Machine Rox – Next Level

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British industrial metallers Machine Rox has never been a slouch in stirring up ears and emotions with its fiery and rapacious energy and imagination, but the London quartet has found a new covetous creative tenacity to consume the senses with new album Next Level. As its title declares, the eleven track adventure sees the band rise to a new plateau in songwriting, sound, and sheer contagious enterprise. Not exactly a game changer but an encounter to set a fierce new blaze within the landscape of industrial and electro rock, Next Level is a gripping and feistily enjoyable rampage.

Originally formed by musician/songwriter Richard K as a solo project in 2007, Machine Rox has evolved into a full line-up consisting of guitarist Val Oproiu, drummer Nuj Farrow, and Aga on keys and vocals alongside vocalist/bassist/ programmer Richard K. Employing his experiences in bands like industrial metallers Meat Machine and Global Noise Attack, and in the sharing of stages with the likes of Rammstein, Napalm Death, and Covenant, Richard after some time away from music began exploring a merger of metal and electro rock in his band’s emerging sound. It is a journey which has intensified and grown with accompanying acclaim through releases such as the Activate Your Anger EP and debut album Shout, both in 2013. Last year also saw the release of the more metal infused Intox EP, a tasty hint of the exploits to be found on Next Level, though to be fair the band’s electro and industrial side is as vocal and potently evolved on the album.

The album flirts with ears straight away through the opening crystalline electro coaxing of Lost My Mind. The first track takes little time to flex its muscles and intensity though, sinew packed riffs and rhythmic teasing combining to challenge and ignite the senses as the vocals of Richard K similarly work on thoughts with his raw expression. The electronic lure of the track provides a contagious enterprise whilst the muscular strength of the song and the vocal bait adds anthemic essences, it all adding up to a riveting and impressive start.

The melodic Front Line Assembly meets Ghost In the Static feel of the song is replaced by the more caustic breath and ferocity of Love Explosion, KMFDM and Godflesh coming to mind though as with all songs the finished recipe is all a2738925395_2Machine Rox. The second track also unleashes an insatiable energy and charge to its pulsating persuasion, synths swirling feistily around the senses whilst guitars and beats cast a heavier and darker confrontation in the relentlessly infectious endeavour. With a glorious solo adding to the proposition, the song continues the outstanding start to the release and is immediately emulated by the heavy and catchy swing of Losers In Your Game. A Marilyn Manson-esque swagger fuels carnivorous riffs and eager rhythms whilst vocally Richard K prowls ears with a provocative narrative cast by his distinctive tones, the mix another slab of inescapable virulence.

Next Level is an album which holds a greater diversity than any Machine Rox release to date, the following warm mellow embrace of Electric Sun one example of the different sides to the character of the album. It is a melodic and seductive smouldering reminding of fellow Brits MiXE1, but also a song unafraid to spread a rawer climate across its sultry canvas; keys and guitars merging extremes for a heat wave of evocative and imaginative adventure.

Both Illusion and Cycle Complete keep body and emotions aflame, the first a bubbling yet bordering on corrosive devilry gaining swift enslavement of feet and imagination, whilst the second has a sinister edge to its imposing presence and electronic fascination. A throaty bass flavouring adds to the song’s drama, its weave of noir kissed shadows soaking the otherwise magnetically fiery track driven by vibrant electronics, heavy metallic riffery, and enticing vocals of Richard and Aga. Though neither song quite finds the plateau of their predecessors, both leave an already hungry appetite greedier before making way for the bewitching instrumental Last Kamikaze. Keys and guitars entwine with melodic beauty whilst the electronic atmosphere of the track provides a mesmeric soundscape for thoughts to drift into their own adventure through. There is also a sterner intimidation offered by slow but voracious riffery, again a blend which results in a stunning incitement for ears and emotions.

The aggressive yet welcoming presence of Breathe Again comes next, its striking metal seeded attack and rabid toxicity instantly contagious as a spice reminding of Gravity Kills and Die Krupps shows itself. Another scorching solo from Val Oproiu lights the exciting and scintillating tempest, its impressive offering contrasted and matched by My Own Religion as a resonating electro temptation swallows the senses to breed a similar weighty enticement as its predecessor. Only nailed to the floor feet could resist its enthralling call whilst the raw glaze to the vocals and the scything guitar invention gives the rest of the body a welcome work over. The two songs show another twist in the nature of the album but each slightly pales against the might of Mind Game. It is a thunderous provocation, rhythms and riffs the heaviest on the album and melodies the most acidic as it evolves into an irresistible almost savage stomp which leaves thoughts and lungs breathless.

The album closes with You Belong To Me, itself another slab of industrial metal loaded with creative voracity and uncompromising attitude within heavyweight infectiousness. It is a thrilling end to an enthralling and rigorously compelling album. Next Level is without doubt Machine Rox at their most potent and thrilling yet, the start of a new adventure which should push the band into a new and greedy industrial /electronic spotlight.

Next Level is available now @ http://machinerox.bandcamp.com/album/next-level

Be sure to catch Machine Rox at the DARK7 festival at The Electrowerkz, London on October 11th

www.machinerox

RingMaster 19/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Machinista – Xenoglossy

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Having set a striking standard with their Arizona Lights EP barely five months ago, Swedish electro/synth pop band Machinista not only confirm the potency and potential of their sound with debut album Xenoglossy, but expand it with an even more rigorously captivating and enterprisingly inventive persuasion. Consisting of eleven tracks which are as boldly fresh and bred of a modern creative climate as they are seeded in an eighties nostalgia, the album is an irresistible blaze of electronic pop, quite simply persistent bait for body, imagination, and emotions to romp and bask in.

Machinista is the creation of Malmö/Kalmar based pair, vocalist/lyricist John Lindqwister (Cat Rapes Dog,Departementet, Basswood Dollies) and musician Richard Flow (ex.Vision Talk, Haze For Sale). Starting the project in the December of 2012 alongside their other bands, the duo instantly gripped attention and keen responses with a cover of David Bowie´s Heroes, which now closes up the new album. Its success and that of their first self-penned release, the single Molecules And Carbon, both accompanied equally appreciated videos, led to an eager spotlight soaking the band not only from fans but media too. Last year the band signed with the Juggernaut Music Group with the Arizona Lights EP their first release this past March. Recently and really before the dust of fervour around the EP could settle, Xenoglossy was uncaged to as mentioned not only reinforce their opening presence but cast a whole new mesmeric spell on the synth pop scene.

