Prowling the dark side of being: exploring the corners of Invertia with Dave Coppola

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An invasive corrosion of senses and emotions, Another Scheme of the Wicked from US band Invertia stands to the fore of psyche invading threats and violating seductions unleashed in 2014. The album is a virulently compelling incitement of senses and thoughts from a duo in guitarist/vocalist Dave Coppola and drummer/programmer Tim Winson who seem to instinctively press all the right buttons with their provocative sonic and primal explorations. With an appetite to find out more about the band and its dark depths, we had the pleasure to talk with Dave who helped us explore the new album, the creative union between the two, the art of remixes and plenty more…

Hello Dave and welcome to the site and thanks for agreeing to talk with us.

Thank you for the interview, my pleasure!

First of all can you tell us about how you both met?

We actually met thru a mutual friend.

Was there a musical connection right away and how long before thoughts of creating a band took hold?

We started working on songs right away. We basically just started tracking guitars to a beat. Those songs would eventually become Blasphemy Be My Name and Perpetual Alert from the first album. We didn’t think of it as a “band” at first. It was just a recording project that became a band! We never thought we would play live when we met, that’s for sure. It’s crazy when we think about how we started to where we have come; for example opening for Blood of Heroes with Bill Laswell, getting a remix done by Justin Broadrick from Godflesh, to putting out an album with Ohm Resistance. It’s unreal.

Did you have any specific intentions when working on your first songs or was it more of let’s play and see what evolves initially?

It was more let’s see what happens. I never thought Tim and I would still be doing this years later…I’m glad we are though.

Invertia2Though your sound seems to be tagged most often as industrial black metal we found it to be so much more and pleasingly impossible to tie down. What are the most predominate inspirations upon yourselves which you feel have spiced your writing etc.?

Thanks for the kind words! We have all kinds of inspirations whether it be bands, film, books etc. There are too many to name, especially between the two of us. I listen to a lot of metal like Mayhem and Burzum, and industrial as well, Godflesh and Ministry. Tim likes the Residents and Adam Ant. We both like the same bands like the Pixies and the Butthole Surfers. William S. Burroughs and George Carlin are huge influences as well. Also the film They Live by John Carpenter is having a huge influence on the new album which is currently underway. So that’s why we sound the way we do.

You have recently released Another Scheme of the Wicked, a captivating and intrusive hybrid of sound and enterprise. Did it in creation fulfil or your hopes and thoughts or has it evolved beyond even your expectations with its potency and might?

We did the best we could, we always do. That way no matter what anybody says about it we are still satisfied in the end. Albums are like Presidents, it takes time to see the mess you made!

It feels a much darker and more predatory encounter than your previous release, more dangerous one; does it feel like that to you and if so was that a deliberate aim from the start or an organic emergence?

I agree, it is much darker…It has a little more of a dynamic feel to it than the first one. I’m not saying it’s a dynamic album just more than the debut haha! We are fast and in your face the whole time with this album other than the remixes. When we were writing we didn’t sit down and plan it that way it just happened. I think that’s the way it goes for most artists, you never know what you’re going to get at the very beginning. It’s always a surprise at some point during the process.

How do the songs come together and evolve primarily between the pair of you?

Typically myself or Tim will write a beat, I’ll put the guitars and bass down and go from there. Tim will take the beat and make it into drum sections and the song will evolve over time. Songs can be like a photo, you have to capture the evolution at the right time or you’ll miss it.

Tell us about the intent and premise behind Another Scheme of the Wicked.

The intent was to put out a decent industrial metal record. The premise was to make it original and not your every day run of mill metal record. I think we achieved that if I may say so. The album got mixed reviews from the metal community. I knew it would, and at the end of the day I’m glad it did.

The five tracks come with another five remixes, each an interpretation of the previous quintet, was this planned from the first seeds of the release?

Not at all… That was pure luck with a sprinkle of dedication. If you would have told me this album would have those artists on it remixing our music, I would have laughed at you.invertiacoverofficial

In many ways the remixes are doppelgangers of the originals for us, though it is debateable which are the darkest and most frightening versions. Did you give free rein for the likes of Justin K. Broadrick and End.user in their take on your songs?

Absolutely…There was no way I was going to tell those guys what to do. There is no way I could have. You can’t tell Justin Broadrick or Kurt Gluck how to do their job, they just do, that’s why we chose them. That’s the element of surprise I enjoy in this art form I spoke of earlier.

