G.R.I.M – Answers

GRIM

Having laid down their web of devilish temptation with the Sounds Like These EP, UK experimental rockers G.R.I.M return to increase the irresistible toxicity of their mouthwatering revelry with new single Answers. Again the Manchester hailing quartet twists the essences of numerous styles into their own unique and virulently compelling contagion as the single builds on their striking debut. Creating a stronger and more startling canvas of sound upon which the band sets free a riotous maelstrom of anthemic rhythms, imposing textures, and a psychotically charming inventive seductive, the track is a demon puppeteer to feet and psyche. It unleashes merciless bait throughout, a tempting which holds more unpredictable turns and deranged enterprise than to be found in the dark corridors of bedlam, a proposition which just inspires similarly raucous reactions

Formed in 2011 Great Riddims In Mind, better known as G.R.I.M, took little time in recruiting a fervour soaked local following with their fusion of styles such as dubstep, hip hop, dub, metal, and drum and bass to their sizzling noise rock core. To be fair any labelling is redundant when the foursome of vocalist Lance Hargreaves, guitarist James Glenn, bassist Nathan Larkin, and drummer Kyle Larkin cast their creative net of intensive rhythms, scorching guitar blazes, and vocal chants, and that is just simplifying their songwriting. With a serious reputation for thrilling live performances around their home city across renowned venues such as DryLive, Roadhouse, Sound Control, Antwerp Mansion, and Retrobar, the band certainly raised potent attention with their first release but it is in the outstanding Answers where you feel the trigger to wider recognition lies.

The single opens with a restrained stroking of guitar which is soon aligned to pumping beats and coaxing vocals. It is a skittish recruitment Answersof attention and appetite, sounding out the senses ready for the imminent expulsion of wantonly swinging grooves and wildly adventurous beats ridden by feistily enthused vocals. In full flight the track twists and flirts like a rapacious lap dancer as melodic toxins and hypnotic rhythms veining and puncturing the swerving rampancy. Playing like a meshuga planted by a union of Hadouken!, Lazy Habits, and Great Imitation with the extra relish of Swound!, the track soon has passions enslaved but it is only the start as it swoops into an atmospheric deviation, glorious orchestrated flames reaching to the sky as a Shrikes like disorientation and experimentation works on the senses. That exploration then evolves into a hip hop shaped lunacy, the song lifting its knees to its creative chin to wrong foot assumptions before moving once more into a delicious Mike Patton like invention.

The song continues to entwine those characters whilst adding new aural voices across its riveting climactic body, all the time sending waves of contagion and anthemic fuel into the passions. Seemingly increasing its thumping stride and urgency as it nears its conclusion, Answers is a predatory enticement with cracked intentions and irresistible weaponry which not only realises the promise suggested by the band’s last EP but uncages even greater potential for their sounds and an impending spotlight coated stature which you just know G.R.I.M will be exploiting ahead.

The single also comes with an equally dramatic and thrilling video directed by Joshua Leo Dorfman and produced by G.R.I.M and Fallout Productions. It brings its own enthralling premise and larger than life colour to the song, its story and cast as dynamic and energetically agitated as the thrilling song itself.

G.R.I.M is one of Britain’s most exhilarating and exhaustingly inventive secrets though Answers might just make that a soon to be well recognised mystery.

Check out the Answers video @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k13smeVyrLw

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https://twitter.com/GRiManchester

10/10

RingMaster 07/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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BulBul – Hirn Fein Hacken

EOM57_PromoWallet

Ok I will admit I had not come across Austrian band Bulbul before being handed their new album Hirn Fein Hacken, a release which sees them returning after six years from not sure where, but from here on in after the intensive psyche examination presented by their latest, a backward investigation is sitting high on the list of musts. An insatiable and mischievous, not forgetting criminally addictive, exploration of every delicious element you can imagine to rile, ignite, and seduce the very core of the mind and senses, Hirn Fein Hacken is quite simply sonic irreverence and quite brilliant.

The first sign of Bulbul we can find is the release of their self-titled debut album in 1997, Bulbul a one man project of guitarist/vocalist Raumschiff Engelmayr at the time. With Derhunt linking up on bass, the band released second and again self-titled album in 1999, via as the first via Trost Records. Drummer Ddkern joined not long after as the band continued to experiment with sound, imagination, and their fans minds through their third and fourth albums in 2003 and 2005 respectively, again under the same monikers as the others. 2006 saw fifth album BlllBlll unleashed whilst the Patrick Pulsinger produced 6 was uncaged via Exile On Mainstream two years later to strong acclaim and attention. Hirn Fein Hacken is as mentioned the band’s return, again via EOM, and takes little time in slipping under the skin of the senses and psyche as well as giving the passions an irresistible creative toxicity to feast upon.

The Vienna hailing band’s influences according to the press release include the likes of The Kinks, Cpt. Beefheart, Rhys Chatham, Django Reinhart, Abner Jay, Fats Domino, and Bob Dylan, but as the album seduces with its ingenious seductive dementia we would suggest artists such as Kontrust, De Staat, Yello, and Fantomas as a starting place. Opener Fire offers a wide groan before bringing all of its thought and energy into a concentrated rhythmically driven nagging of ears and senses. Riffs gently niggle as the bass provides a fuzz kissed tonic to greedily swallow whilst all the while strong vocals dance over the bait with devilry in their tone and relish on their lips. The song continues to swagger and weave across the imagination, enterprise of the guitar as boisterously naughty as it is creative and the bass an irresistible growling incitement impossible to tear emotions away from.

It is a magnetic start which has little difficulty in making slaves of thoughts and passions, leaving the following Uhu a willing canvas to play with. An electro simmering ebbs and flows initially, its voice slightly smothered but eager to break free to greater clarity. That aspect is taken by the funk bred grooves and suasion of the guitar matched by the vivacious vocal delivery. The song smoulders, never lifting its gaze or energy from a wanton sway of its body and sex infused melodies. Not as dramatic as its predecessor but equally as enthralling, the song makes way for I hea eh scho lång nix mea, a song which like the first secures its initial conquest through repetitive coaxing before exploring an industrially inspired realm with clanking tubes, concussive temptations, and unpredictable almost maniacal imagination. The track pushes the earlier thoughts of De Staat to the fore, the song a cousin of their Sweatshop track without the same feverish urgency. It is a glorious trap for the passions warming them up for the even greater infestation to follow.

That virulence comes in the shape of the ridiculously addictive and epidemically infectious instrumental Kanzla. From its first second, guitars respectfully grind against the ears whilst the bass again adds a barracuda like tone to the abrasing lure of the song. The rhythmic restraint with punctuating twists of the drums only reinforces the delicious irritancy as the track persists with its rub through sonic rises and falls. The dip into a brief sultry teasing only inflames the senses more before the track reverts to its feverish meshuga of a tango, intermittently interrupting its blaze with further inventive twists.

Both the psychotic Fisole, where instruments are abused and random items employed for a warped bedlamic cacophony, and the noise rock taunting of Quicksand keep the passions breathless, the second of the two finding an element of Melvins and even Pere Ubu to its spellbinding guitar sculpted temptation. As impressively thrilling as they are the pair are only the appetiser for the pinnacle of the album, Gurdy. The track takes a breath before cantering eagerly through the ears, spicy short guitar strokes and rumbling riffing spurred on by the darkly sinister vocals and unrelenting rhythms. The track is pure 100% unbudging contagion, every flavour, trait, and inventive bait pure addictiveness. Imagine Mike Patton, Pryapsime, and Queens Of The Stone Age engaged in an illicit enterprise and you have the quite magnificent Gurdy.

