Your Favorite Enemies – Between Illness And Migration

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Released back home earlier this year, Canadian band Your Favorite Enemies give their European unleashing to their album Between Illness And Migration this month, an encounter sure to wake up keen attention over this side of the globe for them and their highly flavoursome sound. Made up of ten tracks which capture the imagination as easily as the ears, the album is a potential fuelled and adventurous proposition, a constant fascination which does not quite set the blaze that maybe its invention and diverse presence deserves. There is a sense of familiarity coating every track and twist within an otherwise dramatic presence which seemingly prevents any real surprises breaking through, but nevertheless Between Illness And Migration leaves ears satisfied and appetite ready for more.

Formed in 2006, the Montreal band is no stranger to taking their striking fusion of shoegaze, post punk, and alternative rock into new pastures, Your Favorite Enemies having played shows across Europe, Japan, China, Indonesia, and of course Canada. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Queens of the Stone Age, Drive Like Jehu, and Fugazi, the sextet drew strong attention with debut album Love Is a Promise Whispering Goodbye in 2008, its success following the potent base set by previous and first EP And If I Was to Die in the Morning… Would I Still Be Sleeping with You the year before. After a deluxe version of their album, second full-length Vague Souvenir helped expand their presence in 2012 before last year the band released the vinyl album Sacred Kind Of Whispers and the Youthful Dreams of an Old Empire EP to keen responses and recognition. Between Illness And Migration also began its flirtation with the world in 2013, Australian and Japanese versions being unveiled before this year Canada, alongside the Entre Marées Et Autres Ressacs EP, and now Europe received their versions.

Released via Graphite Records, Between Illness And Migration opens with the imagination sparking instrumental Satsuki Yami. Sonically fiery and emotionally agitated, the track is an intro into the album giving no real hint in hindsight of things to come but awakening senses and thoughts successfully for the following temptation of Empire Of Sorrows. Initially a lonely guitar bred melody melancholically strokes ears, its coaxing joined by the just as lamenting spoken tones of vocalist Alex Foster. Building around that single sonic lure, the guitars of Jeff Beaulieu and Sef begin shaping a dramatic web to which rhythms align their brewing intensity and the keys of Miss Isabel offer their initially subdued hues. Once inflamed the song is a stirring cauldron of cold post punk enterprise and provocation, the bass of Ben Lemelin a groaning treat and the beats of drummer Charles Allicy a reined yet rampant incitement. Evolving through gentle and haunted scenery to roaring blazes, there is a refreshing sense of bands like Wire, Modern English, and Flesh for Lulu to the encounter which intrigues as its tantalises the imagination and illness_migration_cover_europe_800passions.

It is a mighty start to the album which A View From Within backs up with its whipping sonic web and slightly portentous air. The acidic and scorched start to the song reminds of Bauhaus but is soon merging into new terrain as keys toy with synth rock enterprise and vocals from Foster and Miss Isabel entwine with spicy variety. As the first track you feel you know or can predict the turns and shifts the song takes but even without that element of surprise, it lights ears and appetite with a flavoursome drama soaked adventure, as does its successor Where Did We Lose Each Other. The first rub of guitar sets the juices flowing which the subsequent rhythmic shuffle and keen hooks only accentuate before a brief relaxation to draw in the vocals slightly dulls the weighty persuasion. From this point the song ebbs and flows, flying high with its vocal and melodic roars and dipping slightly in its less intensively emotive turns. The enterprise of the guitars and the delicious toxicity of the grooves and increasingly barbed hooks ensure the song wins the day though and provides moments of lingering success.

