Dope Body – Lifer

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In covering Natural History, the previous album from US noise sculptors Dope Body, we boldly declared the band as ‘without doubt one of the most exciting bands in music right now’. Returning with its successor Lifer, the Baltimore quartet has done nothing to change or dispel that declaration. The release is a glorious and voracious maelstrom of invention as now expected from the band, but also one with another open twist in the evolution of Dope Body’s sound. Certainly Lifer is the band’s most rock ‘n’ roll release to date, raw and attractively abrasive, but within tracks and sounds are as dramatically eclectic as ever.

Formed in 2008 for originally just a one off show, Dope Body soon saw and found their sound stirring up the local scene and its passions. Early releases via HOSS Records drew potent attention but it was Natural History, released as the new album through Drag City, which widely announced the band as one of the more original and creatively warped fresh breaths in modern music. Between albums the band has feverishly toured and played shows before seeing the latter part of last year out taking time focussing on other endeavours, bassist John Jones on his solo project Nerftoss and guitarist Zachary Utz and drummer David Jacober with their two piece band Holy Ghost Party, whilst vocalist Andrew Laumann turned to his visual arts side and exhibited work at the Galerie Jeanrochdard in Paris, the Pre Teen Gallery in Mexico City, and Signal in Brooklyn. This year though soon saw the foursome back together in the studio and with producer Travis Harrison creating what is another stirring encounter from them.

The album opens with Intro, an instrumental with carnival-esque vivacity and mischief to the gripping rhythmic juggling of Jacober and scuzz bred tenacity of guitar. It is a great raucous start to the album, instantly unveiling some of the varied rock ‘n’ roll seeded essences to be explored across the release. The piece subsequently slips seamlessly into Repo Man and its opening slow caress and shadowed crawl. Right away the distinct tones of Laumann entice and flirt with ears before raging to match the increased intensity and aggression of the music. It is a captivating track which has as much an air of Nirvana to it as it does The Stooges. In hindsight it is a steady opener to the album in many ways, a raw encounter which as the album, holds a real live feel to its touch and breath, but proves to be just a taster of greater things to come.

That stronger potency grips ears and imagination right away with Hired Gun. From a deliciously acidic web of sonic revelry, the song strides out with a garage punk energy and causticity, though it is still prone to the great scythes of sound liferwhich opened up the encounter. Taunting senses with a devilish swagger and punkish rabidity, the track is a transfixing slice of noise rock, but as expected from the band only part of the story as seductive surf rock sultriness and rhythmic tantalising emerges before a fiery finale. From this song the album really takes unpredictable and diverse shape, the following Echo sauntering through ears with a smouldering blues climate aligned to garage punk turbulence. Like Tom Petty plays The Cramps, the song is an enthralling croon with tendencies to expel caustic ferocity as it makes another step up towards the album’s highest peaks.

They come in the next clutch of songs, starting with AOL. A brawling slab of blazing hard and punk rock incitement, whispers of The Clash and Melvins hinting away, the track comes loaded with lingering grooves and biting hooks for a relatively brief but scintillating roar. It sets ears and emotions up perfectly for the even richer triumph of Rare Air. A song which kind of bridges this and the last album, it emerges from a metronomic coaxing lined with a ridiculously infectious sonic tempting. Instantly there is a post punk emprise to the song, bass and guitars flirting with a mix of Joy Division, Tones On Tails, and John Foxx led Ultravox breeding. It is a gripping adventure with Laumann as vocally enterprising as the tapestry of sounds and textures around him. The pinnacle of the album, the song alone reasserts Dope Body as the imaginative masters of sonic and noise alchemy.

Straight away confirming that point, the dark seductive Day by Day steps forward next. With a heavily shadowed bass resonance spotted by sonic elegance making the first gentle touch, the track forcibly intrigues and entices senses and imagination, increasing its lure and potency as it gathers pace to craft a Bauhaus like tension and presence. That increase in energy also brings a funky gait and appetite to the song, which in turn leads to squalling clouds of scuzz lined ferocity and garage rock devilry. With a pinch of psychobilly and a dab of old school rock ‘n’ roll too, the song takes the listener through scenery of explosive invention and bold creative mischief, all persistently cored by the irresistible throaty bassline which kicked it all off.

