Boy – Darkest Visions

boy 2

Imagine a mix of The Angelic Upstarts and UK Subs with an equally potent blend of Rocket From The Crypt and Turbonegro, and you have a sense of Czech punks Boy and the body of their outstanding debut album Darkest Visions. Fusing old school British punk with a touch of glam and raw rock ‘n’ roll, band and release make a dramatic entrance to a worldwide market with their Rebel Sound/Voltage Records released rampage. It is an encounter which has a welcome familiarity to its brawl but just as strongly a unique breath and substance which marks out Boy as a band with a potentially mighty future within the world of punk rock. The band name suggests wishy-washy media friendly teen pleasing blandness, what you get is raw antagonistic punk rock of the finest order.

There is little we can reveal about the background of the band with any available bio offered in Czechoslovakian, but they are a quintet from Brno who have previously released a three track 7” EP via Voltage Records last year and before that had a track on the 2012 compilation Brno stále v plamenech (Brno Still In Flames). Their new full-length is produced by Turbonegro’s Tommy Akerholdt and features numerous guests including Ronnie King (who has worked with NOFX, Rancid, Offspring, Snoop Dog) on piano, Shawn Smash (Total Chaos) on guitar, Daniel Marusack (Chancers) on flute, Theresa Kovalová (Calm Season) on cello, and Martin Maleček (ex – Centaury ,SRK) on conga. That piece of info alone tells you the flavoursome design and sounds bursting from within the punk bred tempest, though the album starts off with a more straight forward belligerent sound.

The title track opens things up with a fiery welcome, hooks blazing vociferously within the ears whilst vocal samples bred from 9/11 place front coverthe drama of the release. It is a heavy weight welcome with sinews building up their intent and intensity ready for the following I Need Your Hate. The second track is immediately snarling and gnawing at the senses, riffs bordering on carnivorous and rhythms an imposing barracking. The excellent rough vocals roar and confront with a voracity which matches the passion of the sounds around them, the song further flaming with seductive melodies from within its rapacious onslaught. There is nothing dramatically ground breaking about the song but with impressive individual skills, a scorching solo, and anthemic band vocals it is an irresistible proposition.

Never Break Us Down binds the imagination next with an instant addictive groove, a lure aligned to numerous sharp hooks and that again virulent anthem seeded suasion which already the band proves they are expert at sculpting. The resourceful romp offers that earlier mentioned RFTC comparison as well as holding a touch of The Mighty Mighty Bosstones to its catchy temptation, both elements re-occurring across the album and adding extra spice to the outstanding raucous charge of punk ’n’ roll. It is a mix which lights up Back For More to a different degree, the band grazing the senses with greater causticity and ravenous breath. Again there is a compelling contagion to the track which has attention and appetite impatient for more which Stay Free more than happily provides. Abrasing ears with acidic sonic swipes from the first second along with an evocatively brewing wash of keys, the track broadens its riveting narrative with a wonderful dark cello croon and atmospheric shadows. It is like a mix of UK band The Duel and Russian punks Biting Elbows, an invasive seduction which subsequently stretches further into a NOFX like imposing. The track is quite glorious, pushing the invention and songwriting of the band whilst still entrenched in their epidemically appealing seventies seeded punk.

Stop Talking To Me stalks and riles up the imagination next, riffs on a chunky prowl speared by predatory rhythms. The vocals are vitriolic in delivery and malevolent in intent, a seemingly different voice leading the intrusive belligerence as the track squares up to the senses and emotions. It is a great strike but one which ends far too soon, only one minute forty seconds in length, and closes on a frustrating and actually very annoying fade-out. These grievances are soon forgotten though as Drop The Bomb scores ears with an acrid flame of guitar punctuated by keys and wisps of melodic guitar invention. The song strides purposefully with a slow predation, absorbing imagination and the by now constantly submissive passions. It is another total captivation revealing yet more of the depths of sound and invention within Boy, the unveiling continued with the heavy rock exploits of It was the Alcohol. The track is prime punk and hard rock with glam devilry and metal toned hunger, and impossibly addictive especially its infectious chorus which is bait only the deaf or the six feet under could resist joining in with.

The album comes to a close with firstly the thrilling quarrelsome bluster and catchiness of Fashion Police then the incendiary glory of Just A Number. The last track is an aggressive scrap of spellbinding hooks, fierce riffs, and punchy rhythms all merged into a rabid contagious punk spat, a last lingering triumph to sear the sound and name of Boy in to the memory and passions.

Darkest Visions is one of the punk glories of recent years and a potent suggestion that Boy has all the armoury and invention to be a real force in punk and rock rioting across numerous horizons to come.

Darkest Visions is available through Rebel Sound and Voltage Records now as a black vinyl release with a 12 -page booklet and in a deluxe version clad in silver foiled artwork.

https://www.facebook.com/PUNKROCKHOOLIGANS

http://www.boy-punk.com/

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Reverted – Sputter the Worms

Reverted Hi-Res Pic

Though you come out of it feeling there is plenty left for its creators to discover and find to develop a wholly unique voice, it is hard not to be impressed and eagerly captivated by Sputter the Worms the debut album from UK band Reverted. With the release of the band’s new single Die My Saint, taken from the album, a look at the full-length seemed in order. Consisting of thirteen tracks which roar at ears with a ferocious multi-flavoured brew of sound and aggression, the release is a fiery brawl merging thrash, hard rock, and varied essences of metal. The album rampages with imagination and voracity, crawling rigorously over the senses and passions with raw adventure. There is much within it which is arguably familiar but plenty which is vigorously individual as the album riots with thrilling effect.