Underneath A Stretching Skyline keeps things bubbling potently, the raw energy and gnarly voice of bass and riffs an inescapable enticement within the just as magnetic sonic winds cast by guitars and keys. Its time is shared with elegant and gentle melodic reflections matched by the vocals; both characters within the song courting each other’s strengths to provide a fascinating drama of sound and lyrical narration. The song epitomises the album in many ways, its presence an engrossing and easily accessible canvas of craft and invention which impressively and enjoyably smoulders rather than ignites a fire with its offering. The same applies to next up From The City To The Ocean, its resonating body and gripping endeavour a lively simmer more than a furnace for the emotions but a treat for ears all the same. With repetition driving much of the vocals and spoken vocals also a full part to the unfolding picture, as across most songs, it takes more time than some to fully convince but subsequently finds the same level of pleasure.

The deviously addictive bassline within I Just Want You To Know soon has ears trapped in the evocative hazy landscape immersing the senses, the song as tenacious in its emotion as it is in sonic temptation, whilst 1-2-3 (One Step Away) is a climatic build of rugged rhythms and punk antagonism within a melody fired creative sprawl of invention and diversity. The pair grips ears and thoughts with their impassioned suasions, the second of the two especially incendiary as it pulls the album back to the impressive levels it started with.

Between Illness And Migration is completed by the sonic maelstroms of firstly Obsession Is A Gun, its pungent drama bewitching, and finally Muets Aux Temps Des Amours, a noir lit enchantment which croons with anguish and slowly burning but ultimately rich temptation. The closer shows more of the strengths of Fosters striking vocals and those of Miss Isabel but also the one personal niggle about the album. That is the want to use spoken vocals throughout the majority of tracks, some more strongly than others. It is an idea which works a treat for the main but by the last songs it finally feels overdone, its variety and success becoming formula. As mentioned it is just something which laboured for us and will be fine for others, and it definitely does not make for a major issue.

Your Favorite Enemies with Between Illness And Migration show themselves to be an adventurous and bold band, their release impossible to ignore or stay away from as it impresses more with every listen. Their oncoming evolution is one to anticipate and enjoy it is easy to suggest, starting with this great release, and once they find real distinction to their sound that missing blaze just might be running amok.

Between Illness And Migration is available now via Graphite Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/id920852948

http://yourfavoriteenemies.com/

RingMaster 25/11/2014

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Arcade Messiah – Self Titled

John Bassett Promo 3

The creativity of UK musician John Bassett is a feverish kaleidoscope of colour, invention, and innovative exploration. He has proven it time and time again for over a decade, releasing eight increasingly impressive and attention grabbing albums either as KingBathmat or his own name. The last couple of years or so has seen a richer recognition of his craft and expansive musical imagination, the last two critically acclaimed KingBathmat albums Truth Button and Overcoming The Monster, the latter in 2013, pushing he and the band to the fore of progressive metal/rock whilst his debut acoustic album Unearth earlier this year, reinforced his reputation and ability to explore varied and deeply immersive structures and landscapes. Now the Hastings based multi-instrumentalist, singer songwriter, and producer returns with new solo project Arcade Messiah, a vehicle for his instrumental emprises which as shown by its self-titled debut album, are set to also inflame for ears and imagination.

Merging the boldest essences of styles such as metal, stoner, doom, prog, and math rock within constantly revealing canvases of post rock, Bassett and album provide gripping soundscapes for thoughts to cast their own explorations within and for emotions to colour with their own adventures. The musician talking about the project and album commented that “after writing and producing numerous KingBathmat albums and more recently the acoustic solo album Unearth, I decided I wanted to create my first instrumental album, and I wanted it to be set, audibly and visually in a dark, bleak apocalyptic aura of despair and anger. I wanted to focus on enormous riffs and sorrowful yet powerful musical refrains and place them within a terrain of unusual time signatures interspersed by moments of psychedelic calm.” It is an aim successfully achieved but even more an endeavour sculpting one of the essential moments of the year.

Instrumental albums do not always sink in easily with us, a demand for something maybe indefinable but persistent in igniting body and imagination a persistent requirement which the Arcade Messiah Album Covershowing off of supreme technical skill cannot satisfy. In Arcane Messiah there is nothing but that aural and inventive stimulation, from opening track Sun Exile the album a mouth-watering and rigorously compelling provocation for senses and unravelling gests in the imagination. From the first stirring and virulent call of guitar, album and opener becomes a potent weave of sound and aural suggestion, especially as a hypnotic canter of rhythms and fiery melodies join the emerging sonic picture soon after. Twists in time and invention are as fascinating as the heated creative climate of the track, its increasingly steamy breath and dark expression seductive and intimidating sparking a portentous Icarus like warning in thoughts.

