Jacksons Warehouse – Right Here, Right Now

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A constant source of intelligent hook laden songs as thick in passion as they are in insatiable infectiousness, UK rock band Jacksons Warehouse has also shown the ability to write resourceful flights of emotional temptation, and maybe none finer than new single Right Here, Right Now. With an underlying energy and contagion which scoops up feet and emotions in its keen arms, the song is a mesmeric croon of sound and vocals which mix the attractive hooks the band are renowned for with a fresh expansive flight of emotive and sonic expression.

Formed in 2004, the Basildon band has constantly increased their fan base and acclaim through a parade of addiction sparking singles such as the brilliant Hotel by the Sea and their acclaimed and imposingly impressive debut album Homes Next To Houses of 2012. Songs seemingly flow from the minds and talent of the band like water drops from a leaking tap, a constant supply of always attention grabbing offerings which leave a lingering persuasion in varying jwh singledegrees. Right Here, Right Now is one of their releases which make the strongest impact on ears and imagination, its mellow yet fiery presence a provocative embrace to hungrily immerse in.

Crisp inviting beats from Cy Chant enticingly bait ears first, their gait setting down the keen energy kissed spine of the song. They are soon wrapped in elegant melodies and a darker bass tone, their addition laying down an emotive canvas for the distinctive voice of guitarist Stuart Brown to paint the song’s narrative and heart upon. The slight warble to his husky tones lies perfectly with the almost ethereal caress of keys from Simon Brown and the more intense but as warm strokes of enterprise from the guitars of Marc Barnacle and Stu. It is a transfixing incitement, the sultry glaze of sound tempered skilfully by the shadowed presence and tempting of bass sculpted by Rich Hawkins. The song may be a slower stroll than usually crafted by the band but its infectiousness is just as potent and full, vocally and musically the track almost anthemic in its effect on feet and emotions.

Right Here, Right Now is a treat of a song and marks a new twist in the creativity of a band already no strangers to acclaim if still yet to find the break-through into the strongest spotlight. The new single will do Jacksons Warehouse no harm in that direction though.

Right Here, Right Now is released October 13th

https://www.facebook.com/JACKSONSWAREHOUSE

RingMaster 22/09/2014

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Body Futures – Brand New Silhouettes

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Mischievous, unpredictable, and relentlessly adventurous, Brand New Silhouettes is a debut which swiftly sets its creators apart from the crowd. The first album from US indie rock pop band Body Futures, the scintillating encounter is a delightfully warped and devilishly captivating collection of songs which seduce the imagination with the creative innocence of the playground and the adventurous revelry of illicit moments behind the school bike shed. To that there is a captivating mix of feverish ideation and exploratory maturity which turns every track into a unique emprise of ingenuity. The album is simply glorious which is destined to head best album lists and make the Wisconsin band one of your new best friends and lustful obsessions.

Formed in 2012, Body Futures took their time before stepping into a spotlight, taking their first year writing and rehearsing before making a live debut in 2013. Consisting of vocalist Dixie Jacobs (ex- White, Wrench, Conservatory), guitarist/vocalist Christopher Maury (ex-Five Mod Four), bassist/vocalist Michael Wojtasiak (ex-Everybody at Midnight), and vocalist/drummer D.J. Hostettler (ex- IfIHadAHiFi), Body Futures linked up with Latest Flame Records before entering Howl Street Studios to record their album with Shane Hochstetler earlier this year. What has emerged is one of the most riveting and exciting introductions to a band in a long time, certainly in the realms of indie and pop rock.

The Milwaukee quartet instantly engage ears and thoughts with opener Hooks & Eyes, the harmonically aflame vocals of Jacobs a vibrant caress to which the more unbalanced expressive tones of Hostettler bring a delicious almost crazed accompaniment. Rhythms jab within the appealing blend whist riffs carry a jagged attitude and the bass a darker throat to the enticement. It is not the most startling song to leap at the senses but a vivacious start to the album with its Weezer like festivity and slightly frenzied vocal glow which reminds of eighties band Girls At their Best.