From the opening almost warning prod of first track Take Comfort In Being Sad ears and attention are wide awake breeding a just as immediate appetite. Punchy beats thump their coaxing next before keys relax into a melodic sway coveraround those persistently provocative textures. The equally as tantalising voice of Lindqwister is soon caresses the senses too around that jabbing rhythmic punctuation, the mix of forceful tempting and seductive soothing an enthrallingly magnetic proposition. As the song bounces along thoughts of The Cure, certainly vocally and in the shadowed essences which lurk within the bright sounds, and of A-ha musically make their suggestions. It is a masterful start swiftly matched by Arizona Lights. The second song casts a hazy yet crystalline ambience before eager beats and similarly feisty electronic grooves wrap around ears. As with the first track, and the majority of the album, there is a familiarity to the encounter but a recognisable spicing which only enhances the fun and potency of the offerings. Here a Thomas Dolby/Paul Haig like air makes hints as the song unveils its sparkling revelry.

Its lively presence and heart is followed by an initially more reserved and shadowed suasion through Molecules And Carbon, its first breath holding a melancholic spice before opening up into its own vivacious if still slightly reined in dance. Again it is hard to resist adding comparisons to Robert Smith and co, but it is only an appealing hue in the flowing imagination of Machinista. Though not as striking as its predecessors, the song satisfies a by now greed ridden appetite for the release before letting its outstanding successor, Salvation intrigue and seduce the passions. Sporting the irresistible charm and vibrancy of Landscape and poetic melodies of Zero-Eq, the track soars in elegance and beauty, keys and vocals a glowing smouldering climate to immerse in.

An industrial unpredictability and dark air brings the next up Summersault in to view, the track a stirring protagonist with military bred rhythms and an imposing atmosphere of stark and binding incitement. There is also the most vivid cinematic aspect to the song. Each track has that ability to work with the imagination visually it is fair to say but none as voraciously and enthrallingly as here. With drama clad keys and the ever impressing vocals, the song leaves thoughts reminded of Associates and in an evocative grasp before the equally thrilling Pushing The Angels Astray steps forward to sweep body and emotions to their feet for a perfect slice of synth pop. Melodies and hooks blaze away with harmonic resonance whilst rhythms steer the whole thing into the instinctive eagerness of feet and passions. It is the chorus where you lose self-control though, its contagion as toxic as a sunset and just as colourfully entrancing.

Ensuring that pinnacle is not a lone voice in what are nothing but peaks across Xenoglossy, next track Wasted sways and stomps with tenacious enterprise and pop infused vivacity. Featuring guest vocals from Toril Lindqvist of Alice in Videoland, the track is like a flaming collusion between OMD, Blancmange, and MiXE1, and ridiculously addictive. Maybe not quite as gripping but certainly a flavoursome and resourceful coaxing is Love And Hate Song. It has the unenviable task of following the two previous triumphs and does so with a unfussy and minimalistic march covered in a thick and enticing melodic weave which itself is coated in an unpredictable emotive suggestiveness. It is a gentle yet powerful tempting showing another strain of invention and intelligent variation to the album.

The closing stretch of the release is led by the heated emotion and climate of Crash. It is a strong and thought sparking encounter but lacks the spark of earlier tracks even with its Vangelis like flumes of epically honed melodies. It is also left looking pale sandwiched between the last song and slow burning success of The Blues And The Reds. Holding a feel of Pete Wylie to its provocative caress of electronic sound and floating harmonies, the song takes a while to warm up thoughts and emotions but does so to a lingering success.

Xenoglossy is completed by an excellent version of Heroes, and it is easy to see why the track made such a powerful impact with its band introducing release. The Eno/Bowie penned classic is not dramatically changed but given an insertion of electronic teasing and enterprise which brings new inescapable infectiousness to its charm. It finishes off the album in fine and thrilling style. With the fact that despite the praise it is also one of the weaker tracks on the album, it shows the might and impressive adventure across the whole release. Synth pop is an awakening inspiring genre it seems and it is fair to say that Machinista is destined to be one of its leading lights.

Xenoglossy is available now via Juggernaut Music Group @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/xenoglossy

http://www.machinistamusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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MiXE1 – Starlit Skin

Starlit Skin

The Lights Out EP last year confirmed the kind of evolution undergoing within the music of UK electro rockers MiXE1 whilst also hinting at the potential of the band’s impending and eagerly anticipated debut album. Uncaged June 1st, Starlit Skin shows that those suggestions were strong and truthful whispers to its new and enthralling tempest. Originally the band started as a solo project by vocalist/songwriter Mike Evan, a ‘soft spoken’ proposition which caressed and seduced the senses whilst growing in strength and stature not forgetting reputation with every release. Now with the album as its evidence, the Hatfield trio without losing any of its mesmeric passion and floating melodic persuasion has transformed into a snarling bordering on ravenous provocateur of synth rock.

Starlit Skin is a masterful encounter which plays like an eye of a storm, its evocative peace and radiant beauty encircled by a tempestuous incitement of intimidating guitars and imposing rhythms encased in a turbulence of passion and intensity. In hindsight you can see its triumph was an inevitable landmark on a continuing journey but at first touch it is a surprising and dramatic proposition which swiftly has hunger bred and intrigue lit for its emotive adventure. It is a striking flight for the band which began in 2010 as mentioned with Evans (ex-guitarist of alt-metal band Broken Butterfly X). Experimenting with electronics aligned to his smoothly lying and emotionally expressive vocals, Evans released debut EP Module 01 to strong reactions especially sparked by the eagerly devoured track Breathe. Linking up with Static Distortion Records, the Module 02 EP followed in 2012 again to eager acclaim as the richly personal songs showed a growth in confidence, maturity, and sound. It also marked the start of a more aggressive essence to MiXE1 epitomised by This Is Not Goodbye, a song which became a firm favourite with fans and the underground media. That same year the band expanded with Evans bringing in guitarist Lee Towson and drummer Lee O’Brien (formerly of Indie-Rock band Load), the move the signpost to the exploration of a rawer rock element to the band’s music. The Lights Out EP provided potent signs of that evolution but against Starlit Skin, was just a mere suggestion which is now vivaciously vocal in the eleven track all-out electronic rock encounter.

The album opens with a warning, a declaration of a wide spread evacuation which opens the way for voracious riffs and rampaging rhythms to charge down the scenery, sinews resonating and nostrils flaring as Talking In Our Sleep explodes in the ear. Immediately gripping the band’s new single soon settles into a more ordered gait upon which Evans unveils his vocals and narrative. His voice is as melodic and warm as ever but certainly caught in the thrust of the energy around him. As the track expands with Evans’ synths shaping the atmosphere as both Towson and O’Brien keep on their sturdy course, the track brings thoughts of Ghost In The Static meets Johnny Wore Black. Its chorus is pure infectious virulence, an anthemic call flush with enticing melodies perfectly contrasted and accentuated by a guttural growl which creeps in the vocals, all creating a roaring moment to craft a climactic treat within the otherwise compelling body of the impressive opener.