It has to be admitted we have never been fans of remixes, or maybe just do not understand their function though those on Another Scheme of the Wicked have impacted far deeper than most others we have come across on our thoughts. What is it about them which inspires you and lent the idea to include them on the new release?

We are big Skinny Puppy fans and we always liked the way they remixed everything. So I guess it just comes down to demonstrating a different point of view thru a common theme. I always thought that was interesting. I think it gives an extra depth to the album when played in its entirety. The next album we may, if at all, do them separately. To be honest my thinking was it’s just cheaper for the people purchasing the album to not have to buy remixes. But this time around we will give them the choice.

I have to ask as it must happen to someone somewhere, how would you deal with a remix which you did not like and felt did not warrant a place or fitted on one of your releases?

Well, we would be pissed; we hope it would not come to that. That’s why we asked the artists we did, and of course they were very professional in sending us either a couple of versions or following up with us to make sure everything was cool.

Back to your songs; at times they seem to be alive as they ignite the imagination and emotions, feeling like they have hidden depths unrevealed to the listener. How intensively did you take sculpting and shaping the songs of the release?

We are very picky in studio. We have a simple chemistry, and it goes like this. If Tim doesn’t come out of his seat during playback of the initial arrangement, it’s not good enough and I’m back to the drawing board. That’s how I know it will ignite the imagination and emotion, because we can see it in ourselves. If it works for us it might work for the listener as well.

InvertiaWas it an on-going honing process until recording time?

Pretty much, mostly the guitars and arranging…We can bring in ideas on the spot with samples and bass parts.

How about the lyrical side of your music? Was that an intensive development and what inspires their breath predominantly?

The lyrics are inspired by just peoples wrong doing really…People’s hatred for one another and trying to get the last laugh on your own species. It’s a place I don’t like to go for too long a time. We would probably have more material if I frequented the place that inspires the lyrics more often, but it’s a creepy spot.

Tell us about the other projects you are both involved in, and were involved in a couple of the remixes on Another Scheme of the Wicked I believe?

I have another industrial project called TranZi3nT and Tim has another project call R3TRD. We use them as a break from Invertia.

What is next on the horizon of Invertia?

We just released a new single for download at http://invertia.bandcamp.com/ called Existence Exit. It won’t be on Amazon or ITunes as they called the cover “pornographic”. You can judge for yourselves.   We also a have a 7” single coming out called Forever Incision that will have a live version of Facility of the Feeble on it, which is the opening track of the debut album. That will be put out through our label Ohm Resistance, which you will be able to get at http://ohmresistance.bandcamp.com/ soon.   As for the new album we are hoping for late spring time. We are looking to play some more live shows as well. Hopefully 2015 will be a good year for Invertia!

Thanks again for chatting with us; any final thought you would like to leave us with?

Thanks Pete! It was a pleasure doing this interview, good luck to you!!!

Dave (INVERTIA)

Read the review of Another Scheme of the Wicked @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/04/10/invertia-another-scheme-of-the-wicked/

http://www.inv3rtia.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 08/12/2015

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Twingiant – Devil Down

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There is smog like quality to the sound of US band Twingiant which invades every pore and corner of the senses with voracious appetite; within that thick immersion though the band infuses a searing melodic veining and smouldering enterprise to leave the imagination keen and appetite even hungrier. They describe their sound as simply loud and heavy, but as shown by new EP Devil Down, it is also bracingly flavoursome and rigorously compelling.

Devil Down is also uncompromising in its touch and intensity, Twingiant blending fiery stoner and heavy rock with imposing sludge richness for an inflammatory and predatory cauldron of sound. Formed in 2010, the Phoenix, Arizona based quartet drew keen attention with debut album Mass Driver two years later and last year’s Sin Nombre EP. Their success only backed and reinforced the band’s live stature which has seen them persistently impress and inflame audiences whilst sharing stages with the likes of Windhand, Pallbearer, Weedeater, Intronaut, Metal Church, Satan’s Satyrs, Guttermouth, Black Tusk and numerous more. Now with their self-released and produced Devil Down EP, the band look poised to awaken a more momentous spotlight upon themselves. May be it is not a release to ignite a explosive blaze within thunderous rock ‘n’ roll climes but it Devil Down is certainly a fierce proposition to firmly thrust Twingiant upon a broader landscape of attention.