Genderman Can provides a raw punk fuelled rampage next, vocals and bass antagonistic whilst the guitar boils the air with a blues tasting sonic toxin which again is only good for health and passions, especially its closing warped and sizzling smothering of the senses. From here the album relaxes its energetic stance to unveil a pair of slowly burning treats. Bomb comes first, its opening air awash with the fiery country blues flames which were hinted at on its predecessor. With pulsating beats and a psychedelic ambience drifting over song and listener whilst the vocals like the music flickers within a seductive fire formed around the narrative, the track is a mesmeric enchantment littered and primed with broad intrigue and unruly invention, but within a relatively sobering confine.

The closing A To Beans is just aural sex, a slow hip swerving seductress with smooth rhythms, a throbbing intent, and a sinister vocal invitation which should be avoided but impossible not to embrace as deeply as the noir blessed sounds. It is a ridiculously captivating end to a quite sensational release. As these last words are written contemplation of how BulBul avoided our attention is loud and incriminations rife, but it is hard to imagine previous releases being better than Hirn Fein Hacken so maybe this was the right time to find the band. We are heading back into their history as you read and suggest you do the same once you have been infected by this mad beauty.

http://www.bulbul.at/

http://bulbul.bandcamp.com/album/hirn-fein-hacken

10/10

RingMaster 08/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Follow the rabbit into the weird: an interview with Mr. Strange

Mr. Strange

Fans of UK musical mutants The Shanklin Freak Show have already been touched, inspired, and seduced by the creativity and psyche teasing craft of the band’s former frontman Mr. Strange whilst his solo work has equally gripped the imagination of a great many but now the songwriter/producer/vocalist/musician has taken it all to a new level with the release of this exceptional new album The Wonderful World Of Weird. A release walking the reams of insanity and artistic rapaciousness, it is a diverse and riveting exploration of sounds, invention, and dice into the weird persona that is Mr. Strange. Greedily wanting to find out more we had the joy and adventure to talk to the man himself with the adding pleasure of his artistic cohort Stench on top also sharing thoughts and time with us. Investigating The Wonderful World Of Weird, we talked origins, The Shanklin Freak Show, Marilyn Manson, the bright lights and much more…

Greetings Mr. Strange and thank you for taking time out to let us delve into your world of weird.

Mr. Strange: Greetings! Thank you, sir, I’m glad to be here. Smells funny though!

You are well known amongst fans for your founding and leading of The Shanklin Freak Show (TSFS) until recently but maybe less know about your solo exploits before and running alongside the band; could you give some background to those?

Mr. Strange: Before I started The Shanklin Freak Show in March 2003, I began learning my craft as a programmer / producer way back in 1998. I bought a basic music creation game for the original PlayStation simply called ‘Music’ and became completely obsessed with it! As laughable as it sounds, it was actually quite a competent music tool, and a great introduction to music programming. Before I made the upgrade to professional (real) music software, I made a whole album using just this game and my PlayStation. This album was completed in February 2003, although I did add some vocals and guitars to the final version of the album using my current studio set-up. The final version of the album was eventually released in late 2011 as Sounds From The Asylum, which is an apt title methinks! Anyway, back to 2003. As soon as Sounds From The Asylum was finished I went full-throttle into The Shanklin Freak Show project, greatly helped by the fact I could finally record guitars and vocals with my swanky new production software – which I could not do before 2003. The Shanklin Freak Show project pretty much had my full attention until late 2011. The only exceptions to this were my collaborations with Global Citizen acting as co-producer on two albums – those being Master Stroke and Nil By Mouth – as well as the Mr. Strange album The Fall which I made in late 2007.. But for the most part, my solo exploits only resumed once I stepped down from the forefront of The Shanklin Freak Show in November 2011. Now my Mr. Strange projects are my primary focus… and my cats.

From all the music and projects you have been involved with it is clear to see that your sounds and tastes are rather eclectic, what are some of the major inspirations which have spiced your own ideas over the years?

Mr. Strange: Well, being a rather flamboyant chap, nearly all of my musical influences fall in to the “theatrical” category. Bands and artists who present themselves in a very theatrical way tend to make more outlandish music, and that’s definitely what floats my boat, as it were! I’ll try to keep it snappy, so here’s a shortlist of some of my most influential artists: Danny Elfman, David Bowie, Mushroomhead, Dr. Steel, The Sisters Of Mercy,  Alice Cooper, Mortiis (only the ‘Smell Of Rain’ album), Krizz Kaliko, The Duke Of Stratosphere, Twiztid, Marilyn Manson, The Prodigy, ICP, Mr. Bungle (or almost anything from the mind of Mike Patton), Gary Numan, Tech N9ne, White Zombie / Rob Zombie, and Babylon Zoo. That last one’s not a joke by the way! Stop laughing.

Tell us about creating TSFS and its own unique and dark world?TSFS with Mr. Strange

Mr. Strange: I started The Shanklin Freak Show in early 2003, the first ever Freak Show song was written and recorded in March I believe, a little random fact for those who may be interested. The whole concept was meant as a home, a form of escapism, for those who felt rejected by the world. Basically the kind of outlandish, Tim Burton-esque world I wanted to escape to myself at that time. My failure at finding a place to belong in the world led me to try and make my own, both for myself and others who felt the same. The basic concept is articulated best in the song ‘Twisted Family,’ check it out if you want to get your noggin around what the whole Freak Show thang is about. Musically, it was born out of my love of some of the earlier Insane Clown Posse records and my disappointment with (the then newly released) Marilyn Manson album The Golden Age Of Grotesque – I was expecting a deeply engrossing, dark, twisted, circus-style cabaret show of an album, my dream record, but what arrived was an album of fairly standard industrial pop songs. I imagined it to sound far more intriguing and I found the idea behind the record a lot better than the end product, so I went about trying to create the album I imagined. That’s it really. It seemed like a good idea at the time…

Before we concentrate on your new album, you are still involved with TSFS but just not as the vocalist now? Why the decision to step down from that role?

Mr. Strange: Indeed, I’m still involved with the band, but just on the side-lines at the moment. I have to admit that my input has been very minimal since my departure, although that was not a conscious decision, that’s just how it’s played out up until this point. I may play a more active role in the band next year, songwriting and maybe doing the odd live shows here and there, but that’s all dependant on working it around what I’ll be doing with my own projects. There were many different factors contributing to me stepping down as the vocalist and retreating from the forefront of the Shanklin Freak Show, although the main factor was simply that I find performing live extremely nerve-wracking and didn’t want to do it anymore, at least not for a few years. I suppose the other main factor was that I was feeling burnt out with the project and my heart wasn’t really in it, at least not enough to knuckle down, overcome my nerves and keep playing live shows. I started the Freak Show in 2003, so I spent a full 8 years solely focused on that one project and to be honest, I think I just wanted to try new things, things that might not have worked within the context of The Shanklin Freak Show, if that makes sense?

You have just released the brilliant album The Wonderful World Of Weird, our favourite and one of the best if not THE best album this year, how long has it been in the making?

