something extra to the songs and sound of Wovenwar in some way?

Maybe not the sound in particular, but I think the writing process for Wovenwar allowed us to take our minds off the present in a productive way. We didn’t have to dwell on the past, only look to the future.

Once you made the step and set about working on songs and your debut self-titled album, was there a sense of freedom in any way to starting afresh and making music different to your very Wovenwar2successful former guise?

I think the sense of freedom came from knowing our new project had no boundaries in terms of the places we could go musically. We didn’t have a singer yet, so the process began with the 4 of us writing music only for us, no vocalist in mind yet

Musically did you simply see where ideas took you with songs and their sound or did you have some thoughts and intent already waiting to be uncaged which would not have worked with As I Lay Dying?

I think a mixture of both. In the past, there were parts we’d have to shave off or cut out completely due to our previous singer’s style. With Wovenwar we were able to see those ideas through a little more clearly.

For us the band’s sound is very different throughout, though you can obviously find essences which are familiar from AILD just because of the four of you being a perfect fit with each other creatively and musically. Was there any deliberate effort to cast a completely unique proposition or has it all been an organic emergence?

I think the organic emergence came once Shane was in the picture. We had written about 5 songs musically and had given them to him to see what sort of ideas/songs he gravitated to more than others. Once we saw what was and wasn’t working, it gave us a better idea of the direction to head in that complimented both the music and vocals the most.

Some see Wovenwar’s sound as a continuation of the last AILD proposition but forging new territories; we feel it is a wider gulf between the bands than that. How do you see the differences aside from the obvious vocal one?

I think the biggest difference would be in the dynamics. With AILD, we pushed the envelope of speed every album. We were at 110% at all times in terms of tempo, and heaviness. In Wovenwar, we wrote for the song. We weren’t afraid to take the verse down to 50%, only to build up the chorus dramatically and make it feel huge. It definitely allows us to take the songs on more of a ride than we were previously known for.

How did the link-up with vocalist Shane Blay, formerly of Oh, Sleeper, come about and was he an immediate target to recruit?

Shane and Nick have known each other for 15 years, and played in a band together when they were younger. We hadn’t really officially approached anyone to sing when Nick brought up the idea of having Shane come out and jam with us. We sent him a couple of demos and he began writing to them. Once he was here and we heard his ideas we knew it was the perfect fit.

Wovenwar liveHis stunning tones are very much unique from those of Tim, has this made you look at or affected your songwriting in any different way, to help embrace and employ his great voice to full effect?

I think we just made sure that our music fit the spectrum of his abilities, and vice versa.

Give us some idea of the first times you all sat down to write and work on songs or their seeds. Did you take the determined opportunity to try new things and explore new styles/flavours or again was it just a see what comes out type scenario?

We really just sat down and let ideas flow. No preconceived idea of what we wanted, or to venture out specifically, we just let the music write itself and it flowed out pretty naturally.

How has the songwriting process emerged within the band?

Usually a single person brings a riff or collection of riffs to the band and from there, we decide which songs everyone seems to be interested in and we focus on those collectively. 4 separate members wrote songs on the record, which is a first for us.

What are the major inspirations behind the songs and their themes, and does some of it stem from the months between the two bands?

Well, Shane wrote most of the lyrics this time around, but they cover a variety of topics….personal redemption, unfaithfulness, being jaded by the music industry, etc. They cover a lot of ground.

Did you enter the recording of the album and the studio aspect generally any differently than your AILD releases previously?

Not really. Songs were about 95% there already, as we had demoed the entire album before Bill arrived. I guess the biggest difference would be in the sheer amount of time spent on clean vocals. They take longer, and far more effort and nuance to record as compared with screams.

How have AILD fans taken to the album generally?Wovenwar cover

It’s a mixed bag. Most are positive, and have been amazing throughout the transition. We couldn’t be more thankful to those who have stuck with us. There are a few who don’t know what to make of the vocal change, but we think we’ll win them over. They just have to realize that this isn’t AILD pt. 2, and that it’s a new band. With that perspective, I think a lot of them will be able to appreciate it for what it is, and not a ghost of our former band.

