Allusondrugs – Self Titled EP

Allusondrugs Promo 1

UK rockers Allusondrugs has been working away at the imagination and passions for the past couple of years, laying down a bait of three diverse and increasingly impressive singles which has led to a hungry anticipation for the prospect of something bigger from the West Yorkshire quintet. That sizeable offering comes in the enthralling shape of their self-titled EP; a six-track revelry for the passions and tease for the psyche. The band’s last single showed the increasing maturity and immersive expression of the band’s songwriting, now it is in full swing within the suggestive technicoloured seduction of the EP. At times it is tenderly mesmeric, in others psychedelically psychotic, and from start to finish it is a magnetic captivation to reinforce thoughts that Allusondrugs is about to ignite the British rock scene with their raw edged fusion of grunge and warmly warped psychedelic rock.

The band began in 2012, its members coming together out of the Leeds music scene. Taking influences from the likes of Nirvana, Deftones, My Bloody Valentine, and Sonic Youth into their unpredictable adventure of sound, the impressive entrance of debut single Plasters and the following twisted teasing of My Cat/Fruit of 2013 soon thrust the band into a certain underground spotlight whilst earning attention from mainstream ears. Earlier this year, third single Nervous woke up a wider expanse of attention with its masterful presence and call to the imagination. Released on Clue Records, as the singles, the new EP embraces all the essences of the individual delights that came before and casts them into a new inventive drama and virulent persuasion to unapologetically steal the passions.

With the core of the release recorded live over a week in Greenmount Studios, Leeds, the EP immediately flirts with ears and thoughts through the opening beats of I’m Your Man. It is an instantaneously coaxing sure to awaken a3102663430_10attention; a focus soon fed by sonic waves of acidic guitars and the excellent group harmonies we have already become accustomed to. The song is soon holding a bold stride as enticing melodies wrap their temptation around the rhythmic spine of the song whilst rawer rubs of riffing and the creative sonic web crafted by guitarists Drey Pavlovic and Damo Hughes dance with ears and a growing appetite for the rich invention of the song. The track though is a full seduction, the excellent vocals of Jason Moules supported by Hughes and the punch packing beats of drummer Connor Fisher-Atack alongside the rich darker tones of Jemal Malki’s bass equally as impressive and persuasive.

The band is constantly being, and understandably, being placed under comparisons to the likes of Nirvana and Soundgarden, two references easy to bring forth with the following Ted, What’s The Porn Like In Heaven?, but the opener is more Pixies-esque in its immersive and discord kissed ingenuity. It is a flavouring and spark to appear across the whole EP, though as said the second song is firmly spawned from a grunge haze. It roars from the first second, riffs climbing over ears with anthemic purpose whilst the bass of Malki simply roams with a predator’s heart into the imagination. The guitars continue to sling caustic notes and riffs with a freedom and raw intent that puts the listener right there in the studio whilst the vocals and rhythms stir up the sense with their own raucous lures. It is hard to avoid that Nirvana suggestion, especially from around the Bleach album, but there is always that undeniable uniqueness which turns it all into another invigorating original encounter.

The pinnacle of the release comes in Cherry Pie, a song which from the opening grumbling bassline sets ears and passions aflame. It is soon swiftly and provocatively striding with a determined directness as post punk like guitar stabs spear its intent. A brewing sonic potency grows around the irresistibly addictive hook of the song, its groove which would not be lost in a Joy Division intrusion bringing a hunger and resourcefulness which is as punk as it is noise rock. The song is glorious; a thrusting of rhythms and toxic invention, not forgetting that insatiable groove, which across its contagious trap has whispers of Public Image Ltd, Cardiacs, Queens Of The Stone Age, and the St Pierre Snake Invasion, yet still emerges as a distinct beast owned by Allusondrugs.

Nervous caress ears next, its swarming temptation draped in a melodic coaxing, instantly holding ears in a tight embrace to which jabbing beats set a firm punctuation. The grip relaxes soon after though as warm vocals and melodies soak the senses, their kiss aligned to the darker mood of the bass and a new vein of sonic invention. It is riveting, a mesmeric croon with the outstanding dual vocals adding a Walker Brothers like suasion within at times a tempestuously stirring emprise of evocative sound which again offers that Pixies like flavouring. An air of surf rock also adds its wash to the psychedelically fuelled beauty of the song, an elegance ignited further by the eruptions of grunge rapacity which reinforce the depth and insatiable persuasive alchemy of the song.

The release is completed by firstly the emotive climate of Sunset Yellow, a shimmering flight of melodies and haunting harmonies veined by melancholic basslines and slightly bent out of shape, distortion lent sonic ingenuity where again with that Frank Black and co leaning shows its face. It is a smoulder of sound and adventure which just gets more potent overtime, setting up emotions and intrigue perfectly for the final track Thingio. With almost grudging respect from its primal riffery and bass taunting from the first moments, the track stalks and preys on the senses, stroking them with a melodic seducing as the string manipulation of the band brings a raw rabidity to the imposing leer of the song. It is a stunning slice of musical entrapment, the entrancing vocals and weaving melodies a rein on the predacious heart of what is an exhilarating beast.

It is fair to say that we like so many were expecting big things from the band when news of the EP broke and we have not been disappointed, in fact such its might those hopes and expectations were almost an insult to its glory. Watch out UK, Allusondrugs are coming for your souls.