The striking presence of the release begins with the instrumental Old Hag. Starting from a restrained and elegant flame of immediately enthralling enterprise and craft, the track grows within the ears as its melodic acidity and sultry charm creates a spark for the imagination to run with and explore. There is also a sinister edge to the invention and sonic beauty fuelling the track, the guitars of Tony Gallegos and Nikos Mixas providing a highly suggestive soundscape and narrative courted by raw shadows provided by the gripping rhythms of drummer Jeff Ramon and bass predation from Jarrod Le Blanc. It is a transfixing proposition which as it reaches its finale, digs into a new texture of aggressive tenacity and attitude.

The impressive start is followed by Dead To Rights, a track striding forcibly with a combative swagger from its first second. Loaded with just as magnetically swinging grooves it soon adds theDD Front Cover (1) coarse texture of Le Blanc’s vocals to the mix, his tones strong without blowing anyone away but with their generally minimalistic presence in the context of songs, they make the perfect incitement to the blistering tempests of around him. A brawling eruption of skilled endeavour and resourceful voracity, the song makes way for the carnivorously toned Daisy Cutter. From its first breath the bass growl is carnally bestial and soon matched by the thickly gravelled vocals. Heavy metal seeded grooves entwine the intensive weight and prowl of the song, at times taking over with their engaging flames and mouth-watering beauty, though the scuzzy hostility of the bass is a constant prowling intimidation ensuring every twist comes with its share of menace.

Through The Motions is another enslaving instrumental and with no slight on Le Blanc’s vocals, these are the tracks where the listener can really play and immerse into the creative emprise of engagements and release. They are a canvas for the imagination and emotions to dance freely, and this track a virulent persuasion weaving sizzling strands of sonic and melodic temptation with inventively rabid rhythms for a fascinating evocation, a tapestry for thoughts to cast adventures with.

Tiger Lily suffers a little being sandwiched between its predecessor and the next up instrumental, but still provides a feisty and aggressive enterprise of heavy footed riffs and spicy grooves to persistently enjoy. There is something missing though, a spark which evades even the enticing twists and shifting textures within the song, and whilst it is a potent companion it does not linger around as other tracks on the album, and especially like Under A Blood Moon. The third instrumental is the best, a sultry twang to guitars an immediate seduction which only grows as melodies and grooves embrace the flavouring for their own infectious web of wonderfully unpolished and organic temptation. Once more it is a piece which simply ignites ears and imagination into eager life, every diverse flavour and note seemingly a seed to expanding adventures, especially the dark beauty of strings at its conclusion.

Devil Down ends with its title track, a bruising prowl of heavy metal and sludge rapacity aligned to groove and noise rock causticity. It is a predator, an emotionally blackened stalking which lumbers and crawls with the varied creativity of the guitars its light and merciless rhythms its teeth. The song is an immense end to an outstanding release, where even though for personal tastes the instrumentals steal the show, every track is an almost primal incitement to want plenty more from Twingiant, a band whose stock and presence surely from this point will be infesting the world’s full awareness.

The self-released Devil Down is available on vinyl from 2 December @ http://twingiant.bandcamp.com/album/devil-down

A cassette version of Devil Down will be released via Medusa Crush Records on February 7th.

http://twingiant.com/

RingMaster 02/12/2104

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Panzerbastard/Tenebrae Split – Sons Of Belial

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Record Store Day is seeing some rigorously compelling releases this year including the mouth-watering Sons Of Belial split featuring Bostonians Panzerbastard and Tenebrae. Consisting of six tracks forged from an animosity driven union of hardcore and imposing dark metal, the release is a rugged and bruising slab of uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll. Fierce sounds collude with lyrical and vocal antagonism as the two protagonists unleash not the year’s greatest moment but certainly one of its imposingly memorable propositions.

The first three songs on the split come from Panzerbastard, the quartet acclaimed for their impressive Gods, Thugs and Madmen album which came out in 2012 via Patac Records. They open things up with a cover of the GBH track Drugs Party In 526, a track instantly prowling ears and imagination with scorching hooks and a thick throaty bassline. It is a potent lure leading into a brawl of punk rock infused with metallic sinews and incitement. As the raw vocals engagingly court the antagonism fuelling every corner of sound, the band unveils a web of melodic temptation and sonic enterprise which simply lights up ears and appetite. It all adds up for a bracing and anthemic captivation getting the release off to a thrilling and intimidating start.

Workhorse is next and flies from the blocks with sonic turbulence behind voracious rhythms and ferocious riffery. Vocals virtually brawl with the senses from its first breath yet there is a swagger and virulence to the encounter which for not much over a minute drags the passions to their feet with ravenous tenacity. Whereas its predecessor enticed, especially towards its end, with a hostile dance of beats, the second song is an unbridled onslaught and just as irresistible.

