Band of Holy Joy – A Place Called Home

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Following up the success of previous single When a Gift is a Curse, Band of Holy Joy have now tapped into a colourful balladry which musically is as fascinating as the lyrical narrative it colours. The last single impressed if without lighting much more than a spark in the passions, but its successor makes in many ways a much more dramatic incitement and proposal that certainly stirs up lively satisfaction.

As magnetic and striking as they ever were, Band of Holy Joy earned a wealth of fan and critical acclaim with their album Easy Listening earlier this year, with the last single an open doorway into its bracing invention and enterprise. A BOHJ_A_PLACE_CALLED_HOMEPlace Called Home, which has been described as ‘A big city pop song of tradition and place lost in the shiny new urban world of market forces, rising rents and social cleansing’, brings another fresh turn from the band to ignite thoughts and emotions. Released on the band’s own label Radio Joy, the single has an intimacy and broader reach which easily engages with the individual and the climate of life as a whole.

The song emerges from a brew of sonic ambience with a caress of guitar and respectful rhythms beneath the distinctive tones of Johny Brown. It has an immediate grace and charm which intrigues and embraces just as swiftly. There is a feel of The Smiths to the ballad’s croon whilst its melodic warmth has a sultry fifties twang and innocence which equally seduces thoughts and emotions. As its expression of guitar enterprise and stringed melancholy expands over the senses, the track simply glows. Vocals and bass add further character to the temptation whilst the keys bring a whispering glaze of incitement to add further immersive hues to the delightful proposition.

A Place Called Home is a masterful kiss on ears and a tenacious suasion on the imagination, with a romance to its presence which ensures it is a song destined never to be ignored.

A Place Called Home is available digitally now through Radio Joy @ http://bandofholyjoy.bandcamp.com/album/a-place-called-home

http://www.bandofholyjoy.co.uk/

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/23014

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Thom Bowden – Searching The Brittle Light

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From the release of his striking and impressive The Damage EP of 2012 there has been a healthy dose of acclaim placed around UK musician Thom Bowden and keen anticipation bred for his debut album. This week sees the unveiling of Searching The Brittle Light and those hopes are sure to be satisfied with the ten track encounter. It is not a release which impacts as potently and consistently as Bowden’s previous proposition but certainly it brings another wash of the rich potential within his songwriting and highly agreeable sound.

Surrey based, Bowden takes inspirations from the likes of The White Stripes, Nick Drake, Dresden Dolls, Fugazi, and Neil Young into his imagination catching enterprise. As mentioned The Damage EP brought strong attention and responses from fans and media alike, something you can only see the album repeating and increasing. A collection of songs written when Bowden was ‘at a low point in his life’, the album was recorded with and mixed by Steve Albini (Pixies, Nirvana, Manic Street Preachers) and mastered by Steve Rooke at Abbey Road. Inspired by some advice offered whilst the artists was in Chicago by Kim Deal, the album brings a raw honest intent and beauty to the ears. There is also a slightly more adventurous variation across the songs than on the last EP, a move you can only respect and embrace even with its slightly mixed success in comparison to the consistency of the previous release.

With guitarist Richard George and drummer Steve Matthews alongside Bowden, the album opens strongly with Click!, a song taking mere seconds to seduce ears and thoughts with its opening seduction of sultry blues kissed flames. a2137786508_2The slow swipes of guitar are soon joined by punchy beats and a darkly drawing bassline before the great expressively twanged and unpredictable voice of Bowden starts revealing the lyrical narrative. His voice and a rich essence of the music has a Frank Black like temptation which only adds to the smouldering enticement, an invitation which burns increasingly brighter as the song evolves and spreads its senses sizzling charms. The feisty stride of the track is an incessant call on the passions whilst the increasingly warped vocal delivery which by this point has a more My Red Cell essence, Bowden sounding similar to frontman Russell Toomey of the defunct Welsh band, only captivates with mischievous bait. It is a strong and gripping start to the album which without lighting fires sets up a keen appetite for its offering, a hunger soon spicily fed by the second song.

