PROMETHEE release spanking new video and new songs.

Promethee Promo Shot

HIGHLY RATED EURO METAL OUTFIT PROMETHEE RELEASE TWO NEW TRACKS AND IMPRESSIVE VIDEO

Promethee are poised to release two new tracks ‘Dark Souls’ and ‘The Sour Taste’ on 7” vinyl and through bandcamp on 1st May. The Swiss riff kings have also just released a brand new video for ‘Dark Souls’, which is out now and available for viewing at

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2ey8SJggus&feature=youtu.be

 

Hailing from Geneva, Switzerland and born during the early part of 2008, Promethee didn’t waste any time, and quickly racked up a plethora of successful shows throughout Switzerland and France in front of a fast growing public. With the release of their debut five track EP in 2010, the metallers were soon hailed as one of ‘The new bands to catch on the European metal scene’.

True to their growing reputation for being incredibly active, Promethee continued to spread their wings and secured tours throughout Europe, Canada and even Cuba before going back into the studio to record their debut album, “Nothing Happens. Nobody Comes, Nobody Goes.”. The record hit stores in 2012 and immediately propelled Promethee to a higher level. Gathering prestigious feedback from the national press, including Kerrang!, Metal Hammer and Big Cheese Magazine, the album has been continually praised for its technical and musical mastery.

Promethee furthered their climb with well received video singles and live videos which have been lapped up by tens of thousands of fans around the world. Aided by an additional one hundred and fifty shows played in over ten countries, the band’s visibility has swiftly increased.

Now in 2014, Promethee unveil two brand new slabs of mighty metal fused with commanding hardcore and a wealth of groove which will be released in the form of a seven inch vinyl along with a lyric video. The tracks are lifted from the noise chiefs’ new album, which will be released by the end of 2014. After a steady incline during the past three years, the band are now poised for a full scale European and North American assault. And with their fan base growing day to day with tens of thousands of active followers and the band touring as much as humanly possible, Promethee have never been so motivated to transcend and evolve into a heavyweight force on the world metal scene.

 Check out the video for Dark Souls @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2ey8SJggus&feature=youtu.be

www.prometheemusic.com | www.facebook.com/prometheemusic  | www.twitter.com/prometheemusic

Pink Tatami – Chapter and Verse

Pink Tatami

It is with great thanks to the vocalist of Pink Tatami, Mike Marques that we can bask in one of the most invigorating and downright thrilling releases of the year so far. The frontman of the French band introduced himself and colleagues with the hope that a review of their debut album Chapter & Verse might be possible. One blast of just its opening song and a review was not only possible but essential. Consisting of twelve exhaustingly imaginative fusions of alternative rock and metal, with plenty more besides lurking and seducing from within, the album is a breath-taking tantalisation. Bulging with virulent hooks, deceptive shadows, and an irresistible invention which hooks its claws in from the first second to the magnetic last, this is a debut of not only an outstanding band but of a potentially major force.

More than merely flirting with experimental tendencies, the sound of Pink Tatami feeds off the richest essences within metal and rock, every song a distinctive individual combining for an enthralling and mouthwatering proposition. Toying with and igniting the imagination and passions like a mix of Faith No More meets Kontrust with the devilry of Dog Fashion Disco and Destrage adding to the constantly evolving recipe with an extra spice of 6:33, sound and album roars and teases with all the charm of a bestial predator, the seduction of a sultry temptress, and the psychotic lures of a deranged puppeteer, though not always in that order or combination.

Recorded over a two year period, Chapter & Verse leap at ears and imagination right away, the Paris quartet simultaneously stroking coverand threatening the senses with dark riffs and rhythms with the entrance of opener Twisted Lip. The track soon settles into a feisty keen stride, the bass of Alex Ghilardi growling imposingly whilst the guitar of Florent Beaucousin coaxes and fires up thoughts in league with the richly impressive tones of Marques. It is an immediately flaming temptation which elevates its psyche metal seeded bait with the pop rock twist of the chorus. That Faith No More comparison is a swift suggestion though song and Pink Tatami only use it as flavouring to their ripe feast of sound. Across its saunter the song fuses in some funk twists with a Red Hot Chili Peppers lilt and a strong melodic rock grunge like enticement, an ingenuity which only adds to the potency.

The very strong start is soon shaded by the following Sinistra, which opens up its lure with an electro resonance, its stimulating wash surrounding the welcoming vocals and subsequent blaze of guitar steered by the punchy beats of drummer Bamby Alfonço. Again there is a definite Patton-esque flavour to the teasing which only accentuates the rich tones of the song. Flowing into slower romancing avenues and rapaciously toned energetic ventures, the track keeps thoughts and appetite on their toes and greedy for more which False Rebounds is more than happy to offer. Sinister whispers lurk as a singular guitar brings the song into view, the dark ambience standing over the emergence of the song until pushed aside by funky enterprise and bouncy vocals which step in to steal attention. It is a constant balance though, the shadows never far from making their narrative heard alongside evocative melodies and the livelier urgency of the track ever eager to have its say. It results in a riveting and thrilling proposition though in many ways just the appetiser to its quite magnificent successor.

The title track to the album is simply glorious, from its opening scrub of riffs and pulsating hypnotic beats a ridiculously virulent and anthemic suasion. The start has a Buzzcocks feel to its tempting and is soon courted by surf rock like croons and floating harmonies. Capture of heart and soul is done within those opening seconds, leaving the rest of the track to wrap tighter bonds around their submission. Into its stride the track enlists the contagion of rap metal with hip hop seeded vocals chopping across the ears whilst a sonic mystique dances provocatively in the background before erupting into a blazing sun of impressive vocal soars and searing melodies. It is easily the best song on the album, and the others are mighty, and one of the best to grace the year to date, much like the album.