Toy strides purposefully across ears next to return the album to another boiling garage punk/grunge soiled stomp, engaging ears in a dusty rampage of Rocket From The Crypt meets Damn Vandals like irreverence. As everywhere though, references only give a slight idea of something uniquely Dope Body, the band forging new templates and imagination smothering ingenuity at every turn, proof of course immediately coming forward through the pair of Nu Sensation and I’d Say to You . The first of the two is another multi-flavoured rocker, seemingly embracing every corner and era of rock ‘n’ roll to give birth to an uncompromising and inescapably addictive rock devilry, whilst its successor is a torrent of repetitive hooks and lingering grooves as catchy as the common cold and sneakily lingering.

The album is closed by the striking Even In the End, a song opening on another skilfully conjured rhythmic contagion before spreading its melodic and atmospheric tendrils into a progressive terrain of bracing sonic invention and immersive dark shadows. Within that landscape though, guitars and beats unleash imaginative and lively agitation whilst vocals range from slow drawls to raging emotion. It is an absorbing exploration bringing the outstanding release to a mighty close.

Lifer is not a step forward in quality for Dope Body but a side step from Natural History into similarly impressive and individual waters. The excitement brought by a Dope Body encounter continues and the band grows in stature once more.

Lifer is available via Drag City now.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/DOPE-BODY/310914069790

RingMaster 23/10/2014

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Planning For Burial/Liar In Wait – Split 7”

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Bringing together two bands which have already stolen strong attention and praise for their previous releases, the new split 7” from Broken Limbs Records makes a compelling introduction for newcomers to both Planning For Burial and Liar In Wait whilst showing existing fans a glimpse, certainly in the case of the second project, of a new mature landscape of sound. It is an absorbing and immersive experience being offered, two tracks which distinctly differ but unite in their ability to seduce and envelop ears, as well as the imagination, with subtle and bolder invention.

The first track Mischief Night is provided by Planning For Burial, the solo project of Pennsylvania based musician Thom Wasluck. The song is his first outing since the release of the acclaimed album Desideratum earlier this year. It IMG_7856(2)opens with a sonic flame which swiftly immerses into a radiant but oppressive drone. It is a persistence of noise though wrapped and embraced by flowing synth crafted melodies, their evocative breath and nature a warm caress over the caustic spine of the song. Guitars add their raw beauty and unpolished elegance almost as quickly, everything combining for a haunting and ethereal flight through morose and imposing shadows. It is a thick and challenging intensity which emerges from the bewitching cacophony of sound, but one tempered just enough by the slow laboured vocals of Wasluck, melancholia dipping off every syllable within his expressive monotonous delivery. It is an emotion lighting cloud of riveting dark beauty and dramatic shadows lying pleasingly like a mix of Joy Division and Nine Inch Nails within a cold shoegaze soundscape.

   The second song Paper Houses is a lighter and warmer proposition but just as rich in firm textures and infectious magnetism. Liar In Wait began in 2012 as a side project of vocalist Adam Clemans of Wolvhammer and bassist Jim Adolphson from Mourner. It was not long before the band grew to a quartet with the addition of guitarist Jeff Wilson (Wolvhammer, Nachtmystium) and drummer Peter Clarke (Iron Thrones), and recorded debut EP Translations of the Lost which was released last year on Profound Lore. Employing inspirations from the likes of Asylum Party, Joy Division, The Cure, and Fields of the Nephilim, release and sound was well-received and has already raised keen anticipation for the band’s first full-length scheduled for next year.

liw promo     Paper Houses makes a potent and exciting teaser for the release, immediately seducing ears with an intrigue loaded bassline which swiftly suggests Ian Curtis and co. The irresistible bait is then crossed by shards of sonic eruptions before it all slips into a lively but reserved stroll with the bass still leading the seduction beneath the melodic tones of Clemans. There is a shoegaze glazing which mesmerises with House of Love like radiance but equally a dark tonal elegance which embraces essences of Gene Love Jezebel, early Cure, and The Danse Society in its emotive flight across the enthralling song. It is a spellbinding track having no difficulty in awakening real anticipation for Liar In Wait’s first album.