So So Long makes a controlled and infectious entrance, guitars and rhythms a simple but entrancing lure to which Bowden’s grazing tones lay angst spawned invention and caustic passion. The track never lifts its gait to anything more than a slow determined canter but with expulsions of sonic heat and expressive melodic energy, the song irresistibly wins over ears, again thoughts of the previously mentioned Welsh band coming to the fore. It is a masterful slice of sonic magnetism bringing a licking of lips. Its potent presence is followed by the ballad My Arms, the song a union of voice, guitar, and emotive textures which certainly stirs up thoughts and attention but brings an unexpected and underwhelming halt to the thrust of the album. Obviously a highly personal offering, it is hard and impossible to dismiss, or not enjoy, but the song is a wrongly positioned rein on the passions for personal preference.

The following Control brings the temperature and energy back with accomplished and thrilling enterprise. Rhythms roll invitingly through the ears as guitars swerve and let fly with melodic scythes of enticement and sonic tempting which reawakens a thirsty imagination. There is a definite eighties new wave feel to the track, another shade of familiarity which in different designs attractively flirts with most of certainly the rockier numbers on the release. As it continues to tease and impress, the glorious song casts a web of inventive guitar endeavour, melodic mischief, and sonic alchemy to treat and seduce the emotions; it all aided by an emerging Pixies sounding toxicity.

Next up How About It? slips into a gentler hug of emotive intimacy and melodic caressing around a spine of shadow involving rhythmic invention from drums and bass. It is a slowly burning temptation which takes longer than certainly the previous song to persuade but emerges as a deliciously riveting and evocative highlight of the release. Its broody success is followed by the forty five second instrumental , a piece which is just there before the outstanding With Pace unleashes its grunge spawned sinews and punkish desires. As its title suggests, the track romps with swift, heavily thumping feet and fiery riffs around which rapacious grooves and fuzz encased vocals flirt and rage respectively. There is no escaping a Nirvana comparison but as elsewhere it only spices up the brawling encounter. The album and Bowden seems to wear inspirations on their sleeve, definitely more than the EP, to predominantly bring stronger aural colours to embrace.

The raucous air and exhaustive pleasure of the triumph is swiftly tempered and brought back to the ground with the folk seeded reflection of The Water Is Cold, a decent and strikingly performed song but again an underwhelming shift in scenery and suasion. Its emerging emotional stringed flight and expressive vocal coaxing does light thoughts and feelings, but there is the thought that the track would be better served elsewhere in the order or set on a separate release to find the reaction it deserves.

The bluesy plaintive cry of In The Ground comes next to stir up a nest of satisfied thoughts and emotions with its persistent tendrils of sonic imposing and fiery enticement around another roar of vocal lament and expression. It is a track which you want more of before the final elegant balladry of Sweet And Tender brings the album to a musically and lyrically rueful close. Soaked in more folk seeded melancholy it is a captivating end to a fine if inconsistent album.

     Searching The Brittle Light is an impressive next step for Bowden but because of its intent and bravery in stretching its boundaries may be fails to match its predecessor. The songs are a clear step on in craft and maturity let alone invention but the album feels like two releases in one which defuses its impact whereas separating them into EPs of rock and ballad seeded tracks might have brought the showcase and clarity they deserve. Nevertheless Thom Bowden is an exciting talent which will be creating remarkable and keenly devoured statements ahead, we for one wait eagerly.