The following Your Best Line Of Defence Is Obscurity slips in on a gentle breeze of sonic air and melodic caressing, though again it is a coaxing lined with dark bass shadows and prowling beats. The imagination is lured into the depths of the heavy smoulder of the piece with ease, thoughts of a lonely existence within the turmoil of predatory but deceptively welcoming emotive scenery emerging. Bassett’s guitar work is riveting, every groove and scorched melody inescapable incitement, but to be fair that applies to drums and bass through to simply the immersing imposing atmospheres conjured. Thoughts are instantly embraced and sparked by the primal and elegant nature of the music, a common factor across the album and in evidence with Traumascope straight after. Its initial post rock ambience is lined with a funk kissed bassline and lively beats from the drums, a union which hangs around before parting its mist for the voracious tide of riffs, which in turn lead to and compliment a stoner-esque flaming to the emerging tempest of emotional reflection and sonic rapacity. The track is a mesmeric blaze which never gets out of hand but leaves its dramatic imprint on senses and imagination with burning contagion.

Aftermath is a sobering haunting after the previous furnaces of sound and inventive intensity, a delicious feast of invasive melodies and bracing elegance which comes with sinister shadowing and anguished reflections. It also has an ethereal touch to its climate but in many ways is just the calm before or within the storm, its peace the bridge to the inventive alchemy of Everybody Eating Everyone Else. The track is scintillating; its initial also haunted passage the gateway into an antagonistic yet infectiously magnetic terrain of abrasing riffs and sonic temptation. There is a feeling of safety within turbulent and aggressive times or landscapes to the song, the guitars providing guidance through fiercely provocative exploits sculpted by rhythms and Bassett’s riff led raw sonic energy. Though musically it is different, there is a feel of early Killing Joke to the structure and tension of this and many tracks, an unrelenting persuasion which is wonderfully nagging at the heart of the ferociously inventive mergers of light and dark.

Steamy stoner spirals of sound open up The Most Popular Form Of Escape next, their acidic tones and spicing bringing rich hues to the climatic broadening of the song’s thick web of flavour and enterprise. Folkish elements are as prevalent in the piece as progressive endeavour and a sterner metallic tenacity, it all creating another unpredictable fascination for ears to bask in, the imagination to sculpt with, and appetite to devour greedily. Its enthralling waltz makes way for the closing Roman Resolution, itself an aural teleidoscope with wide reflective views and internal emotive majesty. An epic cruise through ever evolving sonic experimentation and poetic melodies, it brings a sensational release to a breath-taking close.

After the combined brilliance of Overcoming The Monster and Unearth, there was a small wonder where Bassett went from there. Where he ventured was into a creative maelstrom of sublime ingenuity with a technical and instinctive invention which has no need to indulge in over the top flourishes and pretension as it steals thoughts and passions. Arcade Messiah presents instrumental music which is organic and bracing whilst Bassett might just have put a stranglehold on best of year charts come the end of next month.

Arcade Messiah is available as a name your price digital version and on CD now via Stereohead Records @ https://arcademessiah.bandcamp.com

http://www.arcademessiah.com/

http://www.johnbassettmusic.com

RingMaster 25/11/2014

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Blind Race – Come And Get It EP

Photo Credit: Joanna Glezakos of Vegenza Forografiad

Photo Credit: Joanna Glezakos of Vegenza Forografiad

Listening to the Come And Get It EP from Canadian intensive rockers Blind Race, is like being run down by a fully loaded juggernaut with its throttle fully open and subsequently being caught on its axle and dragged for the ultimate ride. Five tracks which predominantly stomp like a bear in heat, the release is a muscular confrontation using the listener as its plaything and rewarding with some of the most voracious and ferocious rock ‘n’ roll heard in a long time. The band’s third release, Come And Get It sums up their intent and the EP’s unbridled invitation into their compelling sonic devilry, and though it may not be bulging with startling originality it is hard to remember a fusion of rock and metal more enjoyable and anthemic this year.