Reverted began in 2010 and it is fair to say they have made a more than attention grabbing impression. They have backed up the promise showed by live performances with Sputter the Worms, a release which pulls feet and emotions into active submission early on and refuses to let them relax until it has finished its creative charge. The title track thrusts its muscular weight and body through ears first, though its entrance is relatively reserved with thick riffs and pumped beats making a less than forceful coaxing. It is a magnetic start all the same which increases its bait with a great whining acidic flame of guitar which triggers a hungry rampancy in the gait of the track. The bass of Luis L Valle and guitar of Daniel Ruiz stomp with a prowling menace and rasping riffery respectively with the song in full stride whilst the drums of Ozzy Preciado thump with intimidating skill. It is a richly engaging proposition completed by the excellent vocal tones of Tony Vega, his gruff but clean tones ably backed by those of Preciado. Like a mix of Metallica and Fuckshovel, thrash and punk pleasing additives to the heavyweight rocking going on, the song is a masterful opening persuasion.

The potent start is soon backed up by the similarly impressive Magledonia (Harvest of Sin), another brew brought on a thrash bred Sputter The Worms Artworkappetite. The track swaggers and ripples with antagonistic confidence and sonic bait, guitars and drums enslaving attention so the bass can stalk the senses as vocals sprawl with their menacing narrative. With a vein of classic and hard rock virulence to its encounter, the song romps with a straightforward but appetite sparking success before making way for Don´t Try to Steal Me from the Inside. Valle instantly steals early control of thoughts and song with his throaty lines before the rhythms of Preciado explode in highly agitated invention and the track crowds the ears with a predatory intensity. Groove and thrash metal collide perfectly within the song but also scorching flames of melodic and alternative rock add their spice to the exciting mix, with the vocals as the sound unafraid to vary and play with their delivery.

Both the outstanding Dispose of Heartaches and the new single Die My Saint ignite imagination and pleasure further, the first bursting with a devilish intent forging punk and thrash into a psyche rock and nu-metal mesh. The track exhausts and exhilarates the passions, stealing early best song honours though it is soon rivalled by its successor, an urgent aggressor with absorbing twists of sonic endeavour amidst another richly packed flavoursome design. Psyche and nu-metal colours the sinew driven encounter whilst the rhythmic frame is an unrelenting insistence with anthemic persuasion. The pair provides the first major pinnacle of the album, probably the highest peak though plenty of tracks like the following Pulse stand tall alongside their might. A growl erupts in the vocals and sound of the song, intensity driving forward with bestial rabidity to match the barbarous rhythms and the ever predacious bass provocation. There is a grunge flame to the cleaner stretches of the song though proving again the diverse ground and textures the band explores across the album. Admittedly there are familiar sounds at work too, that Metallica feel never far away, but Reverted mix and come up with an overall sound which holds its own in freshness.

The acidic entrance of Tolerance makes a dramatic lure before a mix of progressive rock and groove metal merges to enthral thoughts, the track littering its pleasing bulk with punchy energy, rising crescendos, and abrasive expulsions. It is another potent enticement which as its predecessors welcomingly lingers. It also in many ways closes the most immediate part of the album with the following Stained Soul andonwards, the album places its most adventurous and involved songs though it certainly does not relinquish its grip on appetite and passions. Stained Soul holds a slower gait than previous tracks but with intensity still high fills the vacancy with a focused melodic rock craft, though that is still courted by the rapacious intent the band revels in which ensures the song is no less a threat and aggressor than others.

The gentle caress of Insanity takes longer to persuade than most but with its emotive strings, warm melodic rock centre, and passionate grumble the track easily secures a greedy appreciation whilst the more power ballad like Forsaken with a definite Hetfield and co feel pleases firmly without lighting fires, the same which can be said about Stairs of Guilt. Neither song grips as tightly as others but shows the expansive power of the band in sound and songwriting which certainly excites.

   Sputter the Worms closes with firstly Time, a track which glides through a weave of styles and. As the previous two it fails to spark a full ardour but furthers the impressive skills and imaginative adventure of the band which are to enthuse over and anticipate creating greater triumphs ahead. Final song Bummer is a muscle driven slab of heavy rock with metal roots, a very easy to devour and enjoy straightforward protagonist.

Reverted is a band on a sure and striking rise in presence and creativity, with the potential to be something very special. They have a drama to their songs and an invention which defuses the recognisable elements also carried; the result one thoroughly thrilling ride.

The self-released Sputter the Worms is available now!

http://www.reverted.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

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Discharger / The Uprisers Split EP

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If you ask us there really are not enough split releases around these days, not enough bands/labels really exploiting their potential in spreading the word and sounds of emerging and established but maybe still to be discovered bands. Rebel Sound Music has stepped up to the plate though with the outstanding link up of Dutch Oi! punks Discharger and US punk ‘n’ rollers The Uprisers. Consisting of four diverse contagions, the 7” single is an irresistible riot of uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll, one gleefully leaving an exhausted and impossibly contented glow over ears and passions.

Hailing from Amersfoort, Discharger has never been slow in unleashing anthemic and compelling encounters to ignite punk appetites starting with debut album Born Immortal in 2004. Our Hate Is Justified two years later and the following The Sword of Our Ancestors in 2008 reinforced the band as a truly provocative proposition whilst the 2012 album Desecrated Ground recruited another wealth of engaged attention and fans, with the band re-embracing their Oi! background they started with than the more metal rooted influences which marked its predecessor. The quartet with their new songs stay rooted firmly in their punk roots on the single though that is not to say that the band has neglected any of its adventurous intent in sound.