The band’s offering is completed by another cover, this time of Motorhead’s Iron Fist. Severely caustic merciless rock ‘n’ roll from the first rub of sound, the track roars with the power and snarl of the song’s creators but is given a contagious punk make-over veined with spicy Panzerbastard invention. The song might not quite rival the original but certainly it gives it a run for its money.

Tenebrae steps up next, the quintet the striking union of hardcore talent including vocalist Mark Civitarese (The Unseen), drummer Rob Falzano (Ramallah, Blood for Blood), and guitarist Craig Silverman (Blood for Blood, Agnostic Front, Ramallah, Slapshot). Completed by Dominic Dibenedetto (guitar/vocals) and Ryan Packer (bass), Tenebrae come to the split fresh from the recent release of their self-titled EP, which is also available on Jailhouse Records. First track Wake Up swiftly fills ears with muscle driven beats and turbulent intensity encased in punk blooded riff aggression and squalling vocals. The track is a gripping blend of punk and metal, the former providing the heart and the latter the hostility. Threatening and openly infectious, the track has ears and appetite hungry, a want fed resourcefully by the heavy metal bred Ways Of The Black next. The track is the reverse of the previous in many ways, classic metal its canvas and punk its colourful chorus and addictive nature, which body and voice cannot resist engaging in.

The band’s final track Norse Tribe is their best, though all leave greed for more rampant. Predatory and savage in equal measure, with bludgeoning rhythms punctuating a scarring riff coloured fury, the track stalks and stomps with bestial intent and vitriolic charm as it brings the whole release to an incendiary and exhilarating close.

Sons Of Belial is a treat and the perfect way to celebrate Record Store Day but also in gaining entry into the intimidating and exhilarating confrontations of both Panzerbastard and Tenebrae.

The Sons Of Belial Split is available from November 28th via Jailhouse Records as a limited to 500 12” vinyl @ http://jailhouserecords3.bandcamp.com/album/sons-of-belial-panzerbastard-tenebrae-split

https://www.facebook.com/panzerbastardboston

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tenebrae/279454968783253

RingMaster 28/11/2014

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Your Favorite Enemies – Between Illness And Migration

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Released back home earlier this year, Canadian band Your Favorite Enemies give their European unleashing to their album Between Illness And Migration this month, an encounter sure to wake up keen attention over this side of the globe for them and their highly flavoursome sound. Made up of ten tracks which capture the imagination as easily as the ears, the album is a potential fuelled and adventurous proposition, a constant fascination which does not quite set the blaze that maybe its invention and diverse presence deserves. There is a sense of familiarity coating every track and twist within an otherwise dramatic presence which seemingly prevents any real surprises breaking through, but nevertheless Between Illness And Migration leaves ears satisfied and appetite ready for more.

Formed in 2006, the Montreal band is no stranger to taking their striking fusion of shoegaze, post punk, and alternative rock into new pastures, Your Favorite Enemies having played shows across Europe, Japan, China, Indonesia, and of course Canada. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Queens of the Stone Age, Drive Like Jehu, and Fugazi, the sextet drew strong attention with debut album Love Is a Promise Whispering Goodbye in 2008, its success following the potent base set by previous and first EP And If I Was to Die in the Morning… Would I Still Be Sleeping with You the year before. After a deluxe version of their album, second full-length Vague Souvenir helped expand their presence in 2012 before last year the band released the vinyl album Sacred Kind Of Whispers and the Youthful Dreams of an Old Empire EP to keen responses and recognition. Between Illness And Migration also began its flirtation with the world in 2013, Australian and Japanese versions being unveiled before this year Canada, alongside the Entre Marées Et Autres Ressacs EP, and now Europe received their versions.

Released via Graphite Records, Between Illness And Migration opens with the imagination sparking instrumental Satsuki Yami. Sonically fiery and emotionally agitated, the track is an intro into the album giving no real hint in hindsight of things to come but awakening senses and thoughts successfully for the following temptation of Empire Of Sorrows. Initially a lonely guitar bred melody melancholically strokes ears, its coaxing joined by the just as lamenting spoken tones of vocalist Alex Foster. Building around that single sonic lure, the guitars of Jeff Beaulieu and Sef begin shaping a dramatic web to which rhythms align their brewing intensity and the keys of Miss Isabel offer their initially subdued hues. Once inflamed the song is a stirring cauldron of cold post punk enterprise and provocation, the bass of Ben Lemelin a groaning treat and the beats of drummer Charles Allicy a reined yet rampant incitement. Evolving through gentle and haunted scenery to roaring blazes, there is a refreshing sense of bands like Wire, Modern English, and Flesh for Lulu to the encounter which intrigues as its tantalises the imagination and illness_migration_cover_europe_800passions.