Mr. Strange: Firstly, thank you very much! Secondly, too damn long! I started the album in October 2011 and finished it in October 2013. The reason for this overly long development process was due to uncertainty as to where I wanted to go after the Shanklin Freak Show. I had loads of ideas, but for my first release after TSFS I wanted to make a record that would be fresh and also slightly familiar, that’s a very specific sound to try and go for, and one that was tricky to find balance for. I’d write a few songs, then over analyse them and come to the conclusion that I wasn’t heading in the right direction, so they’d gather dust for a few months while I procrastinate, then I’d become enthused with the Wonderful World of Weird project again and get a couple of more songs done, then doubt myself again. This process happened a few times, probably half of the two year development cycle was either spent doing nothing or writing material separate from the WWoW project! I’m currently working on developing and finishing those other ideas for my next record, needless to say it already sounds incredibly different to the Wonderful World of Weird and is even more of a departure from The Shanklin Freak Show sound.

StenchYou co-wrote many of the tracks and recorded it with TSFS’s guitarist Stench (Gary Mason to his mum); how easy was it to fit this in as I know the band is recording their own album too; are you to blame for the delay in the finishing of their album??? ;)

Mr. Strange: Having Stench work on the album with me has had no bearing on the speed of The Shanklin Freak Show’s musical output, don’t blame me! Haha.

STENCH:  I don’t think Mr Strange is to blame in the slightest. The delay has been down to a few factors. The Last Show mixing process has been troublesome and we were never completely happy with it and didn’t want to release something that would make us cringe, knowing that we could’ve done better. Obviously, we had the addition of Kronik on Bass, rehearsals, gigs, festivals and the continual cycle of writing and recording. Plus, we’ve had the steep learning curve of being responsible for our own production. We have lots of songs that we’re working on and which are at various states of creation/completion. Plus, very recently, Mr Foul became a Daddy again. All in all, I think we’ve done pretty well, considering.

Mr. Strange: Thanks for backing me up there, Master Stench! I’ll slip you a fiver later.

How did the song writing work for the album and at what point did Stench get to add his explorations to your ideas?

Mr. Strange: We began working together full-time in late 2012 (we’d done bits and bobs together for the album before then, but it was an intermittent thing) almost exactly a year after I began work on the record. At that time I probably had roughly half the album that you can hear today, albeit in a very rough state and with very little guitar work on it. I think ‘White Rabbit’ is the only song that I play all of the guitars on, the rest of the album is pure Stench! With regards to songwriting, it kind of varies as to the approach we took. A lot of the songs were already half written, so Stench worked his magic over what was already there, but a few songs were written in a much more free-form manner. The songs Psycho Surfing A Go-Go‘ and Metropolis 2984 were the result of me and Stench just jamming and coming up with crazy stuff, which I’d never done before, so that was a great experience! Sadly a lot of our random jam songs didn’t make the cut for the album, but they’ll appear eventually. A lot of the tracks we wrote were simply too damn off the wall for the Wonderful World of Weird!

How much did Stench evolve and twist your ideas into new sparks within songs or did you go all dictator on him in this area? ;) (We at The RR know he likes to be dominated…)

Mr. Strange: While there was indeed a fair bit of dictating going on, Stench’s guitar wizardry certainly evolved a lot of songs in many ways. Even songs which were mostly finished by my lonesome have changed in tone and texture considerably since Stench shot his load over them! Songs which may have been dead ends from my point of view (as in not worth finishing) were saved by Stench taking the tune in a new direction with his magical, distorted, electrically-powered stringed instrument. The addition of guitar solos to a few songs has also altered the structure of some of the arrangements, giving the whole album a more free-flowing and natural feel, a definite departure to the more rigid electro-industrial pounding of some of my earlier songs with TSFS.

The guitar work provides a bait of hooks and grooves across the release which seems to breed from the other exotic or should that be erotic melodies and lures at large; did these come after the heart of the songs were exposed or in their initial breeding?

Mr. Strange: Wow, that’s one very eloquently worded question! I want some of what you’re smoking, sir! Haha. Methinks I’ll pass this one over to Stench.

STENCH:  I have to say, Mr Strange is always a pleasure to work with and we seem to be able to communicate very easily musically. So, I suppose that both cases are true as regards to the creation of the tunes. Sometimes, Mr Strange will have an idea of what he wants beforehand and I’ll just add my guitar parts under his strict instruction. Thankfully, I no longer have to wear the gimp mask. Other times, we start completely from scratch. Either way, it’s always fun and inspiring.

The Wonderful World Of Weird is a roller coaster of styles and flavours including industrial, steampunk, surf rock, 555928_584429381594861_1695733989_npsychedelic and gothic rock and much more all merged into the narrative of the album. This is a true reflection of both your musical tastes and the way your creative imaginations works, or predominantly Mr S’s (Saul); the album truly a landscape of your ideas and musical psyche?

STENCH:  I think we both have very eclectic musical influences and appreciate each other’s tastes. This makes it much easier to work together and helps with communicating ideas. But, yes, the album is predominantly Saul’s genius and I add either the cherry on top or the fly in the ointment, whichever is required at the time.

It is fair Mr. Strange to say the album is very different from your earlier songs as on The Fall and those written across all your projects as collated in the Freakshow album, both of 2011. I will admit this was a little bit of a surprise considering your major input and dramatic style within TSFS, so has this been a natural progression or have you had to consciously veer away from anything sounding like the band?

Mr. Strange: Yes, it was definitely a conscious decision to try and move away from the sound of the Shanklin Freak Show. The more complex song arrangements, featuring less prominent/heavy guitars, changing the tone and pitch of my vocals somewhat, being more daring with mixing varying genres on one album, all of it was done with the sole intention of trying to not sound like a new Freak Show album. I’d done 8 years of the Freak Show; I wanted to see if I could create something a little different. With all that said, I also tried to not move too far away from the Freak Show sound as to completely alienate people who may be following me after hearing the Freak Show. You can hear echoes of TSFS on songs like ‘Fire’, ‘White Rabbit’ and on ‘Exile’.

As the album is lyrically and musically a journey through the mind of Mr. Strange did you have a definite step by step guide to the order of songs and their effect on the album in mind before everything was recorded etc.?

Mr. Strange: I did indeed! However, what I planned out and what ended up being the Wonderful World of Weird album are two very different things. The narrative you hear on the finished record was re-written to fit the finished songs only a few months before the album’s release. I originally planned something far grander and more complex, but it was sounding so overblown, silly and pretentious that the scope for the record was scaled back considerably. It’s far more personal now; I think that works in its favour.

We described the opening title track to The Wonderful World Of Weird as Dr. Jekyll meets ICP as early Marilyn Mansion helps Victor Frankenstein create aural life for them to toy with upon a set designed by Willy Wonka, a description which in varying ways applies to the whole album; how would you describe the album to newcomers?

Mr. Strange: Tim Burton and Danny Elfman taking an absinth-fuelled journey through a variety of pop and rock’s more outlandish genres.

I imagine this album might appeal to people who like quirky / alternative pop. I was inspired by lots of the 80′s goth bands and loads of steampunk artists while making this record, so perhaps folks with similar tastes would enjoy it, too.

Tell us about our favourite track out of a great many on the album, Psycho Surfing-A-Go-Go.

STENCH:  Now this song is an example of how suddenly things happen organically. I think this was the fastest tune that we’ve ever written together. The major bones came together in an evening and the riffs were written on an old 1960’s Burns bass. Suddenly, it began writing itself. It was great fun to play as it has a tongue in cheek feel to the guitar lines. Also, it was nice to get outside of the box and let rip on some retro sounds. Mr. Strange knew from the off what he wanted to do vocal-wise and before we knew it, job done.

