Memories Of A Dead Man – Ashes Of Joy

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There is always something appetising about releases which make you work and really listen to their intensive offering before truly reaping the rewards their exploits offer. Ashes Of Joy the new album from French metallers Memories Of A Dead Man is one such impressive encounter. An exhausting venture into thick emotive climates and exhaustive imposing soundscapes, the twelve track journey challenges and intrudes upon senses and imagination respectively for a continually emerging and enriching experience. Certainly a release which needs extensive time to devour fully, though it makes a more than compelling first impression, Ashes Of Joy is a masterful confrontation which gets better and better across its length and to even greater effect over each traverse of its riveting body.

Formed in 2006, Memories Of A Dead Man has evolved their sound over time into a thoroughly absorbing and enveloping persuasion, their albums Beyond the Legend and V.I.T.R.I.O.L. drawing strong and acclaimed responses, but with Ashes of Joy the band has reached a new height in songwriting maturity, provocative presence, and intensive imagination. The melancholic breath which envelops from within the dark shadows and imposing structures of the songs borders on suffocation at times but only in their soaking of every twist and shift of the narratives, musically and lyrically, within the demanding and inciting provocation which in turn intensifies the oppressive intensity and emotive atmospheres brought to bear. Crafted by a new line-up which has been in place from 2012, Ashes Of Joy is an exacting and simultaneously compelling adventure, not one for the faint hearted but certainly one for all those who like to sink their teeth into an incendiary slab of extreme invention and passion.

The opening Prélude (Solemn Requiem) immediately encases ears in a fiery sonic embrace, the guitars of Ben Debrun and Tony Garcia memoriesofadeadman_covercasting a scorching initial smoulder of melodic enticement which calls on the imagination with its evocative lure straight away. Heavier stalking riffs follow thumping beats in joining the molten coaxing as the track increases its intensity and stature; all the time the irresistible grizzled tones of the bass and bear like vocals intimidating and taking thoughts into the  darkest menacing corners in preparation for the impending drama.

That dramatic experience is soon upon ears and emotions with the following Aurora, the track a tempestuous testing of the senses with rampaging rhythms from drummer Jef Ertle powerfully badgering the senses as the guitars squall imposingly around them as vocalist Pierre Duneau ravages syllables and air. With the bass of Herve Osmont similarly enslaving attention, the song evolves in gait and attack throughout, the demanding onslaught at the start drifting into an emotive and thickly atmospheric consumption driven by a more hardcore rapaciousness from Duneau. The twists never relent in their potent and aggressive immersion of the imagination, every second and note a new adventure to fear and equally devour. This variation and that of the vocals is a thrilling and increasingly addictive proposition in what is already a thoroughly intensive and demanding but excitingly rewarding entrance.

The following The Fall Of doG – Maelstrom Involution swoops in on a tide of voracious riffery and sonic enterprise around firm rhythms to instantly seduce the appetite. The again diverse and expressive vocals add to the already captivating and savage sounds throwing their creative and passionate weight against ears. It is a more immediate track than its predecessor but no less involving and steeled in startling textures, and with once more that hardcore causticity to the two toned vocal delivery, it simply ignites senses and passions. The turbulent antagonism and contagiously enterprising confrontation of the track makes way for the shadow grasping emotional beauty of Melancholia. The song floats in on a dark poetic breeze of melodies and a shimmering resonance which drifts from the classically structured and emotively sculpted canvas of the encounter. Two minutes in and the song erupts with a fire of passion and angst coated hunger which drives both music and vocals across the senses like a ferociously lapping tide. Not far short of ten minutes in length, the track is a tumultuous toxin raging and surging through the veins of itself and the thoughts of it’s intended.

The raw and assertively vociferous Touched With Pensiveness steps in next to inflame the passions, inventiveness and unpredictable rabidity to the evolving intent of the track exhilarating. The track did not impress as others first time around but as with the whole album given plenty of time and attention emerges as one intriguing and impossibly enthralling pleasure, the soaring sirenesque female vocal lures just some of the clawing rocks to get willingly snagged upon. Its rich glory though is small in comparison to the triumph of Wounded Knee, a blistering tsunami of crippling rhythms and bestial riffs led by the animalistic predation of the bass. If that was not enough to fire up the passions, a virulently seducing groove ensures the track catches every passing thought and emotion, taking them on a towering severe ride to which ardour is the willingly given price. It is hard to pick out any predominate specifics which make the songs so successful across the album, but certainly here the mix of vocals, the barbarous stride of the rhythms, and that ever belligerent bass sound stirs up a lustful attention.

The short evocative instrumental From Mud To Heaven leads into the acidically flavoured and sonically crusading La Nausée, its breathless emotional pressure and dramatically powered presence holding a strong essence of bands such as Tool and Porcupine Tree to its throbbing breast. The track is a transfixing furnace of emotion and oppressive strength which enthrals with its adventure and ideation, the same that can be said of the distinctly different yet similarly sculpted Draft Of The Second and Going Out With The Whore’s Saliva. Though the first never manages to reach the heights of those before, its grunge/Nirvana like impassioned fervour and coarse imaginative temptation still leaves a greedy appetite in place to be fed by its outstanding successor. Leaden stomping rhythms and scarring riffs steer the menacing intensity and vocal demands of the track whilst caustic flames of melodic abrasiveness and scathing vocals incite thoughts and emotions for another continually gripping peak within the album.

    Ashes Of Joy is concluded by stoner fleshed uncompromising intimidation of The Fall of doG – Erase My Eyes and the extensive explosive landscape of The Swan’s March, both tracks employing scything melodic swipes within primal turbulent atmospheres and permeating ambient causticity respectively. They are both immense provocations to match the exhausting and scintillating weighty persuasion of the album. Ashes Of Joy takes no prisoners but feeds them with the most scintillating and potently demanding emotional investigations. As said Memories Of A Dead Man make you work with their album but pays you back with one of the best encounters this year so far.