Break You Down swaggers in next, keys and guitars weaving a transfixing yet intimidating dark haze to which Evans croons magnetically whilst again slipping in the caustic squalls as introduced in its predecessor. Riffs and hooks capture the imagination as much as the melodic breezes evocatively colouring the intensive breath of the track, each combining for an easily accessible but unpredictable incitement. Though the natural warm delivery of Evans is the lead lure to songs, the use of abrasive textures and expulsions in his voice is an inspired and exciting twist which is matched and coaxed eagerly by the guitars and rhythms.

Both the emotive We’ve Changed and the following title track keep the imagination thrilled whilst offering new diversity to the release. The first soars across the senses with elegant charm and invasive melodies framed by a muscular appetite, though one happy to simply skirt the sultry smouldering heart of the absorbing personal venture whilst its successor explores a slight eighties synth pop spice within its reflective melodic wrap around the senses. There is a tint of Modern English and Depeche Mode to the song which only enhances its poetic wash of sound and expression, whilst again with more restraint than the first song it brings crescendos which infectiously grip and inflame thoughts and emotions.

The next up Plug Me In Tonight with its discordant brew of electronic agitation and probing within a mist of melodramatic synths makes a promising entrance but one which whilst growing into a thought provoking canvas lacks the impact and spark which caught ablaze within the previous songs. Nevertheless it has attention and appetite healthily poised for the pleasing electronic stomp of Here, a song with techno tendencies and synth pop revelry. It is another where the chorus recruits the listener’s feet and vocal chords, though around these moments the track’s shadows are more of a portentous breath, which Towson lights up with his invention, than an incitement to dance. It makes for a richly satisfying and appealing fusion which is then put in the shade by the bordering on antagonistic Image. Thumping rhythms and voracious hues assault first as keys spot their provocation with electronic shards before without losing its stalking ferocity the track opens with the continually impressive tones of Evans and fiery strikes of guitar imagination. It is a tremendous web of invention which instantly has ears gripped and passions sparking. The best track on the album it is unrelenting in its force, invention, and predacious hunger whilst providing a bewitching landscape of thought and imagination.

The Show takes the raw rapacious side of its predecessor to new levels whilst merging it as expected with mouthwatering melodies and vocals courted by electronic sunspot. Riffs and rhythms seem bestial as the synths seduce and smooch their evocative colours upon the senses, thoughts of The Browning freeing themselves in some ways to the predation. It is another glorious pinnacle showing the depths and suggesting the potential of the band still to be fully explored and exposed which All 4 U in its own distinct way supports. It is not as potent as certainly the previous two tracks but employs all of the already unveiled strengths of the album in another captivating storm, though the truly guttural vocal spewing which occasionally erupt arguably do not work. It is the beauty and the beast delivery from Evans which is an unbridled success for us not the demonic causticity, his voice just too nice to succeed.

Airwaves brings the album to an excellent absorbing and emotionally haunting end, though there is a decent enough Beat Version of Talking In Our Sleep as a bonus track with great female vocals from Amie Morandarte-Evans for extra spice. Starlit Skin is a commandingly impressive and thrilling encounter; a major step forward for MiXE1 but one suggesting there is still plenty more to come, a rigorously and irrepressibly exciting thought for us and the electro rock scene.

Starlit Skin is available @ http://mixe1.bandcamp.com/album/starlit-skin

www.mixe1.com

Check out an interview with MiXE1 @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/brewing-melodic-fire-an-interview-with-mixe1/

9.5/10

RingMaster 25/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Brewing melodic fire: an interview with MiXE1

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   The journey of electro rock pop band MiXE1 has been a striking and thrilling rise for it and its fans; from a solo project of founder Mike Evans to a full line-up with the addition of Lee Towson and Lee O’Brien, the band has brought a fresh and vibrant breath to the UK electro scene as confirmed by the excellent just released new EP Lights Out. With an album in the works and the new EP lighting up a hunger, it was time thanks to the members of MiXE1 to find out more about the band and its members. So pry we did…

Hi Guys and thanks for letting us explore the world behind MiXE1

Mike: “Our pleasure, Pete! Fire away :)”

Shall we start right at the beginning…give us some background to yourselves before MiXE1.

Mike Evans: “Before MiXE1, I was the guitarist in an alternative metal band called Broken Butterfly X. I’d been involved in a bunch of bands and projects before (most of those with Lee T), none of them actually got to the gigging stage apart from BBX though. We got a stash of recordings from those projects somewhere (a lot too embarrassing for public consumption)! But yeah BBX was my last band; I basically wrote the music and contributed some vocal melodies.”

Lee Towson: “I’ve actually known Mike since pre-school and we’ve been writing music in some form or another for the best part of about 12-13 years now. We started off, I think, just as secondary school was coming to an end; so we were about 15 or 16 years old and we’d regularly meet whenever we could (including class time) to write and record together.

This continued into College and through University and gradually expanded to include more outside musicians. Up until this point, while we were putting together music that was coming from a serious place, most of our lyrical output was built up around all these incredibly personal jokes or references to specific situations we’d experienced, particularly during school, and it just didn’t make sense to include anybody else. A lot of my most favourite songs of ours are completely nonsensical in subject matter and often spiralled into some of the craziest stuff you could imagine; maybe one day we’ll get the bright idea to release some of it somehow (and then promptly regret it!).”

Lee O’Brien: “Self-taught drummer. Practice!? What’s that? Just don’t have enough time! Played in a few bands over the years… My last band Load went through numerous line-up changes. We managed to record an album which had a few tracks featured on Classic Rock (Track of the day) and some cover mount CD’s for their monthly magazine. In the end we split due to lack of commitment and enthusiasm.”

What sparked and inspired not only the project but your experimentation with electronics and songwriting?

Mike: “Songwriting in general – I can’t even recall how it started! A love of music, a desire to create :) What inspired the project was wanting to try a different sort of music. In terms of how MiXE1 started…Well a few years ago I was in BBX which was alt-metal. The vibe in general was heavy and some darker vibes, influenced by bands like KoRn…Dir en Grey. It had come out exactly how I planned it but I wanted to try some electronics and the big factor for me – the lyrics were quite dark, melancholy, angry – which worked and sounded great in the songs. With my changing life views and stuff, I wanted to try something more uplifting though…More positive and with a hint of romance. So I fired up Sonar and wrote the first MiXE1 song :) And from there MiXE1 has just grown and grown. I feel the songwriting is only getting stronger. Fast forward to now, we’ve got the Lee’s adding their guitar and drum input to the songs. It’s always exciting to see how a song will evolve.”