Searching The Brittle Light is available digitally, on vinyl, and CD now via Audio Candle Records and @ http://thombowden.bandcamp.com/

http://thombowden.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 15/07/2014

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Latimer House – Birdcage Walk

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The make-up of Latimer House is a diverse mix which makes their new single and its sound a bit of a surprise as our introduction to the band. Made up of guitarist Joe Cook from London and drummer/ percussionist Jiří Kominek from Toronto, who set the seeds for the band in 2010 when linking up and playing together, alongside bassist Michael Jetton from Virginia and Baku hailing keyboardist Anar Yusufov, the Prague based band have a sound as English as it comes. New single Birdcage Walk has an eccentric and quaint air which plays like a mix of Ian Dury meets Cockney Rebel with a rich spice of The Kinks and Tankus The Henge in its creative toxin. From the varied globe covering line-up it is an unexpected proposition but one which engages with an irrepressible charm.

Birdcage Walk is an edited version of a track from the recently released Latimer House album All The Rage. Following and along with first single This Is Pop, the new release makes a potent and intriguing temptation for their debut album, one easy to expect a whole new wave of appetite for the band’s sound to be woken up by. Consisting of a collection of tracks recorded in 2012 with engineer Derek Saxenmeyer, the February unveiled All The Rage brought an eager spotlight upon the band with others, one set to one increased by the new pop folk tempting of Birdcage Walk.

Guitars and rhythms immediately enchant ears as the song opens up its melodic caress. It is right away a gentle and endearing stroll which sways with enterprise and quaintly jangling suasion. The vocals of Cook go much towards bringing that British feel but musically there are elements of XTC with whispers of The Divine Comedy to the song which only add to the distinct caress. Cook’s voice has a dulled yet vibrant monotony which increases the charm offensive of the song whilst matching the earthier lyrical narrative, writing which itself brings a Squeeze like essence to the whole persuasion. With keys colouring the more singular stroll of the track and its shuffling dance, Birdcage Walk makes for a captivating encounter. It does not ignite a fire in the belly it is fair to say but as a summer breeze certainly hits the sweet spot.

The song is accompanied by Until Then, an openly rawer and dirtier stomp with blazes of horns and melodic tantalising which themselves have a rough edge and fiery touch. Within that appealing almost teasing scenery a jazzy air and indie rock intrigue plays with thoughts whilst the guitars cast a sonic flaming which brings its own distinctive hue to the spicily varied landscape. Longer to convince but eventually just as persuasive and enjoyable as its companion, it along with Birdcage Walk just infests the imagination and makes an exploration of All The Rage a must and attention on Latimer House ahead inevitable.

Birdcage Walk is out on Honk Records now digitally, CD, and on ltd Ed vinyl @ http://latimerhouse.bandcamp.com/track/birdcage-walk

http://latimerhouse.com/

8/10

RingMaster 07/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dignan Porch – Observatory

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Returning with their third album and the first on Brighton independent label Faux Discx, UK band Dignan Porch reassert themselves as one of the more mesmeric and tantalising psychedelically wrapped indie pop incitements around. Observatory is a captivating collection of lo-fi presented, resourcefully sculpted songs which flirt and then simply run with the imagination. The release is an aural nest egg, an honest escape and comfort to fall back on in times of stress and just when you want good, heart bred music.

Starting out as a one man project for Joseph Walsh, Dignan Porch has evolved into a healthy complement of inventive and expressive musicians creating similarly potent music. The new album follows the well-received Tendrils of 2010 and Nothing Bad Will Ever Happen two years later, both released on the New York label Captured Tracks. Written and predominantly recorded in a cold and noisy flat above a used-carpet shop in South London in 2013, where Joe was living, Observatory is a seductive breeze of DIY invention and care. It has an intimacy which caresses the listener whilst providing the unpredictability and insight of life’s emotions, an often shadowed and dark sadness which entwines with the open radiance of the songs. Of the few tracks recorded differently to the almost jigsaw like piecing together of parts elsewhere, these were recorded as a full band in the moment with Henry Withers at Sound Savers studio. It all makes for a compelling and ultimately enchanting proposition but one with a raw and dirty edge which just as strikingly shapes the release into the triumph it is.