Fears that there might be an anti-climax in store after such a triumph are soon chased off by both The Employee and “A” is for…, the first stalking ears at through dark vocals upon a stirring ridge of riffs before expanding into an intrigue noir kissed adventure with a sultry melodic breath. A track which manages to smooch with and haunt the senses at the same time it is another striking slice of invention; corrosive floods of aggression and predacious riffs having as much of a say in the painting of the song’s mysterious canvas as the mesmeric vocals and entrancing melodies, not forgetting the arcane tempting watching on. Its successor brings a ska toned walk to its delicious pop rock dance, crooning and embracing the listener in another RHCP spiced escapade which entrances and mischievously plays.

   The caustic touch of Dumas & Dos Santos brings another flood of ardour upon the album, the carnivorous bass tones and rapier like aggression of the guitars and rhythms irresistible as they thrust a violent furnace of intensity through the ears. It is tempered though by an infectious side to its provocation which increases the epidemic invasiveness of the explosive treat. It is a pleasure taken on further by the dark suggestiveness of We Can Help You, a track veined by exploratory sonic adventure and intrusively appealing twists, and the intensively shadowed Dorothea Tanning, its tale and invasive sounds an enveloping cloak of danger and creative spite. The song roars and thrashes about as its theme unveils every black twist and intimidating turn whilst merging passages of intimidating seduction into the turmoil.

Adhesive spits and romances with its diverse wares next, the song a gentle caress in certain moments and a voracious assault in others reminding of Russian punk rock band Biting Elbows at times. The song is surpassed by the following Evokes, a spiral of sonic addiction from its first seconds before careering into the passions on a torrent of punk/metal rabidity. Grooves and riffs squall irresistibly across the bow of the rhythmically challenging song, vocals adding irrepressibly to the raucous tempest. It is a stunning and quite brutal peak to the mountainous range of the album, a Breed 77 toxicity only adding to the inescapable trap.

Closing on the mild in comparison Eye Bank, a song where thoughts of Poets Of The Fall come to mind but just another tone in something unique to Pink Tatami, Chapter & Verse is one of those gifts you cannot turn away from without assistance, an enslaving incitement with far reaching snares. Though long in the making, the album is only the debut of Pink Tatami, a quite magnificent and accomplished one admittedly, but just the start of their journey. It is scary to think how good they have the potential to become and extremely exciting.

The self-released Chapter & Verse is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/pinktatami

http://pinktatamiband.bandcamp.com/album/chapter-verse

10/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Memories Of A Dead Man – Ashes Of Joy

memoriesofadeadman_web

There is always something appetising about releases which make you work and really listen to their intensive offering before truly reaping the rewards their exploits offer. Ashes Of Joy the new album from French metallers Memories Of A Dead Man is one such impressive encounter. An exhausting venture into thick emotive climates and exhaustive imposing soundscapes, the twelve track journey challenges and intrudes upon senses and imagination respectively for a continually emerging and enriching experience. Certainly a release which needs extensive time to devour fully, though it makes a more than compelling first impression, Ashes Of Joy is a masterful confrontation which gets better and better across its length and to even greater effect over each traverse of its riveting body.

Formed in 2006, Memories Of A Dead Man has evolved their sound over time into a thoroughly absorbing and enveloping persuasion, their albums Beyond the Legend and V.I.T.R.I.O.L. drawing strong and acclaimed responses, but with Ashes of Joy the band has reached a new height in songwriting maturity, provocative presence, and intensive imagination. The melancholic breath which envelops from within the dark shadows and imposing structures of the songs borders on suffocation at times but only in their soaking of every twist and shift of the narratives, musically and lyrically, within the demanding and inciting provocation which in turn intensifies the oppressive intensity and emotive atmospheres brought to bear. Crafted by a new line-up which has been in place from 2012, Ashes Of Joy is an exacting and simultaneously compelling adventure, not one for the faint hearted but certainly one for all those who like to sink their teeth into an incendiary slab of extreme invention and passion.

The opening Prélude (Solemn Requiem) immediately encases ears in a fiery sonic embrace, the guitars of Ben Debrun and Tony Garcia memoriesofadeadman_covercasting a scorching initial smoulder of melodic enticement which calls on the imagination with its evocative lure straight away. Heavier stalking riffs follow thumping beats in joining the molten coaxing as the track increases its intensity and stature; all the time the irresistible grizzled tones of the bass and bear like vocals intimidating and taking thoughts into the  darkest menacing corners in preparation for the impending drama.

That dramatic experience is soon upon ears and emotions with the following Aurora, the track a tempestuous testing of the senses with rampaging rhythms from drummer Jef Ertle powerfully badgering the senses as the guitars squall imposingly around them as vocalist Pierre Duneau ravages syllables and air. With the bass of Herve Osmont similarly enslaving attention, the song evolves in gait and attack throughout, the demanding onslaught at the start drifting into an emotive and thickly atmospheric consumption driven by a more hardcore rapaciousness from Duneau. The twists never relent in their potent and aggressive immersion of the imagination, every second and note a new adventure to fear and equally devour. This variation and that of the vocals is a thrilling and increasingly addictive proposition in what is already a thoroughly intensive and demanding but excitingly rewarding entrance.

The following The Fall Of doG – Maelstrom Involution swoops in on a tide of voracious riffery and sonic enterprise around firm rhythms to instantly seduce the appetite. The again diverse and expressive vocals add to the already captivating and savage sounds throwing their creative and passionate weight against ears. It is a more immediate track than its predecessor but no less involving and steeled in startling textures, and with once more that hardcore causticity to the two toned vocal delivery, it simply ignites senses and passions. The turbulent antagonism and contagiously enterprising confrontation of the track makes way for the shadow grasping emotional beauty of Melancholia. The song floats in on a dark poetic breeze of melodies and a shimmering resonance which drifts from the classically structured and emotively sculpted canvas of the encounter. Two minutes in and the song erupts with a fire of passion and angst coated hunger which drives both music and vocals across the senses like a ferociously lapping tide. Not far short of ten minutes in length, the track is a tumultuous toxin raging and surging through the veins of itself and the thoughts of it’s intended.