Ashes of Joy is out on April 14 via Send The Wood Music/Season Of Mist

http://www.facebook.com/memoriesofadeadman

9/10

RingMaster 13/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Seizing time and opportunities: an interview with Enfeeble

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German metallers Enfeeble might still be a bit of a secret to the wider metal world but with new album Encapsulate This Moment they have made a potent statement which should grip a stronger attention. It is an album which arguably does not quite fulfil the open potential of the band and their blend of melodic and heavy metal with metalcore predaciousness, but certainly makes a potent impact and in hindsight a lingering lure which brings you back to its compelling confrontation time and time again. Wanting to find out more about the band we had the pleasure to ask guitarist Pascal (Baal) Stafflage and the band about the origins of Enfeeble, their new album, life for a metal band in their hometown, and much more…

Hi and many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Firstly can you tell us how the band and its members came together?

It was a few years ago in 2005…Luke was the singer of the school band and I was looking for a singer and guitarist for a new band. I asked Luke if he wants to start a band with me and he was excited directly. A drummer and bassist were found quickly and so we started as a small punk rock band. In the coming years we’ve had many changes on bass and drums. Since the beginning of 2013 we are the current cast.

Did you have any deliberate idea or direction for Enfeeble from the start?

Absolutely no…We started as a punk rock band (like Sum 41, Blink 182…) in 2005 and somehow we grew old and became some sort of metalheads with a little bit of punk rock influence. With the fast and harder music, we feel more comfortable.

You come from the Lingen in Germany. What is it like in the town and surrounding areas for a band trying to emerge?

Really bad to be honest…This whole area has a couple of metalheads but unfortunately most of them retain to a special kind of genre and it´s not our genre. Maybe it’s the country life here. We have no idea what it is. Therefore, we travel a lot around the country.

coverYou have just released your second album Encapsulate This Moment; how do you see the evolution of your sound to it from your debut full-length Too Ugly to Show it!?

We never really see the evolution ´cause we are right now in this process of evolving. But when you compare Too Ugly To Show It and Encapsulate This Moment you can hear that we have become more “metal” and try to improve our skills at our instruments all the time.

Did you approach the new release any differently to the previous album, whether through simply the experience of previously recording something or to achieve something specific?

We have changed the bass player, drummer, studio and attitude. So you can see…almost everything. The result is Encapsulate This Moment…A significant improvement.

With its strong blend of aggression and grooved endeavour, did you find yourself developing a broader bravery in your songwriting for the new album than ever before?

Of course… Almost every month we find new bands and therefore new influences. The songwriting is affected by this as well. And we try to sound unique as every other band to.

What were the biggest inspirations for the album musically and lyrically?

Musically it´s some bands like Killswitch Engage, Protest The Hero, Dream Theater or Threat Signal.

The lyrics were also created by experiences of everyday life.

How does the songwriting process work within Enfeeble?enfeeble3

We got some different ways. Either we play all together and discuss every part and the arrangement. Or Baal writes a song and we refine just a few parts or Baal and Luke sit together on a weekend locked up from the world only surviving with pizza, beer and energy drinks.

Did you find the tracks developing new characters during the studio process or stayed pretty much as intended going into the situation?

We worked together with Jörg from Soundlodge studios and he gave us some of his advice and we rewrote some parts. It was a very inspiring and enjoyable time with Jörg. We learned a lot and had good experiences.

The album has an invigorating rawness to its breath; did you do anything in particular to encourage this aspect?

Luke has a raw natural voice. No fake – All original. Maybe if he starts with smoking and whisky drinking, he becomes the new Lemmy. Just a little big joke :-) Honestly we would not change much on the vocals. Only improve, not change.

Was anything learnt during recording Encapsulate This Moment which surprised you and will be taken into your next release?

Less is more! Some parts, where we have had some double bass and blastbeats are now a standard rock beats. But in the mix it sounds a lot heavier. That was an important experience for us.

For us it is the title track to the album which gives us thrilling chills, is there any moment or essence of the album which gives you extra satisfaction?

Maybe it´s A Million Voices, because the song is really complex in itself and it’s always fun to play it. But also As We Were Like Shadows ´cause it has a personal story and Luke has sung it so fucking beautifully that Baal was crying in the studio. (Beautiful bastard).

You have a strong reputation for your live performances, a different proposition to the studio of course but do you think you captured that same intensity and honest raw quality on the album also this time around?

We guess not. We are always a bit nervous on stage but we believe that we also therefore play with so much energy.

Talking of shows how is 2014 planning out so far for the band ahead?

We already have some confirmed dates. However, we continue to search for new performances… Also internationally. Current dates are always on our website http://www.enfeeble.de

Back to Encapsulate This Moment; tell us about the striking artwork for the album.

We had the luck, to work together with Björn Goosses of Killustration. We had an artwork in our minds but his suggestion (what he thought when he thinks of Encapsulate This Moment) was just perfect for us.

enfeeble 2What comes next for Enfeeble other than shows?

We are working on new songs for the third album. We want to hit the studio in the beginning of 2015. Maybe by then we have found a label who wants to work with us. That would be a dream come true.

Thanks once again for chatting with us, any last thoughts or words you would like to finish with?

Encapsulate all your moments! And thanks a lot for the interview.

https://www.facebook.com/EnfeebleOfficial

Read the review of Encapsulate This Moment @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/07/enfeeble-encapsulate-this-moment/

Pete Ringmaster

The Ringmaster Review 27/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Forever Still – Breaking Free EP

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  Providing the evidence as to why there is a real buzz brewing around Danish melodic metal band Forever Still, the Breaking Free EP makes a charming captivation with beauty as prevalent as muscles. Merging gothic and melodic metal to simplify their sound, into something not quite unique but attractively distinct to the Copenhagen quartet, Forever Still is an emerging proposition to set the imagination creating and emotions basking.