Blind Race roared from the starting gate in 2007, emerging from the union of two brothers and their best friend two years earlier getting together for some freestyle jams and demo recordings. Taking inspirations from “their love of fast cars and the intrigue of driving them blind, as well as modern-day racial issues and the idea that we are all the same”, the band unleashed their debut album Seeing Red in 2008. It and their live presences earned strong responses with the band in 2010 being nominated at Toronto Independent Music Awards for Best Metal Act and two years later for Best Live Metal Act. 2012 also saw the release of the Lost EP, the band continuing to evolve their diverse sound and again drawing acclaim and attention, something easy to see the Mike Langford (Evans Blue, Parabelle, Charlie Hope, Jeff Martin (Tea Party), Crash Karma, Art Of Dying) produced Come And Get It surpassing.

There is no easy lead into the release, it immediately hitting top gear with opener Hypocrite. Punchy drums lure a blaze of predatory riffs which in turn re-sparks the swipes of Stelio Kentros into casting an even more pungent provocation. It is a gripping entrance swiftly becoming a rampage with nostrils flared and a heavily imposing swagger. The guitar of Costas Kentros continues spraying its predatory designs, matched by the throaty prowling of Mike Ferraro’s bass, whilst the excellent vocal lure of Tommy Geraldes completes the full anthemic narrative and expression of the song. There are also vibrant melodic keys from Joannie Cotton colouring the encounter but such the weight and pulsating intensity elsewhere, they are brief glimpses within the tempest. Swinging with the temptation of Volbeat and the bestial force of a Bloodsimple, the track is primal rock ‘n’ roll at its best and quite irresistible.Come And Get It Album Cover 2014

The EP’s title track comes next and is soon taking all the attention, again ferocious riffery and flaming grooves raging around the rhythmic armoury of Stelio as Geraldes fiercely roars and confronts with accomplished and addictive potency. There is a great abrasing edge and snarl to all aspects of the song, like a Pantera meets Five Finger Death Punch antagonism which only adds to the inescapable bait of the encounter. As its predecessor Come And Get It is an unrelenting insatiable growl which leaves appetite hungry and ears greedy for more, which the next up Hopeless is only happy to provide. The third song is a different kind of beast though, one basking and bred in the grunge and melodic rock fuelled side of the band’s songwriting and sound with a loud whisper of Godsmack throughout. Minimal caresses of guitar and jabbing beats are lorded over by the again excellent vocals, resulting in a less demanding but just as compelling incitement to the previous track. The keys of Cotton are given the room and air to bring their rich hues to the smouldering canvas of the song too whilst the guitars erupt with explosive skill and tenacity across the reserved yet melodically and passionately inflamed proposition.

The following Truth Or Dare emerges from a radiant lure of keys to which the guitar of Costas adds its own dazzling resourcefulness. It is a magnetic entrance which is soon bulging with sinew driven beats and riffs which in turn lead into a melodic haze of vocal expression and sonic beauty. The song is in no time a contagious lure which erupts with tenacious craft and urgency, subsequently entwining both textures for a riveting and enslaving enticement. Once more the band inventively merges varied rock and metal spices for a fiery slab of heavyweight rock ‘n’ roll, and another incendiary stomp.

Come And Get It is concluded by the brief acoustic rock offering Gone. With a southern rock lacing to its fully pleasing vocal and guitar led croon, the song thrills and disappoints, the latter because it is far too short and over just as you get the hang of its body and start to join on. Actually thinking about it with voices like those punishing the office that is a good thing but the adage of ‘leaving them wanting more’ is far too cruel in this case.