Things move up another step with the following When You Had A Jaw and even further with A Complete Divorce straight after. The first of the pair with its great mix of male and female led vocals again carries that eighties essence, LFR-44-cover-300x300the same band as reminded of in its predecessor coming to thoughts as well as fellow US band Late Cambrian. The bouncy chorus and anthemic call of the song makes for a ridiculously catchy tempting but the band mingles it with a muddled flame of sonic agitation and atmospheric intrigue which turns the track into a whole other type of creative bedlam before closing out on the irresistible romp which set it off. It is a clever piece of songwriting and sonic incitement but soon left in the shadow of its successor. The third song starts with Jacobs alone, voice revealing more of its depths before being paced by the absorbing tones of Wojtasiak’s bass and subsequently an evocative glaze of guitar. The track is a ‘regular’ proposition initially but soon blessed by shards of discord kissed guitar resonance and a delicious flow of vocal harmonies. Thoughts of The Passions and Jingo come to the fore here, the latter the one band which most comes close to the inventive majesty of Body Futures.

From the first big peak of the album, the band dances with ears and passions through the feisty beauty of That’s So Church, its enthralling swing of hooks and beats as gripping as the mouth-watering vocals. By now you expect a little of the unexpected and the track certainly offers that with a closing discord lilted twist of inventive drama before making way for the more reserved melodic caress of Is The Skeleton A Weapon? The song smoulders and moves engagingly with a sixties teasing pop charm but along rails of sonic causticity which adds that perpetual tinge of surprise which roams the release. Not the strongest of the songs on the album but one to lick lips over all the same, it is followed by (That’s A) Big Smile (for Someone About to Drown) and its starting blaze of Sex Pistols seeded guitar and riffery. The track proceeds to jangle and rile up the passions with clashing but beautifully merged punk spiced vocals, predatory rabidity, and the melodic resourcefulness of Jacobs’ synth and autoharp prowess and of course her mesmeric vocals. Imagine Devo meets Morningwood and you get the gist of the beauty of the song which triggers another ascent in the album’s exploration and might.

The opening ‘Psycho Killer’ like lure of bass which opens up Save the Clock Tower is potent bait alone but with the military seeded rhythms and stabbing riffing soon courting the magnetic web being cast, the track is soon in irresistible control. Jacobs walks alone through it all, her voice and keys seducing from within the compelling trap like a solitary figure in the midst of an addictive alchemy, but she is really the puppeteer urging and pulling the listener into the concussive and at time disorientating maelstrom of sound and invention. It is a stunning track which is swiftly equalled by the similarly beautifully deranged fascination of Phantom Patterns Arson. Running with a pop punk energy and virulence, the track is as jagged and irritable as it is melodically rampant, vocals and keys a relentless temptation within the more antagonistically captivating web of rhythms and guitar endeavour.

Sha Na Na: Clone Project Alpha is a song about Elmer Edward Solly, an escaped convict who masqueraded as a dead member of Sha Na Na, and just as frantically warped as the other pinnacles of the album. Lurching around with the will and intensity of a Dervish yet still making time to smooch with ears through melodic fondling, the song is impossibly infectious and unique, a track to rival Save the Clock Tower though both have to bow to What Bugs Eat. The penultimate song of the album, it is an immediately challenging fusion of two extremes which simply thrills. On one side there is the vocal pop toxicity of Jacobs alongside acidic yet warming melodies and on the other, a caustic discord spawned rapacity of sound which breeds hooks and riffs which scamper over the senses with the irritancy of a thousand insects. It is a simply bewildering and brilliant union as the sides merge in a bedlam of enterprise and ingenuity

The album finishes on the thick and rich psychedelic sunset of The Spanish of Scraping, a track with a sultry air but unafraid to interrupt with moments of poetic lunacy. It is an outstanding end to a quite brilliant album, Brand New Silhouettes destined to be a marker for indie rock and pop to come you sense as it twists its mischief through ears.

Though not in sound, there is one band which Body Futures reminds of in unique invention and the distinctness of the sounds they can conjure, and that is Talking Heads and we all know what happened to them.