     The band came about in 2009 from the linking up of Mikkel Haastrup (bass, guitar, keys) with vocalist Maja Schønning who he came across during a gig with her former band. Working on songs and recordings, the pair was joined by drummer Chad T. Charlton two years later, his ferocious skills bringing a new aspect to their sound. Studio work also saw Anders Bo (Medina, Celina Ree) adding his guitars craft before Carsten Christensen joined more recently to complete the band’s line-up. Last year saw Forever Still playing Denmark’s Nordic Noise Festival as well as being selected as one of the top 5 bands to play Germany’s biggest dark festival, the M’era Luna Festiva as well as the creation of their debut EP with legendary producer Flemming Rasmussen. Mastered by Troy Glessner (Underoath, Kitie), Breaking Free provides four tracks with the potential to send Forever Still to the forefront of recognition and attention.

     As soon as The Key opens up its sinew clad melodic arms you sense something intriguing is pending, a feeling soon confirmedCover Art Breaking Free as the first electro caress is joined by lively rhythms and feisty riffs. It is the stepping forward of Schønning where things really come together, her seductive yet formidable voice cupping the ears as bass and drums court and temper her elegant narrative. It is an enthralling encounter which only increases its lure and weight the further the band ventures into its depths. A simple yet potent hook lights the way as emotive textures and provocative harmonies expand their persuasions, the song becoming increasingly catchy yet dramatically emotive before taking its leave upon an unexpected and thrilling raw roar from Schønning.

  The excellent start is instantly backed up by The Last Day, another magnetic electronic beckoning calling in an immediate appetite. Once again riffs and rhythms craft a frame which encloses invitingly around the ears whilst offering quiet intimidation. Within its hold colour rich sonic hues and flaming melodies paint a tender, drama driven premise, Schønning impressing yet again to suggest she is one of the rising presences of female fronted and melodic metal. The merging of tones and emotions in to her delivery is bewitching especially when being skirted by a snarling electronic presence within the song. It is the mixing of elegance and predation, vocally and musically though which completes the capture of the passions, that ability bringing a living breath to each unpredictable, but wholly enthralling track.

   Towards The Edge comes into view on a weave of muscular endeavour and almost voracious intent before soaring on the combination of Schønning and gentle keys into air and imagination. Entwining and seamlessly moving between the light and dark of the scenery sculpted by the band, the track is a glorious adventure adding another layer of enterprise and magnificence to the sound and presence of the band.

   Completed by a live acoustic version of The Last Day, the Breaking Free EP might just be three individual songs but potently declares Forever Still as the real deal and a band destined to rich and influential horizons. They have something different to the rest of the like flavoured bands, a hunter of an adventurous essence which can only broaden and deepen ahead.

http://foreverstill.dk/

http://foreverstill.bandcamp.com/album/breaking-free

9/10

RingMaster 12/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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ZOLTAR SPEAKS bring ‘Save As I Save’, to the 14th April‏

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 STUNNING DEBUT ZOLTAR SPEAKS ALBUM AND TOURING CONFIRMED…
Rising female-fronted Brit metallers ‘Zoltar Speaks’ are geared for a reboot of their explosive debut album ‘Save As I Save’ on Monday 14th April, to coincide with widespread UK touring.
Pulling from everyone from the likes of Avenged Sevenfold and Iron Maiden to Coheed and Cambria, Zoltar Speaks are here to shake your world with a sound that merges both fiery and majestic vocals with hearty riffs and elephantine choruses.
Formed in 2009 and bursting out of the rural plains of Somerset, Zoltar Speaks are fronted by enigmatic vocalist Louise Body, with Ben Dean hammering at the drums, Simon Roocroft providing the backbone on bass, and Daniel Pratt and Jason Coles shredding it up on the guitars. The unstoppable five-piece have built up an army of dedicated followers fuelled by extensive touring throughout Southern England and Wales where they notched up supports with Idiom and Malefice. The release of the band’s debut EP ‘Treatment’ further increased their national profile, and now with the launch of their new full length album ‘Save As I Save’, the ascending metal crew are set to soar.
The south west melodic metal crew’s debut album ‘Save As I Save’ features twelve stunning slabs of cutting metal and alluring rock. From the opening piano delicates of ‘A’ and the beautifully enchanting ‘Braver’, through to the aggressive onslaught of ‘See You In Another Life’ and anthemic vigour of ‘Take It Away’, the band have delivered an absolute gem of a record. Their previous singles ‘Treatment’ and ‘Last Man Standing’ also stand out from the pack, truly lifting the album to heady heights. Now with touring in the works for the Spring and a national reboot of the album, the band’s reach is infinite.
=ZOLTAR SPEAKS RELEASE ‘SAVE AS I SAVE’ ON 14th APRIL THROUGH ALL DIGITAL STORES=
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Kirk – Masquerade

 

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   It has been around eleven years since Swiss melodic metallers Kirk impressed and brought a fresh creative punch through their acclaimed debut album The Final Dance, time which saw the band take an extended break due to internal changes and other projects. This week sees the band return with sophomore album Masquerade to not only make up for lost time but to bring another thrilling and invigorating adventure of their blend of melodic and heavy metal. The eleven track stomp is a captivating encounter destined to similar, even greater, acclaim and attention as its 2003 predecessor.

     Formed by vocalist Thomi Rauch and guitarist Sammy Lasagni in the latter part of the nineties, Kirk with bassist Daniel Pfister, drummer Vito Cecere, and Bruno Berger on keys alongside the founding pair, was soon building a formidable reputation for their sound and live performances. The Final Dance was excitedly received around Europe, North America, and particularly in Japan, whilst shows with the likes of Doro, Pink Cream 69, Axxis, and Shakra only enhanced their growing stature. With the departure of Cecere due to health issues and various members becoming heavily involved with other projects such as Decent Disaster, Godiva, Dr. Crankenstein, and In your Face, the band went on a hiatus. 2010 though saw the year the band reassembled with Philipp Eichenberger taking the vacant sticks position and soon songs began to flow once more within Kirk. Entering the studio with producer Dennis Ward (Pink Cream 69, Unisonic, Khymera), who also produced the band’s debut, the quintet set to work on their second full length, a release which grips with a craft and contagious adventure which can seduce any kind of metal wants.