Mr. Strange 4Can we get a brief glimpse of the man behind Mr. Strange, we get the impression he is a shy retiring type… a tea drinker ;)

Mr. Strange: Of course I like tea, and no, you can’t get a glimpse! Aha! Although your impression could be considered strangely accurate…

You both hail from The Isle Of Wight which seems like a small hotbed of talent right now, covering numerous styles?

STENCH:  Absolutely, the music scene here is great and vast. It would take up another couple of pages to name every great musician or band based here. Of course, we have our favourites and it would be rude not to give them a shout. *Deep breath* Pleasurade, Hentai Babies, When Prophecy Fails, Becoming The Leviathan, Born Ina Barn, Silencing The Voiceless, Puritan Slain, Kingz Of Vocals, Counsil Estate Supermodels, The Ohmz, Hollowdrone and Nately’s Whore to name but a few. So you have your Alt-Pop, Progressive Metal, Hip-Hop, Reggae, Grunge and Punk. But, as with any music scene, anywhere, it needs support.

You have not been tempted by the bright lights of the mainland for musical reasons?

Mr. Strange: Career wise? Yes, but many factors prevented that from happening. I haven’t thought about it for years. I’m happy where I am right now, so I have no plans to move closer to the action, there’s more than enough in my trousers to keep me entertained, although the career opportunities are limited.

What is next for Mr. Strange, you do not seem like an artist to sit back and take a rest.

Mr. Strange: Indeed, you know me too well, sir! Were we lovers at some point? I have two projects / albums planned for next year. The first album (which I’m writing at this very moment) is progressing extremely fast, possibly dropping in April 2014. I’d wager no one will see this one coming; it’s so completely different to anything I’ve done before. Once that album is out and people adjust to the new strangeness, I’ll begin work on the next album, the one that will usher in my return to live music and my inevitable conquest of planet Earth! I hope to have that second record ready by the end of 2014, possibly with live touring to follow in 2015. Don’t hold me to those dates though, I’m just speculating at this point. Both albums will have completely different musical styles and theatrical imagery to match, but I shall say no more.

Where can people treat themselves to all things Mr. Strange and especially The Wonderful World Of Weird?

Mr. Strange: I think it would be very spiritually rewarding for people to go to my website and gasp in ecstasy at pictures of my devilishly handsome face! Links to all of my music and whatnot are located there, but my sexy pictures are where it’s at.

www.mrstrangemedia.comMr. Strange 3

If folks are into the social media thang, I’m on most of the popular sites, too:

www.facebook.com/Official.Mr.Strange

www.youtube.com/user/MrStrangeMedia

www.twitter.com/MrStrangeMedia

Once more thank you and of course to Stench for leaving your bedlam to talk with us, any thoughts to leave us with?

Mr. Strange: Expect the unexpected!

…and lastly please give us five records which shaped Mr. Strange.

1. Marilyn Manson – Portrait Of An American Family

2. Dukes Of Stratosphere – Chips From The Chocolate Fireball

3. Insane Clown Posse – The Great Milenko

4. Dr. Steel – Read-Along Album

5. Danny Elfman – Nightmare Before Christmas OST

Read The Wonderful World Of Weird review @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/11/28/mr-strange-the-wonderful-world-of-weird/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 23/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Mucho Tapioca – Self Titled

Mucho Tapioca pic

The self-titled album from French band Mucho Tapioca is one of those treats where you are never quite sure what is going on but enjoying every thrill of the investigation and the imaginative thoughts it inspires and makes suggestive gestures with. The eight track release is a schizophrenic maze of progressive and avant-garde rock with just as vibrant and eager jazz, psyche, and experimental tendencies. It is a delicious adventure which leaves you mystified, fulfilled, and with an appetite for much more of the band’s seductive mania. Imagine a mix of Mr Bungle, or other Mike Patton exploits, with 6:33, Pryapisme, and System Of A Down, then you get an idea what is going on upon the album; add extra spice from Dog Fashion Disco or Diablo Swing Orchestra to the blend and you get closer again but still only scratch the surface of what is uniquely Mucho Tapioca.

Hailing from Toulouse/Tarbes area of France, the band hits you right away with the packaging of their CD version of the album. With nostalgic imagery and recipe providing its art on the outside wrapping and each disc containing one of the two “comic-booklets” inside with artwork from Matthieu Andro, ours contained the desperado tale of La Venganza whilst the other possibility is Scrabble au Coin du Feu Chez Baba Yaga, the first positive impressions are soon confirmed and take to higher plateaus with opening track Parano Yack. The song is an instant swagger through the ear with guitar and bass teasing coaxing the ears into its sultry dance. Voice effected vocals equally flirt at the start whilst the song shuffles itself into position before unveiling its continually twisting and evolving drama and unpredictability. Stomping with and questioning the imagination from second to second, the track is a feast of magnetic invention and psychotic mischief, a devilment which goes within a breath from caressing and kissing the senses to tearing a strip of their flesh off and chewing it boldly before their eyes.

The following Cherche le Fusil! walks in with a jazz seeded strut to its confident stroll, the vocals testing the ear from within the brewed a3282689786_2elegance with a devilry and intent to leave thoughts wrong footed. They are successful as is the sound in the same endeavour but simultaneously it all mesmerises and ignites a fire in the passions to leave a big grin on every surface of the listener from face through to heart. Undoubtedly Mucho Tapioca’s sound like those references we mentioned earlier is not for everyone but taking the previous comparisons as a marker if they appeal this album will have juices dripping.

Both Scrabble au Coin du Feu and Soirée Diapos continue the total persuasion already rampaging from within the album, the first with a throaty resonating bass croon to its sound and atmosphere which with a dark jazz character creates an intrigue of sinister provocation and dramatic shadow clad exploits. There is a bedlamic tone to its invention too which only sparks greater enjoyment and thoughts whilst its successor takes that insanity onto open territory with a kinetically fuelled bewilderment of rhythmic concussion and enchanting jazz crafted ambience speared by tempests of unbridled sonic madness. Reminding at times of eighties band Essential Logic through its brass temptation, it like the whole album feels like the crazed soundtrack to the cartoon Oggy and The Cockroaches, and provides another outstanding incitement for mind and soul.

The moody breath of Malhabile Lama makes an evocative wrap for the great clean passionate vocals opening up the song, rhythms and percussion on the brink of psychotic revelry whilst guitars and bass shape their individual claims on the ear and beyond with craft and magnetic enterprise. Increasing its intensity and pulse rate the further into its inner turmoil it ventures, the track is a slow burning joy with gets better with each encounter whilst the next up La Venganza is straight at the ear and emotions with its jazz funk twist and sultry sax sex matched by the guitar and its loose aural desires. The track is a thrilling hypnotic scat with the drums the puppeteer and ringleader to the tango of scurrying and sizzling synapse firing rodent like ingenuity, its charms and toxicity burrowing unseen into the lustful passions.

     Chez Baba Yaga is another which at first approach is pleasing if not as openly persuasive as other tracks but all the time it is working away with its noir enticing and shadows mastery to seize the listener into its frantic meshuga. It burns a stronger attraction with each taking of its emotive bughouse and makes a stirring appetiser for the final declaration of the album, Méchant Chameau. The track is also a smouldering inducement which takes time but leaves no doubt of its potency and excitingly baited trap. Arguably the most complex track on the album, though no song comes with simplicity as its driver, it completes one oddball and compulsively irresistible crossing of thoughts and imagination, a meeting which is sheer joy and the trigger to a real hunger for more from Mucho Tapioca.

https://www.facebook.com/muchotapiocafanpage

http://muchotapioca.bandcamp.com/

10/10

Upcoming shows:

Oct 30 L’Ubu, Perpignan, France

Oct 31 La Pleine Lune, Montpellier, France

Nov 02 Le Pakebot, Chadron, France

RingMaster 03/10/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Japanese Fighting Fish: Day Bombs

pic by Scot Salt.

pic by Scot Salt.