Lee T: “It just felt like a natural progression really. Though I’m actually a bass player by nature, playing guitar for MiXE1 felt like a comfortable shift due to the amount of music we’ve written together before; the familiarity in the recording environment was a big deciding factor, I think. To be honest, I’m fully aware of my lack of guitar playing knowledge and if it were any other band asking me to take up the same role for them I’d probably have refused! As for the electronic side, we had tried our hand at a fair amount of synth driven rock in the past so slotting into this project was easy enough and I do feel like I can use my more rhythmic, bass-playing tendencies to my advantage in a genre that generally demands these driving low-end parts. That said though, as we push on with recording beyond the EP, we’re adding a lot more lead guitar parts too – which is really pushing my boundaries and has been a pretty fun challenge so far!”

Lee O: “I love to keep busy with music especially writing. I’m a drummer so not very musical. I didn’t want to rely on people to come up with stuff for me to add my drum parts… end up sitting round waiting for ages (although I can’t say that for MiXE1 as we always seem to have something on the go). I decided to have my own little project MiNiMAL FiLTh. It’s all electronic, samples and stuff. I got great enjoyment out of this and it helped with my song writing skills.”

What were/are the strongest inspirations to your creativity either musically or personally? mixe1

Lee O: “For me I’m really inspired (for this type of music) by Linkin Park, Pendulum, Prodigy, Leftfield, Celldweller and Rammstein. It’s their samples, synth sounds, vocals and song writing ability that makes me want to bop :)”

Lee T: “I guess my very first influence was my parent’s record collection! I grew up listening to bands like The Damned, UK Subs, The Clash and a hundred other bands across the punk spectrum; add to that a healthy dose of reggae, new wave, Sabbath and Zeppelin and that was more or less my start in life. I still remember thinking I was the coolest kid in primary school singing Guns n Roses songs in the playground! These days my inspirations come from a wider variety of media; films, books and life experience, the people around me and of course music is always there. The palette is ever changing really! It’s a lot more fun that way, I find. Over a bunch of genres across the board, 2013 so far has been amazing for music in particular for me.”

Mike: “I’m inspired by life, my wife, my family and friends all sorts :) My wife in particular and things we’ve gone through has been a bit inspiration for the songs. In terms of other bands, too many to say really – a lot of music inspires and sometimes influences come from unexpected places!”

The band initially was a solo project for yourself Mike, was this always the intention or even early on were you looking at expanding the band, as you have since of course.

Mike: “At the time of starting the project, I thought it was always going to be a solo thing! I had no real intention of it becoming a band or even playing live – I was quite attracted to doing my own thing and not having any of the creative concessions you can find in bands. But this really was fuelled by wanting to go in a more electronic and lyrically positive direction than the main band I was in at that time. Since setting the foundation of what MiXE1 is, what it’s about and particularly with these guys – that’s not a problem at all. Everyone’s really open about the music and how it comes out.

How we became a full band… Essentially I was looking for some live band members to play a gig or two. The Lee’s joined the mix and I encouraged them to put their own spin on the songs, add their own stuff to their parts and not just to follow the recordings to a tee. We actually played some album songs in rehearsal and what they were adding was really cool and most importantly really fitting to the songs. I remember thinking that I’d love to have this stuff on the actual recordings! From there, it just made sense and felt right to become a band. We’re fortunate in that everyone really adds something positive to the songs. We were looking for a live bass player for ages too afterwards and we finally found Marcos who tears it up live. He’s really talented too but the important thing is everyone gets along. It’s a laid back atmosphere when we’re all together, fun times…exactly how it should be ;)”

Your previous bands were more guitar based how did you find creating music different with electronics, apart from then obvious, and did it open up a more expansive field to explore than before?

Mike: “Oh for sure! Even in my BBX I was using a lot of guitar FX pedals, so it wasn’t always a straight guitar sound – I was always looking to modify the sound to give it atmosphere and diversity rather than driving every song with the same sound. Moving to electronics just gives you a much wider palette. With synths, there are so many different sounds which can give each song a unique texture. The songs have more layers and get even more epic!”

Lee O: “Mine were also more guitar based. I wanted to move more into the Electro scene, maybe creating a British Rammstein. For me, being an Electro group, I can write more as I have the use of midi programs where I can create synth tunes as I’m not very good at playing the keyboards… hey it’s all creativity at the end of the day ;)”

mixe1 pic 4 Your debut EP was Module 1, tells us about it and what you learnt in its creation which helped with subsequent releases.

Mike: “My attitude for Module 01 was kind of experimental! It laid the foundations of the project – the theme which is essentially all based in a futuristic city called MiXE1. There are some references to that in the lyrics and more in the general sound of the music. But yeah it was very much a case of just seeing what I could do on my own with synths and my vocals on the first EP. I learnt a lot actually. The main thing I learnt was what my voice can do, discovering how to use it and what I can do. That was exciting. I learnt a bit about the importance of mixing through the process too. After I wrote the first MiXE1 song, my attitude was very much like…I have this song I think is cool but it’s just gonna sit on hard drive, I’ll release it so even if it’s not the most polished, people can actually hear it and maybe be affected by it. So I wrote and released the EP. These days I’m more picky about having a good mix to represent the songs well but still have that mentality of if I don’t release it, no-one’s gonna hear it so get it out there!”

There feels like your songs hold a deep personal core lyrically and musically especially in Module 2 your second EP, is that the reality and what inspires your songwriting?

Mike: “Yea definitely! Module 02 is a very specific story with four specific songs/chapters of a couple being separated, dealing with a long distance relationship, remembering a time before and finally being reunited – and the story stems straight from my personal life. The reality (without going in to the long story…or trying not to!) is that I’d met the love of my life, Amie – we were super happy but she was on a student visa and when it was about to expire, she had to leave the country (day before Valentine’s Day if you can believe it). We spent a year February to February doing the long distance thing before I finally got her back and she’s now my wife. So it all worked out well but that year was mental…All the emotion, money, stress of immigration, life changes and long distance relationship-ing etc. We communicated every day, some teary phone calls to boot. We kept positive and it’s all worked out! It was a lot of hard work but infinitely worth it. So yeah that situation comes in to so many songs – those on Module 02, Lights Out and Starlit Skin for sure.”

You have just released your new EP, Lights Out, for us your finest and most mature work yet, though I believe the songs were written between your previous pair of EPs. Did you revisit them or take them further on from their inception on the EP?

Mike: “A bit of both really! The songs were all there structurally – with the exception of ‘Find You’ which was written up to the first chorus. I initially thought of it as a ‘band revamp’ – get everyone on the recordings and see what happens. I mean again, a song like ‘Find You’ for example, it originally had an extremely simple beat and Lee OB came in with this really dynamic and involved rhythm – basically stamping his style and personality on it. Similarly on guitars, the song had none and now it’s soaked in atmospheric leads and chords. Suddenly a song has a different vibe or something unexpected has happened and we’ll feed off of it.”

Lee T: “If you were to go back and listen to the demo versions of each track (good luck tracking them down!), it’s actually mind blowing how far some of them have come.

