James King and the Lonewolves – Lost Songs of the Confederacy

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It might be thirty years and more since its release but the James King and the Lonewolves single I Tried/So Alone, has never drifted away too far from the musical landscape here at The RR. With the band coming to a close less than a handful of years later, it is a regular reminder of what might have been and of the potential locked up inside one of the eighties lost opportunities to shine even brighter musically. So it was with surprise and excitement that the band re-emerged a couple of years ago and that the debut album lost to that collapse of the band, was to be released. The original Lost Songs of the Confederacy was recorded with John Cale but as mentioned never saw the like of day, but now ‘mark II’, with re-recorded and re-mastered songs supplemented by new recordings is here and at times it is like the band has never been away.

James King and the Lonewolves emerged in the early eighties in the heart of Glasgow’s music scene and swiftly grabbed attention and support with their feisty and fiery Americana influenced rock ‘n’ roll. The aforementioned single I Tried released via Cubre Libre/Virgin, sparked a wider awareness, certainly grabbing some of us down south. The following Texas Lullaby ‎12″ EP found acclaim of its own too and with the band signing with Alan Horne’s Swamplands label in 1984, it looked like things were about to break for the band. An ill-fated performance on The Old Grey Whistle Test where their profanities drew countless complaints from viewers led to the label dropping the band after just one single and before the album was unveiled. That in turn added to the turbulence within the quartet which saw it subsequently self-implode.

Skip forward to 2011 though and after a ‘long running feud’, James King and Jake McKechan putting differences aside came together as The Lonewolves for a memorial show for former agent, Alan Mawn. Completed by bassist Nick Clark, guitarist Joe Sullivan, and drummer Corey Little; band and audience saw the chemistry was still ablaze within The Lonewolves and they decided to carry on. Released via Edinburgh’s Stereogram Recordings, Lost Songs of the Confederacy is a bridge to the past, ‘unfinished business to be done’ in the words of King, and spark for the future, and as also shown on the recent Pretty Blue Eyes EP, the band’s sound is just as potent and rebellious as ever.

The album seems to work itself up to its biggest triumphs, the first few songs making an appealing and satisfying persuasion but the real roar and fire in the album coming a little later. In saying that opener Fun Patrol immediately ?????????????????????????????????????captures ears and imagination, its initial sonic shimmering bringing a lick of the lips before riffs and rhythms huddle in an imposing stance. King’s vocals carry a mature snarl to his still distinctive tones whilst guitars toy with a bluesy colour to their sultry enterprise. It is a pulsating slice of rock pop, bass almost stalking the senses across its imaginative landscape whilst a flame of harmonica simply lifts spirits and passions further.

It is a mighty start to the album which is not quite matched by either Over the Side or Fly Away. The first caresses ears with sixties melodic coaxing initially, its Kinks like smile an engaging persuasion which the shimmering climate of melodies and throaty bass stroll only accentuates. It is a highly magnetic proposition but is missing the indefinable something which lit its predecessor, the same which can be said of its successor. The album’s third song has a riper infectiousness to it, riffs and hooks inescapable bait but again that certain spark fails to materialise to take an enjoyable song into being an inescapable one. The flame of brass and contagious swagger it carries does it no harm though before it makes way for the hazy presence of Bridgeton Summer. Its air is steamy and melodies again sultry, both wrapping inventive climbs of emotion and energy within the transfixing balladry fuelled song. It also just misses those early heights but provides a vein of ingenuity which is exploited to the full as the album suddenly kicks up in the creative gears.

Even Beatles Die dangles sonic bait to straightaway hook ears and thoughts but it is when the punk voracity and intimidating riffs from guitar and bass break-through, that the track becomes a thrilling predator. It has a nagging to it which is as contagious as it is unrelenting whilst the poppier exploits of guitar and hooks simply flirt with seventies rock ‘n’ roll temptation. It is a treat of a romp setting up the richer blues hued strains of While I Can. With a jazz blues tease of keys leading into stalking bass lures and aligning riff and vocal growls, the track twists and shouts with an old school rock and R&B devilry to also ignite ears and emotions, though it in turn is just an appetiser for the majesty of (Un)happy Home. Instantly holding a delicious whiff of The Mighty Lemon Drops to its net of melodic enterprise, the song prowls and strides with switching adventure to sculpt a dynamic and insatiable stomp of punk ‘n’ roll tenacity and adventure. Everything about the album’s best track, from growly vocals to spicy riffs, seductive low toned bass to crisp rhythms, is pure contagious persuasion.

