Krum Bums – Smoke 12″ EP

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Angry, antagonistic, and some of the best punk rock you will have heard this year, the Smoke EP from Krum Bums celebrates Record Store Day/ Black Friday in sublimely belligerent style. Made up of four rages jammed packed with essential hooks and unique antagonism, EP and band brawl and roar with insatiable passion and intensity. Quite simply street punk has never sounded better.

Hailing from Austin, Texas, Krum Bums was formed in 2000 by vocalist Dave Tejas and guitarist Trae Martinez. The years has seen numerous line-up changes but equally a continuing evolution and impressive growth of sound, a charge coming to a peak with previous and fourth album Cut The Noose in 2011.The band now though has unleashed their finest ferocity yet with Smoke, incendiary punk at its virulent best.

The EPs title track sets the rampage off, riffs and raw chords from guitarists Martinez and Josh Stiffs exploding on the senses alongside the staggered rallies of beats from drummer Nika Bennet. It is an imposing and attention grabbing start, but just a teaser as the track swings into fierce action with a riveting groove and heavy throated bass tempting from Zach Volta. It is the distinctive and gripping scaly vocal tones of Tejas which completes and seals the deal, his coarse persuasion complimented perfectly by the backing calls of the band. Grooves proceed to wind around ears and imagination with addictive potency whilst the sheer tenacity and energy of the song is a blaze which withers the senses and ignites the passions.

The stunning start is swiftly emulated by Nightmares, its sonic lure the first touch to the subsequent furnace of lyrical and vocal spite within a sonic web of searing enterprise and merciless rhythms. Again hooks provide inescapable bait whilst the heavy swings of Bennett only stir up the body with dangerous anthemic tempting. Added to the rasping might of Tejas and predatory tones of the bass, it all colludes to harass and bruise thoughts and senses into willing submission.

The broader melodic hard rock scenery of Falling Down whips up a frenzy in release and listener next, the song a punk anthem demanding the assistance of its victim but also unafraid to flirt with flavoursome rock and horror punk essences. Actually the ‘weakest ‘of the four songs but outstanding aggressive drama and contagion all the same, it makes way for the closing might of Plastic Bomb, arguably the strongest track on Smoke. To be honest there is little between all of the protagonists but with tangy grooves, a tsunami of beats, and ravenous urgency, the track just has the edge. A raging furnace of enterprise and stalking predation within a torrential outpouring, the encounter is sheer slavery of ears and emotions.

We have constantly suggested that punk rock is having a new heyday right now, and with releases like this from bands like Krum Bums, who only get better and more essential with every maturing year, there is no chance of doubting our claim.

The Smoke EP is available via Jailhouse Records from November 28th on 12“coloured vinyl limited to 500 copies and digitally @ http://jailhouserecords3.bandcamp.com/album/krum-bums-smoke-12-e-p with a re-release with different packaging and artwork due in 2015.

https://www.facebook.com/krumbums

RingMaster 28/11/2014

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The Amsterdam Red Light District – Gone For A While

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With a mouthful of a name and a flavoursome depth to their captivating sound, French rockers The Amsterdam Red Light District unleash their new and highly anticipated album Gone For A While. It is a striking encounter which intrigues and pleases at every turn, the band’s mix of alternative rock in a fusion of melodic punk and hardcore, ensuring a persistent drama and vivacity to each and every track. That it does not ignite the passions as rigorously as it maybe should have is a mystery and probably a personal thing, but certainly the eleven track proposition provides a tasty stomp for ears and imagination to invest a real appetite in.

Seemingly with members based in Lyon and California, The Amsterdam Red Light District since forming in 2005 has earned a potent reputation and recognition for their sound and live presence. Employing inspirations from the likes of Refused, The Bronx, The Ghost of a Thousand, and The Bled into their own distinct ideas and invention, the band has made striking marks through debut album Dear Diary in 2010 and the I’m Not Insane EP two years later, their success backed by a live presence which has seen The Amsterdam Red Light District play all over Europe with great regularity, feature at festivals such as Groezrock, Mair1, Resurrection, Sylak and Rockstorm, as well as play with bands such as Refused, Anti-Flag, Thrice, 36 Crazyfists, Comeback Kid, and Slayer. In July this year the band set about recording second full-length Gone for a While, its release like the first with Red Light Records, now upon us and likely to only intensify the spotlight on the band.