The raw and assertively vociferous Touched With Pensiveness steps in next to inflame the passions, inventiveness and unpredictable rabidity to the evolving intent of the track exhilarating. The track did not impress as others first time around but as with the whole album given plenty of time and attention emerges as one intriguing and impossibly enthralling pleasure, the soaring sirenesque female vocal lures just some of the clawing rocks to get willingly snagged upon. Its rich glory though is small in comparison to the triumph of Wounded Knee, a blistering tsunami of crippling rhythms and bestial riffs led by the animalistic predation of the bass. If that was not enough to fire up the passions, a virulently seducing groove ensures the track catches every passing thought and emotion, taking them on a towering severe ride to which ardour is the willingly given price. It is hard to pick out any predominate specifics which make the songs so successful across the album, but certainly here the mix of vocals, the barbarous stride of the rhythms, and that ever belligerent bass sound stirs up a lustful attention.

The short evocative instrumental From Mud To Heaven leads into the acidically flavoured and sonically crusading La Nausée, its breathless emotional pressure and dramatically powered presence holding a strong essence of bands such as Tool and Porcupine Tree to its throbbing breast. The track is a transfixing furnace of emotion and oppressive strength which enthrals with its adventure and ideation, the same that can be said of the distinctly different yet similarly sculpted Draft Of The Second and Going Out With The Whore’s Saliva. Though the first never manages to reach the heights of those before, its grunge/Nirvana like impassioned fervour and coarse imaginative temptation still leaves a greedy appetite in place to be fed by its outstanding successor. Leaden stomping rhythms and scarring riffs steer the menacing intensity and vocal demands of the track whilst caustic flames of melodic abrasiveness and scathing vocals incite thoughts and emotions for another continually gripping peak within the album.

    Ashes Of Joy is concluded by stoner fleshed uncompromising intimidation of The Fall of doG – Erase My Eyes and the extensive explosive landscape of The Swan’s March, both tracks employing scything melodic swipes within primal turbulent atmospheres and permeating ambient causticity respectively. They are both immense provocations to match the exhausting and scintillating weighty persuasion of the album. Ashes Of Joy takes no prisoners but feeds them with the most scintillating and potently demanding emotional investigations. As said Memories Of A Dead Man make you work with their album but pays you back with one of the best encounters this year so far.

Ashes of Joy is out on April 14 via Send The Wood Music/Season Of Mist

http://www.facebook.com/memoriesofadeadman

9/10

RingMaster 13/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Daggers – It’s Not Jazz, Its Blues

daggers

Hardcore right now seems to be one of the most adventurously explored genres, certainly going by the evidence gathered and unleashed by Throatruiner Records this month alone, with It’s Not Jazz, Its Blues by Daggers arguably the biggest slab of unquestionable proof. The new album from the Belgian quartet is a brute of an unleashing, twelve tracks of distinct inventiveness from a band which has never been slow on pushing their limits anyway. Whereas their previous array of releases have been an indignant fusion of crust and hardcore, Daggers upon their new fury pushes the walls down between hardcore and extreme metal noise for a wholly unique brew of rapaciously imaginative rock ‘n’ roll to them and scene. It is a raw maelstrom of inciting imagination and voracious intensity which provokes and violates senses through to thoughts, a ferociously uncompromising adventure which though it needs time to state its persuasion, is an irresistibly compelling bruising.

Hailing from Liège, the foursome of Yannick Tönnes, Gregory Mertz, Thierry Tönnes, and Thomas Fagny has left a trail of satisfaction and exhausted emotions with a clutch of imposing releases, starting with their 2008 self-titled EP through to second album Euphoria in 2011. Across their five years Daggers has always been a provocation which has earned an appetite here if not a raging fire towards them, each release making a lingering and potent scar in the hardcore scene but It’s Not Jazz, It’s Blues is another matter entirely, in presence and impact. The album is a real journey through cavernous sceneries and ruthlessly stark atmospheres but constantly poised to thrust its instinctive punk breeding and metallic causticity down the throats of emotions.

Recorded live by Ben Phillips at the Lightship studio and mastered by Magnus Lindberg from Cult of Luna, the album opens on a reflective accordion croon as Apex slowly unveils its emotive invitation. It is a sinister if restrained enveloping which hints but gives no real clue to the impending and sudden explosion of vocal antagonism within an intensive and hefty weight of snarling riffs and cantankerous rhythms. The track instantly switches character at the expulsion, prowling purposely and intimidatingly across the senses as the guitars entwine a spiral of sonic acidity around things and the bass adds an extra rapacious menace courted  by an inventive texture of lead and backing vocals, again their attack controlled but intrusive. Now that its heart is fully open, the song offers a true portent of the album’s intent and qualities, though not quite the maze of imagination and experimentation also to come.

The song’s closing riff is a bridge into the following Woolgatherer, the coarse link soon replicated with deeper hunger by bass and a Artworkgrittier guitar tone. The track is an instant snarl of vicious rock ‘n’ roll employing numerous textures from rock and metal in its pungent incitement; an infectious repetitive groove aligned to a harsh roar of vocals which even in the briefness of the track steals keen attention and incites a greedy appetite for more which is soon offered by the similarly corrosive yet contagiously welcoming brawl of Blues. Also too short for these greed infused desires, the slice of combative causticity is an imposing wall of melancholic indictment and almost warring accusations lyrically and musically, which only intensifies the impressive start and persuasion of the album.