     The Mausoleum Records released album sidles up to ears with the whispering first touch of Devil’s Claw, a glancing coaxing KirkMasqueradewhich is soon thrust aside by persistent rhythms, hungry riffs and rising melodic atmospheres bred by the keys. The strong start is soon accentuated by the rich tones of Rauch, the singer continuing to impress with more potency as the album progresses. The repetitive eager prowl of the song is the strongest bait of all, which the vocals and guitars swing from with confidence and enterprise. It is not the most dramatic start to a release, or a song which lingers that long after its departure but certainly it makes for an infection clad welcoming which is vivaciously matched by the next up Supersonic Speed. The second song bounds in on a rhythmic stomp which continues to invite as guitars and keys expel their weave of sonic and melodic temptation, whilst emerging grooves to its second half alongside a flaming solo coax the track to another contagious level.

    The title track follows and instantly has the imagination and appetite on greater alert, the almost wanton air of the opening hooks and riffs an insatiable lure eventually tempered by an equally absorbing melodic walk of vocals and emotion. The song continues the evolving rise and success of the album, so far each track outdoing its predecessor, a progress which takes no deviation in course with the arrival of the excellent Eternity. It cups the senses with a ballad like embrace initially, Rauch and the keys of Berger providing an evocative narrative to immerse within, though simultaneously there is a brewing intensity and drama stalking the song aligned to an increasingly anthemic rhythmic march. The prospective dark shadows never come to real fruition but the song certainly deepens its hues and passion with striking textures and darker melodic colours and once into its stride, it creates an appealing mix which you could describe as Dream Theater meets The Mission.

    Fight Or Die Music is a towering prospect from its first breath and soon confirms its might with carnivorous riffs and potent vocals which carry their own personal snarl in league with ravenous beats and a commanding sonic seduction. It is the unashamedly anthemic charge of the chorus which seals the deal, it along with the previous song raising a new pinnacle for the release.

    The album fluctuates a little from here on in but even where songs fail to secure the same depth of reaction they have plenty to induce full satisfaction, as with Nothing Else But Lies and Tragedy, the first a contagion of unsurprisingly but virulently persuasive melodies and group vocal coaxing and the second a flight of smoothly embracing vocals and keys painted melodies skirted by a great cantankerous throat to the bass and rapaciously grunting riff rubs. Neither ignite the air as previous songs or in between them the outstanding Time, but each still leaves full enjoyment. The song they book end is a thrilling waltz of sound and energy, an almost folkish breath playing with thoughts at times whilst its voracious intent recruits limbs and neck muscles with ease whilst the little additives like the deeply masculine backing pokes of vocals, icing on a flavoursome sonic cake.

     The final trio of songs cannot match the first two thirds of the album, though again there is more than enough to draw frequent returns even if they lack the spark and trigger to greater things. Face In The Crowd is an undemanding and resourceful romp whilst The End Of The Universe offers a slower evocation of drama and emotion, both allowing a final slice of unbridled rock ‘n’ roll to be offered by Fallen Angel, it a feisty slab of heavy metal and rousing sinew built rock.

     Masquerade is a stirring march which for the main captures the imagination and lights the energetic boisterous heart in us all. It is like Kirk has never been away, though the experiences and maturity grown over the past decade in its members has led to a new plateau for their presence.

www.facebook.com/KirkSwissMetal

KIRK is on tour this March 2014 with The Poodles & Crystal Ball @

14.03. Milano – Blue Rose Bresso

15.03. Torino – Audiodrome

16.03. Nürnberg – Rockfabrik

17.03. Pratteln – Z7

18.03. Augsburg – Spektrum

20.03. Ludwigsburg – Rockfabrik

21.03. Obermarchtal – Kreuz

22.03. Oberhausen – Helvete

23.03. München – Garage

8/10

RingMaster 07/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Enfeeble – Encapsulate This Moment

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    Proving a mixed bag of adventure which thrills just as openly as it raises uncertainties Encapsulate This Moment, the new album from German metallers Enfeeble, is an encounter which deserves to be investigated and allowed to offer its certainly distinct persuasion. At times the album exhilarates and has you almost running to share its promise and potency but at other moments the album just as easily has you flirting with frustration. There is no question of the thirteen track blend of melodic and heavy metal with metalcore predaciousness being a bad album just one which either does not see or simply ignores its actually quite compelling potential.

    Formed in 2005, the Lingen quartet has built a fine reputation within the German underground scene without not yet breaking through to wider climates. 2007 saw the release of their debut album Too Ugly to Show it! whilst the band continued to draw and excite live audiences with their sound and stage attack. Now almost seven years on the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Lucas Brinker, guitarist Pascal Stafflage, bassist Klaus Boven, and drummer Christopher Grüner stand poised to venture into a wider landscape with Encapsulate This Moment, a release which just might achieve that intent though not as forcibly and potently as it might have.

    From the elegant and appetising melodic Intro, the album explodes into an initially thrash spawn metallic onslaught as ShockEnfeeble - Encapsulate This Moment - Artwork Me unleashes its fury upon ears and senses. It is a tremendous ravishing which gnaws and smothers the senses as the insidious hardcore squalls and toxic growls of Brinker, aided by those of Stafflage, prey on the psyche. Entwining less intensive moments for brief respite within the voracious tempest, the song shows the imagination and craft of the band, their spirals of sonic endeavour catching the eye within a rhythmic provocation and passionate causticity driving the attack. It is an outstanding start raising great hopes and anticipation for the rest of the release.

    Those reactions are soon offered contrasting doubt through the following Personage Collapse, though its opening persuasion is impressive enough to match its predecessor. It is when the clean vocals venture into view that things take an unexpected detour. Vocally the harsh abrasive deliveries are outstanding on the album and never put a foot wrong but the clean delivery is not of the same breeding. There is not anything excessively wrong with the cleaner deliveries and certainly in a group union they work well but they just do not fit in the landscape of the songs, feeling out of place and a constant anti-climax which at times transfers to the rest of a track’s aspects. The song itself provides impressive twists of invention and persistent skill but is sabotaged by that side of the vocals ultimately.