Opener Time Flies swiftly has ears and feet involved in its feisty stomp, riffs and rhythms an immediate frenzy bound in enticing grooves. Vocalist Elio Sxone is a commanding presence within the raucous persuasion from his first syllable, whilst guitarist Maxime Comby is soon complimenting his caustic riffs with sonic enterprise. Arguably there are no real surprises within the song but equally it is a refreshing and magnetic offering with real power to its energy and persuasion capped by the great Red Tape like vocal roars alongside the velvety shadowed tones of bass provided by Gregory Clert.

The attention grabbing start is surpassed by the fascinating Just Have A Good Time, its initial Southern rock/Cajun twang the lead into a ferociously fiery and impressive incitement. Swiftly the_amsterdam_red_light_district_hb_251114revealing more of the depths and diversity to the band’s sound, the heavy rock fuelled track stomps with contagious and aggressive intent driven forcibly by the imposing skills of drummer Julien Chanel. The song though is still as welcoming and catchy as its predecessor, whilst the blend of raw and melodic vocals work a treat across song and subsequently the album, their union as bracing as the contrasting sounds igniting the beast of a song.

   Million Miles Away is no slouch in getting the blood running hungrily through band and listener either, its on-going charge littered with spicy hooks aligned to harsh and melodic elements of punk. Fuelled with a torrent of barbed and addiction forging twists, with further outbreaks of chunky riffing and virulent grooving piling on the temptation, the song keeps the album flying high before handing over ears and emotions to the similarly compelling and voraciously sculpted A Chance To Change. Its energy is as full and insatiable as in its predecessor, and with a thick melodic tempting to its rigorous tenacity, provides another weighty slab of punk hunger and irrepressible contagion.

The brief evocative presence of Final Boarding Call is underwhelming, the track seemingly an intro into the album’s following title track but lacks anything to halt the urge to simply move straight to Gone For A While, itself a song lacking something compared to the first quartet of encounters but reinforcing the craft and imagination surging through the album with ease, if not the earlier adventure shown. Its gentler caresses definitely make for a satisfying companionship before Behind Your Sunglasses unveils its fiercer presence and emotion. Still missing that spark of bold inventiveness, the track impresses as it bawls and croons simultaneously, the vocals especially gripping within the tasty web of chords and hooks.

Both These Kids That Your Parents Warned You About and Come Closer leave ears and appetite full of lingering pleasure, the first with gnarly bass tones and bordering on hostile rhythms, a grouchy and thrilling protagonist. Its growl is wholly infectious, as is the return of that bolder inventiveness which marked the start of the album as the track shows itself to be another lofty peak in the landscape of the release. Its successor is built from the same template, a hearty snarl coating every predatory note and heavily swung beat, not forgetting the raw vocal side of the band, whilst grooves and hooks find their own unique venom to infest the imagination.

The two songs has body and thoughts back hungrily engaged before making way for the addiction causing Set The World On Fire, the track one of those anthemic stomps which only a loss of hearing can deter. Its muscular brawl of a seduction is followed by closing track Waiting For So Long, an encounter featuring Justin Schlosberg from Hell Is For Heroes. A final blaze of rugged and melodic punk vitality which maybe misses truly lighting the passions, it nevertheless gives the album a furnace of a send-off whilst egging on the urge to dive right back into the heart of Gone For A While.

At the start we said that the album did not inflame the strength of ardour that it probably should have. It is hard to define why, certainly there is not an abundance of surprises but there is plenty to enthral and spark a greed for more. It is easy to expect Gone For A While to be a major trigger for the passions in a great many though, and for the rest of us it has to be said The Amsterdam Red Light District has placed a strong enough grip with the album that anticipation for their next endeavour is unavoidable.

Gone For A While is available now via Red Light Records, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/fr/album/gone-for-a-while/id918599363 and on CD @ http://tarld.bigcartel.com/

http://www.tarldtheband.com/

RingMaster 26/11/2014

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The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

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Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

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Para Elite/Total Annihilation – Battle On

Para Elite-Total Annihialtion - Battle On - Artwork

One of those releases you lick your lips in anticipation over, Battle On is the coming together of two of America’s finest oi provocations for one invigorating spilt. Uniting Para Elite and Total Annihilation for a choice slab of Patriotic Oi, the Skinflint Music released album is ten tracks of eighties seeded, invention fuelled punk rock to fire up the senses and passions.