Both Asunder and Beacon push thoughts and passions into stronger enjoyment, the first a feisty confrontation of punk abrasion and metallic ferociousness which skilfully wrong foots not long into the roar with a delicious sonic detour employing seductive if acidic melodies and an irresistible twang to its breath before heading back into a riotous engagement with addiction sparking grooves and stomping attitudes, the bass wonderfully bestial once again. Its successor is a minute touching purge of the senses, uncluttered with twists and ideas taking it from its core intent but still infusing subtle hooks and lures which entice and linger within and after its offering. Again the swiftness of the assault is possibly thirty seconds or more too short but when so memorable and incisive you have to think that Daggers have got it right.

Wanderlust encircles the ears next, grizzled vocals taking their animosity out on air and senses whilst a sonic weave and anger ebbs and flows with inventive enterprise around the provocation. Arguably it is at this point where the album really starts to unveil its new rich pattern of experimentation and adventure, though earlier songs all bring a new character and potency from the band. In its forceful embrace, the song’s narrative takes the listener into sultry climates and melodic pastures, all shadowed and coated by unpredictable intrigue and evocative mystique, an emotive climate explored further by the instrumental Labyrinth, a piece which brings beauty under the sinister scrutiny of shadows and dark temptations.

The pair of Evermore and Dormant unveil the dangers, threat, and bewitchment of these new landscapes, the first an exhaustive charge which magnetically and urgently entices before slipping into a slower and equally incendiary intensive smothering of invasive rabidity which than alternates with a lasting contagion, and the second a stalking heavy legged predator which threatens and tempts the imagination. As all songs there is an agitation which will have its say and here with the most stringent pressure yet.

It’s Not Jazz It’s Blues saves its most thrilling experiments until the end starting with Sovereign, a track with a coarse and almost rustic glaze to its riffs and vocals as well as a hypnotic bordering droning repetition of sonic toxicity. There is a Killing Joke feel to the song as it feverishly works away tempting its victim, the unrelenting venom irrepressible even when the excellent twist of vocal delivery and haunting ambience leaves its compelling colour on the brilliant ingenuity of thought and sculpting. That brilliance continues into Cultist, its hive of waspish toxins an instant burrowing under the skin and across the psyche before relaxing into another persistent nagging which is impossible to resist or not find a new ardour for. Again a haunting, eerie atmosphere embraces the imagination whilst the track presents its venomous and mouthwatering bait with inventive bedlam and vicious veracity.

The release closes with Citadel, a dirty bleak stew of rare sonic abrasion and naked emotion which is punk in its purest form. The track impressively completes a blistering treat of a release. It’s Not Jazz, Its Blues is without doubt the best thing to strike from the minds and hands of Daggers, maybe not quite the classic you feel is alive inside them but certainly an inspirational new instigation for the genre and noise. It also suggest that if the band pursues the realms ventured within the final three or four songs on the album, that imitable pinnacle is nigh.

https://www.facebook.com/daggersband

http://daggersband.bandcamp.com/album/its-not-jazz-its-blues

9/10

RingMaster 31/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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I Am Duckeye – Double Riff Action

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The base morality of the world is always open to a new lesson and our favourite Australian reprobates I Am Duckeye has given it another welcome swipe to the balls with another infuriatingly addictive riff fisting through their new single. After the release of their exceptional album Husband last year; where riffs, rhythms and testicular examinations were wantonly encouraged, it was easy to wonder how the band could improve on its irrepressible delights. The Double Riff Action single provides an instant answer, its double A-sided suasion featuring the first temptation to the band’s upcoming full-length Commando Too, an anthemic bait of riotous proportions. Consisting of nine tracks running around fifty minutes and also featuring live cuts, remixes, and interview, the release is a chunky slab of Duckeye goodness bursting with honest depravity and juicy hilarity.

Formed in 2008 and consisting of brothers Sam (Sydonia, Afterwhite) and Classic Matt Haycroft (Chico Flash), bassist Jules (Dirty F, Afterwhite), and drummer Sean (Sydonia), I Am Duckeye has begun to solicit passions far beyond their already submissive state, especially hometown Melbourne. Their sounds are being voraciously grabbed in the US, France, UK and further afield with almost lecherous attention. It is early days but an appetite is ripe for their merging of comedy and the heaviest riff infused rock available. They provide an encounter which equally feeds of the ripeness of punk and metal, and helps create a rising force to give parents the shivers and grannies tingles.

Double Riff Action as mentioned comprises of an array of tracks led by the two A-sided singles. First up is Son Of A Riff, the lead single double-riff-action-coverfrom the upcoming album. From its first breath guitars are scraping at ears and senses with a scramble of riffs as the vocals introduce the premise of the narrative. With rumbling rhythms carrying more weight than a sumo wrestling team and the bass growling like a bear with crabs, the track erupts into a juggernaut of voracious endeavour and carnivorous intent. Lyrically as expected the band does not leave the funny bone unsatisfied either, the opening presentation….

This is a song, a song about cooking riffs
A cooking song!
Not a cooking song, a song about rolling spliffs
Smoking a bong!
No not smoking a bong Matthew, but writing yourself a hit
Hitting is wrong!
Yes hitting is wrong, unless your song is utter shit
Now!

…telling all.

The track carves up air and senses like a herd of kamikaze first time weightwatchers, though it also throws in a few respites and a My Sharona like hook which we will forgive them for. The song offers more than enough to spark a girly anticipation for Commando Too whilst the following track reminds just how immense the last album was.

The Riff the delivers an even greater cantankerous attitude and predation with its opening riffs, they snarling with bestial intent to provide exactly what it says on its label whilst unearthing a carnal enticement  for which mass mutilation seems a fair price. With sonic repetition and heavy duty oppressiveness an intimidating pleasure, the song is a glorious predator; almost a normal song at times, ok washing my mouth out with soap right now guys.