Brand New Silhouettes is available now on vinyl and digitally via Latest Flame Records @ http://www.latestflame.com/content/lfr-44/ and @ http://bodyfutures.bandcamp.com/album/brand-new-silhouettes

https://www.facebook.com/BodyFutures

9/10

RingMaster 13/08/2014

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Diet – Palindrome

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Brewing up a potently agreeable blend of grunge indie rock with a healthy wash of pop punk and garage rock, US band Diet have just released their latest EP Palindrome to stir up the senses and catch the imagination in a sonic temptation. Consisting of five diverse and fascinating propositions of raw and enthralling noise seeded rock ‘n’ roll, the release is one which does not spark a fire in the passions but lingers relentlessly in thoughts and emotions to provide a more than healthy incitement. Increasingly persuasive and striking over time too, Palindrome simply leaves appetite alert and satisfaction full with its compelling and pleasing proposition.

Hailing out of Staten Island, New York, Diet began in 2009 from when it has continued to evolve its sound whilst flirting with various styles, eventually finding the individual flavour evidenced on the new EP. Compared to bands such as Empire! Empire! (I Was A Lonely Estate), American Football, Tigers Jaw, and Basement, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Thom Kinnear, guitarist/backing vocalist Chris Taranto, bassist Fernando Hernandez, and drummer George Bulger, take little time to seize attention with EP opener Pigman. From a sonic coaxing over a distant sample, the song turns into an infectious stroll of jangling guitars and jabbing beats, both aspects skirted by the darker almost secretive tones of DietPalindromeEP1500the bass. Once the song relaxes into a restrained caress, the vocals of Kinnear open up throat and narrative whilst the now bold basslines add their potent temptation to tempt the returning tenacity of the song. Hooks and melodies with their discord touched tempting, swirl and spark within the song whilst also vocally an off kilter lilt to the voices only adds to the quirky and unpredictable bait of the increasingly inventive and contagious track.

It is a fine and feistily captivating start to a release which swiftly wrong foots expectations with the seductive embrace of Three. The second song strokes ears with gentle guitar charm whilst raw vocals swarm just as captivatingly over their evocative suasion. It is a smouldering lure but soon finding itself in the midst of a tempestuous dawning of abrasing atmospheres and sonic intimidation, caustic scythes of guitar swiping across the scenery as a volatile air erupts into a fiery and abrasive crescendo. The imposing track then slips seamlessly into the punk stomp of Four. Straight away noise rock and pop combine for an instantly appealing brawl before evolving into a minimalistic landscape of guitar and bass enterprise. With punchy beats courting the shifting soundscape, the song like its predecessor spawns a voracious climate to its magnetic body but this time with a more controlled and clearly textured canvas to which guitars add their imaginative sonic colour.

The next up Soap is a floating slice of mesmeric enticement, melodies and vocals owing plenty to shoegaze at times whilst behind their elegant drifting and seduction, the coarse vocals squalls of Taranto lie in wait, preying on the warm flight of the song with their corrosive shadows. It is a highly evocative song which seems to gain potency and new qualities over every listen. Its strong success is matched by final song I Can’t Sit Still, an infectious romp of firmly striding rhythms and again guitars which jangle endearingly as they sculpt weaves of irresistible hooks and addictive riffs. Vocally the song seems to lack the spark of other tracks, though there is no openly apparent reason that they are missing the fire to their presence to match the excellent blaze of sound around them. Nevertheless the track is outstanding and a favourite on what is a thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

As mentioned Palindrome did not ignite a wish to shout from the rooftops but it is a release very easy to recommend and return to over and over again. Whether it is break through moment for Diet is arguable but it will certainly breed plenty of happily satisfied, enthusiastic support you suspect.

The Palindrome EP is available now via Imminence Records and @ http://dietnyc.bandcamp.com/album/palindrome

https://www.facebook.com/dietfudge

8/10

RingMaster 09/08/2014

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Visualise/Colours/Stop – Projected Thoughts

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If the first single from UK trio Visualise/Colours/Stop is an indicator of things to come, then imagination and emotions are in for some thrilling and impacting incitements to come with the band. Projected Thoughts is a glorious evocation of expressive rhythms and sultry melodies aligned to compelling vocals amidst a climactic atmosphere. It embraces the senses with a tender caress initially before evolving into an almost tempestuous landscape of emotive tenacity and evocative flames. It is a formidable introduction to the band, one instantly raising keen anticipation for their horizons.