You recorded the album with producer Bill Stevenson who worked on the last AILD album too. Was this one of the easier decisions in regard to the album, bringing Bill on broad and what is it about his work and presence which stimulates you guys musically?

Bill was the only producer we approached, due to Awakened turning out so well. We love the fact that Bill cares more about the structure and how the song builds than the solos, riffs, etc. He helps us keep that in perspective. He also just a great person to work with and it keeps the mood light.

Not only us but seemingly across the board, the album has made a massive impact and reaped deserved acclaim. Has its initial success outpaced your own hopes for its welcome?

We honestly had no idea what to expect! What I can say is that the reaction definitely surpassed our expectations and we’re grateful for that. We know it’s time now to get out there on the road and earn it.

Once again a big thanks for taking time out to chat with us. Have you any last thoughts for the readers?

Thanks so much for checking out the record and we hope to see you crowd surfing at our next show in your town!

Read the review of Wovenwar’s debut album @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/08/08/wovenwar-self-titled/

http://wovenwar.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Rivertairs – Jack

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Flirting with the imagination like a mix of Common Tongues, Tankus The Henge, and Johnny Foreigner, the debut single from UK band Rivertairs is an introduction which does not instantly make your mind up about their presence but certainly ensures there is an appetite to hear more of their obvious potential. Carrying a flavoursome blend of varied rock spices as dramatic hues of folk rock and indie pop enterprise add their lures to the aural shuffle, Jack is a captivating and seriously intriguing proposition.

Hailing from Manchester, Rivertairs first explored their expressive and expansive design of sound with the 2013 three-track demo, Fool’s Parade. It was supported and followed by numerous shows across the north of England which included sharing stages with bands like Space. Now ready to break into a broader spotlight the band is releasing their first single, a “tongue-in-cheek vignette on the infamous Jack the Ripper”.

Jack opens with swarthy strikes of guitar which in turn are joined by a dark bassline and crisp beats. There is an instant creative and striding swagger to the song which grows in boldness as the vocals begin unveiling the song’s narrative and melodic flames wrap around the infectious enterprise. There are essences of folk and indie pop to the rock based offering and even more varied colour to the imagination spicing up every tenacious sway and seductive caress on show.

The track almost prowls with its adventure and has a theatrical relish to its inventive mischief which keeps ears and imagination gripped and intrigue greedy. As mentioned one song is never enough to decide if a band is for the long-term in thoughts and emotions but Jack has plenty to make Rivertairs a prospect needing thorough exploration ahead and an enjoyable companion right now.

Jack is available as a free download from www.rivertairs.com now!

RingMaster 11/11/2014

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No Way – Sing Praises

Pic  Tony Stanley

Pic Tony Stanley

From sound and presence to voracity and appeal, there is nothing lightweight about the debut release From US band No Way. The four-track Sing Praises EP is a brute of an introduction to the Brooklyn quartet, a compelling and enslaving tempest of noise and invention fusing thick essences of noise and punk rock with those of sludge and heavy melodic rock. Some bands seem to instinctively tune in to the listener’s wants and primal needs, and it is fair to say that No Way certainly fed and intensively satisfied ours.

No Way was formed in 2012, swiftly making their mark on the New York punk scene. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Helmet and Unsane, the band were soon sculpting their own distinct presence and sound, unafraid to infuse varied styles and raw spices into the mix of sound mentioned earlier. Their live reputation has also grown from those early potent days with the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Whores., Fight Amp, Black Tusk, Inter Arma, American Sharks, Cancer Bats, Naam and White Hills. That attention will only be broadened and strengthened by the release of Sing Praises, the Andrew Schneider (Unsane, Pelican, Shrinebuilder) recorded and Carl Saff (Young Widows, Helms Alee, OFF!, Kowloon Walled City, Big Business) mastered proposition an imposing slab of prime sonic and rhythmic beef flavoured with an imagination and a creative intrigue to get the taste buds singing.