We have been blessed with a strong and impressive array of split releases over past months and this is another to add to that list.

 The Planning For Burial/Liar In Wait Split is available now digitally and on vinyl (300 black and 200 on orange vinyl) @ http://brokenlimbsrecordings.com/shop/

https://www.facebook.com/planningforburial

https://www.facebook.com/liarinwait

RingMaster 15/10/2014

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ssSHEENSss – Strapping Stallions

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It might be hard to be convinced by the band name but there is no such issue with the new album from Finnish heavy rockers ssSHEENSss. The band’s second full-length, Strapping Stallions is a compelling beast of a proposition, riffs and rhythms as cantankerous as they are aggressive yet there is an eclectic devilry across the release which aligns itself to a gripping inventive craft, it all resulting in an album which is resourcefully unpredictable, mischievous, and most of all great fun.

Formed in 2011, the Hamina sextet set to work on their self-titled but album at the tail end of 2012 with producer Billy Anderson (Eyehategod, Mr. Bungle, Melvins, Neurosis), before unleashing it on the world to eager reception in the February of last year on guitarist Harri Pikka’s own label Stabbing Records. It was an attention grabbing stomp and sound but one which between albums has evolved into an even more muscular and ferocious tempest of stoner bred sinew sculpted rock ‘n’ roll. Early this year the line-up of vocalist Mikko Kiri, bassist Edu Lethal, drummer Juho Harjula, and the triple strike of guitarists made up of Pikka, Porkka and Muhli, hit the studio with a new horde of songs. Mixed by Tomas Skogsberg (The Hellacopters, Dismember) and mastered by Brad Boatright (Sleep, Corrosion of Conformity, Beastmilk), what emerged was the riveting and virulently contagious Strapping Stallions.

The accompanying press release announces that the album and its sound is something fans of Turbonegro, The Hellacopters, and ZZ Top will want to devour, something easy to agree with though that is only one shade of the diverse flavouring of the encounter. Opening track Adios, Fucker! for example pungently reminds of Troublegum era Therapy?, and as the nine tracks come and flirt with ears and imagination plenty other references come to mind, though they cannot defuse the potency of originality also spewing from ssSHEENSss. The opener is an instant wall of thumping rhythms and predacious riffs, all sides of the song converging on ears with an irritable tenacity. Employing essences of punk and metal to its keen and voracious, the stormy treat as mentioned easily reminds of the aforementioned Northern Ireland trio but also with its melodic sultry swagger hints at the likes of Mondo Generator. It is a riveting and thrilling start to the release, honest rock ‘n’ roll with little need to add over the top flourishes but allowing guitars and rhythms to craft a compelling web of highly infectious baiting.

The excellent opening is not matched by a cover of ZZ Top track Concrete And Steel, though to be fair ssSHEENSss twist it into an individual incitement of their own with resourceful imagination. It is a more than decent encounter but ssSHEENSss_strappingstallions_800x800px_weblacks the spark and in the face potency of its predecessor, something the next up You And Your Daughters is more capable of. Bluesy grooves entwine ears straight away as beats jab powerfully across their fiery coaxing. With vocals and riffs joining the swift temptation on feet and emotions, it is a rigorously inviting opening accentuated by sonic flames searing the magnetic spine of the song. There is also a seventies hard rock breath to the caustic sound fuelling the proposition, a lure which easily secures full attention and appetite but it is the mid-way twist into a bordering on bedlamic post punk/garage rock venture reminding of The Three Johns, where a great track becomes an outstanding one.