The Allusondrugs EP is available via Clue Records 21st July @ http://cluerecords.bandcamp.com/album/allusondrugs-ep on download and Ltd Ed CD as well as an Ltd Cassette via Pinky Swear Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Allusondrugs

9/10

RingMaster 20/07/2014

Allusondrugs Tour Dates:

JULY

25th July = Tramlines Festival, Sheffield (Millenium Galleries)

26th July = Lounge 41, Workington

27th July = Clarence Festival, Wakefield

AUGUST

1st August = The Puzzle Hall, Sowerby Bridge

2nd August = Temple of Boom, Leeds

7th August = Bar Bloc, Glasgow

14th August = Wharf Chambers, Leeds

SEPTEMBER

11th September = The 13th Note, Glasgow

12th September = Downstairs, Aberdeen

13th September = Pickett, Liverpool

14th September = Think Tank, Newcastle

15th September = Static Bar, Swansea

16th September = Red Rooms, Nottingham

17th September = The Garage (upstairs), London

18th September = Sticky Mikes, Brighton

19th September = The Crauford Arms, Milton Keynes

20th September = Huddlefest, Huddersfield

21st September = Boiler Room, Guildford

22nd September = Joiners, Southampton

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The Hertz Complex – A New Habit EP

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Whilst it is not an encounter to instantly set the emotions on fire or leave the imagination awe struck, the A New Habit EP from The Hertz Complex quietly and relentlessly works away at the psyche to emerge as a rather tasty, potential fuelled proposition. It is a slowly burning but persistently persuasive release which puts the band on the radar with ease whilst brewing up a keen anticipation for the quartet ahead as they evolve and grow further into their enterprising sound. The band’s debut EP is as intriguing as it is deceptively infectious, its songs smouldering rather than blazing within ears but they leave seeds and hooks behind which from nowhere can take a hold of the memory.

Hailing from Cork in Ireland, songwriters Neil O’Keeffe (lead vocals, guitar) and Paul Keane (guitar/vocals) have formed an instinctive creative partnership which brings an organic breath and attraction to their songs as evidenced on the EP. Embracing the inspirations of their Irish roots and of bands such as The Chameleons, Joy Division, Whipping Boy, and Howling Wolf, the pair’s distinct twist of post punk with melodic unpredictability offers healthy bait with an imaginative coaxing. Relocating to the Deptford area of London, the duo linked up with Canadians Benjamin Balan (drums) and Chris Keelan (bass), the compelling rhythmic side to the lure of The Hertz Complex. With their live performances, including festivals and a headlining show at LA’s Whisky A Go Go, constantly drawing more attentive fans and responses, as well as the recent announcement that one of their tracks will be featured in a movie soundtrack, it feels like a big step is being taken in the ascent of The Hertz Complex, something A New Habit adds its persuasive weight to.

Maybe I Know starts things off and takes little time in enticing thoughts and appetite with its chilled but seductive charm. A shimmering sonic coaxing wraps ears first, its touch framed by punchy beats. Before long a guitar weaving 10418167_796654680353242_78278592038508633_nmagnetically flirts with the senses, dripping evocative hues as the bass adds its own dark colour. It is a potent welcome which only increases its pull once settling into a steady canter of crisp rhythms and spiralling sonic endeavour. Infectious melodies equally add their rich enticement to create a gripping canvas upon which the initially monotone kissed plaintive clad tones of O’Keeffe opens the narrative. It is a striking union, elements of Joy Division and at times Modern English swirling within the provocative climate being brewed by the band. Thoughts of Flesh For Lulu also make an appearance as the song increases the strength of its virulent suasion and enterprise. As the EP, it is not a song which explodes and has passions drooling but with its persistent fuzz lined sonic taunting and melodic web it is an encounter which beds deeply into the psyche for a long term friendship.

The great start is followed by the just as appealing and addictive Bassy. From its first breath, guitars are binding ears with entrancing acidic melodies and irresistible hooks, but it is through the shadowed throated tones of Keelan’s bass croon that the appetite is sparked into hungry rapture. There is an indefinable familiarity to the main sonic call of the song too which only works in the song’s favour whilst the slightly off kilter vocals add another intrigue sparking texture to the proposition. The track holds a restrained air to its intent, a hint of explosive incitement promised never realised yet again though it is a song which embeds in an awakened imagination for a lingering and welcome persistent presence.

Next up The Boxer Rebellion brings a broader rock ‘n’ roll intent to its keen gait and suggestive almost sinister breath. The vocals veer to a more strained delivery than elsewhere at times but also breaks into a varied punk kissed antagonism to match the evolving sound and adventure of the track. A song which merges elements of initially post punk with hard and garage rock plus that punk essence, it almost does not know what it wants to be but is still a fluid storm to thoroughly enjoy. It does not match the opening pair of songs but shows another range and depth to the sound and songwriting of the band as does its successor No Control. The song is a delicious croon of vocals and guitar, an evocative smoulder which lures in thoughts and appetite with increasing success as the rest of the band bring with their potent colours. Like the previous song it takes a while to fully seduce but given time makes for a persistence of reserved hooks and gentle melodies which entrench their fascination long term.

The EP is completed by the radio edit of Maybe I Know which is as good as the broader version but over too soon in comparison of course. A New Habit EP is probably not going to send you shouting from the rooftops to be honest but it has all the promise and exciting qualities to make The Hertz Complex a band to keep under close and keen scrutiny.

A New Habit EP is available now!

http://www.thehertzcomplex.com/

8/10

RingMaster 14/07/2014

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Teribal Anamal – New Creature

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Having found a greedy appetite for US post punks Teribal Anamal through their debut EP Anamala of last year, there was a hungry anticipation for its successor New Creature when it dropped through the post. It was a hunger swiftly satisfied and more as hopes and expectations were treated to an impressive slice of imaginative incitement. Between releases, the Brooklyn-based trio has grown and expanded their minimalistic post-punk/new wave sound, bred a new maturity to the songwriting which has in turn honed their previously diverse invention into a more focused but no less flavoursome enterprise. The eight track EP, or should that be album, is an unrelenting siren of post punk provocation with repetitious beauty, one to take the previous tantalising properties of its predecessor into stronger irresistible temptations.

Consisting of Stephanie (guitar/vocals), Ryan (bass/vocals), and Chalky (drums), the band has become a potent and feverishly followed proposition around NYC. Formed around two years ago, Teribal Anamal employ inspirations from the likes of Siouxsie and The Banshees, The Cure, The Pixies, Joy Division, New Order, The Wipers, The Kills, Nirvana, Sonic Youth, The Cramps and more into their constantly evolving sound. Between the two releases the threesome seem to have concentrated on a more singular post punk side to their ingenuity, though that does not mean the array of sonic colours and new wave coaxing has been left to the side. Instead New Creature drives a steadfast intent through its chilled unfussy course with riveting washes of melodic coaxing and mesmeric enticements. It is a striking and persistent suasion which leaves passions aflame and anticipation of the band ahead even more fevered.