Ever since Just Before We Go MAD tantalised and teased the ear back in 2011, an eager soft spot for UK taunters Japanese Fighting Fish has been waiting patiently for the band to bring forth some more of their devilry to devour and lust quietly over. Now the Leeds hailing, London based quartet return with their second album Day Bombs and quite simply it far surpasses hopes and expectations bred during the wait. Consisting of ten unique and inventive temptations, the album is pure refreshment to the ear and the UK alternative rock scene, so much so that it is almost a swipe at the lack of ambition fuelling the efforts of so many other bands. Boldly adventurous and unashamedly refusing to conform, the release is a scintillating mischievous triumph and poised to steal album of the year awards.

With two of its members swimming away (sorry could not resist) to join a samba band in Brazil, the remaining pair of Karlost and Gareth Mochizuki Ellmer from watching ‘a documentary on how the Foo Fighters recorded their last album in what effectively was a high-end studio in Dave Grohl’s garage’, decided to go down the same road with this their second album. Using several ‘skuzzy’ garages in Leeds and London on limited funds, the band with Joe John Flannery and Phil Keating now enlisted, went to work creating Day Bombs, eventually shooting over to New York for its final mixing in a studio built in an old taxi repair shop by a friend of the album’s producer. The result is a masterpiece of imagination and contagious sonic belligerence crafted into one of the most riveting and expressive joys this year.

Whereas their debut  had a Latin temperament and carnivalesque vaunt to its theatre, Day Bombs unleashes a punk and noise rock clad 1069396_10153078929340226_618406295_nfire to its breath and sound, sinews and rhythmic enslaving as potent as the at times caustic but always tempting melodic flames which lick at senses and thoughts throughout the individual dramas. Vocalist Karlost returns with his expected one of a kind tone and delivery yet also has a greater control of its intent and flavoursome incitement.  From the moment opener Bloody Fingers starts tempting the ear with a dance of rhythmic enticement around a great throaty bass lure attention is alert and licking lips, especially once Karlost offers his almost theatrical delivery. Immediately the sense of something different is rife, the guitars riling against thoughts with hungry riffs whilst a sonic siren call flirts through the feisty surface and touch of the song. Firm without being aggressive and heavy without bludgeoning down doors it is an impressive and stirring introduction to the album.

Whereas there is a touch of Engerica and The Dropper’s Neck to the track the following He Doesn’t Know What He Wants walks in with a swagger not out of place on a Mike Patton composition. With electro kisses playing on the muscular yet respectful canvas and the bass especially gracious with its predatory voice, blazes of sonic fire and melodic raucousness stir the track into a sensational wash of creative knavery and primal seduction.

The two singles from the album approach to lay down their traps for the passions next. First up is the exceptional Greatest Escape with its Foo Fighters like whisper within a sinisterly romantic narrative, though whether it is supposed to have that menace we will have to learn. With a Slavic lilt to the band vocals and Cossack like bounce to its gait, the song is an irrepressible lead into the album for newcomers backed up just as potently by They Lie. Starting like Mud meets the Sex Pistols but soon unravelling its own form of diablerie as Karlost arguably for the first time on the album fully unveils his melodramatic mischief, the song is a gem and challenges He Doesn’t Know What He Wants as the pinnacle of the album. By its departure there is the shadowed roguery of an Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster adding extra pleasure and might to ensure you just need to have one more listen before moving on.

Both Flick The King and Ben stretch the album and passions further, the first with its discord laced sabre like riffs and mesmeric rhythms casting a rich hue around the ever enthralling vocals before they all unite into an infection causing stomp and its successor through a noir coloured venture of musical and lyrical intrigue and impossibly magnetic ingenuity, a noise driven Melvins or The Fat Dukes Of Fuck like bait adding extra flavour.

A Queens Of The Stone Age attitude and sultriness gently coaxes Legs to add more variation and exploration to its fertile trickery, song and vocals grazing and antagonising with resourceful inspiration whilst So Drunk And Wasted takes a louder essence of Homme and co with a touch of Therapy? into the overall maniacal brilliance of Day Bombs.

The Vandal Records release takes its leave with firstly the so–so Mister Mandolin, a gentle acoustic/vocal song which is so low in sound and production that it barely makes an impression sadly and the sizzling closer Senses. A burning furnace of noxious sonic intent and raw ear scorching intensity which almost suffocates the vocals of Karlost at times, it without finding the heights of the previous tracks is still a tempest of a conclusion to a simply cracking release.

If you were won over by Just Before We Go MAD, you will pee your panties as Day Bombs makes that victory seem barely an appetiser to this sensational alchemy.

http://www.japanesefightingfish.co.uk/

9.5/10

RingMaster 05/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spring and Youth – Between The Irony

spring and youth pic

Schizophrenic and maniacally beautiful, Between The Irony the debut from Serbian metallers Spring and Youth is one of those releases which will have as many running and crying for their mothers as it will have those cutting off ears in the ultimate act of adoration to its psychotic charms. The album is a disorientating and scintillating investigation of avant-garde and experiment progressive metal, a dive into unpredictability and creative mayhem which only gives the richest, deepest pleasures and rewards.

Best described as a mutated pool of essences seeping from the insatiable union of Mike Patton and Mr Bungle, Dog Fashion Disco, Diablo Swing Orchestra, and Parisians 6:33, the eight track release is an exhilarating maybe even bewildering triumph which given time seduces the passions into a lustful compliant subservient. The album certainly needs numerous plays before working its insidious charms, the first encounters throwing thoughts and senses so off kilter they need a tow truck to return home, but once connected Spring and Youth emerges as a thoroughly compelling and invigorating visitation.

Comprising of vocalist Marko Stojanović, guitarist Filip Mladenović, bassist Ivan Vasić, pianist Darko Varga, and drummer Darko Đurić, coverSpring and Youth and its members came together over a few years, many from different directions and musical sources to combine for something unique. With a 2008 released demo introducing the band name and the current line-up in place from 2011, the Beograd based band stepped into a Belgrade studio last year to create their first web of sonic and aural design, some might say conspiracy. Recorded, mixed, and mastered by Goran Crevar, Between The Irony is an imaginative explosion between the ears, a tantalising and teasing test of the willingness to venture through devious asides and devilish ingenuity brought with a creative will that is warped at best and satanic in the extreme, but such an arousing and galvanic journey it emerges to be.

The brief instrumental Kidd Prelude opens up the Pandora’s Box of sonic manipulation first, the piece a short but impacting fire of merciless drum beats and technically driven riffs stalking the senses with an ever shifting and undulating pace, and time signatures coaxed by enticing keys giving just a hint of what is too come. Reaching its thickest potency the track seamlessly twists into the following Two Orangeez. Now things really get interesting. Initial contact is a charge of carnivorous riffs and punching beats which quite rapidly dance and leap about as if on a hot tin roof whilst the expressive thought exploiting keys of Varga evoke emotive teases amongst the almost duelling clean and growling vocals led by Stojanović. Littered with djent provocation and classically honed piano narratives, the song exhausts and bewitches leaving the listener enflamed with emotions, thoughts…possibly bamboozled ones, and blissful pleasure. As mentioned this is not going to be for all but if you want mystique, mystery, and madness in your aural food than this first song alone will have lust raising its head.