The release looms up on ears with opener The Cutting and within a breath is walling them in with bulging riffs and debilitating rhythms. It is an imposing start but only the teaser to greater things as warped sonic scythes from guitars coveradd to the brewing mayhem. Vocalist Chuck Berrett is as a formidable a presence as the song itself, his raw and growling tones an instant lure complimenting and inciting further the rugged turbulence around him. At its heart there is the inventiveness of a Melvins to the song and the caustic beauty of a Cancer Bats whilst the core swagger to grooves is Coal Chamber bred, their swing reminding of the song Sway. It is a merciless seduction gnawing and flirting with thoughts and emotions, an immediate pinnacle matched straight away by Shake the Meat.

The second track makes a less intensive but just as gripping entrance, the guitar of Jordan Melkin coaxing ears and imagination with potent hooks as ripe and pungent beats from drummer Chris Enriquez provide an intimidating cage. Further enhanced and coloured by the throaty bass bait of Dave Maffei alongside the varied and fierce vocals, the track is an unpredictable and insatiable predator threatening and teasing with impassioned aggression and shadow bred, bordering on deranged enterprise. The riveting blaze is followed by the exceptional prowl and creative stalking of War Dance. It is a hypnotic proposition, a lone riff accompanied by this time more restrained tones from Berrett the initial drama; bait subsequently joined by merciless slaps from Enriquez and eventually stoner-esque hues within explosive roars. The song hunts the senses and psyche from start to finish, even its intermittent immersive and invasive sonic squalls a menace which increases the theatre induced by the engrossing single minded slim stalking either side of them

The track is scintillating and leaves the appetite greedier than ever so thankfully closing track Pastures / Abuelas is more than able to feed the hunger. Over eight minutes of imaginative tension, it is a rigorously captivating pursuit of the senses loading with vicious bass growls, savage riffs, and a sprawling thick sonic smog, all punctuated with a rhythmic resourcefulness which leaves ears bruised and emotions raw. There is also a psychedelic smearing to the atmosphere and inventive colour of the track but it is the hellacious and brutal ingenuity of the track, as well as the stoner bred grooves further into its adventure, which lingers longest and the deepest in the psyche. Dark and ravenous with greater menace in its restraint than a full-out assault could achieve, the track is a delicious immersion and challenge as well as another open side to No Way’s sound.

Sing Praises is an exceptional debut from a band with all the potential to be a potent and inspiring force ahead on the evidence of this stunning entrance. No Way seem to know what ears and instincts want in heavy, brutal, and incendiary exploratory sounds, and of course this is only the beginning….

The Sing Praises EP is available now digitally and on cassette @ http://www.nowayny.com

https://www.facebook.com/nowayny

RingMaster 07/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Medusa – Headcase’s Handbook

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It is fair to say that Medusa’s last album Can’t Fucking Win kicked up a potential drenched storm which grabbed the attention of a great many. It was a potent and thrilling stomp with a fiery character and a middle finger raising attitude which pushed the London trio into a broader spotlight. Its successor Headcase’s Handbook is spawned from the same belligerent seeds but comes with a new richness of adventure, songwriting, and quite simply creative maturity. It is fuelled by punk fired rock ‘n’ roll and makes another pungent step in the ascent of the inventive tempest that is Medusa.

Formed in 2006 by vocalist/guitarist Julian Molinero, Medusa swiftly made an impression with their self-titled album which came out in a matter of weeks after the start of the band. It was an eighties inspired entrance which made a strong base from which the band’s sound and eventually second album Can’t Fucking Win was bred. Recorded with producer Romesh Dodangoda, Medusa’s 2011 sophomore album showed an evolution in all aspects of the band yet still held onto the striking raw and honest core which lit up its predecessor. That same breath of sound frequents Headcase’s Handbook but as before comes with another leap in depth and growth which is as open and forceful as it is mouth-wateringly enterprising. Recorded with producer Lee Batiuk (Deaf Havana) at Regal House Studio, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, the album roars and flirts with salacious intent and imagination, the band unleashing a hungry and bracing dose of honest rock ‘n’ roll.