The release plays like one massive breath of sound and endeavour, each track emerging from each other or atmospheric howls to flow seamlessly across the senses as if recorded in one potent stroke. It starts with the delicious teribal Anamal coverShuttlecock, a shimmering sonic landing the spawning for the expected intensively throaty bass tones of Ryan and the rasping sonic squalls of Stephanie. It alone is powerful bait but with the thumping and twisting rhythms of Chalky as well as Ryan’s mellow vocal expression, the song is swiftly an entrancing fascination which permeates ears and thoughts. There is a feel of The Three Johns to the track as well as the rhythmic slavery of Gang Of Four, but with a melodic hue to the entwining grooves of sonic vining, the track is distinctly owned by the band. The effects on the vocals and at times the resonance of sound only add to the thick potent lure which irresistibly binds the passions.

The Rub takes no time in unleashing its own thrilling toxins next, the bass conjuring its own chaining enticement before the grazing scrub of guitar play its cards as again smooth vocals and gripping rhythms dance with the senses. The fuzzy pressure and charm of the song continues to build across a hypnotic repetition at its heart whilst scorched melodies and a wonderful drone quality bring thoughts of Spizz Energi and fellow Brooklyn punks The Black Black to mind. As the first, submission to its call is instant as is the response to next up Sensory, a psyche searching exploration with its own web of ridiculously compelling hooks and attention seizing rhythms within a wind of sonic and vocal captivation. As with every song, there is simplicity to the encounter which sends rapturous tingles down the spine yet a net of almost cold invention which consumes and cages willing senses.

Both Uranium Son and Vulturious keep attention magnetised, though the first reminds that many songs hold similar bait in their core suasion thus at times requiring even closer inspection. This song lures emotions in with haunting siren-esque harmonies which swarm about the insatiable drive of the flaming main temptation. It is as addictive as it is meditatively disorientating, a claim easy to place upon its successor too. A surf rock breeze hinted at in the last permeates with stronger intent across the song, wrapping senses in greater virulence as discord majesty teases ears before Owls next idles in on a rhythmic lure. It is soon doused in discordance and sonic colour too, its croon casting an emotive post punk chill within reined in punk tenacity. Impossible to resist twisting hips and voices to, the track is another unavoidable cage of anthemic and instinctive exhortation.

New Creature is brought to a pungent close with through firstly Megavolts, the track cascading sonic bolts down on the senses as it settles into a sinew strapped stride of roaming sonic binding and rhythmic compulsion. The caustic air which glances over all songs is at its most abrasing and magnetic here igniting ears ready for the majestic distortion drenched glory of Gay Vikings In Love. Almost militant in its gait and anarchic in its stringent adventure of sound, the track is an immense end to a masterful release. New Creature is another major step forward for Teribal Anamal yet you still feel there is plenty left inside for them to unveil and discover. With great offerings like this we can bask in their creative journey while patiently waiting for the realisation of all their promise.

New Creature is out now and available as a buy now name your price release @ http://teribalanamal.bandcamp.com/releases

www.facebook.com/teribalanamal

9/10

RingMaster 04/07/2014

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Silhouettes – Ever Moving Happiness Machines

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    Silhouettes last single Gold Tag offered a sizeable hint and thrilling teaser for the UK indie/electro band’s debut album, a taster which itself has continued to grow and impress since our coverage of its charms. Now that Ever Moving Happiness Machines has arrived all anticipations and expectations of the release have been fed and fully satisfied. The ten track encounter is an intriguing and inspiring slice of creative diversity and poetic imagination, a proposition which ignites the senses and thoughts in a richly varied and at times challenging way for an enthralling incitement which never leaves a moment devoid of emotive provocation or absent from riveting drama.

Hailing from Wolverhampton and formed in 2008, Silhouettes has earned themselves a sizeable reputation for their sound and live performances, a presence more than complemented by a couple of EPs. It was Gold Tag though which has arguably been the spark to a greater spotlight, its more electronic seeded presence a fascinating and tantalising evolution in the band’s sound. Created by Nathan Till (vocals, guitars), Jay Cuthill (guitars, keyboards, drums), and Ben Blewitt (keyboards), Ever Moving Happiness Machines has the potential and certainly the invention to push the band to the next level, and with a line-up completed by Xander Roberts (bass, vocals) and Ben Dargue (drums) live, Silhouettes is poised to take intensely emotive electronic music by storm.

Ever Moving Happiness Machines does not come without the occasional less impacting twist or turn but from the opening Gold Silhouettes coverTag it is an unrelenting feast of striking enterprise and emotional exploration which has ears and imagination hungry for the album’s impressive offerings. The first track immediately unveils an eighties influence, a flavouring which occurs throughout the album, as small but vivacious guitar crafted melodies entice the ears. As they find themselves joined by a magnificent and robustly throaty bassline there is a strong essence of The Farmers Boys at play, a spice which takes on a definite Orange Juice tang as keys and the great vocals of Till add to the exotically vibrant picture. The song strolls with a masterful confidence which in turn recruits a bold reaction from feet and emotions, its crystalline key sculpted melodies and expressive harmonies a seductive glaze to the contagious waltz. It is a glorious entrance which in its fullest form has appetite and imagination aflame especially through its ridiculously addictive rhythmic closing stretch.

From the lively enticement the album glides into the glistening evocative embrace of Creaking Universe. Its initial lure sparkles like sonic crystal, the keys erupting like dust in a shaft of light before a melancholic shadow and croon clouds over ears to tempt them with its darker touch vocally and musically. Slipping into a seductive breeze which soothes the ears and intrigues emotions, the song from a decent beginning becomes a potent magnet, its ever increasing pull through string orchestrated melodies and brooding textures masterful. Imagine The National meets the Walker Brothers and you have an idea of the voice and might of the track.

The next up Sacrifice is another track which needs time to grow but does so with immense success. It opens with a celestial blaze of electronic persuasion, an Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark like wind hugging the senses before the falsetto charm of the vocals lie romantically upon the ears. First impressions are strong and rewarding but as with quite a few tracks on the album, it is one which deviously works away leaving a haunting toxin which repeats time and time again, to return at any moment unannounced. The exciting track is instantly emulated by Cold Water/Grey Flesh, its chillier climate and singular expression a bewitching temptation which again is strong at first but masterful over time. With the keys casting an almost intrusive web which the guitars and vocals unveil colourful and poignant hues over, the song dances elegantly seeping a stark breath of lost hope and scenery. It is a highly evocative narrative which could be described as Joy Division meets Sigur Ros.