Like for many, this was our introduction to Blind Race who easily inspire the expectation that we will be hearing much more them when their virulent bait posing as sound begins infesting the world. As mentioned the Come And Get It EP is not breaking new grounds but for sheer rock ‘n’ roll pleasure there are few better around right now.

The self –released Come And Get It EP is available from November 18th @ http://blindrace.bandcamp.com/album/come-and-get-it

http://www.blindrace.net/online/

RingMaster 18/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Deaf Eyes – Self Titled

Deaf Eyes - Band

Started as a side project in 2013 of the experimental psych progressive metallers Incoming Cerebral Overdrive, Dead Eyes proves itself to be a distinct and formidable entity in its own right with its self-titled debut album. Colliding eight tracks of intense and thunderous post metal with senses and imagination, the instrumental band lives up to its intent of exploring “obscure experimental sounds and atmospheres,” and “a monolithic approach to hard and heavy riffs with a “delayed research” of alternative vibes mixed in a psychedelic mood.” That is quite a wordy description of what consumes and seduces within their album but one realised within the leviathans of sound and textures which transfix and immerse the listener from start to finish. The album is a beast of a proposition but equally a rigorously sultry temptress journeying through exhausting landscapes as imposingly cinematic as they are carnally ravenous.

The Italian quartet begins their voracious seduction with Black Canvas, and in no time thoughts and emotions are engulfed in the drama and almost savage soundscape of the track. Carnivorous riffs and even more bestial bass predation swiftly overwhelm the senses, backed by the intense weight and hunger of the swiping rhythms. Just as the track is immensely intimidating it also impressively takes the imagination into an evolving and challenging climate of sonic and inventive suggestion, across a terrain of danger and intrigue which erupts and snarls with skilled rabidity and riveting ingenuity. It is a demanding and irresistible experience with a contagion which is toxic and inescapable.

Its dark realms are shadowed by those of the following Mirrors, its specific turbulence and antagonism expelled in a barely milder tempest but one with flickers of light and melodic charm to its hostility. The bass has a growl to reverse a tsunami of ravenous beasts whilst guitars wield a sonic enterprise which binds with venomous potency whilst its infestation of infectiousness is Deaf Eyes - Coverimpossible to fend off or resist. It dark corners and shadows are no less merciless than its outright tempestuous climate as the song unleashes a sound which holds essences of the likes of Neurosis and Russian Circles to its breast as well as those of Morkobot.

A more celestial jeopardy is investigated in Orbits, though with all tracks the adventure unfurling is as unique to the listener’s thoughts as the sounds casting the canvas and sonic emprise inspiring them. The track is one of the less intrusive on the album but still a provocative maelstrom of seriously confrontational invention and enterprise, a description suiting both the tantalising exotic and evocative scenery of The Eyes Of Regret and the agitated majesty of Draining Sun. The first of the two descends into a cavernous and melodically infused sonic haze which is as emotionally expansive as it is ferociously unpredictable and inventively coloured. Its exceptional sonic and innovatively perilous emprise is equalled by its successor, the track a hypnotic dance of repetitive riffery and preying rhythms within a psychedelically hued blaze of disturbed sonic revelry. The track is scintillating, a corrosive waltz physically and emotionally which bewitches with cultish persuasion. The accompanying press release listed Goblin as references and of all the songs this with its haunted shadows and demonic colouring is the prime reason.

Red Desert Lullaby keeps body and emotions just as eagerly busy, its thick smouldering climate a wrap to perilous escapades to envision and a sonic rapacity to bask in whilst next up The Withered drifts into a sinister province of crawling shadows and haunted emotions. Their dark secrets converge around a rugged spine of bass and rhythmic bullying of ears and emotions, an ensnaring and violation of the senses setting thoughts and passions aflame. It is a glorious predator and portrait of lost and turbulent emotions, another binding and ingenious traverse of places most fear to contemplate let alone traverse.