The following Heavy off of a great hollow bass grilling erupts into another seismic exploration of mind and limitations, the rabidity of imagination and ever twisting invention a welcome curse on the senses though the vocals are not as successful as on the previous track. Melodrama sows its seeds throughout to be reaped by the arguably over the top delivery of  Stojanović and watered by the emotion painting keys, but when the raptorial muscles and appetite of the song turns on the listener with metal nostrils flaring and jaw ripping chunks out of air and synapses the track is a lethal ingenious lunacy.

The equally extensive in length and depth Feetless next stands up to either send fear or enthrallment into the listener, the jazz lisping keys and delirious guitar bedlam as intoxicating and frenetically unbalancing as they are the bearers of irresistible fascination and adventure. Once more you feel like you are in a nightmare of rapacious beauty and voracious insanity as the song wraps its spellbinding tentacles around mind and passions but only face it with the intent to devouring all on offer.

The erratically rousing and quite brilliant Muriatic and As Fast As Possible with its kin of mesmeric gracefulness and ferocious antagonism within the continuing lyrical and underlying drama, conjure up more inventive splendour whilst the short piano instrumental Play brings some kind of a return to rationality before the closing Four And A Half spends nine minutes leading the listener into another deranged and ambrosial flight of progressive craft and metallic forcefulness brought through a rabid web of psyched imagination.

Spring and Youth with Between The Irony has brought all the evidence and promise that they will take the major stage by storm at some point. At times the songs probably exceed their time and debatably there is so much going on that the amount of visits needed to decipher things will put too many off but the bottom line on the album is that it induces euphoria that most bands can only dream of. Up for a challenge? Then this is a must!

http://www.springandyouth.com

9/10

RingMaster 16/08/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Unleashing truths: an interview with Merc from The Karma Party

Merc

With a snarl and biting attitude which is spawn by and reflects the state of broken Britain, UK band The Karma Party has emerged as a compelling and inventive force with a musical craft and imagination as potent as the uncompromising yet thoughtful lyrical thoughts and often venom they wield. The quartet brews up a unique and irresistible fusion of hardcore, punk and dub-step with flames of electronica which come together for a fiery storm of thrilling and explosive invention. Their recently released Dark Matters EP has caused a fury of acclaim and attention their way and not wanted to be left in the wake we had the pleasure of talking to vocalist Merc about the outstanding release, the band itself, and what inspires the rage and enterprise which drives them.

Hi Merc, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us here.

No problem, thanks for having us!

For all those new to The Karma Party please introduce the band.

Hello! We are The Karma Party from the derelict holiday resort of Blackpool, nice to make your acquaintance.

How did you all meet and how did the band begin?

Me (Merc) and Luke used to be in another band with James who is now in Sonic Boom Six.

For one reason or another that band fell to pieces, after which James helped me formulate ideas and then bit by bit we assembled what is now The Karma Party.

You hail from Blackpool; is the place as run down and far from its former glory as the media portrays?

It’s worse! I mean, I watched 999 What’s Your Emergency? They went easy on the place. A lot of people come to Blackpool as tourists, which is mind boggling enough. They come to see the lights and drive down the prom unaware that one street away people are living in abject poverty. You can see the weight of the place in people’s faces as you walk around. There is a massive problem with violence and drugs and the only the thing the local authorities want to do is to make it more attractive to the booze tourists and hen nights to bring more revenue into the area, which only perpetuates the substance abuse issues.  Most people in Blackpool don’t care about anything anymore; they have become resigned to that lifestyle and believe it is the norm everywhere. I don’t think there is anywhere else in the country like it. Maybe Morecambe…

…And a place to inspire dissent, anger, and lyrical potency for songs?

It’s impossible not to be inspired in a place like that as there is so much material on your doorstep.

I think Blackpool is like a microcosm for the whole country containing every issue the country has, so definitely a main source for the lyrics.

You create a striking and passion inciting sound from blending punk, dubstep, hardcore, electronica, and more. A fascinatingly eclectic brew brought with passion and attitude I think it is fair to say. How would you describe your sound and what are the major influences musically which have had an effect on your ideas and music?

Thank you! We’re not very good with labels but we’ve been called Punk Step and Punk n Bass which kind of sums up a lot of what we do. There is such a massive eclectic taste amongst the band which allows us to see the similarities between the genres. I don’t think it would work as well if we were all into the same music. We love to watch bands utilising electronics properly as it brings another dynamic to the show. It would be impossible for us not to cite Enter Shikari as an influence and one of our favourite bands. Other artists would include: Bad Brains, Gallows, Mike Patton, Squarepusher, Venetian Snares, Reprazent, The King Blues, Sonic Boom Six, Mouthwash, Skindred, London Electricity, Nero, Rusko, Eminem, Lowkey, Clint Mansell, Danny Elfman, Capdown, NOFX and Chris Murray….I could carry on.

Do you see yourselves as a political band using anthemic music for weaponry or a band creating individual and stirring music which just happens to be inspired lyrically by the injustices of the day?Karma Party

One of the main things we agreed on when we started this project was to keep it as real and true as possible. The public have a way of sniffing out lies and if you pretend to be something you’re not, I believe that they can tell. Although I can’t speak for the rest of the band (as it’s not something we talk about) I’ve never been to a protest or voted, I doubt I ever will as I don’t think either makes a difference as all aspects of the game are rigged. I do want to spend the rest of my life trying to make a difference but I think change has to come from the people. They are the ones who are keeping this system in place. We are a tiny part of a massive universe, there is  no past or future, no good or bad and we could change the world in a heartbeat if we so wished. I want people to know they are not insignificant and they are loved…..including politicians.

If everything was perfect, yes a far-fetched possibility ha-ha, would The Karma Party exist?

If everything was perfect I don’t think I would have ever picked up an instrument or have the mind-set that I do now. The famous quote by Victor Hugo springs to mind; Adversity makes men, and prosperity makes monsters. It’s so true in my case.

You have just released your debut EP, the excellent Dark Matters EP. It is for us a five track eclectic feast of sound and invention not forgetting being greedily infectious. I imagine the songs on the release all find an enthusiastic reaction in your live shows such the impact they make on the EP.

Again thanks for your nice words. We’ve just finished the Dark Matters Tour which was our first time on the road and the response has been overwhelming. The shows have been mental, something we didn’t expect first time out. We’ve put a lot of work in making the live show stand up to the recording and from the reaction it seems to have worked. It was crazy to have people singing the words back at us on our first tour something we didn’t see coming and I’ve been humbled by almost everyone we’ve met.

How has Dark Matters been received so far, especially critically?

From our perspective it was such a personal recording that we couldn’t tell if it was good or bad anymore. We were so involved in it that we’d lost all perspective. It has been received better than we ever expected with mainstream press like Kerrang! and Rock Sound giving us great reviews and blogs and websites all over picking it up.

In all honesty we couldn’t have hoped for a better reaction.

You have released it as a free download opportunity for fans, any particular reason for that?

We want everyone to be able to listen to our music whether you can afford a CD or not. In the band we are shameless streamers, torrenters and file sharers, so for us to be precious over our record when we have “stolen” so many other peoples music would be very hypocritical.

How do songs emerge within the band generally?

It’s a varied process, usually we demo and produce a lot of stuff in our bedrooms and over the internet and then take the ideas into the practice room for fine tuning.

Do lyrics spark songs or musical ideas, or is it a mix?