Everytime We Drink opens on a relaxed chord and melodic coaxing before lifting its sinews and knees to burst into a muscular stomp, enthralling grooves lacing the aggressive urgency of the band. Seemingly already a firm favourite with fans and newcomers to the band since its appearance on YouTube a few weeks back, the track roars and recruits with open anthemic revelry around a thumping rhythmic punctuation. A fiery rampage with more contagion in its walls than many bands breed in a whole album, the track ignites an instant greed in ears and appetite for the following No Place For Our Kind. Opening on an acoustic invitation, the song erupts into a rampant confrontation with infectiousness again dripping from every note and digging hook. The great gruff vocals and almost brawling stride of the song has a thick texture which is part metallic and part rockabilly, the combination reminding of Danish motorbillys, The Grumpynators at times. It is a thoroughly incendiary and riveting anthem, quite irresistible and quite brilliant.

Discharger gives a high benchmark for New Hampshire’s The Uprisers to match, but it is no challenge as they rival their companions in Printsound and contagion. Emerging from the ashes of The Radicts, the band sees the reunion of Todd Radict and Rodger Shosa of The Bruisers, the pair having played together in punk band Five Balls of Power in the eighties. The band opens up their contribution to the release with a reworking of an old song of The Radicts. Led by the captivating vocals of Britney Noyes which have more than an essence of Poly Styrene meets Wendy Wu to them, Everybody’s Got A Reason takes a mere breath in time to draw a firmly attentive reaction with its opening thump of beats and classic rock flavoured guitar tempting. Keeping to a controlled stride with strikes of rhythms and guitar around catchy hooks, the song makes a tasty infectious appetiser for the band’s main course, the outstanding Ghetto Blaster. A brand new song from the band, it captures thoughts and emotions right away with its old school/modern punk bait, the track within seconds reminding of bands such as Penetration, 4 Nin Blondes, and Juliette And The Licks. Riffs and rhythms surge through the ears as devilishly as the vocals; every stride leaving a coating of anthemic toxicity which builds into a virulent seduction speared by sonic endeavour and melodically crafted hooks for the strongest bait. The song is punk rock at its purest insatiable best and takes tops honours amongst four quite magnificent beasts.

Whether the bands are intriguingly new to you or you just want punk rock in its strongest guises then the split between Discharger and The Uprisers is essential listening and owning.

The Discharger/ Uprisers split 7” is available now through Rebel Sound Music now coming in 200 Black vinyl, 200 Red vinyl, and 100 White vinyl options.

https://www.facebook.com/dischargerholland

https://www.facebook.com/theuprisersnh

http://www.rebelsoundrecords.com/

9/10

RingMaster 16/04/2014

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The Warriors – Dead To Me

7 Jacket (Glue Pocket - No Spine) [OB-GD17-001]

Reading the bio of UK Oi! veterans The Warriors, it has seemingly been an interrupted and persistently changing  adventure for the band since forming in 1981, their story almost having more twists and delays than a search for a Malaysia airlines flight. What has not been left unsure and broken is the might and passion, not forgetting contagiousness of their undiluted sound as evidenced by their new release, the Dead To Me EP. Two riots of insatiable energy and virulent old school bred punk, the release is a belligerent stomp which masterfully challenges and voraciously incites with raw rock ‘n’ roll.

Hailing from Kent, The Warriors was formed by original Last Resort singer Saxby though initially proved to be a short lived presence. He reformed the band with former-Last Resort bass player Arthur Kitchener in the mid-nineties with a line-up which played numerous shows around the UK, Europe, and Japan. Personal changes were part of the time as were also several album releases including The Full Monty and Noizy Bollox in ’96 and ’97, both via the Step-1 Music, and contributions to compilations and split releases over the years. As mentioned changes within the band is a journey in itself to keep up with but well worth checking out on their bio for, but it has not stopped The Warriors reinforcing themselves as one of the most potent and essential presences within the punk scene which further releases like Unite The Scene and Never Forgive Never Forget, as well as this new EP easily confirm.

Available through Aggro Beat as a 250 Solid Red vinyl release in Europe and with Rebel Sound Music as a 250 Piss Yellow vinyl encounter in the US, Dead To Me storms the ears and passions with all the true punk intent and hunger as expected from the band. The title track, which will be featured in the upcoming British movie Gatwick Gangsters, is instantly upon the senses and imagination with jagged riffs and rolling rhythms skirted by a great almost nasally bass prowl. The song is not an all-out assault but one with a predatory side to its nature, skirting and courting the senses with an emerging brawl of sound and the ever distinct tones of Saxby.  The group calls in the chorus only reinforce the steady anthemic lure of the song whilst the crisp beats and choppy guitar narrative add their creative enslaving web. With craft and emotion as loud as the uncomplicated bait of the song, Dead To Me is an irresistible stomp seeing The Warriors in a richer vein of punk rock than their earlier Oi! exploits and easily seducing the passions.

The song’s companion No One Provokes Me is much the same, a virulently contagious riot of punk antagonism and infectiously toxic hooks driven by magnetically challenging vocals and rhythms. The track takes thoughts right back to the birth of UK punk in many ways whilst caging the ears and an already greedy appetite in the rapacious mischief and combativeness of today. Like the first, the track is impossibly anthemic as it bridges the eras and shows again that the punk appetite and ingenuity never dies no matter the years stretched over by bands such as The Warriors.