Largely the structures remained the same throughout, but sonically you could just sense each song coming to life and taking on these whole new personalities as everyone found their groove and these new ideas started bouncing from one person to the other. It was a pretty global affair actually; each part was written and recorded over a number of days, in completely different places and then attached at the end of the day into a group email session we had set up, where we proceeded to nit-pick each song to death before shipping it on over to Lawrie at Studio X in Australia. So the whole recording process was this great experience of finishing a guitar part off one day and then receiving a new drum layer the next, maybe followed by a new vocal idea or synth and just layering this crazy musical Jenga as we went along – I must have about 8-10 versions of every track on the EP sitting on my computer with something SLIGHTLY different about each one.”

Lee O: “From what I know the basis of the songs was already there (which made our lives easier). It was just a case of adding, changing and tweaking to get them to where they are today.”

The release is the first with you all involved.  Do you think this expanded line-up and mix of ideas played a big part in why the songs have lights-out-ep-coverarguably leapt above your previously released songs, though they themselves have all help make impressive releases?

Lee O: “Without a doubt… ha-ha!  :^o ===(   trumpet, blowing :)

Mike: “Ha, yeah I would say so for sure. I mean the songs were always there – the synths, basic structure, vocals, the basic riffs…The core of the songs. What we have now is a bigger sound, a more ‘live’ one thanks to some big drums and big guitar.”

Going back a bit for clarity how did you all meet and how has the additional skills and instrumentation impacted on the songwriting?

Lee O: “At The Pink Flamingo Club, we were wearing our crop tops and chaps…. oh wait, I’m getting confused! “

Mike: “Lee T and I have been friends for years like he said earlier – think we met in the school playground playing Ninja Turtles or something! How we met Lee OB, we put an advert out for another Lee I think, right? “

Lee T: “Yeah, we felt the dynamic of communicating with each other wasn’t QUITE confusing enough so we had to actively put an end to it. So, like many relationships these days, we found O’B via the internet, on the shadiest musician network we could find and then eventually met in person in the practice room one day. The rest is, as they say, geography… or something.”

Lee O: “I suppose I’d better come clean now…. my name isn’t Lee, its Rupert………….. I’ll get my coat!”

Lee T: “You should have said Richard – we could have called the new album The Crystal Dome!”

Mike: “But yea these guys have taken the songs to the next level! Lee OB is coming in with all these creative drum ideas that blow my mind. He gives the songs so much life and added dynamics. His ideas aren’t always restricted to drums – for example, having that extra bit of verse 2 guitar without vocals on Find You was his idea. Same with Lee T, he’s coming in with some amazing guitar ideas – lots of weird chords, lots of lead guitar stuff. I never really saw MiXE1 as having much lead guitar, I always wrote riffs very rhythmically in the past. It totally works; it’s a different vibe and stamped in his style/personality. On the EP, Find You and Pulling You Back To My World had no guitar written for them at all on the demos so it was a clean slate. Now guitar is a bit part of the songs.”

Is it a three way writing creativity for new songs now or still Mike at the core of that aspect?

Lee O: “I would like to say 3 way, but I would always want Mike (The Overlord :)) to have the final say as he has driven the sound and style to a certain place and wouldn’t want to upset that. He has done a good job in getting MiXE1 where it is today.”

Mike: “Yeah everyone is contributing for sure. I would say at this exact moment in time, I’m writing the core of the songs. That’s because we haven’t really tried writing anything from scratch as a band yet, it’s all been working on existing songs and demos penned before we became a band! There’s been plenty in the backlog :)

Lee T: “Plus a bunch of rough demos and random recordings we keep finding from about 10 years ago!”

How do you personally approach your songwriting?

Lee O: “On tippy toes whilst wearing my lucky pants…..oh wait, I’m confused again!!”

Lee T: “In regards to Lights Out, I suppose we approached the songwriting in the same way we have always done and that’s with an open mind and a good sense of humour! The advantage of the way we work is there are no preconceived notions on how things should be done and there isn’t a certain standard expected from one another, so it leaves room for a real casual, yet productive atmosphere. This actually helped a lot for me over the last year, being the admittedly amateur guitar player that I am…

A huge majority of the guitar sessions for both Lights Out and the upcoming album have been in burst of about two hours at a time, 2-3 times a week and in a way I feel like it really helped shape some of the sound of everything you’re about to hear over the coming months. It was this real quick fire situation where ideas could be made or broken in the space of minutes and there was a hell of a lot of improvisation throughout, where we’d find ourselves picking out a great sounding part and building sections around these tiny sparks of ideas.

One of my favourite recording experiences so far was actually with an album track where I tried my hand for the very first time at soloing (spoiler alert!), and we literally had this one section of song repeating for nearly 2 hours while I repeated the same part with slight tweaks over and over again. It’s that level of fun and sheer patience that I really can’t imagine finding recording with anyone else.”

Mike: “Note – not all 2 hours of solo are on the album! ;) Yeah, as a band we are very relaxed, in the rehearsal room or recording. My personal approach to writing… Well I always have the music first and that will spark off the vocals. I’ll usually cycle through various synth presets until a sound speaks to me or some songs I’ll start writing on guitar and later convert to synths – the 2012 single A Spark In The Air was like that. I just write songs that I want to hear, music I’d love to have on my own mp3 player and blasting out my stereo! I do have a self-imposed lyrical rule that I try to keep things positive or if there is some subject matter on the darker side, lace it with hope. For sure MiXE1 has always been quite open in terms of what sort of songs. “

mixe1 pic 3There is a certain harder rock element and snarl to the electro sounds of the band now, was this something you ha in thoughts for a while or a thrilling consequence of the full line-up?

Lee O: “I don’t know, but I like it :)

Lee T: “Good answer.”

Mike: “I’d say for sure being a band brings out the rock elements though I’d say it’s happened very natural rather than as a conscious decision. There’s always been rock vibes to some of the tracks – listening back to ‘Module 01′ there’s rock guitars there. The majority of synth parts on the EP were already written so I wouldn’t say the intention is brand new as a result of becoming a unit – what’s happened is the band have amplified this hard and it’s come out naturally. There are more guitar parts and these are more prominent. Having an actual drummer typically means you’ll be getting harder hitting rockier drum kits more often than the very electronic ones. It gives us an even bigger sound. I definitely feel the EP has a bit of a darker tone sonically than the previous material though as said, the core songs were written a while ago so the direction isn’t a result of that – however the band definitely accentuate the rock and edge of the songs. Balances nicely with synths to my ears :)”

Has the quality of and acclaim upon the EP changed your intent and thoughts  of the direction of MiXE1 or is it still on course for your original intention?