It is a mighty start to the album which A View From Within backs up with its whipping sonic web and slightly portentous air. The acidic and scorched start to the song reminds of Bauhaus but is soon merging into new terrain as keys toy with synth rock enterprise and vocals from Foster and Miss Isabel entwine with spicy variety. As the first track you feel you know or can predict the turns and shifts the song takes but even without that element of surprise, it lights ears and appetite with a flavoursome drama soaked adventure, as does its successor Where Did We Lose Each Other. The first rub of guitar sets the juices flowing which the subsequent rhythmic shuffle and keen hooks only accentuate before a brief relaxation to draw in the vocals slightly dulls the weighty persuasion. From this point the song ebbs and flows, flying high with its vocal and melodic roars and dipping slightly in its less intensively emotive turns. The enterprise of the guitars and the delicious toxicity of the grooves and increasingly barbed hooks ensure the song wins the day though and provides moments of lingering success.

Underneath A Stretching Skyline keeps things bubbling potently, the raw energy and gnarly voice of bass and riffs an inescapable enticement within the just as magnetic sonic winds cast by guitars and keys. Its time is shared with elegant and gentle melodic reflections matched by the vocals; both characters within the song courting each other’s strengths to provide a fascinating drama of sound and lyrical narration. The song epitomises the album in many ways, its presence an engrossing and easily accessible canvas of craft and invention which impressively and enjoyably smoulders rather than ignites a fire with its offering. The same applies to next up From The City To The Ocean, its resonating body and gripping endeavour a lively simmer more than a furnace for the emotions but a treat for ears all the same. With repetition driving much of the vocals and spoken vocals also a full part to the unfolding picture, as across most songs, it takes more time than some to fully convince but subsequently finds the same level of pleasure.

The deviously addictive bassline within I Just Want You To Know soon has ears trapped in the evocative hazy landscape immersing the senses, the song as tenacious in its emotion as it is in sonic temptation, whilst 1-2-3 (One Step Away) is a climatic build of rugged rhythms and punk antagonism within a melody fired creative sprawl of invention and diversity. The pair grips ears and thoughts with their impassioned suasions, the second of the two especially incendiary as it pulls the album back to the impressive levels it started with.

Between Illness And Migration is completed by the sonic maelstroms of firstly Obsession Is A Gun, its pungent drama bewitching, and finally Muets Aux Temps Des Amours, a noir lit enchantment which croons with anguish and slowly burning but ultimately rich temptation. The closer shows more of the strengths of Fosters striking vocals and those of Miss Isabel but also the one personal niggle about the album. That is the want to use spoken vocals throughout the majority of tracks, some more strongly than others. It is an idea which works a treat for the main but by the last songs it finally feels overdone, its variety and success becoming formula. As mentioned it is just something which laboured for us and will be fine for others, and it definitely does not make for a major issue.

Your Favorite Enemies with Between Illness And Migration show themselves to be an adventurous and bold band, their release impossible to ignore or stay away from as it impresses more with every listen. Their oncoming evolution is one to anticipate and enjoy it is easy to suggest, starting with this great release, and once they find real distinction to their sound that missing blaze just might be running amok.

Between Illness And Migration is available now via Graphite Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/id920852948

http://yourfavoriteenemies.com/

RingMaster 25/11/2014

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Arcade Messiah – Self Titled

John Bassett Promo 3

The creativity of UK musician John Bassett is a feverish kaleidoscope of colour, invention, and innovative exploration. He has proven it time and time again for over a decade, releasing eight increasingly impressive and attention grabbing albums either as KingBathmat or his own name. The last couple of years or so has seen a richer recognition of his craft and expansive musical imagination, the last two critically acclaimed KingBathmat albums Truth Button and Overcoming The Monster, the latter in 2013, pushing he and the band to the fore of progressive metal/rock whilst his debut acoustic album Unearth earlier this year, reinforced his reputation and ability to explore varied and deeply immersive structures and landscapes. Now the Hastings based multi-instrumentalist, singer songwriter, and producer returns with new solo project Arcade Messiah, a vehicle for his instrumental emprises which as shown by its self-titled debut album, are set to also inflame for ears and imagination.