A rhythmic trap catches the ears first as opener Forever Unobscured enters the eye line, the percussive bait instantly gripping FAUX-031-600pxattention and an already awakening appetite. It is soon joined by the slightly mischievous and again wholly magnetic keys of Hayley Akins, which in turn is swiftly courted by the moody tones of Ben Goodwin’s bass and the guitar maze of Joseph and his brother Sam Walsh. It is a mouthwatering mix to which the mellow yet sultry vocals lay seductively, whilst around it all a fiery temperament and energy brews to further inflame the imagination. It is an engrossing start which the brilliant Deep Deep Problem takes to another level. It is the perfect pop song, hooks and melodies courting sirenesque harmonies by Joseph and Hayley as they take thoughts and emotions by the hand and lead them into an infectious waltz. There is a rich sixties psychedelic pop essence to the breath-taking union of guitars and keys which is punctuated by the roaming beats of Luke Walsh, but also a feel of psyc. It is a gorgeous encounter which tempts and abrases perfectly.

The acoustically crafted Veil of Hze strokes ears next, the hollow wrapped vocals a haunting enticement in an emotive embrace, before the wonderful discord kissed No Lies toys with the senses through smouldering keys and deliciously jangly guitar coaxing. Like vortices of sonic wind and vocal sun, the song laps over the senses simultaneously igniting passions with quirky grooves and quaintly cast invention. It is a seductive beauty which sparks a new hunger in the appetite which was less effusive with its predecessor, and just as vibrantly Between the Trees brings a seventies garage pop croon to bear on ears and heart for similar effect. It is a short bounce of a song but one which in its brief presence has the listener tightly gripped and subservient.

The start of Wait & Wait & Wait is excellent; a warped cartoonish lure which turns out to sadly be a false start in the entrance of the song. It is a shame as it would have made an irresistible start to the track. Nevertheless the song without admittedly drawing the same strength of reactions still provides a highly satisfying and elegant friendship before the punk infused crawl of Harshed and the minimalistic call of I Plan to Come Back bring the passions back to the boil. The first of the two strolls with a sultry swagger and Birdland like causticity in its melodic shimmering whilst its successor is a lean bordering on anorexic sonic web of humid melodies and streamline drama encased in a melancholic mist. The song absorbs the imagination like a sponge, inspiring fresh adventure as it expands its celestial colours.

Through the likes of the more than decently attractive Dinner Tray and the beefy evocative of Warm Welcome to Hell, the album continues to firmly engage if not quite finding that incendiary spark of before, though that fuse is soon lit again by the outstanding Got to Fly. Like in the opening song, a rhythmic enticement brings initial slavery before guitars paint thoughts with sonic hues as vocals push forward the developing addictive canvas of the song for a greater feisty bewitchment. It is a tremendous provocation before the final mellow sunset of Swing By, a soothing encounter enriched with varied emotive shades and acidic melodic veining. The song makes a fine end to Observatory, an excellent immersive closing which lingers and wraps the listener impressively.

Dignan Porch has crafted the perfect companion for sullen moments in heat bred summer nights with Observatory, an enticing vehicle through which explorations of evocative realms and personal corners bring a wealthy dose of pleasure.

Observatory is available now on 12” vinyl LP and digital download @ http://fauxdiscx.bandcamp.com/album/observatory

https://www.facebook.com/dignanporch

8/10

RingMaster 17/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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How To Swim – Niagarama

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An inescapable transfixing, Niagarama the new album from Scottish chamber pop band How To Swim seduces with an irresistible charm and almost devious artistry which simply enslaves the imagination and passions. It is a deliciously varied and adventurous escapade, a melodic emprise which is as unafraid to tease and tantalise as it is to lie romantically upon the ears and senses. In many ways the band is still a relative secret, inexplicably escaping so far a spotlight which their new full-length definitely suggests they deserve, but now with its unveiling you can only imagine and expect that whisper of recognition to soon become a roar.