The equally stunning Voice Distortion Call with its heady and weighty intimidation of air and power sparks another lustful wave of hunger for the release, its Queens Of The Stone Age like devilry a sonic toxicity impossible to resist. With grooves and a sonic colouring you can almost physically taste such its spicy twang, the song is a gripping slab of stoner bred ferocity; a track as volatile as it is creatively composed. Another lofty highlight of the release, it is followed by the more classic metal toned Wolf Street Blues where that earlier Turbonegro comparison comes in handy. It is an easy going and undemanding proposition but keenly contagious and enjoyable providing another flavoursome turn in the diversity of Strapping Stallions.

Shadow Animals with its anthemic rhythmic thumping and corrosive riffery sets the fires in the passions burning bright again, its virulent hooks and Kiri’s vocal prowess irresistible amongst nothing but inescapable enticements. Imagine Mastodon meets again QOTSA and you get a sense of the adventurous climate and canvas of the song explored and set ablaze by the band. Its successor Let’s Explode does not quite match its triumph but still provides a lively smoulder of stalking riffs and classic rock soaked sonic endeavour to eagerly embrace. With at times a southern lilt to chords and heated harmonies from vocals, it is an enthralling offering, though it and its predecessor come nowhere close to the brilliance of the next track.

It is rare to call a cover the best track in a seriously impressive release but the band’s version of Love Will Tear Us Apart is sensational. Easily the best version of the track since Joy Division’s own unleashing, the band turns it into a new depressive seduction giving riffs a more carnivorous growl and beats antagonistic agility which lies perfectly with the pulsating throat of the bass and the melodic toxins which seep from every chord and twist of guitar. Even the vocals make a dramatic statement, Kiri managing to hold onto the cold emotion of Ian Curtis’ unique delivery whilst adding further expressive twists. It is pure dark majesty leaving Saigon the unenviable task of following and closing up the album, which it does successfully with its own anthemic rhythmic lures and melodic rabidity creating a song which whispers Eagles of Death Metal and Kyuss meets Melvins.

It is a great end to an exciting release which in some ways might even have missed a trick or two to become a modern classic. Nevertheless Strapping Stallions is another firm treat for the year and ssSHEENSss a band with a dodgy name and a natural ability to create exceptional rock ‘n’ roll.

Strapping Stallions is available via Soulseller Records on 3rd October

www.sssheensss.com

RingMaster 03/10/2014

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Jubilee Courts – Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight

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As shoegaze seems to be pushing its boundaries in sound and intensity, UK band Jubilee Courts add their own striking and tantalising slice of sonic climate with the Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight EP. Holding five tracks which are as sultry as they are invasively seductive, the release brings a delicious merger of eighties post punk and psychedelically fuelled shoegaze with an incendiary and modern sonic rapacity. It makes for a proposition which carries a potently inciting familiarity but equally a uniquely fresh and provocative enticement.

Hailing from Northampton, Jubilee Courts was formed in 2011 by vocalist/guitarist Josh Falconer, guitarist Matt Bradstreet, and bassist/vocalist Harry Boyde. Soon building up a potent reputation with their live presence around their hometown and surrounding areas, the current line-up was completed with the addition of drummer Frank Robertson-Marriott. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Bauhaus, and Joy Division musically, T S Elliott and Delmore Schwartz lyrically, the band laid down a wider stretching lure with the Stalkers Records released single Room with a View at the end of 2013. Mixed by Temples frontman James Bagshaw, the track pushed the band into a fuller spotlight which Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight is sure to intensify. The band’s first EP is a thick and hazy adventure in breath and sound yet one which infuses at times a minimalistic intimacy and seductive romance to its ambient and melodic explorations, turning the imagination on its head whilst nagging with a monotone and humdrum persistence. Each song is an interpretation of life, an emotional and mental flirtation from which thoughts and senses find healthy inspiration.