The first half of the album is provided by LA band Para Elite. Consisting of drummer Cliff Warby (formerly of UK Oi band Condemned 84), vocalist Coop (of White Flag Down who only recently came to an end), guitarist Jason (Lone PESoldier), bassist Rob, and Tony (Rhythm Collision), the band, as indeed their companions on the album, stand eye to eye, toe to toe with the listener and abrase ears and emotions with prime Oi punk antagonism.

First track Battle Cry immediately stirs senses and thoughts as Coop stands alone pressing ears. This is instantly reinforced as a spicy tendril of guitar opens up alongside him, swiftly followed by a pulsating bassline and jabbing beats. Offering a juicy metal bred groove to its rhythmic tempting and great raw vocals, the song instantly defies expectations already gathered for the Oi punk fuelled release with its flavoursome variety. As proven across the whole release, both bands musically and lyrically challenge as with punk bred antagonism but do it in their own compromising way which people can take or leave. The opener makes a potent start to the release but is only an appetiser to the excellent lure of Don’t Wanna Hear It. Gripping the imagination with its opening flame of old school punk soaked guitar, the encounter settles into a provocative stroll with group vocal calls and a fiery texture to hooks and riffs performing aural slavery. The track is in swift control of body and emotions, its anthemic lure and potency an instant protagonist not demanding but certainly provoking reaction.

Hang The Banker is the same, a song which does not bully but definitely has inescapable and immediately riveting steel to its fury. With a chorus which enlists listener participation within the call of only its first line and barbed hooks to bait the passions of any kind of punk rock fan, the track is an addictive ‘call to arms’ igniting thoughts and views as easily as feet and the passions. It is a success matched by next up Patriot, its opening rally of seductive and contagious drumming alone binding bait. Broadening its enticing with similar riveting flames of acidic guitar and the ever inflammatory tones of Coop, it is simply incendiary rock ‘n’ roll with everything slimline but of the richest potency and persuasion.

Finishing their participation with Skinheads, an outstanding cover of the Condemned 84 track which thrills like a mix of Sham 69 Angelic Upstarts, and The 4-Skins but is still all Para Elite, the band leaves a blissful grin on the emotions, their old school yet fresh Oi tenacity and invention lighting nostalgic and new fires. Something which Denver quartet Total TAAnnihilation also easily inspire with their striking sound, an encounter merging Oi, punk, and heavy rock for an easy to greedily devour incitement. Starting with the raw assault of In Bed with the Reds, the band unleashes a distinctive and flavoursome dirty rock ‘n’ roll encounter. The song is a cauldron of spicy grooves and caustic riffs over seen by the great grizzled hostility lined vocals of Jimi (Working Class Heroes). It is also ridiculously contagious as is the following Death of a Nation, a track forging another rock stomp of punk and venomous rock ‘n’ roll for a belligerent and sonically inflamed brawl for ears and emotions. Guitarist Alex (Justice Blocc) colours the provocation with gripping riffs and sonic flames whilst the menacing basslines of Chris (ex-Outta Controllers(Working Class Heroes, Working Class Heroes) flirt forcibly as they align to the intimidation clad swings of drummer James (Archnemesis).

     Puttin in the Boot continues the spicy mixture, the song as its predecessor as much seeded in a Motorhead as it is in a Skrewdriver or indeed a Condemned 84. With a great blues tang to the guitar and incendiary riffery, the track is another tub thumping incitement though soon left looking paler by the brilliant Scene Slut. Part blues, part psychobilly and plenty punk, maybe we should call it Oi-billy; the track is an infectious stomp with more virulence to its tempting than the Playboy mansion.

Closing with the uncompromising inciting of Criminal Invasion, punk rock as raw and unpolished as it is always meant to be, the band leaves ears and passions on a high as the song brings the outstanding release to an impressive conclusion. Battle On is easily one of the best splits heard not only within punk but rock music in general this year. Oi fuelled but simply rock ‘n’ roll at its primal and instinctive best, the album is an easy recommendation for all punk fans.