   Pretty Blue Eyes swiftly keeps the levels flying high with its raw and jangly endeavour, the song seemingly bred from the seeds which early Orange Juice and Josef K employed so well. It is a compelling encounter which rather than grab the psyche by the collar slowly burns its way into causing its subsequent arousal. Igniting an instant reaction is no problem for Texas Lullaby though, the track from its tantalising melody washed jangle brewing up and growing into an impossibly addictive and irresistible chorus. At that moment there is a pungently healthy Skids air to the song but a flavour soon transformed into a Lonewolves tapestry of emotion and lingering persuasion for another massive peak to the increasingly impressing album.

     Lost Songs of the Confederacy is brought to a close by the gentle melodic stroking of A Step Away from Home, a strongly evocative and pleasing prospect but another not quite equipped to match songs like the one before it. Nevertheless it still leaves ears content and pleasure full as it brings a ‘lost son’ of an album home into the hearts of the band’s fans. This is an album which is much more than a memory trip just for fans though, its daring and inventive drama a certain lure for those unaware of James King and the Lonewolves. It has been a long wait but boy was it worth it for them and us.

Lost Songs of the Confederacy is out via Stereogram Recordings now digitally with a vinyl version available from November 10th. Find out more @ http://www.stereogramrecordings.co.uk/audio/lost-songs-confederacy/

https://www.facebook.com/JamesKingLonewolves

RingMaster 30/10/2014

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Denim Snakes – Self Titled

Denim Snakes

Rock ‘n’ roll obviously comes with constant variety of unique riotous tendencies, and each twist of rock music has a pioneer and driving force which recruits equally impressing cohorts to their direction within the expansive scene. There are few bands though which manages to weave a tapestry from a healthy scoop of all that vast flavouring which is something new and in itself wholly individual. Step forward Welsh rockers Denim Snakes and their debut self-titled album. It roars rock ‘n’ roll with every note, syllable, and second of its resourceful stomp. It makes no demands, has no delusions of grandeur, but instead rampages through ears into the passions with a fresh sound which recalls and revitalises essences which have ignited a million hearts and inspired just as many imaginations.

For a debut the album is irresistibly impressive and striking, though maybe that really should be no surprise as Denim Snakes is led by vocalist/guitarist Russell Toomey. The former frontman of the criminally ignored sonic punks My Red Cell and the inexcusably overlooked garage punks Innercity Pirates, Toomey has a knack of twisting songs into insatiable predators of the psyche whilst leaving a lingering temptation others can only dream of in their music. His new band as evidenced by their first full-length is no different in that ability, songwriting as expressive and intrusively seductive as ever, and an instinctive rock ‘n’ roll ravaging.

Formed in 2013, the Barry quartet of guitarist Jake Ellis-Scott, bassist Matt Clarke, and drummer/backing vocalist Tom Hall alongside Toomey, soon explored and whipped up a sound to ignites ears and imagination, first single 21 earlier this year the proof of something exciting brewing from the depths of the “ghost-town pleasure park” from where he band emerged. It sparked an exploratory interest and appetite for the band which second single The Guard in September soon ignited again. Now the band’s debut album is primed to wake-up the nation and such its potency and sheer thrilling adventure there will be calls of a conspiracy at play if Denim Snakes is allowed to slip away as those previous bands mentioned.

The release opens with The Guard, bulging beats lighting up ears before a raw blaze of riffs and a throaty bassline joins the emerging rugged sonic dance. In no time the song is leading body and emotions on a virulent stroll, Ramones bred Denim Snakes coverhooks and grooves flirting with the passions as the distinctive tones of Toomey’s voice similarly and mischievously colours the contagion. A healthy whiff of garage rock and surf pop is brought into the mix of what is insatiable pop punk of the old school kind, whilst a classic rock spicing clasps the solo and melodic enterprise of the sensational opener.