City Flow brings the release to life, its initial sonic wind an attention taking intro from which a lone guitar begins teasing thoughts. Its melodic lead is swiftly accompanied by the dark shadows of the bass and the discord kissed vocals of Jubilee-Courts1-450x450Falconer. It is a raw and haunted enticement which instantly brings thoughts of The Jesus and Mary Chain and early Cure as the song wraps its evocative texture and sonic suggestion around the senses. Eventually the air and turbulence of the scenery increases, guitars creating a tension soaked flaming across bolder and broader rhythmic rumblings. It is a glorious start matched by the cacophonous beauty of Something Different. The again discord fuelled tempest which brings the song into view enslaves attention and appetite but soon makes way for a melody closely related to that within its predecessor, its niggling beckoning rich and irresistible. It too is only a moment in the journey of the track, a surf rock like stream of warmth and sonic acidity immersing ears in a sultry blaze. The instrumental is pure mesmerism, an inescapable soundscape through which the compelling dark bass lure of Boyde coldly tempers an escalating aural sunspot.

The startling entrance of the album is just as impressively continued by Outside Your House, its opening bait a heavy footed and slightly fuzzy bass prowl which is soon aligned to a percussive stomp and a ridiculously addictive guitar hook. A disorientating dance breaks out within the rhythms soon after, not for the first or last time Jubilee Courts binding a melodic elegance and smoothness with a seemingly disorganised and agitated but skilfully crafted contrast of ideation. There is always a rich essence of My Bloody Valentine to songs but here hints of bands like Birdland and Wire similarly add their suggestive whispers. The track continues to lay tender yet imposing melodic and sonic tendrils around the ears as the bass finds its darkest side yet to spark another wave of hunger for the EP which is matched to a lesser but still rich degree by Under the Sand Again. The song is the cloudiest of all on the release, its smoky air and turbulent weave of sonic trespass an insatiable pressure. Throughout though melodic veining shines pleadingly from within the thick atmosphere whilst vocally Falconer resonates and smoulders with his great unpolished tones. It is a heady mix but eventually clarity does free itself as the song builds to a fiery climax. The song is also one which misses that final spark which brings other tracks to bear so addictively on the passions.

The release saves its best proposal till the end, in the riveting and scintillating shape of Sunday Shift. A surf bred line of sonic irresistibility entwines itself around ears and imagination from its first breath, taking the initial lead as suggestive rhythms and a second strand of melodic toxicity rapidly add their spice. There is also fullness to the still minimalistic intent of the track which bounds across the senses but this time with every aspect finding its own clear voice in the entrancing weave. Providing an enthralling and nostalgic post punk temptation in its chilled hooks and rhythms as well as vocally, the track unveils an aural alchemy which even with its rich eighties flavouring and inspiration is innovative and virulently addictive.

To describe the music of Jubilee Courts thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and The Jesus and Mary Chain, as well as Joy Division are unavoidable but to that essences of The Horrors, Wire, Crispy Ambulance, and Artery come into the mix. The band has though forged a sound and release in Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight which stands alone in presence as it gives an impressive and thrilling twist to shoegaze.

The Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight EP is available now.

http://jubileecourts.com/

9/10

RingMaster 04/08/22014

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Jekyll – I Do What I Can

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Taken from their debut EP of a couple of months ago, I Do What I Can provides plenty of evidence as to why there is a healthy buzz around Jekyll. The band’s new single is a flavoursome mix of crisp rhythms and evocative melodies seduced by potent vocals and infectious enterprise, and though the song is not carving out new directions for melodic/alternative rock, it certainly provides a captivating and inventive flavour which sets the band apart from most of the crowd.

Formed in 2011, the Blackpool quartet of Joel Foster (vocals/guitar/keys), Jonny Chatterton (guitar/vocals), Lewis Armistead (bass), and Liam Singleton (drums) were soon grabbing attention locally and further afield with their emerging sound. Inspired by the likes of Muse, Radiohead, Kasabian, The Smiths, Nirvana, Editors, Joy Division, Maximo Park, and REM, the band followed up the well-received release of their demo, which drew strong attention from BBC Introducing and more, with their self-titled debut EP in May of this year. It too was met with an eager response. Released ahead of and in celebration of Jekyll’s appearance at The Membranes upcoming gig at the top of Blackpool Tower to celebrate the landmark’s 120th anniversary, I Do What I Can is one of those melodic parties which linger and never go home. It does not offer startling surprises and ground-breaking moments but for providing rich satisfaction it is a sure bet.