The RingMaster Review was honoured to be the band’s first port of call with the album within days of its completion, and we were instantly hooked and gripped by a broad smile as the release began its feisty persuasion with opener Sid and Nancy. A whine of guitar leads into choppy riffs and the expressive tones of Molinero, the combination an immediate lure which only flares with stronger persuasion when the track brings out its punk antagonism in voice and riffs. Instantly contagious and increasingly more so as the bass of Milo De Nack flirts with ears and the imposing beats of drummer Stefan Hale, the track is a raw and insatiable riot starting things off explosively, one with a poise and resourcefulness which right away highlights the band’s evolution between releases.

Things take another step up with Lip Service, a track bringing again that punk rock tenacity into a hard rock web of spicy guitar craft from Molinero, a weave completed with equally tangy riffs and hooks. This is courted by a just as coverinfectious rhythmic and vocal adventure, neither bursting their boundaries but both aspects bringing the heart of the track rich and catchy expression. It is an outstanding song continuing the impressive start to the album, a loft plateau which is not quite matched by either the following Absinthe Minded or Luxury Crisis. Both tracks though reveal further intriguing and inescapably appealing facets and twists to the character of album and sound for a lingering satisfaction. The first merges melodic country kissed rock with a blues flaming for a tantalising caress of provocative and imaginative endeavour complete with evocative washes of guitar and mandolin like vivacity. Though it lacks the spark of the first songs, it grips ears and appetite with ease much as its successor, a song with an inventive canvas of rolling and roaming rhythms picked at by a repetitive sonic plucking. This is coloured by the impassioned vocal delivery of Molinero and melodic enterprise extending from that riveting initial guitar temptation.

Lydia stomps in next, riffs and beats almost furious in their strength and voracity before relaxing into a more controlled but no less fiery stroll. Not for the first or last time there is a feel of Hagfish to the punkier edge and contagion of the song whilst the melodic enticing of the encounter has a classic lilt which comes with a whisper of Turbonegro in its texture. The track almost brawls with the senses leaving them greedy for more, a want fed by the different but just as flavoursome Call of the Abyss. Again predominantly punk and hard rock meet in a rigorous collision of catchy and unfussy rock ‘n’ roll, though there is plenty more spicing the song’s unpredictable and passionate presence as it tightly grips thoughts and emotions.

As masterful and compelling as the two tracks are they are overshadowed a little by The Sweetest Elixir and its thrilling temptation. Electronic toning wraps ears first before heavily striding beats and velvety basslines join the successful coaxing. Lording over this is the excellent vocal lure of Molinero, his smoother delivery drawing the listener swiftly in to the track’s narrative. As it weaves and swerves with bass and guitar imagination, the song swells in potency and invention, becoming the pinnacle of the album with its melodic emprise. It is a delicious song, as mentioned a major peak in the release, setting a touch challenge for the following track to try and rival, a test which Black Snow more than takes in its bordering on deranged stride. A maelstrom of disorientated rhythms and sonic bluster sets the persuasion in motion before it breaks free to establish a predatory and intimidating shadowed clad prowl. With vocals back on more crazed intent and the bass finding its throatiest intimidation yet, the track rages and roars with irresistible animosity and persuasion. It is a fury though which ingeniously explores more reserved and experimental tendencies too and an emotional veracity and ire, the result one more seriously impressing proposition.

The album closes with firstly the more restrained rock ‘n’ roll of Think It Over, a track not bursting with surprises but loaded with anthemic potency and finally the acoustic ballad Cherry Red. The song is a strong end to close out the album on a high, even if not one getting the blood boiling. There is little to dismiss it for though, and it ensures Headcase’s Handbook departs on a lingering touch.

Medusa gets better and bigger with every release, Headcase’s Handbook proof and easily their finest moment to date. It should be a break-through release for the band and if it just misses out on that success, whilst surely drawing a wealth of attention and acclaim its way, you can be sure the band will make that strike sooner rather than later.

Headcase’s Handbook is available now via Cyberpunk Records and @ http://medusaworld.bandcamp.com/album/headcases-handbook

http://www.medusaworld.co.uk

RingMaster 02/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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