Hailing from Lincoln, Visualise/Colours/Stop consists of vocalist/guitarist Alan Kissane, bassist Gaz Bailey, and drummer Dale Hagger. Initially called Fabonacci, the trio took on the name Visualise/Colours/Stop from a friend’s defunct band, who released an album in 2011.Things are a little hazy here as to the extent of the link between the two but we suggest members maybe are shared as the accompanying promo piece suggests the new single is the band’s first yet they have a link to the older version’s album on their Facebook page. Most importantly though is the strength and stature of Projected Thoughts, a song ‘reflecting on the demise of a relationship and questioning the world with that in mind.’ Mixed live by the band on old analogue recording equipment, the single is an evolving confrontation which simultaneously serenades and wakes up thoughts as it immerses ears in a rich drama of sound.

The song opens with the melancholic groan of bass within a slight but crispy percussive coaxing. It is a slow minimalistic kiss which presses closer through the dark tones of Kissane’s vocals against small but emotive eruptions of melodic radiance. As the track slowly begins to unveil its narrative and aural canvas thoughts of Black offer comparisons whilst as the rhythmic bait of Hagger brings an unpredictable and magnetic lure aside the growing suasion of guitar and vocals, references turn to Comsat Angels and to a lesser degrees Modern English, all offering a slight eighties hint. The track is mesmeric, a tender seduction which captivates ears and attention with irresistible majesty, never losing its grip as it eventually shrugs off its restraint for a still shadowed blaze of sonic intrigue and provocative melodic hues. At this point you can add the likes of Doves to the spicing veining potently through the now dramatic stride and tenacity of the increasingly contagious song.

Leading to a fiery finale which is as riveting and tirelessly compelling as the gentle almost sombre start of the proposition, Projected Thoughts provides a dark alchemy of sound and emotion which broods longingly from its first note right through to its explosive final breath. The single is scintillating and whatever the questions about the bands past, makes their future and an impending EP something to keenly anticipate.

Projected Thoughts just might be the start of something major for British rock, it might just be one song but it is hard to imagine Visualise/Colours/Stop making anything less than a gripping impact such the quality and enthralling presence of their single. Time will as ever tell…

https://www.facebook.com/VisualiseColoursStop

9/10

RingMaster 01/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Sons – Heading Into Land

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Appetite for the new album from UK band The Sons was certainly awoken by their recent single Relic, but to say that the warm irresistible might of Heading into Land was expected would be a little misleading. Certainly the single brought strong hopes its full-length source but not to the extent that the album would dance with the imagination and fire up the emotions. The twelve track release is vibrant refreshment for the summer, a warm consoling for darker times, and one thoroughly enjoyable romp.

Consisting of Paul Herron (vocals, piano, guitar), Steven Herron (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Roger Millichamp (drums), Stewart English (vocals, guitar), Lee Blades (vocals, bass), the 2002 formed Derby indie rock quintet has employed inspirations from the likes of Crowded House, Wilco, Paul Simon, and Fleetwood Mac into a unique sound which has already brought acclaim and floods of fans through previous albums, Visiting Hours of 2007 and its successor The Prime Words Committee four years later. Their sound fuses in elements of folk and rhythm and blues into a melodic rock presence which is varied and persistently intriguing. Heading Into Land is their next adventure, a release for which The Sons started a Kickstarter campaign in late 2012. Despite raising over £11,500, the band just missed their target but rather than sink into pity came back with their own home-grown crowd-funding campaign. It was a successful endeavour thanks to their ever supporting fanbase and innovative rewards with Heading Into Land the result, a thoroughly enjoyable encounter to those who helped bring it to be, we should all share a thank you.