The intensive melancholy of I Miss You, I Want You, I Need You, I Love You carries a rich Radiohead vein to its despondent emotion and cold breath. It is an impressively crafted and presented piece of music and emotion but for personal demands fails to strike the flame other songs on the release do so easily, though the flume of strings create a resonating tempting for the imagination to immerse within. It is not a low point but one personal taste cannot connect with, something the brilliant Prufrock’s Dream has no trouble achieving. The new single from band and album is an enthralling adventure of sound and imagination. Written as the sequel to the TS Eliot poem The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock, the song teases ears with a sultry guitar weave at first before expanding into an exotically rhythmic and mystique soaked flame of sonic and melodic seduction. The guitars continue to bind the senses in a psychedelic glaze of Eastern promise and thought inciting majesty whilst the voice of Till croons with potent expression and absorbing texture. As it persistently flirts with ears and emotions entwining radiance and shadows, whispers of the likes of Teardrop Explodes, The Verve, and Nick Cave make their presence known in a song which is scintillatingly original and unique to Silhouettes.

Both Scuff Marks and Ferry Me Away slip in the wake of their glorious predecessor, though again it is primarily down to preferences. The first has a pulsating core and evocative ambience which increases potently over the length of the song for an enveloping climax, but again with a Radiohead similar breath it fails to spark any real reaction, though Silhouettes is a much more exciting proposition to be fair. Its successor also carries that Thom Yorke and co breeding but evolves into an emotionally infectious play with melodic toxins which seduce with wanton ease and a folk bred gentleness which elevates it to a stronger footing. Neither are songs to pass over swiftly but possibly suffer being stuck between the triumphs of Prufrock’s Dream and the outstanding Black Within The Black, a track unafraid to show its roots in the early days of The Cure. With the bass rapturous bait and rhythms pure anthemic lure, the track is an unbridled temptress to which Till brings his own style of haunted tones and expression for exceptional success. The song invades and seduces every pore and thought to provide another heady pinnacle.

Closing with the climactic Boys, a track from small melodic and expressive seeds grows into an epically shaped tower of intense emotion and powerfully evocative colour, Ever Moving Happiness Machines is a gripping adventure which provides a kaleidoscope of invention and imagination, not forgetting creative passion. It is not an album which quite succeeds with every chapter, but is a radiant success across its whole body as Silhouettes more than delivers on their original promise.

Ever Moving Happiness Machines is available via Integrity Records now!

http://silhouettesmusic.net/

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/06/2014

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KynchinLay – Drink Me EP

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Five uniquely different songs but related through the imagination of one exciting band, the Drink Me EP is one of those unexpected and eagerly accepted treats which come around once in a while to surprise and invigorate the emotions. Crafted by UK rockers KynchinLay, the release is a fun and stimulating encounter from a band you sense will be making many more impressive ventures for our ears to greedily devour in the future.

Led by vocalist/guitarist/songwriter K G Wilson with drummer Damien Welsh and bassist Mal Williams alongside him as seemingly the core of the band, KynchinLay have brewed up a fine and feisty reputation across their home of Liverpool. They have an essence to their sound which reeks of the prime musical time of their city from the late seventies and across the eighties, their vague similarities to Echo and the Bunnymen in certain places a hint to their birth town but more loudly is the very appetising feel of Pete Wylie to their creativity. It makes for an immediately flavoursome presence which fires up the juices which the band then twist and treat with their own distinctive and highly tempting designs.

The release gets off to a tremendous start with Leave Me Alone; a single guitar teasing the ears with its gentle strum before combining with an eager vocal sigh and another coaxing of strings for a highly magnetic entrance. There is a riveting surface discord to the emerging sound which glances off the brewing melodies, a tempting added to by punchy beats, a wonderfully dark bass stroll, and the excellent vocals of Wilson. Instantly that air of familiarity welcomes ears and imagination into the unveiling heart of the song, backing vocals from Ian McIntyre lighting up the background at times as the track evolves into a ridiculously addictive proposition. Everything about the bait of the song is irresistible, from the fluid sonic enterprise and the guitar bred colour permeating every turn of the song to the deliciously heavy throated basslines and rampant yet controlled vocals. It is a scintillating start to the release which sparks a certain hunger for more.

The following Live Free Or Die brings an acoustic led protest with emotive keys and expressive harmonies wrapping their own potent narratives around the lyrical core of the song. Though it lacks the spark and impact of its predecessor, the song easily grabs its own slice of attention with its skilled composition, accomplished presentation, and resourceful passion before making way for the superb Public Execution. From a distant siren like squall overlaid by defiant voices of the people, the track evolves through a hazy ever increasing wind of sonic dissidence which comes into full focus with a web of guitar sculpting, the band aided by the skills of Dave Scott for the song, and the ever moody voice of the bass, all painting an imposing image of shadowed and dissatisfied times. Vocally Wilson drives the lyrical intent home strikingly; his distinctive tones a gripping ‘narrator’ whilst around him a throbbing nagging of The Cure in their early years and that previously mentioned McCulloch and Wylie essence invigorates ears and imagination. The track is glorious, an aural Orwellian painting with the chilled breath of Joy Division to its charm which incites and inspires as well as inflames mind and emotions. Like the first track, each individual element of the song combines for a formidable and impacting triumph, guitars especially inflammatory on the passions alongside the similarly potent vocals.

Dogfathers swiftly cements those thoughts as its jagged stomp of reggae seeded riffs dance with the imagination as mischievous harmonies play within the flight of the song. There is also a greater revelry to the vocals of Wilson whilst musically the song waltzes with the passions like a fusion of The Members and Tankus The Henge, the keys of Wilson and the guitar endeavour of again Scott bringing rich evocative hues to the devilish smile of the song, a grin fuelled by the excellent fiddle niggling provided by Ste Rothwell. With the only the less potent strength of the chorus against the tremendous ingenuity of the verse and courting twists of the song a vague dip, it is a captivation to raise the stock of the band once more.