The band’s first single 21 is next and instantly provides a different creative hue to the release. With a caress of harmonica leading to more melodic scenery vocally and musically, the song sways with folk rock glazed adventure. It is just as catchy as its predecessor, though it has a gentle presence and persuasion which at times is part Weezer and part Late Cambrian, and whilst it does not set a fire in feet and instincts as the previous protagonist, the song emerges as a warm and increasingly tempting offering showing why it made such a strong impression earlier in 2014.

The following It’ll Be Alright also moves with a mellow and breezy charm, though there is a devilry which is never far from its surface. It also finds a forceful prowl in the bass and beats which come more to the fore leading to and in the anthemic chorus, it adding a muscular spirit to another unique slice of melodic pop. In its reserved passages there is a definite Kinks influence which instantly sparks the imagination into greater life whilst it’s punchier exploits rings of Innercity Pirates, though that was always inevitable at some point. It too is a slow burner which grows into something formidable and addictive, the opposite on offer next with Party Hard. This is a song wasting no time in gentle persuasion, instead swiftly gripping ears and thoughts with spicy chords and hungry rhythms before venturing into a hook laden lure of busy riffs and vocal revelry. My Red Cell toxicity teases throughout the song to further colour the fiery rock ‘n’ roll canter, but as across the album though you can pick out similarity of previous exploits, song and album is something openly new.

From the lofty heights of the song, Denim Snakes take another step up in temptation and brilliance with The Runaways. Sinews flex in every aspect of the track from the first breath, riffs imposing and rhythms cantankerous as Turbonegro like punk causticity initially smothers ears. The track is soon exploring its infection drenched melodic side too though, another ridiculously contagious proposition leaping at the passions as riveting twists of guitar and rhythmic endeavour toys with the imagination. A core of hard rock drives the explosively enjoyable encounter, another slither of rock ‘n’ roll variety exploited for something enthrallingly new before the pair of She’s A Woman and Making Money step forward. The first of the two stalks the senses and thoughts straight away, a dark and heavy footed bassline aligned to jabbing beats challenging ears before the effect spiced vocals of Toomey lay their predacious tempting in the web of intrigue. A classic rock breeding smoulders throughout the sultry drama of the song but yet again flavouring is varied and fluid as it almost growls with impressive potency before its successor brings out the big guns in predatory riffs and thumping beats as blues grooving spreads through classic rock devilment. Though not a favourite amongst the pack on the album, the song increasingly convinces and is a sure fire appetite pleaser for fans of bands such as Aerosmith and Alice Cooper.

Don’t You Want Me finds seeds in similar beds but only to lay a canvas for the blues and acidic flames of enterprise erupting over it. Electric Woodland meets My Red Cell meets The Stooges; the track roars and raucously simmers with sonic ingenuity and incendiary expression. It is a fire of anthemic seduction inducing another wave of greedy hunger for the album, which the raunchy tone and energy of Happiness has boiling over with its maelstrom of classic, hard, and punk rock. The song also finds room to drift into a hazy melodic landscape of rock pop, unpredictability as prevalent as imagination and mischief.

Closing with the similarly bred but openly distinct Sex, Denim Snakes has uncaged a slab of rock ‘n’ roll which manages to provide something for everyone in each individual song without leaving one overwhelmed by the intensive brew. The final song is a salacious temptress which simply sums up the whole of the outstanding album. Fans of Russell Toomey’s past works will maybe not be surprised at the craft and invention running over in Denim Snakes but there is no denying the band has tapped into a new depth and maturity in songwriting and sound which is matched by the impressive qualities and imagination of its members. Quite simply it is a must have release for all rock ‘n’ roll fans.

Denim Snakes is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/denim-snakes/id835921265

http://www.denimsnakes.co.uk

RingMaster 26/10.2014

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Dope Body – Lifer

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In covering Natural History, the previous album from US noise sculptors Dope Body, we boldly declared the band as ‘without doubt one of the most exciting bands in music right now’. Returning with its successor Lifer, the Baltimore quartet has done nothing to change or dispel that declaration. The release is a glorious and voracious maelstrom of invention as now expected from the band, but also one with another open twist in the evolution of Dope Body’s sound. Certainly Lifer is the band’s most rock ‘n’ roll release to date, raw and attractively abrasive, but within tracks and sounds are as dramatically eclectic as ever.