    Both Flashedever and Cavity Door brings things back on course if without matching the opener, the first stalking and enticing with acidic grooves and predatory riffs before uncaging a hardcore abrasion which riles up the passions into a greedier appetite. With bulging rhythms and thunderous riffery aligned to similarly oppressive intensity, the track roars and lurches with pleasing results, the vocals equally as resourceful and positive in their suasion. Its successor goes straight for the jugular from the start, brawling vocals and threatening rhythms driving hard whilst the cantankerous riffery sprawls over and sears the senses. It is an uncompromising and pleasing blaze which works at very angle apart from again the clean vocals which this time only make brief contributions to leave no lasting interference in the song’s success. It should be noted that the use of the cleaner delivery is a good idea and contrast in the songs but just needs a more accomplished vocalist in that style and Brinker sticking to the dirtier side of the suasion which he is unrelentingly impressive at.

    The following Cries is a fierce punk bred slice of metallic savagery which has flaws but generally works with great guitar craft and rhythmic viciousness whilst the short instrumental The Last Night Before provides a peaceful beauty which maybe is unsure of its purpose in the passionate scourge of the album but reveals more of the imagination and adventure of the band in thought and songwriting. Its calm is soon consumed by the unbridled severity of Reality Loss and the exhausting malevolence of Agony Revenge, the pair rippling with guitar invention and sonic potency which is unafraid to surprise and intrigue but both caught by the same kind of doubts. Neither have that spark either to set them aside of the rest but still impress and cement the belief that Enfeeble is a band with the potential to leave us open mouthed.

     The Creation and A Million Voices next provide masterful if not exactly explosive bait for the senses before stepping aside for the best track on the album, False Faith. Immediately prowling and courting the senses with the confidence of realising its majesty in the scheme of things, the track provokes and incites with an antagonistic jaw of sonic grazing and rhythmic battering whilst vocally Brinker unleashes rabidity to his attack which is as riveting as the sounds around him. It is a mouthwatering piece of invention and passion where even the clean tones work perfectly and keys seduce from within the torrid fire of the aggression. The song easily show the lost opportunities elsewhere which does not help the album’s cause but also shows why we suggest despite our issues with them, that Enfeeble is a band all should make an acquaintance with.

    Encapsulate This Moment ends on the ballad As We Were Like, a song which is simultaneously raw and majestic whilst Brinker like raising a middle finger to our previously grievances excels in his heart felt delivery, clean notes soaked in emotion matching the beauty around him. It is a fine end to a good album which could have been better, but one easy to spend plenty of time with. Enfeeble is a definite force in the making with just some retuning needed to take them to the next level.

www.enfeeble.de/ENFEEBLE/Start.html

7/10

RingMaster 07/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Destrage – Are You Kidding Me? No.

 

byMichaelGardenia_04

     Destrage is a force which confronts and seduces the imagination with such an exhaustive vivacity of sound and adventure that it becomes a proposition which has you simultaneously confused, bewildered, and thrillingly basking in a maelstrom of sonic alchemy. Hailing from Italy, the band has forged an impressive and unforgettable once bitten presence which is ascending into more fevered attention release by release, but it is the release of new album Are You Kidding Me? No. which feels like the trigger into worldwide recognition and ardour with its Metal Blade Records release. With more flavours, styles, and imagination than a carnival in Rio, the release turns a band which was still waiting to explode around the globe into an exhilarating infection of the psyche and passions with that target in its sights. With words like unpredictable and intriguing the weakest descriptions of the inventive anarchy teasing and ravishing the senses, Destrage is a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.

     Formed in 2005, the Milan quintet has been on a charge of persuading and recruiting hearts at home and further afield since their first days, the current line-up in place since 2007 especially stoking those the fires. From their first demo Self Id Generator, Destrage has continued to evolve into a aurally spectacular provocation, the albums Urban Being of 2009 and The King Is Fat’n’Old the following year potent bait greedily devoured by more and more willing souls, though you suspect it will be nothing compared to the awakening sparked by Are You Kidding Me? No. Live too the band has left wasted bodies and hungry bodies in their wake, the undertaking of tours across Europe, Japan, and numerous festivals and shows where they have shared spaces with the likes of Every Time I Die, Parkway Drive, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Lordi, Moonspell and many more, increasing their stock. The new album though feels and sounds like their time to lead the pack has now come and it is not a moment too soon.

     You may be wondering what the band sound like, which we will endeavour to reveal song by song, but suffice to say it is Coverwonderfully something quite impossible to label. Opener Destroy Create Transform Sublimate tells you all you need to know about Destrage and whether to unreservedly embrace or stand scratching your head over their voracious experimentation and invention. The track opens with a spiral of sonic enterprise courted by aggressive riffs and combative rhythms, the mix alluring and intimidating in equal measure. It is not long before the song is throwing off any restraint to stomp with entwining essences of groove and funk veining a still voracious assault of technical and carnivorous metal. The impressive vocals of Paolo Colavolpe are just as eager to tempt and savage as the music with a delivery as wide as the range of sounds around him. The song aggressively dances like a fusion of Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, and French band Mucho Tapioca, but even with its gait it switches and shuffles its suasion without notice or care.

   With a climactic finale which simply thrills and enthrals, dub and techno added to the spice cupboard of the song, the towering opener is swiftly matched in quality and psyche twisting grandeur by Purania. From a charged entrance of rapacious riffing and similarly hungry rhythms, the song settles into a melodic bordering mellow stroll which lasts just the length of the impatience the band has to light the touch paper to another maze of eclectic sonic fascination. Imagine a hybrid of Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, 6:33, and System Of A Down and you get a glimpse of the beauty and schizophrenic glory of the song, a triumph within which the guitars of Matteo Di Gioia and Ralph Salati craft a narrative and web which bewitches and challenges, their hypnotic mix of creative frenzy and skilful acidic elegance spellbinding within the predatory frame built by bassist Gabriel Pignata and drummer Federico Paulovich.