The album closes with the just as dark and Luciferian Commiserate, a primal senses ravishing beauty which scars as it seduces. The bracing incursion into psyche and emotions is an enthralling end to an exceptional release, an album which is a playground for the imagination and trial by sonic fire for the senses. It is quite exceptional and provides a new excursion into the unknown for thoughts and emotions with every violating listen.

Deaf Eyes is available now via Argonauta Records @ http://www.argonautarecords.com/shop/music-/41-deaf-eyes-deaf-eyes-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/deafeyesband

RingMaster 12/11/2014

https://soundcloud.com/deaf-eyes

Metal Moth – Rise EP

Rise Artwork

Though the band name might not have convinced yet, there was no such problem with the aggressive incitement unleashed by UK metallers Metal Moth on their Rise EP. The band’s debut is four slabs of classic metal bullied and twisted into a rampage of modern melody enriched rock ‘n’ roll. It has more familiarity than originality to its potency and presence but this only fuels the potential and thorough enjoyment given by the heavily flavoursome entrance of the band.

Formed in 2012, Metal Moth was soon stomping across country and venues with their adrenaline fuelled barbarous sounds. An enthusiastically growing fan base came hand in hand with their emergence, one sure to be reinforced and accelerated with the release of the Rise, the first of three consecutive EPs. Band and release ignite appetite and imagination within seconds as opener Moth To The Flame stands toe to toe with ears, flinging weighty rhythms and sinew crafted riffs with antagonistic intent. It is a ferocious start which only intensifies as the riffing and heavily swinging beats stampede with flared nostrils across the senses. Around this assault invention mischievously offers acidic grooves and a deliciously carnal bassline whilst vocally Kurt Hudson excels with his melodic yet snarled delivery. From the merciless swipes of drummer Natalie Gaines to the threatening bass predation provided by David Collinson (who announced his departure from the band in recent days), and the fiery adventure and skilled devilry provided by guitarists Mark Gibbons and Chris Fisher, the track is gripping drama and ruggedly impressive.

The same can be said of the following One More Time, again a proposition which has speakers bulging under its savage rhythmic onslaught and ravenous riffery. Equally there is no escaping the rigorous contagion uncaged within the track or the unpredictable twists and jagged barbarism which gnaw on the senses as wiry flames of melodic endeavour flirt with similarly rapacious intent. It is a full blooded stomp which again has recognisable traits but just as plentiful new designs and invention in its lyrical and sonic provocation.

Melt Down steps up next and immediately is a haze of sonic menace swiftly speared by those pungent beats of Gaines and the crunchy scythes of riffs from the guitars. Either side of that core Metal Moth Pic 2there is the vocal quality and fluid expression of Hudson and the dark predatory tones of Collinson’s bass, each complementing and sparking against the other. It is a blend which magnetically colours the threatening prowl and confrontation of the track, especially when aligned to the intermittent eruptions of melodic and unpredictable intrigue offered by Gibbons and Fisher. Though the song does not brawl with and corrupt the passions at the same strength and immediacy as its predecessors, it reveals more depth to the invention and skills of the band whilst laying down a tasty appetiser for the EP’s finale.

The closing Metal Maniac also takes a more restrained approach to its seducing of ears, the bass rumbling with dark devilry whilst guitars create a web of melodic coaxing. It is not long though before the song settles into a fevered stroll as addictive grooves and hooks provide riveting barbs to the feisty lure of the track. Providing a thrilling end to a just as exciting debut, the track sums up the band and release perfectly, that being rock ‘n’ roll at its instinctive and insatiable best.

If the next pair of EPs matches and confirms the promise and already accomplished quality in skills and sound of the band, it will be impossible not to suggest that as they evolve Metal Moth will be a band playing a big part in the evolution of British metal ahead. To be honest though, if this is as good as it gets there will be few complaints either.