Tricky question…Musical ideas definitely inspire the lyrics in the demo process and then later the track is re-worked around the lyrics. So I guess it would be a mix.

1616807321-1The release contains your two singles Collapse and This Is Britain, both seemingly gained the tag infamous from a great many. Tell us about both of the powerful and lyrically volatile songs.

This is Britain – You’ve got to laugh at what Britain has become. I find it almost impossible to relate to any facet of mainstream culture. So this is our way of poking fun at what seems to be a ridiculous way of life. From the Royal Family to Ant and Dec, from our drinking culture to gossip magazines and from politicians and police to orange girls with Sharpie eyebrows, I don’t fit in anywhere. I didn’t want to whinge about all this so I tried to put myself in the mind-set of someone who loves modern Britain. It’s so sarcastic we were worried people might take it literally.

Collapse – Collapse is almost like the serious brother of This Is Britain. We wanted to talk about the poverty we see in the country. This recession and depression has been brought on by the government and they continue to shift the blame and show us statistics that say everything is ok but you only need to go out in the street to see how bad it’s getting. We want people to know they are the real power in this country and globally and politicians are counting on you to do nothing about it. Your country needs you and it needs you now.

Would you say This Is Britain has become already your musical calling card, the song people instantly refer to in relation to the band?

I really hope so, I think it’s a fine example of what we want to say and do musically. I think we’ll be playing that track for years to come.

Both songs have impressive videos, with the one for This is Britain like the song especially potent. Who did you record them with?

Thanks! Videos are a massive part of what we want to do. James Kennedy from Trifecta Films in Manchester did the This Is Britain video. We brought him to Blackpool for two days. We shot in our local and took him and his team on a sightseeing tour of the grimiest places in town. We had really good fun.

Some bands find it hard to create contagious songs without diluting the message or impact of the lyrics whilst others just concuss with noise to empower their impacting words. On the evidence of Dark Matters you have found the perfect balance. How much effort goes into your balance of both aspects or is it something which is just instinctive for you?

The rest of the band act as editors for the lyrics so when I’m pushing a point too much or what I’m doing lyrically is impacting on the aesthetics of the track they let me know. It’s sometimes hard for me to hear anything but the lyrics so it helps to have a team who know a good track when they hear it. There is definitely a group editing process.

How much impact do you believe artists and music can truly make on people in regard to social and world issues?

Art in general has the ability to change the world forever; it connects more people than Facebook and brings us together in ways we still don’t properly understand. A lot of people would call me naïve but I think doing nothing, putting your faith in political systems and hoping for the best is naïve.

What is next for The Karma Party?KP

Touring in April, May and June with Random Hand and Anti Vigilante. Playing Rebellion festival in August and we will have more new material / videos out later in the year!

Once more big thanks for chatting with us, any last thoughts for the readers and fans?

No worries thanks for the great questions. The only thing we want to say is a massive thanks to anyone who has given us a listen or come to show you are the reason we do this.

Grab the Dark Matters EP for free @ http://thekarmaparty.co.uk

Read the Dark Matters EP review @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/the-karma-party-dark-matters-ep/

The RingMaster Review 28/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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II II II : A Conundrum On My Coffee Table

cover

Something wicked this way comes, an exceptional experiment of sonics, sounds and adventurous sensibilities to engineer the deepest ardour. Plenty of releases excite and thrill the senses but just a few ignite a fire of passion and deeply rooted rapture for the sounds they offer. One such rarity has just been unleashed into the world by II II II. The project from former Mishkin vocalist Ben Davy is sensational and its debut release without doubt one of the most enthralling and intoxicating pleasures of 2012. The A Conundrum On My Coffee Table EP captures the imagination in every aspect, its innovative weaves and inventive teasing an invigorating breath of fresh air which like the band name inspires thought, intrigue, and a hungry anticipation which is quenched with staggering ease.

Being a massive fan of the now deceased Leeds band Mishkin, the excitement of hearing from Davy with the EP was immense and

Ben Davy

Ben Davy

arguably placed higher expectations on the impending release than any other new record might have to prove itself against. It was child’s play for the release though, its six tracks leaving hopes as just inadequate musings when placed before their creative triumphs and exhilarating sounds. Fusing  blend of mathcore, metal, jazz, and rock, the release is an experimental tempest which offers essences of Faith No More, Mishkin, 6:33, Mike Patton, Dog Fashion Disco and much more, all honed into a unique and compelling encounter. The tracks are slight sonic swipes, colourful aural blades which barely worry a third minute but are rigidly magnetic in the time they take to transform the emotions into a compliant subservient.

Dog’s Lost His Bone swaggers in with sultry melodies and bruising basslines over firm rhythmic slaps to immediately pull all focus in its direction. A tempest of delicious enterprise and aggressive sinews the track is a storm of scattergun like energies and sounds honed into deliberate patterns and senses manipulating structures. It is glorious, an evolving beast of sound which ignites every corner of mind and heart. The track reminds of Guano Padano at times especially their recent collaboration with Mike Patton, whilst offering the ever shifting weaves which marked Mishkin and the technical mesmerism of a Karnivool.

From there things just venture into arguably further elevated areas of psyched investigation and musical excellence. Firstly the psychotic HITPTYGWYDIYL exposes the nerve endings with its wanton melodic caresses and scything rhythmic malevolence, the track a piece of aural sculpture which teeters on insanity. It like the first song is just irresistible, a brief unpredictable expanse of taunting and challenges bringing the richest of rewards. If the likes of Polkadot Cadaver give you a buzz, this track as the release will have you feeling like a teenager on your first sexual quest.

No Condition and Memories follow with their own individual ingenuity, the first a tirade of white hot sonics and argumentative riffs with a smouldering seductive centre and expressive challenging gest, and the second a flash of thought exploiting invention which leaves nothing less than heightened pleasure in its wake. In addition to the previous mentioned references the release inspires there is a sense of the maniacal mischief of 12 Stone Toddler to this pair of songs bringing yet another refreshing and inspirational flavour to the whole experience.

The release is completed by the ravenous craft of The Key To Denial and the serpentine Shingles. The former is a sizzling encounter, a face to face with the devil in aural form, its sonic tongue licking over the senses with insidious sexual greed to leave you tingling whilst grinning in sheer pleasure. Like all the songs it caresses and investigates the body like an insatiable lover whilst all the time stretching and twisting their prey with their venomous desires.  The latter is even more dangerous behind its jazz lined melodic brilliance, the passage of almost corruptive challenges and dazzling invention just breath-taking and magically intrusive.

A Conundrum On My Coffee Table is pure excellence, a release coming in the closing days of December which sets the highest standard for 2013. The EP is an essential investigation and a must get with its name your own price offer on the II II II Bandcamp Page… so go on off you go.

http://ii-ii-ii.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/II-II-II/100277240054308

RingMaster 30/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Fat Dukes Of Fuck: Honey From The Lips Of An Angel

The creators of new album Honey From The Lips Of An Angel is a band revelling in subtlety and warm tender moments to fill the heart with emotion and reassurance… yeah and we always wear pink tutus and Doc Martens when reviewing music. Well the latter might have some truth to its but one thing you can never accuse The Fat Dukes Of Fuck of being is sensitive or worried about appearing PC. You can though throw accusations of creating riotously fun, fully infectious, quality dirty rock n roll at the band and they will stick firmly.  Honey From The Lips Of An Angel is a glorious and irreverent slap around the senses brought with mightily addictive sounds and a mischievousness which only pulls one willingly and eagerly into its heart.