    My Green Neighbour rifles ears next, its first breath a frantic tsunami of beats and riffs courting a bedlamic mind-set. Forcing its agitated psyche and attack into a smoother flowing blaze of heavy and melodic metal, the song takes little effort in replicating the temptation of its predecessors, merging varied flames of sound and persistently captivating detours into a brawling riot of invention and insatiable metal manipulation. The stunning tempest then has to step aside for the more primal bordering bestial presence of Hosts, Rifles & Coke, its heavy throated savagery magnetic and even more tantalising when it shares time with a contagion of melodic prowess and mouth-wateringly catchy choruses, all seared by a scotching solo to top things off.

    Both the discordant and masterful mayhem of G.O.D. and the smoother voiced mesmeric Where the Things Have No Colour unveil new scenic aspects of the Destrage’s songwriting and imagination; the first a riot of Faith No More meets Ugly Kid Joe voraciousness aligned to a mind tripping sensibility and the second a progressively honed melodic venture through rapturous harmonies and exotic melodies within an irresistible toxin of craft and infectiousness. Arguably the track is the band at its most restrained artistically but certainly no less potent and imaginative as well as exciting.

     Waterpark Bachelorette has the band squalling and rioting over the senses, grooves and lethal rhythms a blistering endeavour matched by the predacious expulsions of vocals and sound which litter the rampant torrent of rock ‘n’ roll. Guitar doodling veins the song for only the most satisfying results whilst the addictive anthemic call of vocals and hooks make a lingering bait which seeps into the breather of melodic caresses and sonic entanglement. Its excellence is soon equalled by firstly the dramatically textured Before, After and All Around and the almost hysterical invention of – (Obedience), the track verging on maniacal with its avant-garde/melodic metal ants nest of busy yet ordered chaos.

    To prove that the song is still not the deranged imagination of the band exhausted the closing title track takes all honours on the Are You Kidding Me? No. Featuring a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal (Guns’N’Roses), the track is an inventive meshuga but one which knows exactly what it is doing. Fusing experimentation, jazz, funk, and pure dementia into its unrelenting crazed waltz, the track is a triumph of insanity which disorientates and seduces with perfect touch and irreverence. Ending on a sensational emotive stomp of gypsy punk with swing desires and reminding very much of Kontrust and another French band Toumai, the track is a magnificent concluding revelry to a quite brilliant and monumental release.  Quite simply Destrage has provided your probable album of the year.

www.facebook.com/destrage

10/10

Ringmaster 06/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Intervals – A Voice Within

 

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    The additional information accompanying the promo for the debut album from Canadian band Intervals, declares that the quartet is ‘set to be the most exciting new progressive metal prospects of 2014 with the release of debut album, A Voice Within. As their offering seduces and fascinates it really is impossible to disagree, the nine track adventure a magnetic kaleidoscope of sonic colours, inciting textures, and contagious adventures. With a technical craft to match its progressive enterprise, the self-released A Voice Within, with distribution across Europe by Basick Records, is a maze of diverse and inventive flavours which captivates and absorbs from start to finish.

      The Toronto hailing Intervals was formed in 2011 by guitarist Aaron Marshall and took little time in earning a well-respected and acclaimed presence with their evocative instrumental soundscapes. With a line-up completed by guitarist Lukas Guyader and drummer Anup Sastry (Jeff Loomis / Skyharbor), the band released two well-received EPs, The Space Between and In Time in 2011 and 2012 respectively, as well as playing and touring with the likes of Texas In July, Northlane, Structures, The Kindred, The Color Morale, Misery Signals and more. Last year a new direction was taken by the band, not so much in sound though that was unavoidably affected, but with the joining of vocalist Mike Semesky (formerly of The Haarp Machine). Work began on their first album last September with Jordan Valeriote (Silverstein, Structures, Counterparts) and what has emerged is a riveting triumph taking the band to new scintillating levels and you can only expect greater spotlights.

      The first single taken from the album Ephemeral opens up the endeavour, the track taking no time to immerse the ears in the Intervals.AVoiceWithin.cover.lotechnical skill and inventive breath of band and release. Bass and drums instantly cast a web which entangles and excites the senses whilst the guitars flirt and dance with the imagination. It is a potent start enhanced by the melodic tones of Semesky, his expressive and fluid delivery holding hands with the melody rich flames licking from within the sinew framed opener. Sculpting an aurally scenic venture which intrigues and draws in thoughts with ease, it is only hindsight and not its company which suggests the album’s introduction is merely an appetiser to greater things ahead.

    That suggestion arises straight away with the following Moment Marauder, the song a compelling temptation which enslaves and dances with the passions from its initial melodic caress and technical invention. Winding jazz bred imagination around precise and bewitching temptation, it seduces with almost mischievous glee as the vocals stroke and coaxes the emotions as irresistibly as the complicated breeze of sounds surrounding them. Dazzling bordering on disorientating , the ingenuity and sculpting of the song is a virulent lure but one which never indulges itself, each transfixing technical exploit matched by an openly accessible and infectious hook or sweeping groove aligned to the persistently persuasive vocals.

     Automation and The Self Surrendered struggle just slightly to match the album’s first pinnacle, though both build their own plateaus to rigorously enthuse over. The first offers an almost pop rock swagger within its progressive and technical mesmerism, the melodies and contagious assets framed by muscular rhythms which take no prisoners but equally have a respect leaving ardour rather than wounds. It’s equally smouldering and vivacious bait is swiftly matched by the second of the two, a song which has voraciousness to its opening technical gambit which it then lends to the rest of its potently catchy and provocative body. As all the tracks, the melodic canter never settles into one gait or stance for long, the ever evolving and twisting emprise coming with flared nostrils and irrepressible passion.