Formed in 2008 for originally just a one off show, Dope Body soon saw and found their sound stirring up the local scene and its passions. Early releases via HOSS Records drew potent attention but it was Natural History, released as the new album through Drag City, which widely announced the band as one of the more original and creatively warped fresh breaths in modern music. Between albums the band has feverishly toured and played shows before seeing the latter part of last year out taking time focussing on other endeavours, bassist John Jones on his solo project Nerftoss and guitarist Zachary Utz and drummer David Jacober with their two piece band Holy Ghost Party, whilst vocalist Andrew Laumann turned to his visual arts side and exhibited work at the Galerie Jeanrochdard in Paris, the Pre Teen Gallery in Mexico City, and Signal in Brooklyn. This year though soon saw the foursome back together in the studio and with producer Travis Harrison creating what is another stirring encounter from them.

The album opens with Intro, an instrumental with carnival-esque vivacity and mischief to the gripping rhythmic juggling of Jacober and scuzz bred tenacity of guitar. It is a great raucous start to the album, instantly unveiling some of the varied rock ‘n’ roll seeded essences to be explored across the release. The piece subsequently slips seamlessly into Repo Man and its opening slow caress and shadowed crawl. Right away the distinct tones of Laumann entice and flirt with ears before raging to match the increased intensity and aggression of the music. It is a captivating track which has as much an air of Nirvana to it as it does The Stooges. In hindsight it is a steady opener to the album in many ways, a raw encounter which as the album, holds a real live feel to its touch and breath, but proves to be just a taster of greater things to come.

That stronger potency grips ears and imagination right away with Hired Gun. From a deliciously acidic web of sonic revelry, the song strides out with a garage punk energy and causticity, though it is still prone to the great scythes of sound liferwhich opened up the encounter. Taunting senses with a devilish swagger and punkish rabidity, the track is a transfixing slice of noise rock, but as expected from the band only part of the story as seductive surf rock sultriness and rhythmic tantalising emerges before a fiery finale. From this song the album really takes unpredictable and diverse shape, the following Echo sauntering through ears with a smouldering blues climate aligned to garage punk turbulence. Like Tom Petty plays The Cramps, the song is an enthralling croon with tendencies to expel caustic ferocity as it makes another step up towards the album’s highest peaks.

They come in the next clutch of songs, starting with AOL. A brawling slab of blazing hard and punk rock incitement, whispers of The Clash and Melvins hinting away, the track comes loaded with lingering grooves and biting hooks for a relatively brief but scintillating roar. It sets ears and emotions up perfectly for the even richer triumph of Rare Air. A song which kind of bridges this and the last album, it emerges from a metronomic coaxing lined with a ridiculously infectious sonic tempting. Instantly there is a post punk emprise to the song, bass and guitars flirting with a mix of Joy Division, Tones On Tails, and John Foxx led Ultravox breeding. It is a gripping adventure with Laumann as vocally enterprising as the tapestry of sounds and textures around him. The pinnacle of the album, the song alone reasserts Dope Body as the imaginative masters of sonic and noise alchemy.

Straight away confirming that point, the dark seductive Day by Day steps forward next. With a heavily shadowed bass resonance spotted by sonic elegance making the first gentle touch, the track forcibly intrigues and entices senses and imagination, increasing its lure and potency as it gathers pace to craft a Bauhaus like tension and presence. That increase in energy also brings a funky gait and appetite to the song, which in turn leads to squalling clouds of scuzz lined ferocity and garage rock devilry. With a pinch of psychobilly and a dab of old school rock ‘n’ roll too, the song takes the listener through scenery of explosive invention and bold creative mischief, all persistently cored by the irresistible throaty bassline which kicked it all off.