Merging the boldest essences of styles such as metal, stoner, doom, prog, and math rock within constantly revealing canvases of post rock, Bassett and album provide gripping soundscapes for thoughts to cast their own explorations within and for emotions to colour with their own adventures. The musician talking about the project and album commented that “after writing and producing numerous KingBathmat albums and more recently the acoustic solo album Unearth, I decided I wanted to create my first instrumental album, and I wanted it to be set, audibly and visually in a dark, bleak apocalyptic aura of despair and anger. I wanted to focus on enormous riffs and sorrowful yet powerful musical refrains and place them within a terrain of unusual time signatures interspersed by moments of psychedelic calm.” It is an aim successfully achieved but even more an endeavour sculpting one of the essential moments of the year.

Instrumental albums do not always sink in easily with us, a demand for something maybe indefinable but persistent in igniting body and imagination a persistent requirement which the Arcade Messiah Album Covershowing off of supreme technical skill cannot satisfy. In Arcane Messiah there is nothing but that aural and inventive stimulation, from opening track Sun Exile the album a mouth-watering and rigorously compelling provocation for senses and unravelling gests in the imagination. From the first stirring and virulent call of guitar, album and opener becomes a potent weave of sound and aural suggestion, especially as a hypnotic canter of rhythms and fiery melodies join the emerging sonic picture soon after. Twists in time and invention are as fascinating as the heated creative climate of the track, its increasingly steamy breath and dark expression seductive and intimidating sparking a portentous Icarus like warning in thoughts.

The following Your Best Line Of Defence Is Obscurity slips in on a gentle breeze of sonic air and melodic caressing, though again it is a coaxing lined with dark bass shadows and prowling beats. The imagination is lured into the depths of the heavy smoulder of the piece with ease, thoughts of a lonely existence within the turmoil of predatory but deceptively welcoming emotive scenery emerging. Bassett’s guitar work is riveting, every groove and scorched melody inescapable incitement, but to be fair that applies to drums and bass through to simply the immersing imposing atmospheres conjured. Thoughts are instantly embraced and sparked by the primal and elegant nature of the music, a common factor across the album and in evidence with Traumascope straight after. Its initial post rock ambience is lined with a funk kissed bassline and lively beats from the drums, a union which hangs around before parting its mist for the voracious tide of riffs, which in turn lead to and compliment a stoner-esque flaming to the emerging tempest of emotional reflection and sonic rapacity. The track is a mesmeric blaze which never gets out of hand but leaves its dramatic imprint on senses and imagination with burning contagion.

Aftermath is a sobering haunting after the previous furnaces of sound and inventive intensity, a delicious feast of invasive melodies and bracing elegance which comes with sinister shadowing and anguished reflections. It also has an ethereal touch to its climate but in many ways is just the calm before or within the storm, its peace the bridge to the inventive alchemy of Everybody Eating Everyone Else. The track is scintillating; its initial also haunted passage the gateway into an antagonistic yet infectiously magnetic terrain of abrasing riffs and sonic temptation. There is a feeling of safety within turbulent and aggressive times or landscapes to the song, the guitars providing guidance through fiercely provocative exploits sculpted by rhythms and Bassett’s riff led raw sonic energy. Though musically it is different, there is a feel of early Killing Joke to the structure and tension of this and many tracks, an unrelenting persuasion which is wonderfully nagging at the heart of the ferociously inventive mergers of light and dark.

Steamy stoner spirals of sound open up The Most Popular Form Of Escape next, their acidic tones and spicing bringing rich hues to the climatic broadening of the song’s thick web of flavour and enterprise. Folkish elements are as prevalent in the piece as progressive endeavour and a sterner metallic tenacity, it all creating another unpredictable fascination for ears to bask in, the imagination to sculpt with, and appetite to devour greedily. Its enthralling waltz makes way for the closing Roman Resolution, itself an aural teleidoscope with wide reflective views and internal emotive majesty. An epic cruise through ever evolving sonic experimentation and poetic melodies, it brings a sensational release to a breath-taking close.

After the combined brilliance of Overcoming The Monster and Unearth, there was a small wonder where Bassett went from there. Where he ventured was into a creative maelstrom of sublime ingenuity with a technical and instinctive invention which has no need to indulge in over the top flourishes and pretension as it steals thoughts and passions. Arcade Messiah presents instrumental music which is organic and bracing whilst Bassett might just have put a stranglehold on best of year charts come the end of next month.