The rest of the single is made up of firstly acoustic live performances of Tuesday I Go the Blues Way, The Riff, and the should be world anthem Punching Dicks, all thoroughly enjoyable with pipes, violins and more in tow, but it is the verbal antics of the band before and during songs which steals the show more often than not.

The full live track of The Riff recorded at The Cherry Bar, Melbourne last year is a hungry gem whilst the remixes End Of The Riff and Punching McVomit, a squalling version of Punching Dicks hit the right spot before a hilarious interview with the band closes up shop.

Double Riff Action is another great intrusion by the band, its two lead songs sheer I Am Duckeye alchemy and the band as contagious and unstoppable as ever. The hunger for the new album is destined to be impatient and demanding after this…in fact hurry up with it you taunting teabaggers. ;)

http://iamduckeye.com

9/10

RingMaster 27/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Sunsmasher – Hell/Noise/Church

sunsmasher

A sonic suffocation and intrusive adventure which smothers the senses whilst igniting the imagination, Hell/Noise/Church the new EP from Scottish metallers Sunsmasher, is one of those exhaustive violations you can only welcome hungrily.  The three track release is not a comfortable listen but certainly a compelling ravaging to which addiction is an easy option. A merger of doom, crust, sludge, noise and plenty more, the Glasgow trio’s sound takes no prisoners and shows no mercy ensuring that their new EP is an inescapable predator, one fuelled by a thrillingly corruptive toxicity.

The Glasgow quartet was formed in 2010 with the intent to create ‘claustrophobic, intense, and violent music’ with essences bred in the member’s background in the Scottish grind, crust, and hardcore scenes. Debut release, the Mammothian/Loud/Cult demo a year later drew good attention and helped the band to a potent following which was accelerated as Sunsmasher exhausted stages alongside bands such as Conan, Dragged Into Sunlight, Monarch, and Wormrot. The last couple of years saw a few line-up changes in the band and a stronger crust and noise inspired sound emerging through their original doom seeded invention, the result as evidenced by Hell/Noise/Church, a not exactly unique but certainly a hellacious proposition individual to the band. Mastered by James Plotkin (Khanate/O.L.D.) and recorded with Kevin Hare (Black Sun), the new release easily pushes Sunsmasher into a greater spotlight, one deserving to reward as much as the band thrills.

Axe To Grind emerges from an increasingly intensifying and swirling sonic incitement, though the emergence is more a vicious launch at Sunsmasher - Hell-Noise-Church - coverthe ears with guitars and drums carving chunks from the senses and synapses whilst vocals squall with a razor sharp edge and malicious savagery. It is a brutal abrasion of hardcore and noise voracity which within seconds has ears ringing and emotions cowering. The band soon teaches though that they are unafraid to experiment and wrong foot as the track suddenly stops and drops into the thick embrace of an oppressive sludge prowl. Bass and drums find a restraint to their onslaught, though not their bestial intimidation, whilst the guitars merge a melodically hinting sonic tempting with a deeper guttural growl. It is a riveting enticement which consumes and invigorates simultaneously; a droning bait veining it all to captivate infectiously as a stalking low slung groove seduces. With vocal and atmospheric torments searing the air, the track is hypnotic slavery which grows stronger and more compelling over time.

The following Redeemer is just as rapacious but uses a ‘lighter’ sonic toxin to master senses and passions early on. There is a discordant lilt to the guitar call which immediately adds a tempting edge to the opening crawl whilst the lumbering rhythms and heavy throat of the bass provide a formidable canvas for the evolving stature and incitement to ravage. The best track of the three, the song worms its way into the psyche for a long term and intensely lingering chastisement.

Final song Perdition lets a great bass line draw in the imagination first, guitars soon joining it’s tempting with magnetic riffery. The initial premise of the song is almost gentle in comparison to that of the previous tracks, a caustic yet embracing abrading. It is not for long though as the weighty intensity of the track smothers all to enclose and consume the senses. Confirming the invention and exploratory heart of the band, the new thick doom clad swamp of sound is speared by a heavy swaggering groove right out of the Pantera songbook before merging all essences into a choking and enlivening strangling. As all the songs, it twists and turns with enterprise and malevolence, employing all the flavours announced at the start of the review into a mouthwatering and contagious destruction.

Obviously Sunsmasher and Hell/Noise/Church are not going to be for everyone but for noise corruption and feral sonic sculpting within a sludge/doom landscape it is hard to recommend much better.

https://www.facebook.com/sunsmashermlc

http://sunsmasher.bandcamp.com/album/hell-noise-church

9/10

RingMaster 26/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Ringworm – Hammer Of The Witch

 

pic scott schumacher

pic scott schumacher

    I think it is safe to say that the ferocity and sonic viciousness of metallic hardcore protagonists Ringworm has not abated or diminished over their twenty plus years brawling with the senses. The indisputable evidence comes with new album Hammer Of The Witch, a towering and vindictive slab of destructive raging and antagonistic creativity. Packed to the brim with thirteen vitriol spewing tracks that just as venomously unleash a range of uncompromising riffs and addictive grooves, the album is a commanding onslaught of spite and animosity, simply unadulterated hardcore excellence.

     Formed in 1991, it is fair to say that Ringworm has left an indelible mark with their fusion of metal and hardcore, debut album The Promise in 1993 setting the Cleveland band as a sizeable proposition before a hiatus of sorts was ended by the unleashing of the critically acclaimed Birth Is Pain on Victory Records in 2001. Subsequent albums like Justice Replaced By Revenge four years later and the following The Venomous Grand Design of 2007 reinforced and strengthened their grip on passions and scene. Scars three years ago continued the stretching of the band’s creativity and power, the same pleasing accusation you can throw at Hammer Of The Witch, the band’s debut on Relapse Records. Recorded with Ben Schigel (Chimaira, Walls of Jericho) producing, the album is a merciless tempest chewing up and spitting out everything from ears to emotions.