Formed in 2000 by vocalist/guitarist Gregor Barclay, How to Swim has persistently intrigued and ignited thoughts with their releases and evolving sound. From a rawer encounter the band has developed an orchestrated pop which devours ears as vivaciously as ears devour it, with Niagarama the pinnacle of the band’s rise so far. Numerous line-up changes have come within the life of the band and now from a complement of personnel reaching double figures the band has become a lean mean pop machine featuring members of The Second Hand Marching Band, The Martial Arts, and the now-defunct Mother and The Addicts, but a sextet just as potent in presence and weight of invention as ever. The new album also sees a wealth of talented guests helping realise the songwriting and imagination of Barclay and the Glasgow band, and the exploration of ‘the loss of youth and how we process it’, the album’s core theme amidst a pungent metaphor indicated by its title. It is a magnificent beast of enticement, one to have feet dancing, imagination painting, and emotions reflecting.

Released on their own Personal Hygiene Recordings and the successor to the acclaimed Retina (or More Fun Than a Vat of Love) of HTS cover2010, Niagarama takes little time to fascinate and subsequently bewitch as Niagara opens up the fun. From a haunted intro the song cups ears with poetic keys and the coaxing expressive tones of Barclay, his voice a slightly gravelly but alluring enticement which fits perfectly within the piano melodies and emotive strokes of strings from their manipulative bows. It is a surprising entrance into the album, a potent croon which does not ignite senses and emotions but certainly stirs them up nicely for the following triumph of Small Parts Moving. The second track instantly grips attention with discord kissed rub of violins immediately courted by darker bass hues and great twisted teasing of guitars. The song is soon in full control of the emotions as it hits its stride, brass and vocals adding their descriptive hues to the emerging narrative. Bouncing with the appetite of pure pop but equally twisting it with an invention which crosses numerous styles and veins of sound, the track dances eagerly like a mix of James Cook and Union Starr.

With an inspired rapturous hunger now in place the following Bacterium feeds it again with its insatiable bait complete with a swagger clad melodic tempting and rhythmic shuffle matched by vocals and brass. An essence of Young Knives brings further depth to the persuasion, whilst the mischievous heart and swing of the song simply enslaves body and soul. It is a glorious romp matching its predecessor in setting an early lofty plateau for the album. With mesmeric devilry to the guitars and the gait of the encounter, the band envelops the listener in a weave of feisty seduction which is straight away pushed to greater success by Too Old For A Crush (To Be Endearing). With firm rhythms aligned to imagination clasping swipes of riffs, brass, and elegant keys, all under the spell of the excellently blended male and female harmonies, the song is an irresistible temptress; a seductress which steals even greater submission through sudden blazes of intensity and concussive voracity. It is a scintillating waltz of beauty and ferocity, a dramatic show with the carnivalesque suasion of Tankus The Henge and the rapacious ingenuity of 12 Stone Toddler, yet rigorously unique to How To Swim.

Both It Doesn’t Even Have To Be You and I Need A War keep the album in control of attention and greedy appetite, if without quite matching earlier heights. The first recalls the fluid warmth of eighties bands like The Lightning Seeds which soak radiant melodies and brass flames with extra infectiousness skirted by the emotive strings which constantly provide the colour for emotions and thoughts to cast their individual premises. Its successor from a slow and charming vocal/acoustic embrace glides in on a seventies pop like breath, with again strong blends of harmonies to fill its emotional embrace. It is an appealing start but one which does not take a firm hold until a rhythmic adventure and a web of guitar sculpted ingenuity takes over the tempting. The song then swiftly moves into unpredictable scenery which entwines both aspects of its intent for a thoroughly satisfying sultry proposition.

The brief INTERMISSION: The Dead Cat Bounce steps in next for an ok diversion before the jazzy waltz of Long Division takes ears on another seventies bred mystery with exciting rewards. The song merges funk and pop into its lively yet smouldering saunter to capture the imagination once more before the potent Bark steps in to steal the passions all over again. Managing to be melancholic and excitingly buoyant simultaneously, it an effervescent whirlwind of invention and emotions, the track is gorgeous with keys and strings along with the ever inviting vocals taking top honours.