Arcade Messiah is available as a name your price digital version and on CD now via Stereohead Records @ https://arcademessiah.bandcamp.com

http://www.arcademessiah.com/

http://www.johnbassettmusic.com

RingMaster 25/11/2014

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Blind Race – Come And Get It EP

Photo Credit: Joanna Glezakos of Vegenza Forografiad

Photo Credit: Joanna Glezakos of Vegenza Forografiad

Listening to the Come And Get It EP from Canadian intensive rockers Blind Race, is like being run down by a fully loaded juggernaut with its throttle fully open and subsequently being caught on its axle and dragged for the ultimate ride. Five tracks which predominantly stomp like a bear in heat, the release is a muscular confrontation using the listener as its plaything and rewarding with some of the most voracious and ferocious rock ‘n’ roll heard in a long time. The band’s third release, Come And Get It sums up their intent and the EP’s unbridled invitation into their compelling sonic devilry, and though it may not be bulging with startling originality it is hard to remember a fusion of rock and metal more enjoyable and anthemic this year.

Blind Race roared from the starting gate in 2007, emerging from the union of two brothers and their best friend two years earlier getting together for some freestyle jams and demo recordings. Taking inspirations from “their love of fast cars and the intrigue of driving them blind, as well as modern-day racial issues and the idea that we are all the same”, the band unleashed their debut album Seeing Red in 2008. It and their live presences earned strong responses with the band in 2010 being nominated at Toronto Independent Music Awards for Best Metal Act and two years later for Best Live Metal Act. 2012 also saw the release of the Lost EP, the band continuing to evolve their diverse sound and again drawing acclaim and attention, something easy to see the Mike Langford (Evans Blue, Parabelle, Charlie Hope, Jeff Martin (Tea Party), Crash Karma, Art Of Dying) produced Come And Get It surpassing.

There is no easy lead into the release, it immediately hitting top gear with opener Hypocrite. Punchy drums lure a blaze of predatory riffs which in turn re-sparks the swipes of Stelio Kentros into casting an even more pungent provocation. It is a gripping entrance swiftly becoming a rampage with nostrils flared and a heavily imposing swagger. The guitar of Costas Kentros continues spraying its predatory designs, matched by the throaty prowling of Mike Ferraro’s bass, whilst the excellent vocal lure of Tommy Geraldes completes the full anthemic narrative and expression of the song. There are also vibrant melodic keys from Joannie Cotton colouring the encounter but such the weight and pulsating intensity elsewhere, they are brief glimpses within the tempest. Swinging with the temptation of Volbeat and the bestial force of a Bloodsimple, the track is primal rock ‘n’ roll at its best and quite irresistible.Come And Get It Album Cover 2014

The EP’s title track comes next and is soon taking all the attention, again ferocious riffery and flaming grooves raging around the rhythmic armoury of Stelio as Geraldes fiercely roars and confronts with accomplished and addictive potency. There is a great abrasing edge and snarl to all aspects of the song, like a Pantera meets Five Finger Death Punch antagonism which only adds to the inescapable bait of the encounter. As its predecessor Come And Get It is an unrelenting insatiable growl which leaves appetite hungry and ears greedy for more, which the next up Hopeless is only happy to provide. The third song is a different kind of beast though, one basking and bred in the grunge and melodic rock fuelled side of the band’s songwriting and sound with a loud whisper of Godsmack throughout. Minimal caresses of guitar and jabbing beats are lorded over by the again excellent vocals, resulting in a less demanding but just as compelling incitement to the previous track. The keys of Cotton are given the room and air to bring their rich hues to the smouldering canvas of the song too whilst the guitars erupt with explosive skill and tenacity across the reserved yet melodically and passionately inflamed proposition.

The following Truth Or Dare emerges from a radiant lure of keys to which the guitar of Costas adds its own dazzling resourcefulness. It is a magnetic entrance which is soon bulging with sinew driven beats and riffs which in turn lead into a melodic haze of vocal expression and sonic beauty. The song is in no time a contagious lure which erupts with tenacious craft and urgency, subsequently entwining both textures for a riveting and enslaving enticement. Once more the band inventively merges varied rock and metal spices for a fiery slab of heavyweight rock ‘n’ roll, and another incendiary stomp.

Come And Get It is concluded by the brief acoustic rock offering Gone. With a southern rock lacing to its fully pleasing vocal and guitar led croon, the song thrills and disappoints, the latter because it is far too short and over just as you get the hang of its body and start to join on. Actually thinking about it with voices like those punishing the office that is a good thing but the adage of ‘leaving them wanting more’ is far too cruel in this case.