     Opener Dawn of Decay emerges from a cinematic intimidation, a sense of epic danger spawning a weave of carnivorous 12 Jacket (3mm Spine) [GDOB-30H3-007}basslines, rapacious riffing, and combative rhythms, all honed into a prowling entity which sizes up its victim before exploding into  fire of musical causticity and vocal threat, the tones of frontman Human Furnace as always living up to his moniker. The song stalks the senses from start to finish, the guitars of Matt Sorg and John Comprix abrasively ravishing air and ears whilst drummer Danny Zink gives them a further mighty battering.

  The excellent start is potently backed up by the corrosive wrath of Bleed and the nastily venomous Leave Your Skin at the Door, both individual tirades of inventive riffery and precisely sculpted contagious grooves courted by the deliciously dark hearted tones spawned from the bass of Ed Stephens, his opening of the second of these songs a mouthwatering provocation. Each track is also marked by keen sonic endeavour from the guitars; theirs an acidic play within the riot which even in brief colours raises the potency of the anger.

    The toxic Exit Life rails against ears next, its narrative and approach singular in venom and hatred but fully magnetic, before Psychic Vampire belts and engages the senses with rhythmic violence and a deceptively seductive groove which winds around and recruits the passions. The track is a maelstrom of vehemence, lyrically and sonically, and rich infectiousness. It is an intrusive antagonist that is hard to have enough of, the same that can also be said of King of Blood, another unbridled onslaught which savages and ignites the emotions with dramatic grooves, temper driven riffs, and bitter rhythms. The track in many ways is similar to its predecessor, the one trait you could lay against the album with a regularly familiarity across some songs, though it does not reduce the pleasure and power of the release one iota.

    Through tracks like the torrentially consumptive I Recommend Amputation and the predatory We’ll Always Have the End as well as the raging causticity of One Of Us Is Going to Have to Die…, band and album abrases and sears with compelling efficiency and enterprise even if each lacks some of the spark of previous songs, though amongst them the title track takes its victims on a hellacious ride of physical and mental ferocity which simply ignites the passions, it’s almost demonic poisons irresistibly and dramatically enthralling.

     The final trio of tracks starting with the flesh and synapse scorching Vicious Circle of Life lift the album back to its opening plateau, the fearsome slice of tempestuous hostility scarred with great guitar acid soon thrown under the shadow of the brilliant Die Like a Pig. The bass of Stephens digs deep for its strongest guttural growl whilst HF soaks every syllable and rage spewing sound with bile spawned malevolence and passion to match the creative rabidity of its partners of dispute.

     The album closes with slab of prime hardcore/punk jaundice in the riveting shape of Height of Revelation. The uncivil and rigorously inciting melee of sonic and rhythmic rancor is a thunderous and thoroughly incendiary last triumph for passions and album. Hammer of the Witch is a breath stealing, bone splintering furnace of acrimony and virulent contagion. It is masterful and thrilling assault on the ear which if not the pinnacle of Ringworm’s career is certainly right up there. Hardcore has never sounded better in the hands of the ‘veterans’, and they show no signs of losing their devastating anger and invention either…Happy Days!

http://www.ringworm13.net/

9/10

RingMaster 19/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Havenside – Living Our Darkest Days

band

    Formed in 2006, US band Havenside has become an invigorating excitement for ears but never quite made that big step into the strongest spotlight. Forging a ferocious mix of metal and hardcore, the band certainly across their previous three albums has sculpted persistently pleasing results from within their continuing rich potential but without lighting the major fires they suggest they are capable of. Their fourth album Living Our Darkest Days is in also a little guilty of not truly exploiting the promise and undeniable quality of the band but it certainly makes a strong fist of its attempt. The twelve track slab of sonic savagery and antagonistic vitality seizes ears and imagination from its first ravenous minute never relinquishing its grip until the final seconds. There are a few ‘ailments’ you can lay against the otherwise impressive encounter but the Sacramento has still crafted their finest moment yet to worry those higher echelons of recognition.

    Formed in 2006 by vocalist Brandon Wells, Havenside despite going through a few line-up changes has earned a fine reputation LODD_HighRes_Coverfor their ferocious sound and stage presence, not forgetting their well-received albums. Released via Innerstrength Records, Living Our Darkest Days is the Californian quintet’s fourth full-length fury, an intensive bruising to fire up appetites and emotions. The album takes little time to ravage ears as opener Indisputable from a distant squall launches a violent tirade upon the senses; riffs and rhythms aligned to lethally rapacious vocal spite producing an immediate savagery. The rigid antagonistic riffery of Casey Mann and Nik Santos churns up and chews on synapses with their heavily laden vitriol whilst the bass of Jordon Morch snarls with bestial rage alongside. It is a towering mix under the drive of the crippling rhythms of drummer Jaramia Bond, a thrust given a rabid head by the raw tones of Wells. Grooves threaten to break free from the tempest at times, teasing with their presence but never given full rein by the weight of the song. It is an intriguing and satisfying start which suggests more than it delivers but all the same grabs attention and enjoyment.