Mike: “Acclaim-wise – It’s a fantastic feeling to get positive feedback from reviewers and fans – we’re really appreciative and super grateful for it! In terms of impact on songwriting direction – there is none. Personally speaking I always write the music I want to write and be true to myself and what sort of songs I want to make, which is a very wide range and quite open. But it needs to feel right. If anything, the EP doing so well is an indication to keep doing that :) There’s nothing greater than hearing from a fan that the music has connected with them and has been with them through times in their lives. Those messages keep me smiling for days on end!”

Lee T: “In light of the positive feedback we’re getting about the EP so far, I just wanna say a quick, but huge thanks to anyone and everyone out there who has taken the time to check it out, review it, spread the word or simply messaging positive vibes back via social media. The reaction to Lights Out so far has been way above and beyond what I expected and as my first “proper” release, the ride so far has been mind-blowing.”

Does the Lights Out EP give a strong taster of what to expect from the album you are currently working on, Starlit Skin?

Lee O: “No, not really. The album is becoming a beast. We have played more of the songs from the album in the studio than the EP, so I think that helped shape it into what it’s become.”

Lee T: “For me, I’ve gotta say that it doesn’t. The songs themselves are definitely coming from a similar place and space in time, but each track we finish up at the moment is just leaps and bounds ahead of Lights Out. That’s not to take anything away from the EP, of course, but I get a real sense of pride that I didn’t quite get with the EP. The best way I can describe it, I think, is in my own performance; not being well-versed in the art of guitar, I think my style can best be described as “winging it” and I definitely play with a ‘heart-not-head’ mentality. I think it works to our advantage, really – but you’ll have to decide when the album drops!”

Mike: “Yeah the songs on the album are sound huge. I’d actually say yes it’s a taster in the sense that we have big drums and big guitars and of course my voice and style. It’s very much MiXE1 with the new MiXE1 band vibe. So for me, it’s a taster in that respect for sure. Although I do feel the same as the guys in that the songs are coming out even better than Lights Out definitely! I’m proud of Lights Out but the songs on Starlit Skin are some of our best yet. There are a couple of more chilled songs on the album and a couple which are our heaviest yet, there’s a lot of emotion and exploration.”

Can you tell us more about the album, any spoilers ;)

Lee O: “Spoilers shmoilers…. it’s gonna have 10 original songs…. there ya go! ;)”

Lee T: “Expect to be head banging one minute and holding your hands aloft and swaying the next.”

When can we hope to see it?

Lee O: “That’s the trickiest question so far :) Well it’s nearly finished…. we have a video shot for one of the tracks (just waiting for that to be completed). We’ve only just released the EP so wouldn’t be wise to release the album too soon. Think we were really going to promote, review and tease this album before release… so at a guess, towards the end of the year.”

Mike: “What Lee said! The plan is most likely the end of the year – we’ll be sitting on the album for a while sorting promo ideas for it and things for the next release. We need to give Lights Out time to air first ;)

Certainly the songs on Lights Out at times give suggestion of inspirations from eighties and nineties artists and sounds, we mentioned being reminded of the likes of Modern English, John Foxx and even Blancmange, as well as more current people like Celldweller and Static Distortion stable mates Ghost In The Static, but is that older period one which has impacted on you most to spice your music would you say?

Mike: “Y’know what – I can’t actually think of any bands that come to mind as a big influence on the EP… At least not intentionally. I listen to a lot of music and I have so many influences – over time they become so integrated it’s sometimes hard to tell what influences are being channelled! So for sure older stuff has had an influence on me in some way and possibly on the EP though it wasn’t conscious ;)”

Lee T: “I’m similar in a way. While there were wasn’t any particular road map to writing these songs, I guess you’re always going to be influenced by whatever you’ve enjoyed previously whether you consciously want to or not. My music collection is so chock full of bands that make me say “I’d love to be involved in something like this”, it’s no doubt having some effect on my own output and it’s interesting so far seeing how other people are interpreting that. Being mentioned in the same sentence as some of the bands that people are reminded of, while listening to Lights Out, is just crazy to me I can tell you that!”

Lee O: “I feel I’m more influenced by current music, but who knows whether 80’s / 90’s music / bands like Duran Duran, Nik Kershaw, Pet Shop Boys, Adam and the Ants, Madness and Genesis influence me sub consciously. They probably do in a small way.”

You have and probably are involved in other projects and collaborations, can you fill us in on those too?

Lee O: “Maybe…. maybe not :)”

Mike: “Those which are public are ‘DEP featuring MiXE1′ – a project with Mark Haigh of Draconic Elimination Projects which we started last year. We shot a video as well for one of the singles earlier in the year, currently being edited. And also ‘M3SSAGE’ which consists of myself, Gary from Defeat and Steve from Ghost In The Static. The songs are sounding great though we’re very slow as we have our main projects as priorities. Some seven string guitar action in that one!

In terms of collabs, I’ve done a few guest vocals! I don’t really get to talk about them so I’ll talk about each of the public ones! Ghost In The Static’s song ‘Lost’ was the first. A kick-ass song, I was very honoured to be on their album (it’s awesome check it out). Steve had all the lyrics and vocals written I basically sang them and added my style and threw a few extra bits in there.

Cease2Xist’s song ‘Still Not Dead’ – that came out amazing, Dayve Yates absolutely nailed that song. He told me the lyrical theme he had in mind so I just sang some bits with the idea in mind, did a few backing screams and wrote the chorus – though only Dayve is singing that bit and added his embellishments (e.g. mental high scream :D)

Most recent is Cryogenic Echelon’s ‘From Comatose’ – basically Dayve linked me up to one of Gerry Hawkin’s releases which sounded really great and we got talking. Next thing you know I was working on a track with them. The track is awesome and Gerry was really encouraging to let me do my own thing. Really great bunch of guys, seriously talented and I’m proud how the song turned out! Bonus of that collab was Gerry introduced me to Lawrie (of CE and Studio-X) who mixed Lights Out.”

What apart from finishing the album and working on the EP promotion is next for MiXE1?

Lee O: “World domination of course. Oh, and a cup of tea with a nice biscuit on the side.”

Lee T: “Next on the agenda for me is a remix of one of the album tracks. Should be interesting as I’ve never really put one together with the intention of it actually getting out there so it’ll be an experience working on it knowing it’ll be promptly ripped apart by all the guys out there who are actually good at it! ha-ha.

Other than that, we’ve been toying with the idea of how to promote the future album release when the time comes. I produced the Lights Out trailer with my video production venture: Shooting Satellite and we didn’t really want to rinse and repeat that idea for promoting the album; so we’re currently bouncing some ideas around for something far more interesting…”

Thanks so much for sharing time to talk with us guys, anything else you would like to add?

Mike: “Thanks for the interview, Pete. We just want to say thank you for all the support – every listen, every share, every purchase, every bit of feedback. It means a lot and we are very grateful!”

Lee T: “Also thanks for the great review!”

Lee O: “This is going in OK magazine, isn’t it?”