Like for many, this was our introduction to Blind Race who easily inspire the expectation that we will be hearing much more them when their virulent bait posing as sound begins infesting the world. As mentioned the Come And Get It EP is not breaking new grounds but for sheer rock ‘n’ roll pleasure there are few better around right now.

The self –released Come And Get It EP is available from November 18th @ http://blindrace.bandcamp.com/album/come-and-get-it

http://www.blindrace.net/online/

RingMaster 18/11/2014

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Deaf Eyes – Self Titled

Deaf Eyes - Band

Started as a side project in 2013 of the experimental psych progressive metallers Incoming Cerebral Overdrive, Dead Eyes proves itself to be a distinct and formidable entity in its own right with its self-titled debut album. Colliding eight tracks of intense and thunderous post metal with senses and imagination, the instrumental band lives up to its intent of exploring “obscure experimental sounds and atmospheres,” and “a monolithic approach to hard and heavy riffs with a “delayed research” of alternative vibes mixed in a psychedelic mood.” That is quite a wordy description of what consumes and seduces within their album but one realised within the leviathans of sound and textures which transfix and immerse the listener from start to finish. The album is a beast of a proposition but equally a rigorously sultry temptress journeying through exhausting landscapes as imposingly cinematic as they are carnally ravenous.

The Italian quartet begins their voracious seduction with Black Canvas, and in no time thoughts and emotions are engulfed in the drama and almost savage soundscape of the track. Carnivorous riffs and even more bestial bass predation swiftly overwhelm the senses, backed by the intense weight and hunger of the swiping rhythms. Just as the track is immensely intimidating it also impressively takes the imagination into an evolving and challenging climate of sonic and inventive suggestion, across a terrain of danger and intrigue which erupts and snarls with skilled rabidity and riveting ingenuity. It is a demanding and irresistible experience with a contagion which is toxic and inescapable.

Its dark realms are shadowed by those of the following Mirrors, its specific turbulence and antagonism expelled in a barely milder tempest but one with flickers of light and melodic charm to its hostility. The bass has a growl to reverse a tsunami of ravenous beasts whilst guitars wield a sonic enterprise which binds with venomous potency whilst its infestation of infectiousness is Deaf Eyes - Coverimpossible to fend off or resist. It dark corners and shadows are no less merciless than its outright tempestuous climate as the song unleashes a sound which holds essences of the likes of Neurosis and Russian Circles to its breast as well as those of Morkobot.

A more celestial jeopardy is investigated in Orbits, though with all tracks the adventure unfurling is as unique to the listener’s thoughts as the sounds casting the canvas and sonic emprise inspiring them. The track is one of the less intrusive on the album but still a provocative maelstrom of seriously confrontational invention and enterprise, a description suiting both the tantalising exotic and evocative scenery of The Eyes Of Regret and the agitated majesty of Draining Sun. The first of the two descends into a cavernous and melodically infused sonic haze which is as emotionally expansive as it is ferociously unpredictable and inventively coloured. Its exceptional sonic and innovatively perilous emprise is equalled by its successor, the track a hypnotic dance of repetitive riffery and preying rhythms within a psychedelically hued blaze of disturbed sonic revelry. The track is scintillating, a corrosive waltz physically and emotionally which bewitches with cultish persuasion. The accompanying press release listed Goblin as references and of all the songs this with its haunted shadows and demonic colouring is the prime reason.

Red Desert Lullaby keeps body and emotions just as eagerly busy, its thick smouldering climate a wrap to perilous escapades to envision and a sonic rapacity to bask in whilst next up The Withered drifts into a sinister province of crawling shadows and haunted emotions. Their dark secrets converge around a rugged spine of bass and rhythmic bullying of ears and emotions, an ensnaring and violation of the senses setting thoughts and passions aflame. It is a glorious predator and portrait of lost and turbulent emotions, another binding and ingenious traverse of places most fear to contemplate let alone traverse.

The album closes with the just as dark and Luciferian Commiserate, a primal senses ravishing beauty which scars as it seduces. The bracing incursion into psyche and emotions is an enthralling end to an exceptional release, an album which is a playground for the imagination and trial by sonic fire for the senses. It is quite exceptional and provides a new excursion into the unknown for thoughts and emotions with every violating listen.

Deaf Eyes is available now via Argonauta Records @ http://www.argonautarecords.com/shop/music-/41-deaf-eyes-deaf-eyes-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/deafeyesband

RingMaster 12/11/2014

https://soundcloud.com/deaf-eyes