Toy strides purposefully across ears next to return the album to another boiling garage punk/grunge soiled stomp, engaging ears in a dusty rampage of Rocket From The Crypt meets Damn Vandals like irreverence. As everywhere though, references only give a slight idea of something uniquely Dope Body, the band forging new templates and imagination smothering ingenuity at every turn, proof of course immediately coming forward through the pair of Nu Sensation and I’d Say to You . The first of the two is another multi-flavoured rocker, seemingly embracing every corner and era of rock ‘n’ roll to give birth to an uncompromising and inescapably addictive rock devilry, whilst its successor is a torrent of repetitive hooks and lingering grooves as catchy as the common cold and sneakily lingering.

The album is closed by the striking Even In the End, a song opening on another skilfully conjured rhythmic contagion before spreading its melodic and atmospheric tendrils into a progressive terrain of bracing sonic invention and immersive dark shadows. Within that landscape though, guitars and beats unleash imaginative and lively agitation whilst vocals range from slow drawls to raging emotion. It is an absorbing exploration bringing the outstanding release to a mighty close.

Lifer is not a step forward in quality for Dope Body but a side step from Natural History into similarly impressive and individual waters. The excitement brought by a Dope Body encounter continues and the band grows in stature once more.

Lifer is available via Drag City now.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/DOPE-BODY/310914069790

RingMaster 23/10/2014

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Vaudeville Remedy – Ladykiller EP

 

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If you are looking for some blues punk rock with a raw and tenacious presence than you could do a lot worse than to check out the Ladykiller EP from Canadian rockers Vaudeville Remedy. It is a lo-fi and honest brawl of rock ‘n’ roll which is as captivating as it is passionate, and very easy to engulf the senses with time and time again.

Recorded in the basement studio of the Assiniboia, Saskatchewan trio, the DIY EP presents an in your face presence with songs which have been recorded live and are uninfected by polish and trickery. As mentioned the band has an honest sound which says take me as I am and it makes for an intriguing and enjoyable proposition. It is always fun to climb on board with a band at the relative start of its emergence, Vaudeville Remedy founded in 2009, and watch it grow. This trio is no exception, the new release showing a more aggressive and angry intensity and intent to that found on its predecessor, the thirteen-track Squeaky wheels of 2012. This is a band still evolving and exploring its depths and sound, but as Ladykiller shows one set to provide thrills along the way.

The release opens with The Winds Of Shit, an atmospheric piece of portentous sonic haze swirling around cinematic samples and stalking yet restrained beats. It is an attention awakening entrance into the EP though no real hint of what ladykiller ep cd coveris to come. What does follow is the rampant antagonistic devilry of the title track. Senses grazing riffs and rolling rhythms make the first impression alongside a great weave of blues scented grooves. It is an imagination holding blaze of craft and easy going but imposing riffs linked to those fiery grooves. The vocals, as the song, are offered in their rawest form and though they do not always capture ears as potently as the sounds around them, they only add to the live and dirty feel of the occasion of the song’s recording.

From the compelling rolling beats and the blistering sonic lure of the guitar, especially the excellent scorching solo, through to the antagonistic prowl of the bass, the song is a potent and exciting start but soon surpassed by the excellent Superhero Jizz. It is dirt clad, abrasing rock at its most captivating; again riffs and rhythms sculpting an irresistible riot of energy and temptation which is rabidly coloured by excellent vocal incitement and sizzling melodic acidity. The best track on the EP, it is a blaze of contagious and essential heavy, hungry rock ‘n’ roll.

Next up is Bong Rips, a brief slab of infection rising from a thick enticing bassline and growing strands of blues kissed sonic endeavour. It is as raw as it gets on Ladykiller, coming over as if it is right there staring at the listener face to face and again very satisfying, the same feeling and success which can be applied to closing song Headbanger’s Blue. Whereas the earlier songs feel like they have had a little time put into them for the recording, the final pair are as live as it gets, and a great notice of what the band is like in person and why they should be checked out in that state.

Vaudeville Remedy is a band with a sound and approach as honest as the day is long. There are no shortcuts and frivolous flourishes to their music, just the essential ingredients for real rock ‘n’ roll. This band is not re-inventing the wheel but they are heating up the original with some relish.