Battle On is available from November 25th via Skinflint Music @ http://shop.skinflintmusic.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=755 , the first pressing of 300 coming in a gatefold jacket and the second pressing with a standard jacket available on white/yellow split vinyl (125 copies) and black (175 copies) vinyl.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/PARA-ELITE/769232079773053

https://www.facebook.com/Total.Annihilationoi

RingMaster 20/11/2014

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Duncan Reid and The Big Heads – The Difficult Second Album

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If it was as problematic as its title might allude to, The Difficult Second Album from Duncan Reid and The Big Heads has no intentions of showing it within its fluid and mischievous power pop revelry. The trickiness of following an impressing debut is one of those issues which is arguably more imagined and supposed than generally realised, and certainly there is no hint of anything but an equally thrilling and potent encounter from Reid for his second solo offering. Spawned from the same punk and pop rock devilry which marked its predecessor and its creator’s career, The Difficult Second Album is a contagious romp which explores more power pop essences this time around but still provides an instinctive and inescapable incitement of hook laden rock ‘n’ roll.

Reid’s impact and inspiration on punk rock came as bassist/vocalist of melodic punks The Boys, an outfit which Joey Ramone declared his favourite band in the eighties, and indeed that decade saw Reid alongside fellow Boys member Casino Steel provide backing vocals for the live version of The Ramones hit, Baby I Love You. Alongside band founders Matt Dangerfield and Steel, as well as Honest John Plain and Jack Black, Reid and The Boys released four albums and a host of singles before splitting in 1981.Eighteen years later the band reformed for a couple of shows in Tokyo, which in turn eventually led to a full comeback and tours across varied areas of the world. Leaving the band in 2011, Reid set about recording his debut solo album Little Big Head which gripped attention and appetites upon its release in 2012. Now he returns with its successor and another excursion into majestic power and punk pop.

With multi-instrumentalist Alexander Gold, guitarist Sophie Lynch, and drummer Ciara Lavers alongside him, Reid and the band swiftly light up ears and appetite with opener Another City. Within a breath melodies are teasing and captivating whilst crisp beats and a dark bass seducing are adding their potent coaxing to the songs immediately catchy invitation. It is not long before the tones of Reid bring their distinctive hues, his voice somewhere between Ste McCabe, Pete Shelly, and Ian Broudie, and fuelling the track with even greater temptation. With suggestive melodies dancing on the senses, the song is a lively croon setting the release off in fine and magnetic style.

The strong start is instantly surpassed by the outstanding Baby Doll, its entrance a flight of Devo-esque keys bred persuasion which has the imagination in the palms of their colourful hands. duncan_album_2Nestling into a minimalistic stroll with a tangy bassline escorting Reid’s compelling narrative, the song lyrically as intriguing and enthralling as the sounds it casts, it is in no time a devilish treat. With an even pace even through its mini crescendos, the track persistently inflames and ignites ears with spicy enterprise and Pixies like imagination across its singular rhythmic direction. The song is an early pinnacle for the album backed strongly by C’est La Vie, a juicy pop infused blaze of bracing riffs and glowing harmonies. Admittedly at its strongest in the verses rather than the hazy choruses, the track is a magnet for the passions and vocal participation, raising an eager smile at every turn of its mischief.

Both End of the World and Joe keep things bubbling vivaciously, the first of the two a weave of incendiary rhythms and flavoursome chords which at times are early Undertones like and in others more like The Briefs, whilst the second is a riveting drama of Beatle-esque melodrama and melodic rock colouring with a gorgeous breeze of melancholic strings matched by keys. Though neither can quite match those before them, each adds a rich new shade to the character of the album and a treat for ears to devour before Just As Good As I Used To Be unveils its quaint balladry. It is a slow embrace and admittedly persuasion until it suddenly erupts into a fevered pop punk stomp which in turn ignites the already appealing vocal lures with extra spice and energy. From its appealing but underwhelming start the track turns into the life of the party and feeds the greedy appetite now in place for the album with its exciting The Freshies like revelry.

Little Fingers and Toes steps up next and straight away is flinging spicy riffs and hooks which spark in the imagination with Rezillos like radiance. It should be stated that for all the references and reminders moments in songs inspire they more often than not are fleeting or simple essences which only spice up the unique propositions. The song itself has a curled lip to its presence, a belligerence which is all punk rock and lingering attitude, even as contagious hooks and vocal harmonies steal attention. As across the album, the excellent encounter is unfussy and to the point but still a masterful web of textures and sounds dragging feet and emotions into its persuasion with sublime ease.