The closing My Heart with its opening and slightly choppy range of riffs and the always welcome velvety call of the bass continues the richly pleasing might of Drink Me. More restrained than previous songs in its adventure but easily as contagious and addictive in its presence and structure, it is hypnotic stroll which simply draws the listener into its provocative script. Less dramatic than maybe other songs of the EP but right to the fore as a persuasion it brings a fine release to an outstanding end.

Drink Me took a few passages to unveil all of its bait and lures but once absorbed provides all the evidence to suggest that KynchinLay is something all melodic/alternative rock fans need to check out though they may have no choice in noticing them anyway if future releases build on this tantalising start.

The Drink Me EP is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/KynchinLay/242399799167716

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/05/2014

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Welington Irish Black Warrior – Vafancuneo

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Welcome to this year’s most rigorously exciting and insatiably compelling release, Vafancuneo. Ok it is probably too early to truly give the title to Welington Irish Black Warrior, the creators of the extraordinary release but there are no doubts it will be in the top handful of nominees come judgement time. Brewing a unique sound most closely described as post punk meets psyche rock with a veining of noise and experimental industry, the Swiss band has sculpted a new template for emerging noise driven bands. Their EP is sensational, a riveting and breath-taking, almost tribal incendiary device for imagination and passions to explode over, and certainly one of the essential releases of 2014.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Brynjar Thorsson, bassist Léon Jodry, and drummer Steven Doutaz, the Neuchâtel based trio came together in 2005, three music loving men who supposedly came together as a band to stop working in a watch making factory. Since that entrance Welington Irish Black Warrior has been on an upward spiral, notably releasing a self-titled debut album in 2012, collaborating with Kunz on the five track KUNZWIBW of last year, and spending a whole year writing music based on Alejandro Jodorowsky’s movie Holy Mountain, which they performed live in a church in front of the screen during a projection of the 2 hours movie. With a flood of shows, European tours, and festival appearances only increasing their stock, time is ripe for the band to draw the strongest spotlight, something Vafancuneo is potent bait for.

Recorded live by Alberto Dutto (Movie Star Junkies), mixed by Mano Moccia, and mastered by Louis Jucker (Coilguns, Kunz, The Fawn), 02_Front CoverVafancuneo is a virulent infestation of senses and mind from the opening minute of first track Hand on Stomach. The beginning to the song is a scattering of noises and splattering of rhythms but a mix brewing and merging into a united probing as it all comes into potent focus. A resonating throat calls out from the bass as the rhythms of Doutaz roam with a rampant appetite, both prowling and seducing the senses as distorted flames of guitar wind their riveting toxicity around thoughts. It is a thrilling provocation even before the joining expressive almost psychotic vocals tones of Thorsson complete the scintillating package, every aspect of the song a stark yet endearing poison writhing under the skin and into the passions.

The post punk conspiracy of the track is just as intensive in the following Jahzz, reinforcing thoughts of Wire and early Gang of Four hinted at for varying reasons in its predecessor. Jodry’s bass lies down the first delicious lure, its hypnotic suasion a predacious instigator to striding rhythms and sonic scythes of guitar. To those previously mentioned references you can also add Kabul Golf Club and unavoidably Joy Division as the track courts imagination and ears with its unpredictable and unrelenting web of sound and invention. There is also a sinister air to its aural narrative, a noir kissed ambience which colours the intriguing canvas and persistent single minded gait of song and hook.

It is already an irresistible encounter by this point but the album opens an even richer vat of temptation and tempting with Lac Orbu. The initial clutch of short grooves is once again an instant capture of a raging appetite for the EP before the track stirs up an agitated blanket of rhythms with stabbing guitar as the bass groans hungrily by their side. Vocals bring their distinct enticement to the psychotic dance next; a canter pungent with a contagion of repetition and rhythmic disorientation. Thoughts of The Fire Engines add to the suggestive spicery of the romp before everything is smothering in a sonic squall. Lines are blurred and air infused with raw ambience as the song moves towards its departure, the band again leaving assumptions as pointless as warm melodies trying to encroach into the creeping soundscape.

A pulsating distortion of sonic psyching draws the next up Fascination into view, its strobing soon matched by whipping rhythms and the anthemic vocals. The bass brings a stable shadow to the light show, its premeditated drawl holding the scattered bait for one massive and intrusive seducing. The jagged breath of the track scars the senses beautifully, seizing their allegiance automatically as the acidic flight of guitar winds enticingly almost wantonly around the imagination and emotions. A strong whisper of The Gaa Gaas also permeates the scaring of sonics and rhythms but as throughout thoughts of Wire come the closest to describing a little of the brilliant brew the band conjures.

A schizophrenic character grins from within Bankal 10/15; a fruity discordant twang casting its spell over the guitars as the bass again adds the more even gaited poise to the cacophonous exploits littering ears with scarring beauty. The breaking swagger and addictive swerve of guitar and song simply ignite another wave of lustful ardour in mind and heart, inspiring the return of feelings and bewildered yet hungry thoughts arguably not felt since the late seventies when many of the comparisons mentioned reigned. There is a definite nostalgic feel to the release but only as rich hue to something unique and of the corrosive now.

Vafancuneo closes with the just as tremendous Samba Suicide, a hive of waspish sonics making the first play for the passions before an infectious grinding of riffs and sharp hooks pounce with a pop intent. Probably the most accessible song on the EP, certainly the most danceable, the track evolves into a disorderly, unsynchronised adrenaline fuelled waltz, an atonal stomp which exhausts and exhilarates with equal success. It is a dynamic and masterful finale to a quite brilliant encounter. Welington Irish Black Warrior takes noise and discord and weaves them into the most insatiably gripping and antagonistically seducing pleasure possible. Their songs are genius and wickedly captivating, and once they worm under the surface impossible to shake off.