The Ladykiller EP is available digitally, on CD, and vinyl now @ https://thevaudevilleremedy.bandcamp.com/album/lady-killer-e-p

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Vaudeville-Remedy/237873806253225

RingMaster 10/10/2014

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The Boy From The Crowd – Revelator

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Throwing blues, garage rock, and punk into a flaws and all slab of raw rock ‘n’ roll, UK duo The Boy From The Crowd make an intriguing and ultimately gripping entrance with debut single Revelator. The single actually embraces more flavours than mentioned in the last sentence, but takes that core into a wild and compelling riot of noise and attitude.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Vinny Piana and drummer Vegas Ivy, The Boy From The Crowd on the evidence of Revelator, is not a band concerned with offering polished enticements but one driven by the rugged essence of dirt encrusted rock ‘n’ roll and the antagonistic tenacity of punk rock. Yet there is a vein of enterprise within the song revealing a definite thought bred resourcefulness to their sonic brawl which only adds to the success of the track.revelator-single-cover

A lone guitar teases ears initially from within a raw and dusty sonic haze before the track erupts with thumping beats and a heavy bass coaxing bound in a sizzling wash of blues drenched guitar temptation. It is a raucous blaze of noise and intent but one with a rein to its assault which increases its potency and potential. Vocally Piana provides a delivery which ebbs and flows in success depending on which aspect you look at, but at the same time brings captivating character to the growing anthemic nature and appeal of the song.

With fire to the pleasing guitar enterprise and the rhythmic incitement of Ivy pounding emotions into keen submission, the track is an intriguing and wholly satisfying introduction to The Boy From The Crowd. Its raw charm wins over the imagination right away and with only the lack of the intimidating snarl it often hints at a niggle, Revelator is strong entrance from the band’s and potent teaser for their upcoming album.

The self-released Revelator is available as a free download now @ https://www.facebook.com/TheBoyFromTheCrowd/app_262920113912164

http://www.theboyfromthecrowd.com/

RingMaster 22/09/2014

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The Black Waterside – Self Titled EP

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Like a bottle of fire breathing bourbon which as soon as you take a taste you are addictively hooked, the sound of UK rockers The Black Waterside instantly grabs the balls and passions to create a lustful understanding and hunger. Fusing the richest spices of blues, psychobilly, Americana, and vintage rock ‘n’ roll then fuelling it with a modern attitude and aggression, the Kent band has created a unique and ridiculously flavoursome proposition in sound and their self-titled debut EP. It is a masterful blaze of dirt encrusted and grouchy rock ‘n’ roll with irresistible drama and pure devilry to its every note and syllable, and simply irresistible.

Formed in the latter stages of 2011, The Black Waterside draws on inspirations from the likes of Tom Waits, Sun House, Kill It Kid, The Cramps, The Clash, The Black Keys, and Led Zeppelin to create a fascinating and explosively provocative sound as evidenced by their thoroughly impressive EP. Imagination and passions drips off of every skilful chord and rhythmic swipe emulated by the great grizzled tones of vocalist Adam Bray and the riveting canvases of the songs themselves. They are dark adventures which are as unpredictable as they are imposingly dramatic and incendiary to the imagination, and all irreversibly compelling.

A ‘vintage’ radio introduction to the band sets the opening shot of Four Minute Warning! in motion, before ragged riffs and beats instantly ignites senses and appetite with their rockabilly snarl. The gravelled tones of Bray soon covercountdown the full force of the song from within its initial addictive bait, the guitars of Holly Kinnear and Dan Lucas dancing feistily across ears as the throaty lure of Joe Whalen’s bass adds another delicious texture and enticement to the swiftly enslaving song. A blues swagger and breath cloaks the bouncy stride of the song, similarly spicing up the flames of enterprise and sultry designs of the guitars. It is an anthemic treat; feet governed and urged on by the thumping beats of drummer Jim Davies whilst body and passions are led into salacious endeavours by the swinging groove of the song.

The sensational start is matched by Whorehouse Down On The Southeast, another immediately fascinating and enthralling proposition. The track makes its own captivating start, though this time there is grouchiness to the vocals and rhythmic enticing which is no less inviting than the more embracing start of its predecessor. A hungry scything of electrified riffs ignite on the senses from virtually its first breath whilst rhythms tumble relentlessly to incite another wave of hunger in the passions. There is no escaping the trap for thoughts and emotions, especially with the entrance of the increasingly potent roars of Bray backed this time by the just as potent and gripping vocals of Kinnear. It is a powerful mix matched by the increasingly thrilling blues vapours and contagious twang which breeds its own temptation within the explosive track. Like Seasick Steve meets Tom Waits at the instigation of The Reverend Horton Heat, it is another striking and virulent contagion to devour greedily.