And finally, it is becoming known that I do not get on with or understand the need for remixes, though the one of  your track Part Of Me on the new EP by the great band Defeat  did impress. So finally try to convince me of the worth of remixes as a valid proposition alongside original writing J

Mike: “I feel it serves two purposes – firstly a reimagining of a song, maybe taking it in a direction not explored in the original. A good remix for me takes the song to a new place but also very much has the sound of the remixer. Secondly, it gets bands names out – if you find a remix you like, you can check out the band who remixed and maybe you’ll like their stuff. So I feel it’s a way to promote your project as well. Personally speaking I do very few remixes, I’ve only done two. Takes me a bit of motivation as with my music time, I’d prefer to just blast new material! ;)

Lee O: “I had a crack at a remix, it was my first as I can’t say I’ve ever been a fan of remixes myself…. but boy it’s hard. I found it harder than writing an original song. You have to do the original justice (even though it’s probably never going to be as good as) and feel like there is a pressure there for it to be real good. People think it’s easy as the song is already written and all you have to do is jig it about a bit. It’s like redesigning something that is good and functional…. it can be done, but will you come up with a better design than the original? Hmmmm!”

Lee T: “Oooh, controversial subject! This is where I’m gonna plant my foot firmly in my mouth after telling you I’m working on one myself but I’ve gotta say it’s not often I actively seek remixes out to listen to. That said, I understand their importance in certain circles, especially in the genre we find ourselves in, as they widen the potential audience while serving as a sort of dragnet for people to check out the originals! Defeat did some awesome work with Part of Me and turned it into this awesome, dark, dance-y number that I’m sure everyone will really enjoy. It definitely sounds killer in my car!”

https://www.facebook.com/mixe1

Read the review of the Lights Out EP @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/07/22/mixe1-lights-out-ep/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 05/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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MiXE1 – Lights Out EP

mixe1

UK electro pop band MiXE1 started out in 2010 as the solo project of Mike Evans and took no time in impressing with the first two EPs Module 01 and Module 02. Creating a warm but adventurously impacting blend of electro and pop around a rock spine the pair of releases enchanted and evoked with their absorbing and seemingly very personal invitation. Since the summer of last year when the second EP was unveiled, Evans has taken the project up another level with further additions to its line-up whilst the already openly evolving and growing sound has blossomed into a sweltering and enthralling blaze of riveting potency.

Consisting of guitarist Lee Towson and drummer Lee O’Brien (formerly of Indie-Rock band Load) alongside Evans (former guitarist of alt-metal band Broken Butterfly X), with bassist Marcos Farias making the band a quartet for live shows, the Hatfield based MiXE1 release their new collection of songs via Static Distortion Records. Though we say new the songs themselves are revisited and explored further songs written between the two previous EPs but such the growing creative intensity and growth of the band they feel as if they are bred from a much later time whilst equally showing the strength of the songwriting from day one. With debut album Starlit Skin scheduled for later in the year, MiXE1 (pronounced Mikes 1) are set to have the rest of the year melting under a different kind of heat.

The title track opens up the release and immediately has the senses shielding their eyes under an electro radiance which shimmersLights Out EP Cover vigorously as a moody shadow lurks in the sun. The vocals of Evans are as compelling and inviting as ever, his warm seductive tones wrapping around song and emotions as drums and guitar revel in the invigorating breath of the electronic wash. At this precise moment the UK is in the clasp of a heatwave and Lights Out, song and release make the perfect soundtrack whilst intensifying the sultriness of the atmosphere. The song is a passionate affair for ear and emotions, one hinting danger but ultimately caressing with infectious charm and craft.

The outstanding Part Of Me follows and ventures into the rock suggestiveness which prowled its predecessor. From a short sonic blistering rife with temptation, the track leaps into a contagious stomp of crisp rhythms, scathing riffs, and electronic enterprise.  Like a mix of Celldweller and John Foxx with a snarl of Pendulum to its darker corners, the song is a thrilling riot down flumes of exhausting and invigorating imagination littered with appetising barbs and mesmeric kisses from music through to vocals. There is also a strong essence of label mates Ghost In The Static to its muscular addictiveness which only leads to greater ardour for its immense presence.

     Pulling You Back To My World instantly has an eighties electro pop feel to its touch, the initial wave of rich sound Blancmange like whilst the incendiary hook reminds of early Modern English. Another track which is virulent in its appeal and graceful in poise it seduces with each emotive note, the song simply growing in stature with each subsequent listen, the vocals of Evans wonderfully assisted by those of Amie Morandarte-Evans entrancing whilst the mix of guitar and synths is pure magnetism driven by the influential rhythms. Along with Part Of Me, the song steals top accolades on the release and alone makes the hunger for the forthcoming album greedy.

Both Find You and This Time continue the scintillating melodic and emotional fire of the release, the first a gentler though muggy in its ambience, encounter which tenderly walks along thoughts and imagination urging them with a muscular intensity into deeper reflection whilst its successor is an almost savage confrontation, in comparison to earlier songs. With fire in its eyes it prowls and challenges whilst still flowing with melodic beauty and sentiment. The track again shows the depth of exploration in the heart and creativity of the band which again makes Starlit Skin an exciting proposition.

Completed by a remix of Part Of Me by another Static Distortion band Defeat, Lights Out is a breath-taking encounter. The final song which challenges our personal natural reticence towards remixes with an inventive face to the track, though still the original holds it in its shadow, bringing one of the brightest and exhilarating aural massages of the year to a close. Released July 27th the EP sets MiXE1 as one of the forces which will guide UK electro pop to its greatest heights, hell, probably the world’s.

https://www.facebook.com/mixe1

9/10

RingMaster 22/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Calming Cyclones: Various

     coverAccompanying their Moving Mountains compilation album, Juggernaut Services and its founder Nick Quarm have released a second album of artists working with the management and promotion company. Calming Cyclones brings together tracks and bands which reap the rewards of and flourish within calmer melodic areas of industrial/electro. Consisting of sixteen tracks the album is a warm and refreshing further evidence of the passion and powerful imagination and creativity within underground electronic music right now, something which has maybe always been the case but now with the likes of Juggernaut has an emerging voice to be heard by.

     Made up of tracks from ten artists, with some offering two entries, the album offers the dancefloor and emotions a vibrant alternative to unleash its passions to, a collection of new artists for which invention and original thought is as instinctive as breathing. The album opens with Burning Down from XP8, a duo from Italy, who also closes the release with the track Trip remixed by Cutoff:Sky. The song is a riveting expanse of golden electro kisses with an acidic heat coursing through the elegance but also offers a sinister intimidation across its embrace which is startling and unforgettable. Infectious and virulent to feet and passions, the track is a potent opening statement for the album, soon ably backed up by UK band MiXE1. The solo project of Michael Evans, the band engages and seduces the ear with the delicious embrace of Breathe, a song which smothers the senses in warmth and melodic mastery brought through emotive radiance. Originally released on the EP Module 01 via Static Distortion Records, the track like the first holds a menace deep within its heart which snarls from within the dazzling depths. Evans also offers a second song in the even more impressive electro tease of This Is Not Goodbye from Module 02, the song a union of extremes and unpredictability offering a NIN/ Celldweller meets Sonic Syndicate treat.