Vafancuneo is available now @ http://hummusrecords.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/welingtonirishblackwarrior

10/10

RingMaster 01/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Select All Delete Save As – Ultra Cultura

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It is not only a slight shift in band name which is offered by new album Ultra Cultura, but also a richer maturity in songwriting and sound from its creators Select All Delete Save As which at times catches the breath. The band’s previous self-titled debut showed selectalldeletesaveas, as their name was written in 2011, as a highly mischievous and unpredictable proposition. It was a raw and promising encounter which ebbed and flowed in success but nevertheless ignited the imagination of a great many, and a potential soaked seed which has bred the tremendous Ultra Cultura. The new ten track release from the Jersey bred duo of by Antony Walker and Terry Emm is a tantalising and eclectic persuasion which has not lost any of the pair’s devilish intent to wrong foot and constantly surprise the listener. It more impressively though shows a big leap in the quality, writing, and musical craft of the band, showing a maturity which has the potential to bring the band intensive attention.

The pair of Walker and Emm met on a music course at the University of Gloucestershire, and it was when the former was commissioned to record an album, that the two linked up with Selectalldeletesaveas, band and first album the results. With tracks recorded over a year ago, the two musicians have returned to spread their lyrical and musically revelry, Ultra Cultura a natural but to be honest far greater continuation than maybe anticipated. Linking up with sound engineer Jono McMillan, who also provided drums and percussion on most of the tracks, Select All Delete Save As has sculpted an album to steal attention and imagination from its opening seconds, something it never relinquishes until the closing of the final festival of devilment and intrigue. As with its predecessor, certain moments on the release shine stronger than others, but there is never a moment when attention gets seduced away from the release this time around.

The title track sets things off to a strikingly potent start, sparking an immediate increase in an already eager appetite inspired from the band’s last release. Electronic pulses and percussive teasing toys with ears initially, coaxing their focus ready for a raw rub of guitar. Already something feels different to the band, a more honed and concentrated enterprise stroking thoughts as mellow vocals smoulder within the brew. A stronger indie breath seizes control soon after as a shoegaze like warmth permeates the still nicely grazing texture provided by guitars. It is an absorbing persuasion which really ignites with the stunning voice of guest vocalist and fellow islander Rachael McVay. With tones which seduce note by note and a fire to her delivery, the singer ignites the already pleasing track to new levels, which in turn seemingly sparks a greater intensity in the sounds wrapping her contribution. The song is a magnetic start to the album, the first character of a multi-faceted release.

The following Human Error merges chilled electronic premise with guitar woven melodies, vocals plain and emotionless tempering the emotive flames around them. It is a more testing blend than the previous song but also growing to a proposition easily successful with the imagination, its mix of Radiohead and Joy Division coldness with expressive post rock like enticements permeating incessantly until the listener is immerged within its shadowed grin. Its place is sandwiched between the opener and the excellent Modern Life is War and does it no favours but the song easily holds its own before its successor lights another fuse of ardour. Again featuring McVay, the song makes a restrained entrance before a sizzling shot of guitar spirals across the ceiling of the emerging track. There is a feel of House Of love to the track at first which with the alignment of vocals between band and McVay sparking a broader smile of energy, the song glides sultrily across the senses like a mix of The Adult Net and Some Kind Of Wonderful era March Violets. Mesmeric and ravenously seductive, the song is an evocative breeze of indie pop and quite delicious.

Both the melancholic Temperature and the Archetypal Woman simmer in their temptations but croon and dance respectively their way into the affections, the first with the band’s skilled humour and precisely invasive melodic bait within another emotionally haunted atmosphere and the second with its jazzy meanderings and very English relish to refuse predictability and expectations. Whereas Temperature plays with a post punk seeded lack of light its successor romps like The Monochrome Set meets The Jazz Butcher, a distinct British kind of eccentricity which as its companion only expands the diversity and boundaries of the album further.

The pair of Service of the Lord and Nectar of Instruction also takes longer to wrap their persuasive toxins around the passions though imagination is soon enlisted by the temperate yet solemn caress of the first and the anti-folk smile of the latter. The evidence of their success is the lingering enticements which swim around the memory after their leaving, the jazz funk invention of guitar in the second of the two leading into an eagerly catchy chorus one of the persistent lures.

The virulent seduction of instrumental Slowcore Puck absorbs next, its impassioned climate and melody hued colours flirting with thoughts before the post punk/electronic minimalism of The Sun & his Sunglasses brings its entrancing psyche encircling hypnotism to the party. The humour of the band as everywhere simmers and spills with glee, adding to the fun and creative irreverence often at work as in closing song Charge my Pad. An infectious stroll of guitar crafted indie rock with pop spice and drama which seems seeded in The Cure, band and song turn on its audience with a great flume of Bowie inspired mischief, this passage of the song simply the illegitimate yet endearing bastard son of Starman. With blossoming keys and a constantly flavoursome throaty bass line, the song leaves album and its recipient with a gleefully wide grin.

It is probably fair to say that Select All Delete Save As is still an incitement for a certain audience but as we stated in our review of the last album, the band does not care when it comes down to it as long as they light up their own and some other hearts somewhere. Ultra Cultura is sure to recruit a great many more adventurous appetites to the band and its ever evolving presence which has really leap in impressive growth between albums.

The self-released Ultra Cultura is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/ultra-cultura/id868037607

http://www.selectalldeletesaveas.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 27/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tim Paris – Dancers

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Dancers is the ideal title for the debut album from London based Parisian Tim Paris, each of its tracks whether an open flirtation or a more chilled proposition, a vibrant adventurous waltz. Better known as one half of It’s a Fine Line with Ivan Smagghe, Paris has sculpted songs which pull the imagination into unpredictable and vivacious soundscapes. Each one is distinct and stands alone in the tapestry of the release but have a symbiotic union which provides one refreshingly inventive landscape for senses and emotions to bask in. Dancers ebbs and flows in success across its body it is fair to say but only to waiver within a constant magnetic seduction which never relinquishes its strength.

As renowned for his remix invention which has seen him reinterpreting invention from the likes of The XX, Femi Kuti, Battant, Au Revoire Simone, Ewan Pearson, and Tiga, the DJ, producer, and musician now unleashes his own electronic alchemy through the album, merging the purest essences of synth pop, new wave, post punk, electronica, disco, house, and much more for transfixing and evocative aural climates. Dancers provides insights into richly flavoursome cinematic scenes but also ones which have an intimacy which goes beyond voyeurism to draw the listener emotionally into the imaginative investigations. Featuring a wealth of guests, the album is also a collaborative affair embraced by the creative ingenuity of Paris.

