Archers And Arrows: Alone Together

Archers & Arrows pic

    Alone Together is a rather intriguing and thrilling album from Swiss band Archers and Arrows, a release which as much as it pleases and excites equally instils further immense promise for the band ahead as it evolves and explores a truly unique voice to its already quite distinct invention. Though it does not quite continually ignite the fiercest fires inside the album nevertheless thrills with its peaks and engages fully in its less individual moments.

Bringing influences of the likes of The Lawrences Arms, Further Seems Forever, Hot Water Music, Mae, and Thrice to their sound, the 2009 formed quartet of Sebastien, Nicolas, Bunty, and Yves conjure a stirring mix of punk, melodic hardcore, and indie. The band first drew strong attention in their homeland with their self-titled debut EP of 2010 which earned Archers And Arrows good radio play on Swiss national radio satiation, Couleur 3. Since then the foursome has furthered their reputation with impressive shows alongside bands such as The Gaslight Anthem, The Bouncing Souls, The Get Up Kids, The Chariot, Polar Bear Club, and Roger Miret (Agnostic Front). Their debut album one suspects is set to trigger a wider enthused awareness and from much farther afield such its impressive and evolving strength.

Opening track Innocence takes no time in scything through the ear with tight sonic grooves and melodic teasing before the excellent vocals take their place in the already captivating song. With every note and syllable the track has a fresh and crispness to its engagement which startles and warms the appetite. Arguably it provokes and suggests more than it delivers in uniqueness but all the time there is the feeling and expectation of greater things waiting to emerge from the appealing start and constantly it offers enough to keep one captivated whilst brewing a hunger for more.

The following Numb/Dumb steps from the closing strains of its predecessor with a delicious bass twang and indie hook persuasion beneath group vocal harmonies. Settling in to its stride there is a dissipation of that initial seduction into something more expected but the band are in control and twist the song with various asides and unexpected detours within the purposeful destination of the track. Again great vocals and accomplished imaginative guitar play leaves flavoursome rewards whilst the energy and agitation of the rhythms and passion brings an intensity which settles nicely alongside the melodic beauty.

     My Own God, Sing To The Wind, and the hard-core veined Self-Made Man continue the strongly convincing invitation of the album, all again offering inspired imagination and skilled enterprise which has one irresistibly focused to each swerve of the songs within their triumphant mix of styles but each also not quite going through with all their ideas to leave one a little dissatisfied as they also involve familiar essences well-worn elsewhere.

The second half of the album though is where things creatively explode as the band is at its most riveting and inspired; songs where they step aside into their own distinct spotlight. Danse Macabre offers a gentle hand at first though its rhythms are biting at the bit to involve an eager gait. Soon they get their way as the track opens up its presence with a dual emotive weave of expressive vocals, senses jangling guitars, and anthemic rhythms. The song is a delicious stroll of a band freeing up its imagination and heart, a contagious and emotive recruitment which leaves a heated ardour in its wake.

The title track and Dirty Hands both rise to the challenge and stand side by side in quality and stature to the first of the three. Alone Together merges a coarser vocal delivery with melodic flames which singe the ear with passion but tempers the acidic touch with addictive anthemic choruses and precise seductive hooks. It is pure pop with punk intensity and raw emotion, an inciting and thrilling piece of triumph. The third of the trio also carries a raw breath to its sonic victory and further inspires, with its co-conspirators, thoughts of how immense the band could and should become on the evidence of they and the album as a whole.

The closing Emergency offers one last treat in excellent female vocals which assist its lasting firm caress, the song completing an album which grows and impresses more and more with each sharing of its companionship. Archers And Arrows is a band to watch very carefully and Alone Together is the perfect starting point.

https://www.facebook.com/archersandarrows

8/10

RingMaster 13/03/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

www.audioburger.com

Kids We Used To Be: And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP

The And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP is the debut release from Liverpool pop punk band Kids We Used To Be. Released through Like Records it offers four tracks dripping promise for a band still in evolution. With a hardcore vein bursting through their songs the band whilst not laying down deep scars of originality leaves one anticipating great things ahead once they find their true selves in their sound.

Taking their name from one of their influences Alexisonfire and their song Old Crows, Kids We Used to Be is barely a year old, being formed in the Summer of last year. Consisting of vocalists Ste McEvatt and Carl Gunning, backed by the musical prowess of guitarists James Cremor and Lewis Gardner, bassist Mike Higgins, and Lee Berrill on drums, the sextet use additional flavours from the likes of The Wonder Years, Set Your Goals, Alexisonfire, and Man Overboard, to forge their own not yet distinct but flavoursome sound, the band feeling like one still in transition. They have in their relatively short time already lit up stages alongside bands such as Polar Bear Club, Paige, Kyoto Drive, The Story so Far, Man Overboard, and Decade and set themselves as a band to certainly keep an eye on, something the EP does nothing to suggest otherwise.

30 Down opens up the release with a firm hand of striking melodic strikes and cruising riffs. Gruff brawling shouts going as vocals enter the affray and are fair if unspectacular in what seems to be a growing need for bands to employ this aspect against clean vocals which here are very agreeable and add a balance to their coarse counterpart and the track itself. The song itself is a bruising encounter without unleashing a barrage of aggression which works well with the melodic enterprise from the guitars.

The following Hey Aqualung litters the ear with feisty riffs and firm rhythms in a regular pop punk approach. Again the dual vocals dominate the song predominately though it is no reflection on the strong songwriting and sounds which without being the most imaginative easily satisfy and keep the attention fully engaged. The building crescendos throughout work well and add extra intrigue to what is a good song with an anthemic edge.

By this point the rough vocals feel in need of variety to be honest, the idea of using the twin attack in pop punk is a different aspect but someone simply screaming in the ear is at times too distracting. Against music which at the end of the day is not the most intensified and violent personal taste leaves one to hope there is a reassessment in that department, not a removal but a better definition and diversity.

The best song by far on the EP is Nothing Good Happens After 2AM, a song which alone shows why the suspicion that Kids We Used To Be has a definite strong future ahead is so strong by the end of the release. Easily infectious the song is the most inventive and imaginative track. With the punk urgency which is to an extent lacking elsewhere and a predatory air to its muscular riffs and thumping beats, it shows a band in complete unison and at the top of their current skills. Whether the song is new compared to the others or recorded at a different time we cannot say but in every aspect it is better, in creation, individual delivery, and production. This is the lead song and should be a single to really set the band off on a decisive rise.

Completed by a demo version of Man, I Hate Your Friends which again offers strong assumption the band will make a bigger mark ahead, the And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP is a more than decent introduction with one song by itself declaring Kids We Used To Be a band who will grab our attention often as they develop. Right now the EP is well worth some of your time, Nothing Good Happens After 2AM worth a persistent entertaining.

https://www.facebook.com/KidsWeUsedToBeOfficial

RingMaster 30/06/2012

copyright RingMaster: myfreecopyright

The best and easiest way to get your music on iTunes, Amazon and lots more. Click below for details.