Another band which ignites the fullest rapture on the album is Oklahoma based electronic band, Pittersplatter who firstly with Necrotech enthrals and deliciously contaminates the senses with explosive cyber spawn melodies and an exhausting soundscape before returning again later to equal strength and addictive allurement with Mummies And Music Boxes and its invidious sonic theatrics.

Throughout its rich breadth the album continues to enchant and raise shadows with craft and enterprise. The album like its sister release has  impressive consistency in quality, imagination, and depth to all the tracks featured. Most single compilations waver within personal tastes but the pair from Juggernaut Services ignites the passions with every minute of their declarations. The likes of Manchester, UK band Cortex Defect with their two slices of future pop, Bliss Of Surrender and Heart Of Dust (Club Mix), the twin goth/darkwave offerings Messiah and Songs Made Of Solitude And Pain from Belarus band Kaltherzig, and Washington DC Retrogramme all cast their diverse and emotive sonic instigations upon the listener bringing the fullest rewards. The last of the three is a trio of musicians who create a tapestry of synthpop, darkwave, and ambience into a mesmeric and enveloping atmospheric encounter with a pop lit heart and electro voice. On Calming Cyclones their songs 911 For Locals and Heaven Is Closer Than You Think entice and infuse the most open of emotions and pleasure.

The likes of Revenant Cult from Australia and Canadians Psykkle with their dark electro continue the shifting infection upon the album whilst Scottish misanthropes Plastic Noose ensure the album ends on an elevated pinnacle in the sonic sedition Road To Perdition immediately backed up by Tactical Module and the Cortex Defect Remix of Dead Zone.

As with its companion compilation, Calming Cyclones in its own unique and distinct presence leaves the previously hidden shadows of industrial/electro underground with all it glorious detours an openly lit invitation, something which to ignore would be irresponsible to the passions.

Get the Name Your Price purchase @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/calming-cyclones

8/10

Tracklisting:

1. XP8 – Burning Down

2. MiXE1 – Breathe

3. Pittersplatter – Necrotech

4. Cortex Defect – Bliss Of Surrender

5. Kaltherzig – Messiah

6. Retrogramme – 911 For Locals

7. Revenant Cult – Spectral Heresy

8. MiXE1 – This Is Not Goodbye

9. Cortex Defect – Heart Of Dust (Club Mix)

10. Pittersplatter – Mummies And Music Boxes

11. Retrogramme – Heaven Is Closer Than You Think

12. Kaltherzig – Songs Made Of Solitude And Pain

13. Psykkle – City Of Nodes (Revenant Cult Remix)

14. Plastic Noose – Road To Perdition

15. Tactical Module – Dead Zone (Cortex Defect Remix)

16. XP8 – Trip (Remixed By Cutoff:Sky)

RingMaster 07/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cease2Xist – You Are Expendable

You Are Expendable the debut album from Cease2Xist is undoubtedly the sweetest abrasion to be felt this year, the warmest violation and one of the most welcome mesmeric abuses upon the senses. The release from the British band was one of the more eagerly awaited albums this year but one wonders if any one truly expected something this powerful and imaginatively colossal. Crossing and pushing all boundaries musically and with its recipients, You Are Expendable unleashes a storm of industrial, harsh EBM, noise and post punk, in sound as well as attitude and energy. It is a toxic shower of caustic imagination and noise bringing the deepest fullest pleasure and smouldering rapture.

Cease2Xist is primarily Dayve Yates, with the skills of Jay Ruin, Seamus Bradd, and O.S. Entity added to the live setting. Back in 2010 with the release of debut EP Living by the Bullet, Yates immediately grabbed attention with his diverse composing and startling sound. With You are Expendable he has evolved and grown into a much more inventive and towering composer, a true merciless instigator of unforgiving sounds and unrelenting provocation. The album hits and rubs fiercely from beginning to end, its magnetic corrosive breath a mix of Cynical Existence and Gods Destruction, to simplify it, but offering a distinct uniqueness which marks the band as permanently recognisable from mere whispers of sound.

The album has a less than dramatic start if one is honest though that is in hindsight after the further riots have left their mark. Not All Is Wrong is a clash upon the ear of rhythmic surges within a disassociated seemingly crumbling atmosphere. It is a slow enveloping crawl over the senses, a statically bruised ambient smothering underneath the sonic eruptions. Though brief the piece sets up the senses for what is to follow without giving the full picture of the incredible strength and incendiary grandeur in store.    

My Burning Rage waves a melodic weave before the ear then manipulates it into pulsating sonic erosion which one willingly and swiftly succumbs to. The vocals of Yates are partly submerged within the brewing spite, the production and placing of his vocals a constant on the album and it works so well, adding to the shadowed and heart borne anger which sharp clarity would have distilled. The track itself leaves one breathless and smarting from its aural salt but wholly satisfied and eager for more violation.

The title track bakes the senses again with a sizzling contagion of scorched melodic touches and malignant energy to match the lyrical theme whilst the following Still Not Dead creates a dance to enrapture whilst peeling synapses further of their strength. Featuring MiXE1 on vocals alongside Yates, there is a sensational ebb and flow to the song within its rampant energy, the cleaner melodic tones of Mike Evans tempering and firing off of the harsher squalls of Yates.

Tonight is an aural defibrillator, its charged pulse shooting through ear, senses, mind and body, the sonic acid swirls it delivers cutting deeply as they tighten within the emerging sonic sandstorm. The track is as abrasive as the others whilst furthering the vibrant diversity which fuels the release, its melodies diving into the flailed flesh from the energies around them, to prove equally as violent but distinctly beautiful.

The likes of One-Zero, the virulent Teenage America, and the hypnotic I Am Destroyer only increase the depth of quality though all on the album is put into the shade by one song, the highest peak of the album, Occupy Everything. The track is irresistible, a thrilling, infectious, throbbing muscle of brilliance. A brazen and angry stomp bursting with dazzling electro fingerings and spiralling melodic ingenuity, the song is sheer addiction, its burrowing potency and majesty overwhelming whilst its crystalline expulsions and insatiable depravity persuades every cell of the body and all thoughts into subservience.

Cease2Xist has created one of the albums of the year in You Are Expendable, and upon its release on September 29th through Static Distortion Records, a label which seemingly can do no wrong this year, the band and UK industrial music will take its rightful place at the head of the world table.

https://www.facebook.com/cease2xistuk

RingMaster 25/09/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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