    After the brief elegant instrumental Breathe, the song allowing that very action before the next spiral of adventure, The Escape confronts the ears like a frantic acrobat, leaping through and wringing out its sonic narrative upon a mouthwatering canvas of inventive hues and emotion. Its beauty is replaced by the fiery landscape of Atlas Hour, technical poise and passionate energies once again offering a journey of unpredictable and persistently shifting scenic inspiration clad in formidable rhythms aligned to just as forceful riffs.

    Siren Sound confronts the senses next, the song a whirl of almost carnivorous jagged riffs and rhythmic antagonism reined in by the ever impressive vocals and harmonies. As the second song on the album, the track explores and unveils that something extra, something which sparks a furnace in the imagination and passions in comparison to the fierce blazes spawned elsewhere. There is a predatory instinct to the song too which inspires everything from the skill and hunger of the band to the uncompromising sounds themselves, and all engulfed in an irresistible seduction. The track steps up to offer a real challenge to the brilliant Moment Marauder for best song accolades, the pair then tested by the closing title track. Bringing the outstanding album to a tremendous close, the song stomps and teases the passions with a weave of severe rhythms, awe inspiring technical artistry, and simply unbridled adventure.

     Offering a kind of mix of Circles and Beneath the Buried and Me with TesseracT, but something different again, A Voice Within is an exceptional encounter and yes as suggested the evidence of something new and exciting emerging. The evolution to include vocals and new adventures by Intervals might just be the boldest most inspirational move from any band in recent times too.

www.facebook.com/intervalsmusic

http://intervalsmusic.bandcamp.com/

9/10

RingMaster 05/03/2014

  Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Johnny Wore Black – Walking Underwater

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     Having richly impressed with a quartet of singles which were as emotively potent as they were compellingly crafted, UK rock band Johnny Wore Black finally release debut album Walking Underwater to complete the seduction and seal the long term capture of the passions. We say finally as it seems like it has been a long time in making, though maybe it is just the greedy anticipation which was bred from the first single that made it seem so. The ten track release is a mouthwatering and enthralling evocation of melodic rock with tinges of metal. At times it simmers and coaxes with lively emotional embers and in other moments blazes with sonic flames and vivacious endeavour, searing the hairs lining the ears. Whichever the character of songs, each one engages and absorbs senses and thoughts with a suggestive spark and provocative texture for a quite mesmeric and thrilling adventure.

     Johnny Wore Black is the solo project of former Hollywood stuntman Johnny Jay (Jay Coen). The former leading force of The Jay Harley Band, the London based songwriter/producer has carved an invigorating and eagerly accepted presence with his refreshing sounds, in the last couple of years especially with the release of exciting singles which sparked a greater acceleration in his rise within the British rock scene. Jay has equally built a strong reputation with his collaborations, one which has specifically been spawned through Johnny Wore Black being a union with David Ellefson from Megadeth. Walking Underwater again brings the writing and musical skills of the pair together, their union ripe with organic power and commanding suasion. Produced by Grammy Award winning producer David Bottrill and featuring clips from his Jay’s father’s seminal 1960s documentary The London Nobody Knows, the March 28th released Walking Underwater is Part 1 of a bigger entity, with the second 10 song part scheduled for this coming autumn, each containing two of the four outstanding singles which have already marked out the project for hungry attention.

     The encounter opens with Different Shades which bursts into the ears after the first of the evocative samples taken from the coveraforementioned film, each splice of cinema making a highly stimulating impact and link between songs. The track initially entices the ears with a single melodic dance on the imagination before further guitar caresses gently add their stroking alongside a velvety dark bassline aligned to firm beats. It is an instantly riveting beckoning which increases its lure as the strong and expressive vocals of Jay weave in with the lyrical narrative. That earlier mentioned smoulder is at work from the start of song and album, its mesmeric touch and seductive breath permeating thoughts and feelings whilst brewing up to a muscular finale with an almost accusing edge to its passion.

    It is a magnetic start to the release soon matched and surpassed by All the Rage. The song is the first of the previous singles from Johnny Wore Black, the debut release which was originally released in conjunction with Help For Heroes to raise funds for Help for Heroes and Combat Stress. Once again the entrance is restrained and poetically alluring, a sonically crafted melody and evocative atmosphere wrapping the senses before the vocals and fuller breath of the track encloses the ears. As throughout the album there is a melancholic feel to the track but one which never snuffs out the light and hope of the song or its ambience.

    Up in Flames, another previous single follows next, it a slice of rock/metal excellence which still makes the strongest persuasion even after a horde of listens. Riffs and rhythms make a firm and compulsive frame for the contagious draw of excellent vocals which combine with the melodic weave of imagination, glowing feisty bait poised to erupt with its metallic sinews and infection soaked energy across the resourceful and flavoursome stroll of rock ‘n’ roll. Everything from the bordering on sombre initial coaxing to the climactic eruptions is perfection; the track one of the best heavy/melodic rock compositions in recent years.

   Both So Dusted and The Battle continue the impressive temptation, the first an atmospheric reflection of shadows with a warm melodic breeze for company and the second from a shimmering summoning of the imagination, evolves its shadowed heart and sonic portrait into a darker unleashing of fiery passion. The pair though very different in appearance, share mutual melancholy which coats every note and seeps from each syllable offered by the heart bred tones of Jay.

   The acoustically shaped One & the Same steps up next to seduce and spark the listeners thoughts, the gentle sway and gait of the song lapping the imagination like waves on a lonely beach, one left in a shadow draped view with hypnotic aural scenery. Its slow pervading beauty is succeeded by the similarly chilled atmosphere of Cold Water, though as with all the songs there is enough warmth and melody spawned adventure to inspire hope to temper the lyrical dark. Though the pair of songs takes a little longer to secure the lingering ardour bred by other songs, the outcome is just as powerfully the same.

     The intrigue and mystique brought by What I Am entrances next, its noir almost sinister climate a deliciously rich hue to the pictorial mix of vocals and floating melodies. One more the contrast of shadows and light, emotionally and musically, is an open canvas for the listener to reflect and imagine within, the word alchemy applicable to the depth and power in his songs Jay achieves with the blend again gloriously shown in One Love Song. The track seduces from first breath to its last, a catchiness spawning from its chorus complementing and tempering the almost invasive dark eloquence and reserved yet potent drama of the song. It is a beautiful song if not stealing best track honours certainly sharing them.