With an appearance at the Rebellion Festival, Blackpool in August confirmed and many other shows in the planning, The Warriors looks set to take the UK punk scene by the scruff of the neck, Dead To Me their first unmissable stranglehold of 2014.

http://www.warriorsuk.com/

9/10

Ringmaster 09/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Seizing time and opportunities: an interview with Enfeeble

enfeeble

German metallers Enfeeble might still be a bit of a secret to the wider metal world but with new album Encapsulate This Moment they have made a potent statement which should grip a stronger attention. It is an album which arguably does not quite fulfil the open potential of the band and their blend of melodic and heavy metal with metalcore predaciousness, but certainly makes a potent impact and in hindsight a lingering lure which brings you back to its compelling confrontation time and time again. Wanting to find out more about the band we had the pleasure to ask guitarist Pascal (Baal) Stafflage and the band about the origins of Enfeeble, their new album, life for a metal band in their hometown, and much more…

Hi and many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Firstly can you tell us how the band and its members came together?

It was a few years ago in 2005…Luke was the singer of the school band and I was looking for a singer and guitarist for a new band. I asked Luke if he wants to start a band with me and he was excited directly. A drummer and bassist were found quickly and so we started as a small punk rock band. In the coming years we’ve had many changes on bass and drums. Since the beginning of 2013 we are the current cast.

Did you have any deliberate idea or direction for Enfeeble from the start?

Absolutely no…We started as a punk rock band (like Sum 41, Blink 182…) in 2005 and somehow we grew old and became some sort of metalheads with a little bit of punk rock influence. With the fast and harder music, we feel more comfortable.

You come from the Lingen in Germany. What is it like in the town and surrounding areas for a band trying to emerge?

Really bad to be honest…This whole area has a couple of metalheads but unfortunately most of them retain to a special kind of genre and it´s not our genre. Maybe it’s the country life here. We have no idea what it is. Therefore, we travel a lot around the country.

coverYou have just released your second album Encapsulate This Moment; how do you see the evolution of your sound to it from your debut full-length Too Ugly to Show it!?

We never really see the evolution ´cause we are right now in this process of evolving. But when you compare Too Ugly To Show It and Encapsulate This Moment you can hear that we have become more “metal” and try to improve our skills at our instruments all the time.

Did you approach the new release any differently to the previous album, whether through simply the experience of previously recording something or to achieve something specific?

We have changed the bass player, drummer, studio and attitude. So you can see…almost everything. The result is Encapsulate This Moment…A significant improvement.

With its strong blend of aggression and grooved endeavour, did you find yourself developing a broader bravery in your songwriting for the new album than ever before?

Of course… Almost every month we find new bands and therefore new influences. The songwriting is affected by this as well. And we try to sound unique as every other band to.

What were the biggest inspirations for the album musically and lyrically?

Musically it´s some bands like Killswitch Engage, Protest The Hero, Dream Theater or Threat Signal.

The lyrics were also created by experiences of everyday life.

How does the songwriting process work within Enfeeble?enfeeble3

We got some different ways. Either we play all together and discuss every part and the arrangement. Or Baal writes a song and we refine just a few parts or Baal and Luke sit together on a weekend locked up from the world only surviving with pizza, beer and energy drinks.

Did you find the tracks developing new characters during the studio process or stayed pretty much as intended going into the situation?

We worked together with Jörg from Soundlodge studios and he gave us some of his advice and we rewrote some parts. It was a very inspiring and enjoyable time with Jörg. We learned a lot and had good experiences.

The album has an invigorating rawness to its breath; did you do anything in particular to encourage this aspect?

Luke has a raw natural voice. No fake – All original. Maybe if he starts with smoking and whisky drinking, he becomes the new Lemmy. Just a little big joke :-) Honestly we would not change much on the vocals. Only improve, not change.

Was anything learnt during recording Encapsulate This Moment which surprised you and will be taken into your next release?

Less is more! Some parts, where we have had some double bass and blastbeats are now a standard rock beats. But in the mix it sounds a lot heavier. That was an important experience for us.

For us it is the title track to the album which gives us thrilling chills, is there any moment or essence of the album which gives you extra satisfaction?

Maybe it´s A Million Voices, because the song is really complex in itself and it’s always fun to play it. But also As We Were Like Shadows ´cause it has a personal story and Luke has sung it so fucking beautifully that Baal was crying in the studio. (Beautiful bastard).

You have a strong reputation for your live performances, a different proposition to the studio of course but do you think you captured that same intensity and honest raw quality on the album also this time around?

We guess not. We are always a bit nervous on stage but we believe that we also therefore play with so much energy.

Talking of shows how is 2014 planning out so far for the band ahead?

We already have some confirmed dates. However, we continue to search for new performances… Also internationally. Current dates are always on our website http://www.enfeeble.de

Back to Encapsulate This Moment; tell us about the striking artwork for the album.

We had the luck, to work together with Björn Goosses of Killustration. We had an artwork in our minds but his suggestion (what he thought when he thinks of Encapsulate This Moment) was just perfect for us.

enfeeble 2What comes next for Enfeeble other than shows?

We are working on new songs for the third album. We want to hit the studio in the beginning of 2015. Maybe by then we have found a label who wants to work with us. That would be a dream come true.

Thanks once again for chatting with us, any last thoughts or words you would like to finish with?

Encapsulate all your moments! And thanks a lot for the interview.

https://www.facebook.com/EnfeebleOfficial

Read the review of Encapsulate This Moment @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/07/enfeeble-encapsulate-this-moment/

Pete Ringmaster

The Ringmaster Review 27/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Creeping Ivies – Ghost World

The  Creeping Ivies

Taking senses and imagination on another psyche ripping helter skelter of raw and sonically sculpted rock ‘n’ roll, Scottish duo The Creeping Ivies unveil their second album Ghost World and prove themselves yet again to be one of the most exciting provocateurs of primal incitement. The new full-length from the band is a riotous seduction of garage punk and naked rock ‘n’ roll with plenty of spices from psychobilly to punk rock. It also sees the band at its most potent and insatiably virulent yet, the release loaded with deliciously caustic and masterfully magnetic, to steal from the title of one of their earlier songs, buzzbombs.