The Rise EP is available digitally now @ http://metalmoth1.bandcamp.com/album/rise

https://www.facebook.com/MetalMoth/

RingMaster 12/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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No Way – Sing Praises

Pic  Tony Stanley

Pic Tony Stanley

From sound and presence to voracity and appeal, there is nothing lightweight about the debut release From US band No Way. The four-track Sing Praises EP is a brute of an introduction to the Brooklyn quartet, a compelling and enslaving tempest of noise and invention fusing thick essences of noise and punk rock with those of sludge and heavy melodic rock. Some bands seem to instinctively tune in to the listener’s wants and primal needs, and it is fair to say that No Way certainly fed and intensively satisfied ours.

No Way was formed in 2012, swiftly making their mark on the New York punk scene. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Helmet and Unsane, the band were soon sculpting their own distinct presence and sound, unafraid to infuse varied styles and raw spices into the mix of sound mentioned earlier. Their live reputation has also grown from those early potent days with the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Whores., Fight Amp, Black Tusk, Inter Arma, American Sharks, Cancer Bats, Naam and White Hills. That attention will only be broadened and strengthened by the release of Sing Praises, the Andrew Schneider (Unsane, Pelican, Shrinebuilder) recorded and Carl Saff (Young Widows, Helms Alee, OFF!, Kowloon Walled City, Big Business) mastered proposition an imposing slab of prime sonic and rhythmic beef flavoured with an imagination and a creative intrigue to get the taste buds singing.

The release looms up on ears with opener The Cutting and within a breath is walling them in with bulging riffs and debilitating rhythms. It is an imposing start but only the teaser to greater things as warped sonic scythes from guitars coveradd to the brewing mayhem. Vocalist Chuck Berrett is as a formidable a presence as the song itself, his raw and growling tones an instant lure complimenting and inciting further the rugged turbulence around him. At its heart there is the inventiveness of a Melvins to the song and the caustic beauty of a Cancer Bats whilst the core swagger to grooves is Coal Chamber bred, their swing reminding of the song Sway. It is a merciless seduction gnawing and flirting with thoughts and emotions, an immediate pinnacle matched straight away by Shake the Meat.

The second track makes a less intensive but just as gripping entrance, the guitar of Jordan Melkin coaxing ears and imagination with potent hooks as ripe and pungent beats from drummer Chris Enriquez provide an intimidating cage. Further enhanced and coloured by the throaty bass bait of Dave Maffei alongside the varied and fierce vocals, the track is an unpredictable and insatiable predator threatening and teasing with impassioned aggression and shadow bred, bordering on deranged enterprise. The riveting blaze is followed by the exceptional prowl and creative stalking of War Dance. It is a hypnotic proposition, a lone riff accompanied by this time more restrained tones from Berrett the initial drama; bait subsequently joined by merciless slaps from Enriquez and eventually stoner-esque hues within explosive roars. The song hunts the senses and psyche from start to finish, even its intermittent immersive and invasive sonic squalls a menace which increases the theatre induced by the engrossing single minded slim stalking either side of them

The track is scintillating and leaves the appetite greedier than ever so thankfully closing track Pastures / Abuelas is more than able to feed the hunger. Over eight minutes of imaginative tension, it is a rigorously captivating pursuit of the senses loading with vicious bass growls, savage riffs, and a sprawling thick sonic smog, all punctuated with a rhythmic resourcefulness which leaves ears bruised and emotions raw. There is also a psychedelic smearing to the atmosphere and inventive colour of the track but it is the hellacious and brutal ingenuity of the track, as well as the stoner bred grooves further into its adventure, which lingers longest and the deepest in the psyche. Dark and ravenous with greater menace in its restraint than a full-out assault could achieve, the track is a delicious immersion and challenge as well as another open side to No Way’s sound.

Sing Praises is an exceptional debut from a band with all the potential to be a potent and inspiring force ahead on the evidence of this stunning entrance. No Way seem to know what ears and instincts want in heavy, brutal, and incendiary exploratory sounds, and of course this is only the beginning….