The album closes with Animals and All That We Wait For, two songs which certainly in the case of the first are almost toying with thoughts, inflaming their creativity with a weave of inspiring musical imagination. An electronic simplicity marks the first of the pair whilst a vocal caress within a flight of engrossing strings and absorbing melodies ensures the final song brings a compelling last incitement to bask in. The song takes longer than most to convince but with a riveting Walker Brothers like sixties magnificence to its emerging grandeur, it is another immense highlight of the album.

Niagarama is quite sensational and surely the key to taking How To Swim into the recognition and burning spotlight they have long suggested through their music and invention that they deserved. Pop does not get any better than this, or as imposingly impacting, a must release for all.

Niagarama is available via Personal Hygiene Recordings now @ https://howtoswim.bandcamp.com/album/niagarama

https://www.facebook.com/howtoswim

9/10

RingMaster 16/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Band Of Holy Joy – When a Gift is a Curse

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The first in a series of ‘libationary’ singles dedicated to the glorious and dark aspects of ‘the older person’s habitual alcohol consumption’, When a Gift is a Curse is another riveting evocative encounter from the UK’s premier folk punks Band Of Holy Joy. Paying tribute to the genius George Best and the wayward life emerging from his world enlightening talent, the single is released on the band’s own Radio Joy to coincide with their second stage headline appearance at the NME C86 festival at London’s 229 Club on June 14th. Taken from their latest and acclaimed album Easy Listening, the release is another slice of unique incitement from a band entering its fourth decade.

When a Gift is a Curse opens with a sultry swipe of guitar swiftly joined by an additional emotive caress of melodic melancholy and the Band of holyjoy When-A-Gift-Is-A-Curseever distinctly expressive vocals of Johny Brown. Opening up its heart and evocative textures, the song spreads like mist over ears and the imagination, keys accentuating the sultry breath and radiance of the song whilst the shadowed tones of bass provides a tempering air which subsequently only highlights the rich hues wrapping the lyrical and vocal potency.

To be honest the song does not make a startling impact or impression initially though there is plenty to intrigue and entice the senses and imagination. This maybe makes not the most incisive temptation for newcomers to their album and its might but given time the song permeates and seduces for another provocative hymn from Band Of Holy Joy which is impossible to ignore or resist…pretty much like the band itself since those early days in the mid-eighties.

When a Gift is a Curse is released digitally on June 16th through Radio Joy.

http://www.bandofholyjoy.co.uk/

7/10

RingMaster 15/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Embracing individual shadows and unique lights: an interview with Katie Buckett of Jingo

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Across the past twelve months or so, UK based band Jingo has been one of the biggest surprises and persistently unique propositions to keep the site excited and busy with a regular presentation of singles. Recently the band unveiled the final three tracks in a series of four which were released one by one over a four track period. As almost expected now but always impressed by, the songs came with individual character and stylishly varied sounds wrapped in an equally mesmeric imagination.

There was the poetically evocative Before You Were Born, a song which opens with the ever sirenesque voice of Katie Buckett courted by just as elegant melodic caresses and pungent keys. Heart bred and emotively enchanting, the song immerses senses and thoughts in a striking aural narrative which grows and brews in intensity across its length, Kate’s husband Jack alongside Joseph Reeves and Sahil Batra casting a magnetic web of sound and vocal support, not forgetting sonic drama which is mouthwatering. It is a glorious song which shares diversity and startling persuasion with Home, another song which is able to simultaneously seduce and inflict an intrusive adventure upon the imagination and passions. The drama of the previous song is again, as across most of their songs, a thick temptation which shares shadows and sultry colour with the equally delicious sounds and gripping premise of the encounter. The track is a brilliant aural movie for mind and heart, a provocative suitor for ears and senses, and an ingenious lover for the imagination, just like the last of the single released in that aforementioned quartet. Turn Around is rhythmic enticement around which vocals and harmonies flame and melodies dance with a flirtatious summer bred festivity. Again the track offers something new from and about Jingo. It is a trait all of their ten plus singles has succeeded in impressing by, here a Caribbean swagger and warmth aligned to a psychedelic coaxing a bewitching venture to which Katie excels, once again.