The Creeping Ivies consists of Becca Bomb providing piercing, coarsely sirenesque vocals and raw sonic guitar vivacity and Duncan Destruction who brings heavy thumping, rapaciously intruding beats to the thrilling equation. Their union is a simultaneously primitive and precisely sculpted enslaving of the senses, one which from day one intrigued and wildly enthralled. First release the Rock N Roll Party EP in 2011 stirred up attention and emotions with its synapse searing acidity and voracious rioting, that an ever present trait expanding with greater potency on the following Ghost Train EP and debut album Stay Wild, both in 2012. Inciting audiences just as dramatically with their live performances, which has seen them share a stage with the likes of  Viv Albertine of The Slits and Vic Godard & Subway Sect, the stature of The Creeping Ivies has increased constantly within the underground scene, their sound recalling many influences but undeniably unique to them. Last November the release of the double A-sided single What Would Joey Ramone Do? / Ramona Wolf teased and tempted as the band showed a continuing to evolve invention to their sonic exploits and imagination. It certainly led to the anticipation and expectations of their next album to intensify. The two tracks hinted at the possible magnificence of Ghost World but it is fair to say that its haunting intrusive delights have emerged as a far greater and dangerous triumph than hoped.

The Dundee pair open up the adventure with the album’s title track. Instantly a haunted caress of guitar glances over ears with a caustic kiss coverin tow as well as a rub of riffs and the joining tub thumping beats of Duncan. Immediately enticing in its noir lit breath and grazing ambience, the track pulsates as it worms its way under the skin laying irresistible bait for the entrance of Becca’s vocals. As ever her voice holds a definite Wanda Jackson meets Siouxsie Sioux texture and magnetism to it, intensity in her delivery searing flesh and air as she and the song hit their stride. With an addiction spawning groove and the delicious occasional blaze of harmonica from guest Homesick Aldo, the track takes little time to secure full submission for its tempting whilst showing the evolution in sound and songwriting maturity poised to consume the senses  in hand with the expected sonic feverishness of the band.

The following entangling chords of The Bridge provide an instant variation to the toxicity of the album; its opening fifties bred melodic teasing charming the listener before thrusting sinew packed beats and the wonderfully torrid vocal tones of Bomb into the appealing recipe. The hook which drew the first spark of ardour as the song started continues to vein the stomp whilst a resonating shimmer to the sound engulfs and exhilarates the senses. As with all their songs, the premise is uncomplicated and minimalistic but always thick in presence and invention leading to fully textured and imposing encounters.

The intimidating shadows of The Creeps consumes attention next, their threat and imposing provocation sizeable but defused by an excellent revelry of keys, vocal wails, and the urgent dance of hooks and harmonies. Short, sweet, and irresistible, the song is then put in its appealing place by Love Kills, a brilliant blend of sixties pop, garage punk, and rockabilly energy. Imagine The Shangri-Las and The Cramps in a saucy romantic triangle with Australian band Valentiine and you have the brilliant Love Kills. The track sways and romps with revelry and mischievousness to cast a perfect raw pop song on the passions.

Ramona Wolf just sounds better with each encounter since its single release last November. It’s almost spatial opening ambience paves the way for the vocal seduction of Becca to spread a temptress like devilry, a sonic medusa with a delivery writhing with searing harmonies and enslaving qualities. Musically the song is a repetitive narrative, punchy beats and scalding guitar probing and grazing respectively with singular intent beneath the harsh atmosphere of the tale. It is also quite glorious as is the next up Dream Baby Dream. Providing irrepressible flirting from the sax of Andrew Pattie within its scintillating fifties pop ravaging and punk seeded ravishing, the song stomps over and challenges the senses for another unruly treat, Bo Diddley meets Helen Shapiro at the home of The Trashmen.

Both Trippin’ Out and Haunted High School finger the passions in their individual ways next, the first a heart rapping rampage of jabbing beats and scarring riffs skirting the sinister drama. It is a tale of ghostly enterprise and inescapable rapacious shadows with a heartbeat which resonates through the bone and core of the evocative tale whilst melodic acidity and vocal colouring courts its intent. The excellent fierce smouldering is soon exceeded by What Would Joey Ramone Do?, a song which sculpts a raising of the spirits of Gene Vincent and Lux Interior with that of the song’s namesake. The track provides all you expect and much more, the Cochran/ Poison Ivy Rorschach like mix of guitar sound with the impossible contagious punk stomp of the song an epidemic for the passions.

Arguably the band saves the best till last, though every listen offers a different favourite. Forever Leather fuses sixties girl pop with a raw voracity, the song like the punk infected offspring of The Crystals and The Stooges with a heady dose of Siouxsie menace. It is a scintillating end to an outstanding album. The Creeping Ivies continue to impress as they evolve and push their boundaries, doing so without losing any of the elements which made them an unbridled addiction certainly for us since their early days. Whether their sound will ever find the major spotlight it deserves is impossible to say, such its uniqueness and undiluted rawness, but it will definitely recruit the most passionate and feverish passions from an increasingly growing legion of fans we suggest, it just needs the opportunity to make that infectious strike.

http://thecreepingivies.com/

http://thecreepingivies.bandcamp.com/

10/10

RingMaster 24/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Shameless – Guilt

 

12 Picture Disc [GD30PD]

    With its well-received unleashing in Europe through Bords de Seine, Lion Records, and Last Rockers, and an even more recent uncaging as a 500 strong Limited Edition Picture Disk in the US via Rebel Sound Music, debut album Guilt from punks Shameless is an impressively solid and potent introduction to the French band. A feisty attitude drenched mix of old school and oi punk, the Lyon based quartet’s sound hits the spot forcibly and honestly, no overblown sonic theatrics or candy coated hooks cluttering their straightforward anthemic antagonism. Guilty is an album which does not hold many surprises or always gets the blood boiling but it certainly rouses and incites a healthy appetite for the promising sound and future provocations from the band.