From its first second guitars are crafting an emotive melodic web as rhythms jab across them purposefully whilst the bass independently offers a potent shadow to an already melancholic air. It is a swiftly enticing blend which the vocals of Foster only brings more evocative expression to, the song now relaxing to a percussive coaxing as guitars tenderly embrace his entrance. There is a familiarity around the eventful chorus, vocally and musically, with that REM essence open but equally it flows into a sonic colour and adventure which soon has the imagination lost in originality and melodic emprise. The track continues to flirt and seduce with invention and skilful twists across its fluid narrative, and though lyrically a couple of times you have to give the song the benefit of the doubt, I Do What I Can embraces and leads ears through to emotions on a tantalising flight of creative and anthemic endeavour.

Jekyll is a band catching on with the thoughts and emotions of an increasingly growing following and I Do What I Can will certainly do no harm to their growing spotlight.

I Do What I Can is available digitally now.

http://jekyllband.wix.com/jekyllband

8/10

RingMaster 04/08/2014

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Allusondrugs – Self Titled EP

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UK rockers Allusondrugs has been working away at the imagination and passions for the past couple of years, laying down a bait of three diverse and increasingly impressive singles which has led to a hungry anticipation for the prospect of something bigger from the West Yorkshire quintet. That sizeable offering comes in the enthralling shape of their self-titled EP; a six-track revelry for the passions and tease for the psyche. The band’s last single showed the increasing maturity and immersive expression of the band’s songwriting, now it is in full swing within the suggestive technicoloured seduction of the EP. At times it is tenderly mesmeric, in others psychedelically psychotic, and from start to finish it is a magnetic captivation to reinforce thoughts that Allusondrugs is about to ignite the British rock scene with their raw edged fusion of grunge and warmly warped psychedelic rock.

The band began in 2012, its members coming together out of the Leeds music scene. Taking influences from the likes of Nirvana, Deftones, My Bloody Valentine, and Sonic Youth into their unpredictable adventure of sound, the impressive entrance of debut single Plasters and the following twisted teasing of My Cat/Fruit of 2013 soon thrust the band into a certain underground spotlight whilst earning attention from mainstream ears. Earlier this year, third single Nervous woke up a wider expanse of attention with its masterful presence and call to the imagination. Released on Clue Records, as the singles, the new EP embraces all the essences of the individual delights that came before and casts them into a new inventive drama and virulent persuasion to unapologetically steal the passions.

With the core of the release recorded live over a week in Greenmount Studios, Leeds, the EP immediately flirts with ears and thoughts through the opening beats of I’m Your Man. It is an instantaneously coaxing sure to awaken a3102663430_10attention; a focus soon fed by sonic waves of acidic guitars and the excellent group harmonies we have already become accustomed to. The song is soon holding a bold stride as enticing melodies wrap their temptation around the rhythmic spine of the song whilst rawer rubs of riffing and the creative sonic web crafted by guitarists Drey Pavlovic and Damo Hughes dance with ears and a growing appetite for the rich invention of the song. The track though is a full seduction, the excellent vocals of Jason Moules supported by Hughes and the punch packing beats of drummer Connor Fisher-Atack alongside the rich darker tones of Jemal Malki’s bass equally as impressive and persuasive.

The band is constantly being, and understandably, being placed under comparisons to the likes of Nirvana and Soundgarden, two references easy to bring forth with the following Ted, What’s The Porn Like In Heaven?, but the opener is more Pixies-esque in its immersive and discord kissed ingenuity. It is a flavouring and spark to appear across the whole EP, though as said the second song is firmly spawned from a grunge haze. It roars from the first second, riffs climbing over ears with anthemic purpose whilst the bass of Malki simply roams with a predator’s heart into the imagination. The guitars continue to sling caustic notes and riffs with a freedom and raw intent that puts the listener right there in the studio whilst the vocals and rhythms stir up the sense with their own raucous lures. It is hard to avoid that Nirvana suggestion, especially from around the Bleach album, but there is always that undeniable uniqueness which turns it all into another invigorating original encounter.