   Featuring Rob McCarthy (ex-Lionheart), The Broken storms in next, a winding groove given licence to twist around the imagination as the rhythms punch a frame around their lure. With Wells unleashing a malicious combativeness, the track plunders the senses with invention and voraciousness like an agitated leviathan. It is a spiteful yet magnetic provocateur raising the stakes for the passions to embrace. Its tempestuous qualities and strength is soon matched by the following Despised and then left behind by the excellent Things Will Never Change. The first of the two, like its predecessor, casts grooves and hooks within an intense cyclone of aggression and though the song does not quite have the bait to spark the same depth of reactions as the first pair, it has plenty to keep a hunger brewing. By this point a surface similarity coats the songs which does not deter or disappoint but does suggest some of the reason that the album does not explode in the passions as strongly as it should. The second of these two tracks is the exception and shows what is possible. Grazing and brawling with the ears from its first breath, the song instantly has something about it which is different and bold, drawing in the imagination ready for the excellent twist of clean backing vocals. Flinging sinews and malevolent attitude lyrically and musically around, the track has a swagger and swerving flow to its body which ripples and enthrals, the track moving away from the more metalcore premise of other tracks. It is a glorious incitement and one easy to hope the band explore further.

    Both the intimidating Unite & Conquer and the almost danceable, almost, Standing Your Ground Pt. 2 prey on the listener next, both accomplished and severe examinations which pale against the previous song but stand tall alone, before the first single from the album stomps forward. Stronger Everyday is a fiery and formidable encounter which lurches over and traps attention with its keen and resourceful animosity, providing another worthwhile wounding for the senses.

     The outstanding pair of King By Destruction and Supplicator soon put the last song in a shadow with their adventure and intensity. The first with a pack like stalking from its rhythms and riffs, nags and provokes with purposeful intent but it is the small melodically bred sonic veining and assisting clean vocals which lift the track from the rest, that and the increasing dramatic imagination and diversity which ignites the latter part of the song. Its successor is a swift explosion of bad blood, an excellent unpredictable tirade focusing on the more hardcore heart of the band. Like the last, it further suggests the expansive elements of the songwriting and sound within Havenside, something still not allowed enough freedom for us.

    The final trio of songs ensure the release ends on a strong footing if slightly underwhelming compared to previous songs. Composure rants and riles against the listener musically and lyrical in fine style with flashes of intrigue lighting up its war whilst Curse, which sees a guest appearance from Howie Favichia of Lifeforms, from a fascinating melodic intro crafts a brutality which scavenges emotions. Again there are great glimpses of emprise to the engagement though never anything truly pushed to its limits. Final song Refuse To Sink brings Living Our Darkest Days to an uncompromising and pleasing end if again without realising or exploring the full promise of its invention.

    The track sums up the album, a song which impresses and crafts some strikingly imaginative moments but seems afraid to unleash the creative beast inside. Living Our Darkest Days is a thoroughly engaging proposition all the same, Havenside at its best but still with some potential to unleash…that something to eagerly wait for.

https://www.facebook.com/havensideofficial

http://innerstrengthrecords.bandcamp.com/music

8/10

RingMaster 12/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Monsterworks – Universe

 

Universe Band

   It feels like just a mere breath ago that New Zealand metallers Monsterworks released the outstanding Earth, an album which took the listener on an enthralling journey through time and a continually expanding sound, in flavour and textures. Now the London, UK based quartet push the adventure and theme found on the last release to further absorbing depths with Universe, a seven track epic which assaults, seduces, and envelops the imagination.   

  Whereas previous album Earth took on the concept of our planet and its flight from birth to death, Monsterworks takes the next epic step and explores the lifecycle of the Universe in their new incitement. Vocalist/guitarist Jon gave a richer explanation about the release recently, “This is our follow up to Monsterworks :: Earth from last year.  We wanted to top ourselves conceptually, so how to surpass an album about the life cycle of Earth from birth to death?  It could only be an album about the life cycle of the Universe from birth to death.  At least it started out that way with lyrics exploring big bang to heat death, but it gets a little philosophical along the way considering the path mankind might take in its evolution.  It is a bloody long time until the last black hole evaporates.”  Like its predecessor the album provides a thick and complex presence and with each trip unveils more levels and corners to immerse within. Equally like Earth, the new release reaps the essences of a wealth of metal and heavy rock styles to create a tapestry of unpredictability and intrigue around a similarly creative narrative. Whether Universe rivals Earth’s triumph can be debated but as a sister companion in an epic adventure it leaves the imagination alive and passions engaged.

    The Eat Lead and Die released album opens up the journey with its title track, its emergence from a distant realm gentle and Universe Starchildinviting as the guitars unwind sonic tendrils and beats provide a forming heart for the piece. The vocals also come in a mellow and harmonic breeze which washes over and wraps around the ears until an explosion of passionate energy and rhythmic penetration brings everything into intensive focus. The vocals subsequently veer with almost wild abandon from clean to a Rob Halford like wail and then into a bestial predation, twisting and evolving from there on in like the music around them. As mentioned each song reveals more of its depths as numerous encounters are embraced, the first track seemingly having patience in its declaration to offer a fresh aspect to every immersion into its impressive flight. With the wealth of styles employed in its maze of invention and sound, song and album fluctuates in success depending on personal tastes, but never relinquishes the strength and potency of its initial temptation across the vast landscape.

    The following Grandiose is a tempestuous storm from its first seconds, guitars and rhythms a bruising enticement driven by equally rapacious vocals. As the first, it also flares up and twists with demonic efficiency to leave expectations a wasted exercise and imagination enflamed. The progressive core of the track provides a magnetic canvas but it is the almost carnivorous fire and heat of the cosmic hues which thrill as they lure the emotions on a provocative and satisfying plunge into celestial turbulence, even if the fade-out at the end is less pleasing though it does help suggest the unlimited expanse of the scenery.

     The touch of man brings a more intimate aspect to Voyager, its gorgeous entrance with beauty clad guitar and vocal harmonies mesmeric in its tempting. The imaginative hooks and twists of guitar invention add to the mystery and exploratory intent of the song as it soars through peaceful and more intensive realms. It is a scintillating ride bringing the album to a towering pinnacle which is never surpassed though The Bridge gives it a formidable go with its raw and fiery venture into the unknown. With a blackened air to its voracious malevolence, the track threatens and entices as it treads into new spatial waters. At times it is an uncomfortable but always a thoroughly riveting investigation which is as thrilling as it is intimidating.