    The seeds of the band go back to 2009 when vocalist/guitarist Pépito moves to Lyon and meets bassist Nico of the Rude Gones. They talk of getting a band up together, a suggestion which is given an opportunity to be realised when the Rude Gones split in the October of 2010. Writing together, the pair then recruit ex-Urban Gones drummer Scooter into their English Oi! inspired project. The band’s second gig saw them opening for La Souris Déglinguée, West Side Boys, and Warrior Kids to eager responses, a spark the band took into the making of their first full-length. Six months in the making the album came out to strong reactions swiftly followed by equally potent responses when the band around the time of its release played a show to celebrate the anniversary of the band Bad Gones with La Souris Déglinguée, Booze & Glory and Wayne Barrett of Slaughter and the Dogs. Unveiling second guitarist and ex-Urban Gones Gilles, who had already played as a guest with them on stage previously, as a permanent addition to the band at the show, Shameless show themselves ready and poised to take their DIY bred sound and presence to the punk passions of the world. A quest you feel if not with this album is a certainty within one of their near horizons.

    The title track arrives on sirens to open things up, public disorder soon sound-tracked by stirring riffs and crisp rhythms soaked in anthemic weight. The vocals of Pépito, gruff and slightly antagonistic, join the charge as the song stomps with addictive grooves and equally compelling hooks. Its prime bait has an essence of The Sweet meets Suburban Studs to it, the song as a whole an excellent and infectious doorway into the release.

     The following Friday Night Losers backs up the starter with its own incitement of riling rhythms and caustic riffery driven by uncompromising but welcoming vocals. There is little to surprise in the song though it avoids real predictability with ease, as does its successors 30 Years Tomorrow and Bastard!. The first taunts ears with a great throaty bassline and a quietly riotous stance around an irresistible chorus whilst the second instantly eyeballs senses and thoughts, bawling them out with another potently contagious chorus within abrasing sounds and vocals. As with most of the songs there are very few really striking hooks that viciously grip but it does not stop tracks like this from becoming a lingering and memorable pleasure.

    Both the unruly chant fest Oi! For My Nation and the outstanding We Are the Boys keep attention hungry for the release, the second of the two one of the major highlights of the release. With a delicious twang to the again predacious bass sound and a swagger to the vocal inducement, the track is a fiery encounter though like all the songs it is fair to say it does not explore or antagonise enough for personal tastes, almost holding itself in check for some reason.

     Men With Ties is a raw graze for the senses, its threatening to brawl approach a magnetic lure to spark up another flame of excited satisfaction whilst the next up Vote For Shameless has a reserved but definite Angelic Upstarts feel to its rebellion, a fight which is veined by a Buzzcocks like great hook and the only really attention seeking one on the album. From the pleasing recruitment drive Disappointing Friend steps in next to make a strong and enjoyable statement if without rivalling anything before its appearance. It is a decent enough song but lacks the spark and infectious suasion of others, though that toxicity is soon back fuelling the passions through Fashion Week. The track is a commanding and confronting bruising with the primal rhythmic combativeness and scolding riffery all the great punk songs unload on the senses. The best track on the album it is an invigorating barracking bringing the heart of the album to a close before final track provides an epilogue through its live version of Virage Nord, the Oi! hymn of Urban Gones.

     Guilt is a great rage parading the potential and punk voracity of a band it is easy to keep an eager eye upon. Once Shameless find their distinct voice and unshackle their reserve you can expect major fireworks ahead, whilst right now they simply provide a thoroughly pleasing and rousing experience…something never easy to refuse.

https://www.facebook.com/shamelessoi

http://www.shamelessoi.com/

8/10

RingMaster 19/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Pulsebeats – Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me 7”

The Pulsebeats

   It feels a long time since being introduced to the irrepressible Spanish miscreants The Pulsebeats through their debut self-titled album of late 2011. Across that distance though their lure and mischievous temptation has never waned, their release remaining a regular on the RR playlist. Its time though may have come to a ‘end’ as the riotous sounds of the Spaniards return in scintillating style with new 7” single and download, Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me. Released via FOLC Records, it is a three song riot of punk bred rock ‘n’ roll which simply infects and incites full emotional and physical rebellion.

     Hailing from Santander, The Pulsebeats leapt at the world at the beginning of 2010, the quartet containing two experienced in rock ‘n’ roll from playing in The Vipers alongside another pair of musicians just as voraciously hungry and creatively energetic. As mentioned it was their debut album which sparked a keen appetite for the band, a thrilling and potential driven release which only suggested greater things to come, which the single is only too happy to confirm. Whereas the full-length had an infectious pop punk thrust to its garage punk and rock mayhem, Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me reaps the contagious seeds of more caustic punk rock but without losing any of the trademark ridiculously catchy and insatiably addictive charm. Hooks and riffs aligned to a lyrical and passionate snarl once again steal the passions, but as always with The Pulsebeats fun is the order of the day and there is plenty of that thrashing around on the single.

    The title track makes the first thrust, its opening play of guitars moving into a strolling gait with a slight cowpunk lilt to its pulsebeats coverenergetic stance. The vocals step in next adding a raw punk attack to the infectious provocation with a garage punk breath also barging in on the raucous revelry as the song rolls out its irresistible stomp. It is a glorious sonic incitement opening up an attack on politicians and their neglect of the needy whilst lining their own pockets. The Pulsebeats may like to rock and rock hard but they are no wallflowers when it comes to dealing with society’s issues either.