The initially folk lilted Long Long Gone is next and strides with a blues flame to its accomplished design and air before making way for Not The Kind of Guy Girls Hug, another song with an open whisper of Lennon and McCartney to its charm. Adding another enjoyable twist to the album, the song still lacks the spark of its predecessors though admittedly that is more personal taste driven than any shortcoming in its skilled persuasion, though it is soon forgotten as One Night in Rio uncages its rock ‘n’ roll rampage. An out and out punk stomp with a blues rock underbelly, the track is the kind of song Reid has become renowned for which is hungry punk rock at its melodic and insatiable best, this track offering a great Ramones meets Eddie and the Hot Rods tasting.

The thrilling success of the song is instantly emulated by Wasting Time, this showing distinct and sultry personality with its first flame of blues and surf rock enriched glaze of guitar. It is a tempting which never leaves the rigorous lure of the song, only lays in wait during moments of predatory riffing for the chance to again soak subsequent melodies and harmonies. A radiant gem of a suasion for body and emotions, the song leaves for closer When We were Young to bring the infectious shindig to a close. Toying with synth rock and indie pop within its alluring body, the track is a tenaciously satisfying end to a release which makes you groan in disappointment once its last note is cast.

The Difficult Second Album hits the sweet spot time and time again across its nostalgia and modern infused body, and even when it misses the target for individual tastes, it still leaves a feverish and lingering wake which only leads to a hunger for more.

The Difficult Second Album is available now via LBH Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00MPNSP9I/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=19450&creativeASIN=B00MPNSP9I&linkCode=as2&tag=uberoc-21&linkId=N5K5ZLSPALFB6SUJ

http://web.little-big-head.de/

RingMaster 17/11/2014

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Dirt Box Disco – I don’t want anything for Christmas

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Going hand in hand with every Christmas we get overtired squabbling brats, unwanted guests, and the worst clothing since MC Hammer was causing blindness with his flashy pantaloons and their movements. The worst import in the festive season though is the Christmas single, a disease which with few, very few, exceptions turns skilled and accomplished musicians into creatively retarded festive jumper wearing disasters. There are the occasional successes which buck the trend, though right now only Jona Lewie’s Stop the Cavalry comes to mind and that is debatable if it truly qualifies. To that positive list you can now add UK punk ‘n’ rollers Dirt Box Disco and their single I don’t want anything for Christmas.

They have not totally escaped the curse it is fair to say, the song not their finest moment, but the band does what Dirt Box Disco does best with the single and that is unleash mischievously stomping rock ‘n’ roll. Whether it will be a song which remains as potent and favourably welcomed over repeated plays as it is right now, time will tell but the Burton on Trent certainly provides an evocative tease which borders on maudlin but escapes through its infectious and smile inducing revelry.

From its first breath the track is declaring its intent and almost self-pitying premise through vocals and simple but fiery riffs. The chorus opens up proceedings, a simple repetition of the song’s FRONTtitle primarily before slipping into a more relaxed stroll with the vocals of WEAB.I.AM and Spunk Volcano entwining for the track’s narrative. It is a straight forward offering of the band’s distinct sound which ignites more strikingly with the sizzling sonic enterprise unveiled by the guitars of Danny Fingers and Spunk, whilst throughout the rhythmic probing of bassist Deadbeatz Chris and drummer Maff Fazzo keeps it all compelling and contagious. It is fair to say that there is nothing out of the Dirt Box Disco ordinary going on but that alone ensures the track will surpass any other Xmas offering this year, even though they do insist in having infernal sleigh bells to accompany its end.

Accompanying I don’t want anything for Christmas the band offers Punk By Numbers, a raw and belligerent slab of old school punk with a healthy soaking of The Ramones and The Dead Boys to its riot. It is a brilliant rock ‘n’ roll threat which again is the band revelling in creative devilry proving what it is that sets them apart from the crowd with consummate ease. Even without the second song the single would be very worthy of attention but it adds the icing on the flavoursome Christmas cake.

I don’t want anything for Christmas will not dramatically change views on Christmas singles but it does make one very palatable helping which will ensure one year has a beacon of hope and a gift which you think you might not want but will greedily devour. Now just have to convince Granny that it is really Cliff Richard bursting from the speakers over the festive pudding.’