Opening track Golden Ratio strides boldly in on punchy beats and an electro tinkling which reminds instantly of Love Cats by The Cure Tim Paris - Dancersthough it takes little time to show its own distinct tease to the coaxing. The song then infuses intriguing melodic lures which do not nestle easily within the established pulse of the song but only accentuates the awakening potency. Featuring Georg Levin of Wahoo, the song opens up warm arms of melody bred enticement and smooth vocal expression which are themselves veined by intriguing twists of enterprise and electronic investigation. The post punk strict rhythmic heartbeat steers the journey allowing thoughts to take in the radiant sights and absorbing atmosphere. It is an adventure which midway takes a breath to return with an even more masterful hold on the appetite, a case of absence making the heart grow fonder.

The enticing start is matched by Rain which sees the guest appearance of Coco Solid of the Parallel Dance Ensemble. The song drips slightly chilled riffs down upon the ear whilst a rhythmic shuffle hurries across the senses. It is another alluring start given extra drama by the skirting dark throated bass, the combination building a striking premise which is enriched further by the cyber kissed vocal narrative. The repetitive spine of the track bewitches constantly; the stark core holding Joy Division/Bauhaus like predation around which the elegant and mesmeric call of the song spreads and croons.

The metallic breath of Outback, Stones & Vinyl soaks the ears next, the initial caress of the song courting a John Foxx essence which never leaves the infectious persuasion. As the track explores its seductive canvas, building and colouring the imagination with inspiring textures, the instrumental toys with the senses further, stretching its provocative enveloping with an additional Bill Nelson like invention. Like standing on a heaven lit cliff top whilst warm winds and sights wrap rivetingly around the senses, the song puts the listener in a hypnotic almost meditative emotional trance.

The following Minireich which features Sex Judas and Rupert Cross and Disco Ellipse both create a transfixing dancefloor bred temptation, though the pair tantalise and shimmer in their enticement rather than leap upon the eagerness of feet. The first has a definite Yello feel to its mischievous invention, vocally and in the devilish temptation offered whilst its successor is a cybernetic tango, flashing sonics and dazzling electronics spraying their bait around before the emotive weave of distressed melodies and restrained bedlam make their play successfully for the passions. Those nor the next up Unsung Deaf Hero fire up the same intensity of hunger and thrills as the opening songs but all captivate and refuse to release the album’s hold, the third of the trio a smothering wash of thick ambiences and funk spawned vocals casting a dark dance of inciting suggestiveness and mystery.

Dancers is back to dominating senses and mind with the outstanding drama of The Grip. With Ben Shemie, Paris lays a noir bred sinister atmosphere within which guitar and rhythms stalk the imagination, the encounter a soundtrack which could easily grace any caped crusader or futuristic darkly shadowed enigma. All the tracks allow the mind to run riot with their aural paint but this more than most conjures up stories and emotions to intoxicatingly bask in.

You’ll Never Know also creates a tenebrous encounter to immerse within, it’s again noir crafted riddle an imposing and incendiary fuse for an adventurous mind to run with whilst ears welcome the varied vocal hues and electronic weaves. It is a blend which is just as alluring in the slightly lighter Extreme Nails, its celestial stroll within a heavy but slow rhythmic frame a beacon for the listener to explore in their own design. Shadows as across most tracks are never far away with their tempering relish though they have to take more of a backseat within the fruity exploits of Heaven Parking which again sees Sex Judas involved. There is a subdued but visible lunacy to the song which brings thoughts of the eighties Martin Atkins band Brian Brain. It is a thrilling revelry which steps aside for the equally delicious Backseat Reflexion to close the album. The song sees Forrest joining Paris in a last irresistible seduction, electronics and melodies aligning within a shadow built emotional seduction.

It is a masterful end to a similarly consummate release, Dancers offering a collection of emotive and provocative vignettes which absorb thoughts and passions like a sponge for exhilarating experiences and adventures. Apart from the length of a few tracks stretching their staying power to clutch at straws in an attempt to temper the enthusiasm, Tim Paris has provided his finest hour with his own solo release, the first of many we hope and suspect.

Dancers is available on 2 x 12″ vinyl, CD, and download right now via My Favorite Robot Records.

http://www.facebook.com/djtimparis

9/10

RingMaster 12/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Velvet Morning – Velvet Moon

 

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    Immersed in the heat haze of sonic endeavour and melodic mesmerism that is Velvet Moon, atmospheric seduction its engulfing breath, it is hard to resist the temptation of pronouncing UK band Velvet Morning as one of the most compelling and impressive propositions to emerge in recent times. Their six track sultry breeze of guitar based psychedelia and intensive shoegaze temptation is a masterful embrace, one which soars around the senses whilst wrapping around the imagination with a thick and wonderfully intrusive persuasion. Suspenseful and meditative, enthrallingly droning, and simply a sublime coaxing of the emotions, the release is a transfixing debut statement from a band you will be hearing a lot more from we suggest.

     Hailing from Southend-on-Sea, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Samuel Jones, bassist John Kirkwood, guitarist Luke Elgar, and drummer Chris Richardson seemingly embrace the richly evocative invention of bands like The Jesus and Mary Chain, Spacemen 3, and The Brian Jonestown Massacre, infusing it into their own imaginative incitement of sound whist equally showing a uniqueness which sets them apart from those mentioned. At times it is a creeping rather than raging individualism which strokes ears but one which instinctively slides under the skin and into the psyche igniting a long term enjoyment and passion for their presence.

    As soon as the first croon of bass and guitar tenderly handles the ears as opener Paranoia steps into view there is a feeling of something very appetising approaching, the first irresistible hook unveiled that strong and infectious. The song glides with a romantic gait to its slow melodic caress and rhythmic shuffle, its enveloping narrative like a restrained yet potent flame for thoughts and passions with the excellent expressive drawl of Jones a similarly impacting and descriptive tonic for the imagination. The track is a slow dance of contagious invention, nothing ever hungry enough to want to explode or explore a rigorous technical or intensive weave but built on textures and a breath-taking ambience that are thoughtfully cast and ingeniously developed.