The Sing Praises EP is available now digitally and on cassette @ http://www.nowayny.com

https://www.facebook.com/nowayny

RingMaster 07/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Malefice – Gravitas EP

Malefice 2014 Promo

There is always a twinge of excitement when news of a new Malefice release breaks, having been hooked on them via debut album Entities back in 2007, and so it was with the announcement of new EP Gravitas. It was an appetite and anticipation more than forcibly fed by the brutal fury of a release. The EP sees the UK metallers at their most fearsome and uncompromising best. It is a beast of an adventure and assault; hard to say the band’s best rage yet but definitely there on the frontline of their finest moments.

The successor to last year’s V EP and third album Awaken the Tides two years before it, Gravitas finds Malefice going back to the sounds which they feel ignites and is the core of the band. Vocalist Dale Butler talked about the album recently saying, “After taking some time out from the band to do our own things and focus on our own lives we came back together not feeling as we had given all we have to give to Malefice… We spent a long booze-fuelled evening talking about what we want to do and what came out of that discussion is that we want to write music we like…We are going to back to what makes us Malefice and we’re gonna write some fucking heavy music to headbang to.“ There is no doubting their success in that, the release a merciless and inventive brute force but unafraid to vein and spear it with the melodic fire and imaginative tenacity which the band has equally become renowned for in British metal.

There is no escaping the primal fury and angry weight of the EP as opener Forsaken descends on ears with predatory riffs and rhythms, both aspects converging in one intrigue soaked stalking. It is a seriously intimidating proposal with effects teasing the skirting vocals, Butler eventually escaping their restraints to snarl venomously as the song moves into a new aspect of its hunt of the psyche. From that initial harrowing prowl, the track slips into a torrential charge of spicy grooves across cantankerous riffs and murderous rhythms. It is a gripping and savage violation, the guitars of Ben Symons and Andrew Wilson pure spite and invention in their rabid riffery and designs whilst the heavy handed swings of drummer James Pearly Cook are judge, jury, and executioner in their attack on the senses. Completed with the almost carnal tones of Tom Hynes’ bass, the track is a furnace of malice and unfussy yet pungent imagination.Cover

The cauldron of vocal ire and variety from Butler and band is just as feverishly addictive as the sounds brawling around them, second track Heroes providing more of their exploits in its own unique violation. A more merciful start fuelled by fiery melodic enterprise makes a ‘gentler’ welcome though the track is soon barging through ears with nagging riffs and unforgiving rhythms. It tempers and scythes across this tempest though with an outstanding haze of superb clean vocals and just as thick sonic expression, before exploring a mesmeric calm of evocative radiance and melodic charm. It is just the eye of the storm of course, the track soon back in vicious mood and ferocity. There is a feel of Fear Factory to it in some of its parts but ultimately this is a unique and thrilling exploration all of Malefice’s own making

Within a breath Escape is bawling over and brawling with ears, providing another distinct twist to the blaze of the release. Grooves seduce from the first second, scorching the raw and turbulent landscape of the song whilst another array of differing and complimenting vocal diversity grips the imagination giving more potency and depth to the track’s narrative. Swirling and savaging within its towering rhythmic walls, the track is a glorious trespass of senses and emotions.

Gravitas comes to a close with My Design, riffs hunting down the listener with pack like mentality as grooves sear air and flesh with their pestilential temptation and resourcefulness. As it expands and immerses the listener in its lyrical sufferance, the track is a riveting and skilled provocation but lacks the creative spark which ignites the other three tracks on the EP so magnificently. Nevertheless it is an assault drenched in what Malefice is all about, creatively threatening, destructively intense, and driven by pure passion, not forgetting irresistibly thrilling.

Gravitas is a scintillating slab of barbarous majesty reinforcing Malefice as one of the UK’s and Europe’s leading inventive metallers. Earlier we suggested a debate on whether this is the band’s best moment yet; another listen as we write though suggests it just might be and if not, anticipation that the forthcoming new album from Malefice will be is hard to shake off.

The Gravitas EP is available now via Transcend Music @  https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/gravitas-ep/id922130758

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RingMaster 04/11/2014

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