     From the excellent start, the band shifts up the gears with firstly White Little Horse. The song unleashes an opening almost disorientating melee of beats and sonically sculpted guitar teasing ensuring attention is instantly wide awake. From there it settles into a riveting stroll laced with a great throaty bass line and jagged riffs, both courting the ever coaxing vocals amid the brewing mischief of the band. Garage punk with a pop spawned catchiness, the song flirts with the ears like a mix of The Stooges, Eddie and The Hot Rod, and Buzzcocks with an extra air of The Strokes; the blend happily leading imaginations into bad habits and emotions into lustful responses.

   The final track I’ll Let You Know brings addictiveness another potent dose of provocation as guitars jangle and clash teasingly with the senses whilst raw vocals, singular and on a united front, add discordant irreverence to the party. With a ridiculously virulent bass hook the prime protagonist for the passions within the sixties punk inspired blaze of guitar and attitude, not forgetting infection, the song is a mouthwatering and exhausting rampage which anyone would sell their souls for to create or simply enjoy.

    It has taken a while to see the return of The Pulsebeats  release wise but they have made that wait an insignificant niggle with easily their best fevered frenzy yet. Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me is a magnificent beast of a riot again reminding us that The Pulsebeats is one of the finest inimitable exponents of vivacious multi-faceted rock ‘n’ roll.

http://www.thepulsebeats.org

http://thepulsebeats.bandcamp.com/album/dont-turn-your-fucking-back-on-me-7-single

9/10

RingMaster 12/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Midnight Mob -These Days

 

MM

    The second in their range of very limited edition CDs helping to get UK coverage for bands from around the world, STP Records are releasing the excellent These Days album from New York City rockers Midnight Mob. Consisting of ten rousing tracks of punk and incendiary rock, the release is a feisty and thrilling showcase for an equally compelling band.

     Midnight Mob formed in 2009 and took little time in firing up audiences and passions with their seduction of passionate and bruising rock ‘n’ roll. A year later the band’s line-up became a stable confrontation, its frontline provided by the rich and feisty tones of Blackey Deathproof, sweetness and venom wrapped up in every unleashed syllable. Alongside her the guitars of Mickey Squeeze and Spydyr cast equally riveting and persuasive sounds whilst dangerous rhythms are bred from bassist Carly Quinn and drummer Catastrophe. A self-titled EP was uncaged in 2011 alongside a video for the track Overdrive. Both drew healthy attention to complement the band’s live reputation which has seen them play sizeable chunks of the US. Last year a second EP, Black Moon Rising, pushed the band further into the spotlight with the singles These Days and All For Nothing stand out opportunities, both subsequently receiving video releases filmed by Jarret Bellucci and Adam Bailey respectively. 2013 also saw the departure of Catastrophe but also interest from STP in bringing the band to the attention of a European appetite, which the new CD achieves with ease and quality. Bringing all the EPs and singles into one concentration of fevered rock music, it is hard to imagine that These Days will not make Midnight Mob a heavily talked about and sought after import for British passions.

     Overdrive starts things off and instantly has appetite and feet launching their support. From a distant vocal cry within an intriguing sonic breath, the song collects its sinews and fire in a brewing intimidation before unleashing a torrent of sonic bait, thumping rhythms, and rebellious riffs. Into full stride the track, ridden by the instantly provocative and enthralling delivery of Blackey, seduces and rages with hooks and grooves aplenty, all enslaving the imagination whilst frisking the passions. It is potent punk ‘n’ roll, a fire of enterprise and passion which nags and taunts for the fullest satisfaction.

     From the scintillating start, the album moves from a brawl to a wanton rock dance with All Or Nothing. More reserved in its gait and intensity though certainly not potency, the song romps with melodic majesty and a delicious vocal harmony which just caresses all the naughty places. Like a mix of eighties band The Photos and the early days of Blondie but with the snarl of The Objex included, the track is a contagious temptation instantly matched by Hit Or Miss and Perfect Crime. The first has a chorus which stands before you eye to eye, daring you not to join in with its ridiculously tempting chorus like calls from the first few seconds. Almost preying on the senses with its energetic stomp and virulently masterful persuasion, the song merges pop punk and hard rock for a quite magnetic encounter which may not fire up the emotions as the first pair but certainly leaves them grinning as broadly, especially that deviously addictive vocal enslavement. The second of the two takes a more straight on rock route to thoughts, its body as with so many of the songs familiar, though it might just be to the fact that we have listened to the album much more than anything else these past couple of weeks, and engagingly welcoming. Again infectiousness works its way into ears and passions for another persistently fun time.

    Through the belligerent rhythmic and riff driven stomp of Be Mine, a track which lays shadows on vocals and thoughts like a warm glaze, the band continues to light the fuse of rapturous hunger. At times the song, especially through its ratchet of guitar strikes, reminds of Penetration but also with its blaze of melodic rock enticement presses other thoughts of artists like Lita Ford into the blend, as does the following Walking Dead, it a masterful menacing seduction from Blackey matched by the melodic weave of Squeeze and Spydyr and the bass prowl offered by Quinn. Listening to the album is like indulging in an expanse of greatest hits tracks with this one of the biggest pinnacles.

   The twin musical growls of Black Moon Rising and My Undead Darling “You Still Haunt Me” push the listener into a darker diverse corner of the album, the first a sultry embrace with a bordering on psychobilly swagger and Danzig like drama. It is a riveting adventure abrasing and seducing the emotions in skilled and tempting style whilst its successor rolls in on a wash of rhythmic incitement soon aided by sonic and bass teasing, again a rockabilly essence seeding the magnificent stroll of rock ‘n’ roll. The band states as one of their influences Cheap Trick, and certainly this joy has that epidemic pop rock essence and passion stealing potency, to which you can adds tasty moments of The Creepshow.