   Brand New Cadillac has that psychobilly tang and swagger which never gets tiring, a confident rebellious stride entwined in guitar and bass grooves which flirt with every note of their wonderfully toxic tempting. There is much more to the song though, a surf wash of acidity and an imposing cloud of garage punk bringing dramatic textures and diversity to the stunning track. As hot and heavy as a vat of blazing liquor and passionately intensive, the track is pure infectiousness and wholly enthralling, especially in its closing twist where Bray shows the qualities of his clean delivery in a simmering bed of emotive seduction.

The release closes with Wrong Side Of The Track, a slow crawl of blues fire which croons as it wraps a sizzling sonic and lyrical narrative across the imagination. A real slow burner in comparison to the previous tracks, it evolves and increases its potency over its length and time, showing further creative depth and musical invention in the band which can only lead to excitement and demanding anticipation for their subsequent adventures.

A must for every fan of blues and psychobilly too quite simply rock ‘n’ roll, The Black Waterside is a lustful addiction just waiting to offer you its first inescapable lure.

The Black Waterside EP is available now @ http://www.theblackwaterside.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/theblackwaterside

9/10

RingMaster 02/09/2014

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Bite The Shark – First Blood

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With a sound as snappy and hungry as their band name suggests, Bite The Shark have made one impressive and attention grabbing entrance with debut single First Blood. Consisting of three songs which roar and swagger with a muscular rock tenacity and punk ferocity, the release is an adrenaline charged juggernaut of rock ‘n’ roll. If you are looking for music unafraid to get dirty whilst spilling bodily fluids then letting Bite The Shark and its single clamp its jaws on you could be one of the wisest moves you make this year.

Hailing from Manchester, the UK band only formed in the early days of 2014 and has swiftly drawn a healthy attention and fan base their way. The recently released First Blood equally took no time in garnering acclaim and more, its success leading to an invitation to the trio of Rory O’Grady and brothers Adam and Edd Langmead, to record with Romesh Dodangoda (Motörhead, Bullet For My Valentine, Twin Atlantic) this September. Like the music within the single, it is fair to say that Bite The Shark is on a charge.

Gas & Air right away tells you all you need to know about its creators, rugged riffs immediately sizing up ears before welcoming imposing rhythms and spicy grooves. It is a striking entrance which is as bold in its presence as it is addictive Microsoft Word - bitesuarez.docxin its explosive enterprise. Elements of Turbonegro and Buckcherry whisper across the raucous adventure as well as spillages of old school punk rock, all resulting in a richly flavoursome and highly anthemic stomp. Hooks and increasingly infectious grooves continue to enslave ears and emotions whilst vocally the band provides a captivating call and brawl of passion drenched energy. The song seems to be the one the band’s fans has grasped to their hearts the most and it is easy to see why as it flirts and romps around the senses.

For us though it is Burn em to the ground (sometimes seemingly just called Burn) which ignites the biggest lust. The track is a beast of an encounter, its opening prowl of beats and bass grooving irresistible and only added to by the sonic squall from the almost belligerent invention of the guitar. Lyrically and musically the song has a snarl and attitude which finds its seeds in bands like The Clash and Stiff little Fingers, whilst its addictive grooves and rapier like swings of rhythms infuses a hard rock riot into its predation. Politically powered and lyrically accusing with a weight of sound and tenacity to back it up, the track is immense and the seal to believing Bite The Shark is definitely going places with the potential to make a lingering mark.

The single is completed by the acoustic track Ms. Ratshit, a song with a swing to it that is bordering on rockabilly and vocals which simply captivate. Based on One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, it is another contagious stomp to cast praise and ardour over.

Do expect to hear a lot about Bite the Shark ahead and if you are wise you will jump on board their ascent right away with First Blood.

First Blood is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/first-blood-single/id899365205

http://www.facebook.com/bitetheshark

9.5/10

RingMaster 27/08/2014

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