    The closing Outside Looking In unleashes the sinews which have had to play second fiddle for the most to the scintillating melodies and inciting evocative textures which predominantly breed the album, not that the track lacks any of their fascination either. The song is a galvanic stride of energy and power with sonic captivation and melodic ingenuity. It offers a tremendous end to a scintillating release, one which gives melodic rock a new spellbinding creative fire to embrace. With essences comparable to bands such as A Perfect Circle, Deftones, Tool, and Porcupine Tree but sounding very little like any of them, Walking Underwater and Johnny Wore Black are one of the must investigations of the year now and ahead. Roll on Part 2 is all that is left to say.

http://www.johnnyworeblack.com/

9/10

RingMaster 27/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Farewell, My Love – Gold Tattoos

fml new fixes

    Though it is hard to dismiss US rock band Farewell, My Love as just another teen fad, even when their emergence is drawing an eagerly attentive and rapidly growing fanbase from a seemingly young teen element you cannot help sensing that they will be just as hungrily derided. The band’s debut album Gold Tattoos equally gives evidence and support to that assumption in many ways but also suggests that they are much more than just a blaze of style. The Arizona quintet look set to have a love or hate relationship with media and music lovers, much like one of their biggest influences My Chemical Romance. Whether they override the animosity bred towards them like the band they definitely sound like and certainly rip the primes essences from on their debut, time will tell but it is fair to say that there is much more substance and depth to Farewell, My Love than you would suspect from their look alone. When the Phoenix band hits full stride and potency on the twelve-track romp they easily and infectiously steal attention and a keen appetite for their presence, though sadly it is not an appeal and strength which is sustained throughout the whole release. Honesty declares that we have to admit that early MCR found a soft spot to exploit in our passions here and just occasionally Gold Tattoos and band threaten to reap that same appreciative well too.

    Consisting of vocalist Ryan Howell, guitarists Röbby Creasey and Logan Thayer, bassist Charlee Conley, and drummer Chad Kowal, Farewell, My Love first sparked rich focus their way with the A Dance You Won’t Forget EP in 2011. With its bulging choruses and anthemic potency, the release was soon soaking up eagerness and praise from newly drawn fans. Comparisons to the likes of Avenged Sevenfold, AFI, 30 Seconds to Mars as well of course as MCR were latched upon the band’s sound something Gold Tattoos only accentuates. It is fair to say that the Don Debiase (Modern Day Escape, Beneath the Sky, For All Those Sleeping) produced album is not rippling with startling originality but again like the songs individually, the Standby Records released encounter has something about it which is hungrily refreshing and hard to turn away from.

     Afraid Of The Dark opens things up, a resonating heartbeat haunting the atmosphere before fiery guitar sonics burst out to FML_cover-officiallead rampaging grooves and rampant beats into a welcome seizure of the ears. That MCR influence is an open contagion from the first full stride of the song, even vocally Howell sounds like he is laying homage to Gerard Way in his tone and delivery. The song though is an intriguing and addiction inflicting stomp, sonic bursts and melodic endeavour keeping things unpredictable if still familiar across the thoroughly engaging track. There is a drama and theatrical vivacity to the song too, if at times laid on almost too thickly, which adds something richer to its invitation to remain in control of already magnetised emotions.

    The strong start is followed by the equally enticing My Perfect Thing, the song more reserved compared to the first but still lively and similarly littered with hooks and rich harmonies across an inventive body. That ‘ingenuity’ though comes with a rich dressing of recognisable adventure which defuses the undeniable craft and hunger of the band to excite and entertain. Nevertheless the track keeps attention enthused before firstly Faceless Frames toys with and then Mirror, Mirror inflames the passions. The first of the two pumps sinew built rhythms through the ear with rousing hooks as anthemic bait wantonly seduces the imagination whilst the second lights the touch paper to a pop punk voraciousness, the rapacious drive of the song irresistible as it leads the listener into a virulently contagious chorus. If MCR at their epidemic best was a lure for you than this song is the next best thing, a treat which suggests the band can possibly be something special if they find their distinct presence.

     From here on in the release ebbs and flows, or more deflates with fitful returns to earlier heights. Certainly the likes of Rewind The Play and Skip The Memories provide imaginative attempts to persuade but seem content to drift into a more formulaic design lacking incendiary grooves and the depth of riotous exploit which made the first third of the album as impressive as it was. The songs though do tease with swipes of sonic drama and nibbling hooks from time to time to keep you hanging on just in case, though ultimately they disappoint with Friends & Fiends another example, it an agreeable song with fine electronic colour but unable to lift the spirits and appetite for their attempts.

    The keys driven ballad Paper Forts is an elegant figure of a song with great vocals but again finds no purchase with thoughts and emotions, its boy band breath off-putting at times. Its failure though is soon forgotten once Angels unveils its eloquent pop fuelled suasion. It is not a song to challenge earlier triumphs but has that something special with stroking orchestral bred synths helping to make it a lingering impact. Neither the title track nor the closing The Queen Of Hearts stoke up the fires either but as with all songs there is quality and undeniable promise about them to keep you interested if uninspired.

    If someone like My Chemical Romance is a passion then Farewell, My Love is an investigation definitely needed to be made though of course if they are not then look elsewhere for your new adventure. As an EP and just made up of the first quartet of tracks, Gold Tattoos would certainly have had us enthusing much more about band and release but as a full length confrontation it relinquishes that early capture of the passions quite easily as it progresses to provide very decent but underwhelming company. It is hard not to have a mixed view about the album but easy to admit it does offer more than enough to suggest that if not now, ahead they could become one of those naughty secrets that we all have in our playlists.

http://www.facebook.com/farewellmyloveofficial

7/10

RingMaster 03/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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