Jingo is a band which surely cannot be a British secret for much longer, their invention and craft too big to be contained you suspect and hope, especially with the forthcoming release of their debut album which the band are finishing as you read. With a long overdue move to find out much more about the band; its past, present, and future we had the pleasure of having Katie share time with us and revealing…

 

Hey Katie and welcome to the site, thank you for talking with us.

Thanks for liking our music.

Tell us about the beginnings of Jingo, where it all started and on which side of the ocean; oh and was it band or romance first? ;)

Jack (guitar) and Joe (drums) brought their band to New York for six months to live the dream. They rented a basement flat in The McKibbin Lofts, a converted warehouse in Bushwick where I had been living for a couple years. I ran an open mic in the building where I first met them and there was a really great community vibe in the area so I guess you could say music brought us together, but it all really came together when Jack and I got married and we decided I should move to London. It was tough, I trained long and hard, but sure enough I mustered the strength to swim across the Ocean. Soon after their other band came to an end, we started playing music and calling it a band little over a year ago.

So what specifically inspired the relocation to London from the US?

Well Jack said in the event of a nuclear catastrophe, in which the only way he could survive was to move to the US, he would only just consider it, so I packed my bags.

Did Jingo start out with any specific intent and vision for the music and its presence? jingo3

The most important thing has always been making good music. Sometimes I make the mistake of asking Joe if my hair looks okay and he always says, “I don’t give a shit.” People sometimes ask questions about our varying styles of songs or our fluctuating stage antics but we don’t really care. We’re still growing and I think our attitude towards the music will lead us in the right direction. A Jingo can be stuck in their ways and no one wants to be that guy.

As evidenced by the mass of singles released over the past couple of years, your sound is as diverse as it is contagious; how would you describe your music in a single sentence for newcomers?

Rock and Roll Dinosaur Electronia that the girls can dance to.

Listening to your songs you get the feeling that they organically spring to life with their own ideas on character and then you hone and sculpt them; how does the songwriting works within the band?

Usually I’ll have the skeleton of a song with some words and Jack will refine the melody, then we’ll jam it out in the studio. Sometimes it will start with a guitar riff or more recently we’ll jam the whole song into being. We never really know when a song is going to come out, but at the moment they are coming out our ears. We don’t like to be very formulaic we just take them as they come.

It is a democracy when it comes to creating songs or is there a core source more often than not?

It is a democracy in the sense that whatever sounds the best is law. Sometimes it’s a matter of demonstrating your point, but most times we end up agreeing in the end. People naturally fall into their roles. Jack is definitely the band leader, lyrics are mostly all me, but the all-round writing of the song is very much a group endeavour.

Your songs always, however emotively shadowed they might be, come with a stroll and smile; this is a reflection of you as people and your wants from good music?

I think that even if you write a sad or dark song, you want the listener to enjoy the experience of listening to your music. Bad experience can unite us and a bumping beat is the best remedy. And you can never take yourself too seriously.

What inspires the lyrical side of your music? Some of the songs are quite dark at their core.

It’s not the same for everyone in the band, but for me art can be a sort of therapy. There are some things that have happened in life that are hard to conceptualize in any other way besides writing a song. I had a troubled friend who killed herself and our song Jaclyn is a combination of anger and loving life in her honour. Sometimes rocking out and screaming your heart out is better than suppressing love and loss where no light can get to it.

As mentioned you have released a tide of singles, how do you see your sound has evolved and grown since the first and the recent Turn Around?