The pinnacle of the release comes in Cherry Pie, a song which from the opening grumbling bassline sets ears and passions aflame. It is soon swiftly and provocatively striding with a determined directness as post punk like guitar stabs spear its intent. A brewing sonic potency grows around the irresistibly addictive hook of the song, its groove which would not be lost in a Joy Division intrusion bringing a hunger and resourcefulness which is as punk as it is noise rock. The song is glorious; a thrusting of rhythms and toxic invention, not forgetting that insatiable groove, which across its contagious trap has whispers of Public Image Ltd, Cardiacs, Queens Of The Stone Age, and the St Pierre Snake Invasion, yet still emerges as a distinct beast owned by Allusondrugs.

Nervous caress ears next, its swarming temptation draped in a melodic coaxing, instantly holding ears in a tight embrace to which jabbing beats set a firm punctuation. The grip relaxes soon after though as warm vocals and melodies soak the senses, their kiss aligned to the darker mood of the bass and a new vein of sonic invention. It is riveting, a mesmeric croon with the outstanding dual vocals adding a Walker Brothers like suasion within at times a tempestuously stirring emprise of evocative sound which again offers that Pixies like flavouring. An air of surf rock also adds its wash to the psychedelically fuelled beauty of the song, an elegance ignited further by the eruptions of grunge rapacity which reinforce the depth and insatiable persuasive alchemy of the song.

The release is completed by firstly the emotive climate of Sunset Yellow, a shimmering flight of melodies and haunting harmonies veined by melancholic basslines and slightly bent out of shape, distortion lent sonic ingenuity where again with that Frank Black and co leaning shows its face. It is a smoulder of sound and adventure which just gets more potent overtime, setting up emotions and intrigue perfectly for the final track Thingio. With almost grudging respect from its primal riffery and bass taunting from the first moments, the track stalks and preys on the senses, stroking them with a melodic seducing as the string manipulation of the band brings a raw rabidity to the imposing leer of the song. It is a stunning slice of musical entrapment, the entrancing vocals and weaving melodies a rein on the predacious heart of what is an exhilarating beast.

It is fair to say that we like so many were expecting big things from the band when news of the EP broke and we have not been disappointed, in fact such its might those hopes and expectations were almost an insult to its glory. Watch out UK, Allusondrugs are coming for your souls.

The Allusondrugs EP is available via Clue Records 21st July @ http://cluerecords.bandcamp.com/album/allusondrugs-ep on download and Ltd Ed CD as well as an Ltd Cassette via Pinky Swear Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Allusondrugs

9/10

RingMaster 20/07/2014

Allusondrugs Tour Dates:

JULY

25th July = Tramlines Festival, Sheffield (Millenium Galleries)

26th July = Lounge 41, Workington

27th July = Clarence Festival, Wakefield

AUGUST

1st August = The Puzzle Hall, Sowerby Bridge

2nd August = Temple of Boom, Leeds

7th August = Bar Bloc, Glasgow

14th August = Wharf Chambers, Leeds

SEPTEMBER

11th September = The 13th Note, Glasgow

12th September = Downstairs, Aberdeen

13th September = Pickett, Liverpool

14th September = Think Tank, Newcastle

15th September = Static Bar, Swansea

16th September = Red Rooms, Nottingham

17th September = The Garage (upstairs), London

18th September = Sticky Mikes, Brighton

19th September = The Crauford Arms, Milton Keynes

20th September = Huddlefest, Huddersfield

21st September = Boiler Room, Guildford

22nd September = Joiners, Southampton

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The Hertz Complex – A New Habit EP

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Whilst it is not an encounter to instantly set the emotions on fire or leave the imagination awe struck, the A New Habit EP from The Hertz Complex quietly and relentlessly works away at the psyche to emerge as a rather tasty, potential fuelled proposition. It is a slowly burning but persistently persuasive release which puts the band on the radar with ease whilst brewing up a keen anticipation for the quartet ahead as they evolve and grow further into their enterprising sound. The band’s debut EP is as intriguing as it is deceptively infectious, its songs smouldering rather than blazing within ears but they leave seeds and hooks behind which from nowhere can take a hold of the memory.