     The collision of thrash and heavy metal at the first bluster of Extropy makes an instantly contagious ride, a rhythmic recruitment irresistible as guitars and bass carve a sinew driven torrent of enterprise and intensive endeavour. It is a song which at first pleased without much more, but given the time and companionship it turns into another major highlight which simply exhausts and scintillates. Its successor Heat Death is similar in that it too was not as instant in its persuasion compared to the earlier tracks but equally worked away to convince and excite, though not to the same potency and depth as the previous song. At ten minutes it is a slightly demanding coaxing but with elegant keys and melodic flames which lick at the senses with tenderness and hope reaped caresses, the song seizes keen attention and emotional companionship which never wavers especially as it expels acidic sonic scythes across a caustic energy in its latter half.

   The excellent Outside Time brings the album to a mighty close, its multi-flavoured ever turning body of sound and adventure pure captivation. With a skilled manipulation of thoughts and emotions, it is a towering incitement concluding another outstanding exploit from Monsterworks. Though personally the album misses igniting the depth of passion as Earth achieved, Universe is undeniably a piece of sonic alchemy which leaves the listener involved and excited on numerous levels; another journey from Monsterworks impossible to enthuse loudly over.

http://www.supermetal.net

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Animus – Fall of the Elite

Animus Online Promo Shot

    If you understandably missed the limited regional release of the Fall of the Elite EP last year, Scottish metallers Animus have provided another chance to immerse in its tempest with its deserved nationwide unleashing. Consisting of four savagely aggressive and rivetingly varied slabs of sonic provocation, the band’s introduction is a mouthwatering onslaught providing a well of satisfaction as deep as the promise also rampaging through its sinews. Its sound whips up an antagonistic fury from a brew of progressive death metal and djent with technical and groove metal, creating a predation which is equally recognisable and innovative. Fall of the Elite certainly suggests this is a band still evolving its presence but one with major expulsions ahead you easily feel.

     Hailing from Dundee, Animus was formed in 2010 by drummer Poul Thomassen and guitarist Sam Gilmour. It was not long before the pair was joined by second guitarist Graham Brown and Gavin Holloway on bass. The first couple of years saw the band playing around Scotland drawing strong support and responses but it was with the addition of vocalist Aaron Fawns in 2012 that it could be said a spark ignited within the band, the quintet finding that something bringing everything into focus and vital explosiveness. A further rampage of shows ensued, including sharing stages with the likes of Bleed From Within, To Kill Achilles, Here Lies A Warning, Heights, Silent Screams, Chronographs, Hero In Error, Our People Versus Yours, and I Divide, all only increasing the stature and reputation of the band. The final weeks of 2012 saw Animus enter the studio to sculpt their debut Fall Of The Elite, influences from the likes of After The Burial, Suicide Silence, Bring Me The Horizon, Whitechapel, and Tesseract spicing up their own distinct toxicity. After a well-received first unveiling, the EP is now poised to work on the rest of the UK with its ravenous and creative intensity.

    Drawing a single breath whilst a groan brews in the background, opener Damnation announces its presence with an intriguingAnimus - Front Cover air accentuated by sirens and an apocalyptic ambience. With the scene set, the track emerges from the anarchy with forcibly twisting grooves and percussive provocation speared by vicious rhythms skirted by predatory riffing. The vocals of Fawns snarl and growl with bile soaked animosity, his direct intent sharing enough variety to engage whilst musically the band lashes and entices the senses with a masterful and bold invention. The song is not the most malevolent and violent proposition but holds an intimidation and intensity which leaves knees buckled and ears scarred as its imagination captures that of its recipient with ease and enterprise.

   The following DB8666 follows suit but instantly uncages a lethal groove and commanding swagger which leaves its predecessor in the shade. The swinging contagion of the track is clad in a threatening musculature upon a djent inspired spine whilst it’s flailing sonic arms and acrid melodic adventure provides the most compelling hues to potently ignite the imagination. Every move and twist of the song is pure infectious bait, at times almost too involved in itself but never relinquishing the tightest entrapment of thoughts and emotions. As all the tracks upon the EP, there is plenty to discover with each subsequent encounter, certain underlying textures and touches unveiled within the increasingly persuasive tempestuous engagement after numerous excursions.

     The following Home(less) is a bestial display of maliciousness but one aligned to the most creative progressive enticement yet. The guitars sculpt simultaneously uncompromising and seductive endeavours whilst bass and drums carve out bruising lures which also only beckon and threaten. Once again the song is a cascade of innovative manipulations which flirt with indulgence and chaos but only to tease and taunt within its skilled and deliberately devious craft. That dramatic and alluring enterprise is pushed further with the closing title track, its bewitching opening progressive design of melody caressing keys wrapping the ears in a transfixing coaxing before being joined by staccato riffs and splintering rhythms within a brawling cast of sonic causticity. Carnivorous in its stalking and guitar endeavour whilst magnetic in its continually evolving melody induced progressive searing of the air, the track is a smouldering rampancy which seizes an instant lingering submission for its ruinous nature and assault yet slowly burns an even greater seduction in the passions over time and multiple unions.

   The outstanding climax brings a similarly impressive release to a close leaving anticipation and appetite for Animus a greedy hunger. Certainly the release shows that the band is yet to find its truly unique presence but that is only a matter of time with, on the evidence of Fall of the Elite, stronger dramatic triumphs destined to follow. This is an immense exciting start and base for their horizons and the open doorway to eager recognition countrywide.

www.facebook.com/AnimusUK

9/10

RingMaster 03/03/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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