    The title track leaves little time to compose your clothing and temptations, whisking the listener to their feet for a waltz through heat climates and smouldering emotions. It is an elegantly absorbing invitation with the charm to calm wild stallions and rioting crowds. Something the closing So Hard would achieve the opposite of, its sinews and boisterous intensity a punk rock provocation with melodic rock armoury. Though the track does not reach the same levels as the rest of the album it makes a powerful finale and only adds to the reasons why this side of the pond should join the Midnight Mob.

      These Days is not an album to push boundaries it is fair to say but for honest and give it all rock ‘n’ roll there are few better. Jump on board and grab a copy of Midnight Mob’s UK debut is the recommendation, before it is too late.

http://www.midnightmob.com/

These Days is available from http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page5.htm

9/10

RingMaster 12/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Foreign Legion – Light At The End Of The Tunnel

12 Jacket (3mm Spine) [GDOB-30H3-007}

    As shown by their new album Light At The End Of The Tunnel, Welsh punks Foreign Legion has never strayed too far away from their roots but continue to invigorate and push their core sound with a passion and energy which never becomes tiresome. The band’s latest riot bridges their old school punk/oi background with a modern punk ‘n’ roll confrontation resulting in twelve songs which make swift anthemic stabs with contagious endeavour aligned to antagonistic intent.

     Formed in 1984, Foreign Legion has built an attention grabbing presence which has endured and widened over the years. A trio of full-length releases continued to set the band apart from the pack, especially the acclaimed Mick Jones produced What Goes Around Comes Around of 2002, whilst split releases with Major Accident in 2000 and Sledgeback in 2010 amidst their own EPs and compilation gracing songs, have proved the band a potent encounter within the modern era of punk rock. On stage again the quartet has forged a formidable reputation, the band playing across over 15 countries and sharing stages with bands such as Cockney Rejects, Guitar Gangsters, Control, The Warriors, GBH, The Ruts, Stiff Little Fingers and many more. They are also the only Welsh band to play the legendary CBGB’s in New York which makes an additional potent mark on their career’s CV alongside their numerous festival appearances including the likes of Back On The Streets, Punk & Disorderly and the Rebellion Festival, where the band is set to ignite the crowd again in 2014. Released via Aggro Beat in Europe as a Green With Red Splatter vinyl and Rebel Sound in the US as an equivalent in Mint Green with both issues limited to 250, Light At The End Of The Tunnel provides another feisty and tasty morsel from Foreign Legion to enthuse over.

     Light At The End Of The Tunnel makes a strong and appealing start with opener Jenny and its successor What A Place To Be, if neither really inspires a greedy appetite in the emotions. Both tracks still grab attention easily to set things off promisingly, the opening song entangling ears with welcoming guitar strands of melody from Simon Bendon punctured by the firm beats of drummer Glyn Bendon. Soon into its stride with the track’s narrative unveiled by founding band member and vocalist Marcus Howells, the restrained and easy to access stroll makes a simple and catchy romp before the second song on the album similarly has feet and voice in tandem with its infectious if undemanding beckoning, the bass of Steve Zuki the most irresistible lure.

    The album catches fire from here on in with firstly the excellent Regenerations (Council list. Riffs and rhythms bring an instant entrapment of the imagination before soon being reinforced by the swiping vocals as the song looks g at local governments and the decline of British towns and all that inspires. The track is a contagious two minutes plus of uncomplicated but thoroughly inciting social commentary in the renowned Foreign Legion style, though again maybe there is a spark missing in comparison to the following tracks. There is an undeniable greater potency to the song which the band and album expands further through songs like My Radio. A great bass intro from Zuki sets the track off in compelling style, its swagger and groove matched by the hooks of the guitars and the effect rubbed vocals. Infection again wraps the song, its virulence at new heights for the release with riffs and rhythms an additional thrilling toxic bait.

   Both Hey Girl and George Best continue and elevate the new plateau of the album, the first a Peter and the Test Tube Babies meets The Clash like provocation which takes mere seconds to seduce senses and passions whilst the similarly bred second creates a terraces like anthemic quality for an Serious Drinking mixed with Angelic Upstarts eyeballing, both songs enlisting full physical and emotional participation to its recruitment drive. As probably recognised, Light At The End Of The Tunnel just gets stronger and more impressive the further into its body you delve, the likes of Stalker with its deviously addictive bass hook, another striking offering from Zuki who adds something extra to the album arguably lacking on earlier releases, and the excellent Market Trader adding to the weight and bait of the release. The second of the pair again deals with the decline of towns, this through the intervention of supermarket chains and the likes, whilst raging and infecting with resourceful invention. #

     The uncompromising Three Years, and its unbridled assault on child abuse and feeble punishments, scars and provokes with greater venom and passion within the album before Miners and Drunken Heroes uncages a raw, caustic sonic grazing and belligerent defiance respectively. All three songs stalk and coax with spite and energy before the closing song covers them with its shadow. Phoenix from the Flame is a pure punk rock anthem, a band banner which alone places Foreign Legion band amongst the highest echelons of British punk, its body holding all the cards and bait to ignite crowds and recruit new hearts.

   Closing on its finest moment Light At The End Of The Tunnel is an outstanding punk quarrel and maybe the best thing Foreign Legion has set loose to date, certainly the rival to past glories. Punk right now feels like it is moving to a new heyday and records like this only reinforce that notion.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Foreign-Legion/149893361856696

8.5/10

RingMaster 03/03/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com