Hailing from Cork in Ireland, songwriters Neil O’Keeffe (lead vocals, guitar) and Paul Keane (guitar/vocals) have formed an instinctive creative partnership which brings an organic breath and attraction to their songs as evidenced on the EP. Embracing the inspirations of their Irish roots and of bands such as The Chameleons, Joy Division, Whipping Boy, and Howling Wolf, the pair’s distinct twist of post punk with melodic unpredictability offers healthy bait with an imaginative coaxing. Relocating to the Deptford area of London, the duo linked up with Canadians Benjamin Balan (drums) and Chris Keelan (bass), the compelling rhythmic side to the lure of The Hertz Complex. With their live performances, including festivals and a headlining show at LA’s Whisky A Go Go, constantly drawing more attentive fans and responses, as well as the recent announcement that one of their tracks will be featured in a movie soundtrack, it feels like a big step is being taken in the ascent of The Hertz Complex, something A New Habit adds its persuasive weight to.

Maybe I Know starts things off and takes little time in enticing thoughts and appetite with its chilled but seductive charm. A shimmering sonic coaxing wraps ears first, its touch framed by punchy beats. Before long a guitar weaving 10418167_796654680353242_78278592038508633_nmagnetically flirts with the senses, dripping evocative hues as the bass adds its own dark colour. It is a potent welcome which only increases its pull once settling into a steady canter of crisp rhythms and spiralling sonic endeavour. Infectious melodies equally add their rich enticement to create a gripping canvas upon which the initially monotone kissed plaintive clad tones of O’Keeffe opens the narrative. It is a striking union, elements of Joy Division and at times Modern English swirling within the provocative climate being brewed by the band. Thoughts of Flesh For Lulu also make an appearance as the song increases the strength of its virulent suasion and enterprise. As the EP, it is not a song which explodes and has passions drooling but with its persistent fuzz lined sonic taunting and melodic web it is an encounter which beds deeply into the psyche for a long term friendship.

The great start is followed by the just as appealing and addictive Bassy. From its first breath, guitars are binding ears with entrancing acidic melodies and irresistible hooks, but it is through the shadowed throated tones of Keelan’s bass croon that the appetite is sparked into hungry rapture. There is an indefinable familiarity to the main sonic call of the song too which only works in the song’s favour whilst the slightly off kilter vocals add another intrigue sparking texture to the proposition. The track holds a restrained air to its intent, a hint of explosive incitement promised never realised yet again though it is a song which embeds in an awakened imagination for a lingering and welcome persistent presence.

Next up The Boxer Rebellion brings a broader rock ‘n’ roll intent to its keen gait and suggestive almost sinister breath. The vocals veer to a more strained delivery than elsewhere at times but also breaks into a varied punk kissed antagonism to match the evolving sound and adventure of the track. A song which merges elements of initially post punk with hard and garage rock plus that punk essence, it almost does not know what it wants to be but is still a fluid storm to thoroughly enjoy. It does not match the opening pair of songs but shows another range and depth to the sound and songwriting of the band as does its successor No Control. The song is a delicious croon of vocals and guitar, an evocative smoulder which lures in thoughts and appetite with increasing success as the rest of the band bring with their potent colours. Like the previous song it takes a while to fully seduce but given time makes for a persistence of reserved hooks and gentle melodies which entrench their fascination long term.

The EP is completed by the radio edit of Maybe I Know which is as good as the broader version but over too soon in comparison of course. A New Habit EP is probably not going to send you shouting from the rooftops to be honest but it has all the promise and exciting qualities to make The Hertz Complex a band to keep under close and keen scrutiny.

A New Habit EP is available now!

http://www.thehertzcomplex.com/

8/10

RingMaster 14/07/2014

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