I don’t want anything for Christmas is available now via STP Records/Deadfly Recordings digitally and on CD @ http://dirtboxdisco.bigcartel.com/product/dirt-box-disco-i-don-t-want-anything-for-christmas-cd

Dirt Box Disco live dates over Christmas:

DEC 13 – The Bridge inn, Rotherham

DEC 20 – Star And Garter, Manchester

DEC 27 – ZOMBIE HUT, CORBY

DEC 28 – The Maze. Nottingham

DEC 30 – Adam & Eve, Birmingham

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk

RingMaster 17/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Füneral Käb – Self Titled EP

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A noise fuelled collision with the senses from which only a hunger for more can be the outcome, the self-titled EP from US punk rockers Füneral Käb is one of those treats which no matter the warnings your parents ingrained, you ignore and give your soul to. Unashamedly hostile and cantankerous, enthusiastically abrasing and ravenous, the release as the band’s presence, is a delicious effrontery on senses and common decency. If punk rock with the swagger and devilry of dirty rock ‘n’ roll is your recipe to filth encrusted bliss, then Füneral Käb and their raw and sonically dishevelled release is a must.

Füneral Käb was the inspiration of vocalist Derek Krisitan Nordlof (bassist with Confuzatron and Orange Platypus) who with bassist Mark Vance Arroyo (ex-The Moistboyz) started up the band around 2011. The pair swiftly brought in guitarist/vocalist David Rangel (bassist of Black Earth and guitarist/vocalist of Orange Platypus) next, before after a few drummers completing the line-up with Ben Scott (Vermicous Canids). Most of the band already had connections through their previous exploits at some time or other, a kinship which if we take their debut as evidence, seems to fire up the antagonistic mischief and fury of their sound with relish.

Straight away the EP is crawling over the psyche and stirring up the imagination with opener Church Maus. It coaxes attention with a rugged mix of guitar and bass predation bound in a further sonic lure as beats jab with simple venom. It is a slow crawl of an entrance which is almost leering at its target before exploding into a caustic and fiery rampage of punk riffs and heavy footed provocation guided by an excellent blend of raw vocals from Derek K backed by Rangel. Ridiculously contagious and intimidatingly testing with sharper hooks than found in abattoir, and with a similar blood lust, the track is punk rock at its feverish best, an inescapable toxicity for all genre fans.

The following Christian Sheep is steeped in even richer old school punk animosity and flavouring. It is a sneering blaze of pungent riffs and searing grooves riddled with inhospitable rhythmic provocation, and again another virulent persuasion. There is a definite English punk breeding to the Texan’s sound which is certainly evident on the second song but also loudly whispering in the dirty rock ’ n’ roll song of the next up . . . And Now You’re Shit. Flaming with bluesy enterprise and heavy rock tenacity but equally equipped with punk spawned bait, it is a romantic primal assault to get feet and vocal chords engaged, though just a taster of the bigger anthemic temptation to come with 1717 17th Street. Rolling in on a devilish rhythmic saunter and sonic tempting, the song is soon spewing its melodic acidity around like aural confetti before settling into another impossibly addictive stomp which is as much a rage vocally and sonically as it an epidemic persuasion. Addressing issue of drugs with its title taken from the address of the high school where 15 kids overdosed on a bad batch of heroin, the track is a funked up, hard rock punk shuffle and quite irresistible.

The release closes with the grouchy, dirt smothered HEY Hollywood, a track with a healthy essence of Frankenstein Drag Queens From Planet 13 to its unpolished and infectiously unsavoury beauty. It is a brute of a final track revealing another twist to the varied punk and heavy rock sound the band toys with and twists into their own severe and thrilling trespass on the senses.

Füneral Käb has a sound which embraces the punk ages; it has the unbridled spite of a Sex Pistols or The Adicts, the confrontational hunger of a Suicidal Tendencies or Exploited, and the warped devilry of a Melvins or Dope Body. If any of those tick your boxes or punk at its abrasive best in general, then why are you still here… go explore this great band.

The Füneral Käb EP is available digitally and on 10” vinyl now. Get in touch with teh band to order @ https://www.facebook.com/pages/F%C3%BCneral-K%C3%A4b/221157981243934?sk

RingMaster 11/11/2014

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