I don’t think we’ve found a specific sound yet, but we are starting to play a lot more songs that aren’t as dark. Jack had only just started music production with these first recordings, so we’re definitely improving fast in that way. We’re becoming a lot more relaxed with each other and with our new band-mate Chris, who also produces electronic music. We’re really excited for what the future holds.

You are obviously a band who pushes themselves and embraces different styles and flavours; what past and currently has inspired you most potently?

I think we all get down with the music our parents listened to in the 60s and 70s- Led Zeppelin, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby Stills Nash & Young, King Crimson, Jimi, Beatles, . We are all avid music listeners. Our heroes of now are Jack White, Queens of the Stone Age, Interpol, Jeff Buckley, Radiohead, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Neil Young, Pearl Jam, Tame Impala, Grizzly Bear, Lana Del Rey, Prince, Haim, First Aid Kit the list is endless.

jingo4Live you are renown for your exciting performances, your first ever show being support for Blur’s Graham Coxon. How did that come about?

We run an open mic called Cable Street Electric. Once in a while we do a charity night, one of those was at Mother London in Shoreditch. When they wanted to do their own charity night for Shelter, they thought of us and invited us to play, just so happens Graham Coxon was playing after us, pretty dope.

Would you say it put you swiftly under a certain spotlight or it did not really aid the emergence of the band other than in experience?

It’s always great to play for fresh ears. I don’t know if we really benefitted especially from that night as far as the band goes, but it makes for a great story and none of us will ever forget it.

I am assuming band members have a ‘real ‘life’ and job outside of the band, so how does Jingo manage to be so prolific with their songwriting?

We’re really lucky in that music is what we do. We intentionally don’t have full-time jobs so that we can put as much into our music as possible. We all have certain skills that we can get by with for living costs, but the music is always at the forefront of our minds. We practice often, have a good work ethic, but also have a ton of fun doing it.

What has been your favourite single to date, or the one which you feel epitomises Jingo for new ears?

That’s a hard one, I’m sure it’s different for everyone, but I really liked the release of When You Want Me. We won a competition where we got to record at Strongroom studios where Radiohead and a load of others have recorded. It felt for a second like we were big dogs and they treated us really well and we got to tinker with all their toys.

Tell us about your forthcoming EP? What can we expect and how does it push on from the excellent singles which have already seduced so many?

It’s a full album silly! We are releasing our last couple songs with the record and they are quite fresh so we’re really excited about it. Also I’m a painter, so I get to do some artwork for it so I’m pretty pumped about that. There are some surprises with all that and two new music videos coming out around the same time. We aim to please.

Your singles have all been released for free downloads, are you going the same way with the album?

Nothing is final but we are definitely selling our album. With putting out free singles we really wanted to build a fan base and give everyone a chance to get to know us, I hope our fans will return the favour and purchase a copy so we can make more and tour potentially.

What were the ambitions for the band when it first began and for you when first making music, and have they changed or evolved since?

The ambition has always been to make great music; I don’t think that will change. The next cloud would be to make a living at it, I think we are well on our way but only time and hard work will tell. Maybe I can get the guys to all wear animal costumes, I’d get a kick outta that.

What is planned for the rest of 2014?jingo2

There are definitely secrets in store of which I can’t divulge. All I can say is stay tuned; album, videos and more to come soon.

Again a big thank you for chatting with us and providing such great and richly loved songs for our podcasts :)

Thank you so much for listening and sharing, we owe it to people like you putting a signal out.

Any last thought you would like to leave us contemplating?

All you need is mom’s spaghetti, a brick and a bin bag.

Lastly if you could schedule a stage at a festival with Jingo headlining, what emerging bands which you have played with or come across would you invite?

Not Blood Paint, Bird Courage, Bailiff, Pat Dam Smyth, Bad for Lazarus, Steve Nelson

http://jingomusic.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 08/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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