    The following Octocity brings a gentle swagger to its entrance whilst the smouldering warmth and entwining adventure of its predecessor moves into a lighter poppier flight on the song, drawing thoughts of House Of Love into the equation. With shadowing percussive intrigue flirting with the climactic euphoria drifting alongside the sonic humidity, the song bewitches an already eager appetite for the release which the next up Black Velvet Morning sends to new rapture. Immediately capturing the imagination with a dark almost Joy Division like throaty bass sound and a rasping sonic bluster, both again relatively subdued with their shadow bred threat, the track sways before the senses, entrancing them whilst a ridiculously spicy melodic hook takes care of everything else. Merging raw and beauteous narratives the track is a glorious adventure, post punk mystery meets psychedelic incursions for a masterfully magnetic journey.

   She’s A Live Wire takes the listener back into a sweltering sea of lush melodies, minimalistic yet imposing textures, and vocally driven simmering atmospheres. There is an even greater laid back feel and energy to the song than anything before but despite an open skill in the musicianship and sonic colouring soaking the tale, there is also a less dramatic spark to the scorched landscape compared to those around it. It cannot defuse the impressive impact of the EP so far but does lose itself in the shadows of the previous song and the excellent Blue Jean Baby. The track, as the release overall, is an aural drug, an addictive bathing of the senses which leaves imagination painting a scenery and emotions simply reflecting.

    Closing track I Got You provides a final lingering emotive waltz to investigate and bask in, its slow motion enslavement of body and soul another abduction of the passions. There is a rapturous expression and stroll to the track which reflects the heart of the release vividly. It makes the perfect finale to a quite absorbing and exciting first bow from Velvet Morning. Certainly you have to dive deeply within the songs to discover all of the intricacies and vibrant hues, some of their successes submerged within a slightly similar surface presence of some songs, but the rewards for the patience and endeavour are mouthwatering. The Velvet Moon EP is glorious, an encounter which easily inspires full submission into its tranquil fire of lustful intent.

https://www.facebook.com/Velvet.Morning.band

9/10

RingMaster 23/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tense Men – Where Dull Care Is Forgotten

Tense Men promo

    Bringing a primitively lustful tingle inside with its post punk bred fusion of noise and psyche rock, the Where Dull Care Is Forgotten EP from UK band Tense Men, is one of those delicious treats which flicks all the right switches. Band and release is a ripe proposition for those with a strong appetite for post punk, repetitious discord, and minimalistic adventures of noise and maybe less tasty not for those with different appetites, but we would suggest still a rewarding encounter leaving a lingering mark whatever your penchant.

    Tense Men was formed in 2011 by Cold Pumas guitarist/vocalist Oliver Fisher and singer/drummer Richard Phoenix of Sauna Youth. Combining drums, guitar and a loop pedal the duo made people stand up and notice with a clutch of live performances before recording the six track Where Dull Care Is Forgotten. Since its recording the Brighton band has expanded with the addition of Omi Palone bassist Liam O’Neill. Now with its release via Faux Discx on 12” vinyl and digital download, the debut EP from Tense Men is poised to push this union of craft and noise sculpting into an eager awareness, its success on the strength of the release something hard to doubt.

    As soon as opener Stages Of Boredom scars the ears, imagination and an already assumptive hunger are lit as guitars lash the Layout 1air with sonic persistence matched by a rhythmic enticement. The first piece of insidiously addictive weaponry is unleashed within seconds, a repetition driven groove entwining the senses with seductive potency as the vocals of Fisher offer a mutually monotone seeded suasion. Into its full drone bred swagger, the track baits the emotions with a mix of The Gaa Gaas like psyche temptation and the post punk causticity and repeating moroseness of Joy Division. It is a magnetising provocation which worms itself under the skin with an insatiable toxicity and an intensively powerful lure into release and band.

    The following RNRFON resonates through bone as its rawer body presses on the senses with a bass cast coaxing rapidly joined by equally unrelenting rhythms. Across their flanks shards of caustic guitar sear the air before the vocals join the affair with a sombre wishful tone to their delivery. The track reminds of another English band; The St Pierre Snake Invasion with its rawer punk lent persistence, again restrained torrents of repetition veined by squirreling guitar leading the passions into another ardour clad response. With a coat of discord to the jangling swipes of Fisher’s strings in dramatic contrast to his vocals and the low hum of the track, Tense Men has imagination, theirs and ours, tightly clasped in their hands.

     Lie Heavy (Desperate Times) has a thicker rapacious throat and presence to its sound, Mary & Jesus Chain with a touch of Birdland coming to mind whilst the enticing jagged guitar melodies add a touch of The Fire Engines to the abrasive incitement. Though the song does not spark the same depth of greed as its predecessors it still leaves satisfaction basking in a resourceful web of noise which the title track tries to exploit further with its slow and patient consumptive breath. The dark wash of the track almost swarms as it offers its doomy pressure, the drone preying on body and thoughts and in a different guise repeated through the equally potent Nonentities. The track has a slightly lighter atmosphere which also ventures into a Reid brothers inspired premise as its predecessor, but still allows no respite from the intensity and mesmeric call that unbridled reduplication brings.

    The EP ends on a riot to match the incredible start of the release, Opiate Glow the dramatic treat. The rawest punk spawned track on the album with post punk voracity, the tempest emerges from a two barrelled incitement into a ridiculously contagious stroll, rhythms and vocals simultaneously beckoning and taunting before expulsions of furious guitars and energy savage the air. It is an outstanding trap which has more than a whisper of Wire to its devilment, in fact the song like a close relation to the legend’s track 12XU, just a few generations on in the family time line.

     Where Dull Care Is Forgotten is a fabulous release, a scourge of nostalgic and modern smothering which ignites the passions from start to finish. Whether Tense Men will have to bide its times as its members return to their day jobs we will see but already the anticipation for their next offering is impatient.

http://tensemen.tumblr.com/

http://fauxdiscx.bandcamp.com/album/where-dull-care-is-forgotten

9/10

RingMaster 10/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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