The album is an aggressive crash upon the senses brought through an excellent brew of punk, metal, and filth lined rock n roll. The tracks rampage through and toy with the ear like a riot instigated by the combined aural profanity of Suicidal Tendencies, Trucker Diablo, The Damned, Clutch, ZZ Top and the Melvins. You can add some early Beastie Boys and Sabbath too, their sound expansive in invention and contagious in its recognisable seeds and maniacal interpretation. The Fat Dukes Of Fuck is a band where having fun and taking the piss is instinct ran wild but musically they leave nothing floundering in mediocrity or flabby imagination, these guys know how to brew impressive and inciteful rock n roll to recruit the passions.

Consisting of founders vocalist Brent Lynch and guitarist Jarrod Miller alongside bassist Jason Lamb and drummer Jeremy Brenton (also in doom metalers Demon Lung), the Vegas based quartet immediately drop a cluster bomb of funk dripping grooves and punked up energy upon the ear through opener The Mighty Bulge. The vocals are caustically twisting whilst the guitar splices the air with scorched and venomous mischief. Hyperactive and brilliantly impossible to guess its next move, the track easily fires up the strongest greedy reactions, the blatant lyrical content as sure to open ear to ear grins as the sounds, especially the hungry bass gnawing, are going to trigger open adoration.

   Sorry About Your Dick with its taunting groove and vocal pointing lifts the senses even higher, a blistering onslaught of ravenous energy and spiralling vocals with that mentioned tightly wound groove a wanton hussy, which ignites even bigger flames of pleasure. Uncomplicated, to the point, and the instigator of primal lustful intentions, the song and album are aural locker-room pornography and insatiably pleasing.

With Oral Agenda stepping up next one could almost assume it was turning into a concept album of sorts, but the fiery track is just the step to greater sins and delights starting with the Prelude to the Greatest Night of Your Life, a heavy rub upon the ear with sonic vocal squalls and bridging melodic incursions from within the steady nibbling riffing. It has a classic rock breath to its restrained stomp which is linked to further funk swaggering, imagine early Red Hot Chili Peppers in a bruising encounter with Red Fang and Melvins and you get a taste of the sonic tonguing in the ear going on.

    Honey From The Lips Of An Angel is magnificent with its best moment coming in the outstanding Step Aside and Let That Fucker Dance. The track mesmerises and enchants whilst exposing our natural irreverence through simply hilarious lyrics and inspirational multi directional musical invention. Dancing through the ear like a dad at a wedding, coordination awry and discord deliciously toning every chant, the song is immensely contagious and sheer brilliance.

Tracks like the punk driven Cigarette, the rhythmically teasing I Killed a Small Child with its abrasive vaunt, and the southern fried melodic cruising Let My People Grow, just pile on more unbridled unruly behaviour and sounds to spawn only deeper need and satisfaction. The closing title track ensures a final slice of raucous provocation, its impure heart and carnivalesque stroll like dark music hall, well if created and produced by Mike Patton, The Cardiacs, and 6:33.

    Honey From The Lips Of An Angel is definitely one the best albums to emerge this year whilst The Fat Dukes Of Fuck isthat out of control, crude, irrepressibly funny, best friend you always wanted to riot with.

http://www.thefatdukesoffuck.com

RingMaster 24/09/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Guano Padano: 2

Like a soundtrack to a disturbed world drawn from the imagination of Sergio Leone, David Lynch, and Robert Rodriguez, 2 the glorious new album from Italian band Guano Padano, lights up every aspect of the body. The release awakens the senses, incites thoughts and imagination whilst using feet like a puppeteer with their contagious heated sounds and rhythms. The album is outstanding, a release which fits nowhere but has a feast of delights for all.

The new album follows the 2009 self titled debut album from Guano Padano which had a limited release in Italy. Released through Ipecac Recordings, 2 gives the band a needed and deserved wider canvas to recruit from and it is hard to imagine their following not increasing dramatically as the album reaches many more ears. The trio of guitarist/multi-string instrumentalist Alessandro Stefana, Danilo Gallo bass/piano/organ and Zeno De Rossi on drums, unleash a series of cinematic instrumentals which evoke individual moments and lives within this golden world which dazzle and transport thoughts to new yet familiar soundscapes. Musically the band combines the fine flavours distilled from jazz, bluegrass, surf rock, country, folk, rock and more, to conjure a smouldering journey with a spaghetti western film noir breath. To be honest it is wonderfully hard to explain but very easy to immerse within and enjoy to the full.

The album opens with the short Last Night, a piece of music which is emotively elegant but comes with a blistered background and increasing intensity as it moves into the waiting heat of Zebulon. The second track gallops into view with an eager swagger and shimmering spaghetti western melodics. You can feel the heat sliding off the atmosphere which wraps the music and visualise sceneries of sand and bristling activity. There is also a slight surf spice to the composition which wakens the taste buds for the full flavour a little further on within Gran Bazaar.

The track is stunning, a sultry presence within the ear and a seductive temptation for the senses. With guitars either picking at notes to find their limits before snapping  or sending flames of sharp melodic  passion through the air, the track is an insatiable infection offering a fluid feast of Middle Eastern promise and surf romance within its mesmeric world. It is a near wanton tease which no one can or would refuse.

The album as each track passes into the imagination, shows fully eclectic sounds and ideas, the likes of the slow pacing Gumbo with its pulsating jazz whispers and evocative melodic showers, the excitable hoe down Bellavista, and Miss Chan with its hypnotic oriental kiss, all offering  new detours and experiences within the expansive journey. The last of the three starts off with a scratchy mesh of oriental radio voices and the plunking of traditional eastern strings before erupting into another sizzling fire of surf and Japanese sounds veined with acidic sonic guitar manipulations. As seemingly everywhere one is transported into an enveloping weave of picture telling emotion and sonic sights soundtracked by great provocative sounds.

2 is an album with every track leaving nothing but deep pleasure in their wake but as always personal tastes finds ones which stand out from the crowd and alongside Gran Bazaar there are two which ignite the fullest fires. Firstly there is Lynch, a track borne from the dark shadows and empty solitary street corners with just a lone jazz musician for a friend.  The track has a film noir breath but behind it there is a sinister and almost unworldly pulse, a hungry discord waiting to misdirect the melodic enterprise. It is glorious, arguably the most powerful of all the tracks and one which lingers in the mind well past its expiring notes.

As with their first album, the band brought in the talents of others on 2 letting the craft of the likes of Marc Ribot (John Zorn, Tom Waits), Chris Speed, and Paul Niehaus (Lambchop) grace the release. The other great highlight of the album Prairie Fire, the only track with vocals. It also features a guest, the inimitable Mike Patton. The track is brilliant, a song with the wicked grin of the devil and the mischief of, well Mike Patton. It is slightly schizophrenic with more than an air of a Gotham City villain to the vocal character. It is a rock n roll contagion of the purest sin brought with a wholly unique and inventive majesty to have one dribbling lust. If this song does not take Guano Padano in the ears and minds of the world nothing will.

The album ends with a cover of the Santo & Johnny track Sleep Walk, a song which has had numerous versions made of it and it has to be said Guano Padano do not do anything to make it their own. Against the excellence before it is just a pleasant kiss goodnight from the album to be honest and the only time the album drops its levels.

2 is a vibrant dream and escape rolled into one stirring and immersive journey. It gives only pleasure whilst inspiring thoughts to create their own landscape and companions for the trip alongside your aural tour guide Guano Padano.

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RingMaster 23/08/2012

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