The immediately engaging Right Colour Makeup sets the album off on a strong note, a piano casting melodic expression as the vocals begin parading the narrative of the song. With similarly enticing rhythms the song makes a tempting start before darker bass tones and flirting guitar designs wrap ears. At times there is a feel of XTC to the offering as well as Union Starr within the expanding melodic caress, a flavour easy to consume, as is the song in its impressive entirety.

The strong start is matched by Death Love Money, a track with a sultry air to its stroll and expressive punch to its vocal and melodic swagger. There is also a southern croon to the heart of the song which colours its magnetic canvas, a landscape again crafted through the emotive hues of keys and guitar. A familiarity is also prevalent but only to add further suasion to the tempting, an air as with most of the songs breeding immediate friendship for ears and thoughts. That flavouring in another unique character flirts from within the deliciously rhythmic temptation of Crowd Went Wild. The rhythms of Millichamp roam enticingly across senses and imagination, every beat evocatively leading thoughts into an instinctive and organic canter of smouldering melodies and vocal descriptions. It is a glorious encounter, the first of a few lofty pinnacles within the already impressive release.

Both the riveting When I Want To and the I’m Not Happy keep fun and pleasure aflame, the first with its nagging piano lure and poetic guitar melodies. There is also a drama to the easy going and flowing persuasion which makes every note and syllable a spark for the imagination whilst its successor shuffles and twists like a Caribbean bred temptress, every swing of its rhythmic hips and wrapping of melodic caresses a vivaciously simmering seduction. It is an aural cruise for thoughts to bask in and emotions to explore, a reassuring siren for the heart leading into the immensely captivating Relic. Released a short few weeks ago, the song as mentioned laid down compelling bait and still after numerous excursions of its evocative seizure of ears and imagination, continues to ignite the strongest hunger. Opening on a gentle swing of emotive keys, subtle groaning bass, and the expressive voice of Paul Herron, the track evolves into an enthralling smouldering of mouthwatering enterprise and imagination. Intrigue sculpted crescendos erupt across the song’s body, each accompanied by melodic mystique and irresistible design from guitars and keys, whilst the bass groans with riveting expression. The song quite simply is melancholic beauty which just gets better with age.

We See Stars is another song destined to be a long-term friend, its crisp rhythms courted by the ever appealing throaty voice of the bass beneath absorbing breezes of melodies and creative imagination. As the album, there is a freshness and rich melodic colour to the castings on ears, a unique vibrancy which is just as open on the folk hug of On The Corner where dark velvety string plucks of assumedly an upright bass steal the show. Both tracks embrace and invigorate, though admittedly not to the extent of the outstanding Flash And Bang which follows. With bass carvings and an electrified web of guitar, the track is an anthemic indie rocker clad in inventive mischief and boisterous revelry. With a wind of eighties new wave and a vein of Late Cambrian like power pop, the track takes top honours on the album, sinews and melodic relish ablaze to incite feet and passion with puppeteer artistry.

A southern country bred air returns to soaks the next up Hard Life, another song which consumes thoughts with a gentle but formidable potency, if without exciting as infectiously as previous tracks. It is still a highly appealing turn in the album, setting up emotions for the excellent reggae seeded stepping of Down Sometimes, a track swerving its body with melodic fantasy and quirky key stabs for a beautifully sculpted and presented stroll. Feet and voice are instant slaves to the song so that the listener goes into the final title track on a high to fully embrace its dramatic and stormy yet uplifting landscape and emotional journey. It is a fine end to an impressive album which leaves ears and pleasure basking in melodic and creative mastery.

The Sons has been described as a ‘best kept secret’ but after the so easy to recommend Heading Into Land hits shore it is easy to suspect that the term will be quite redundant.

Heading Into Land is available now!

http://the-sons.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 30/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Jake Evans – This is Life

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This is Life is one of those tracks which just triggers the sweet spot, treats it to a masterful seduction of stirring rock music which lingers and simply grows with time. It is perhaps no real surprise that the new single from UK singer/songwriter Jake Evans is so potent and exhilarating with its following of his acclaimed debut single Easy On My Soul, as well as impressive musical history, but there is something in its heart and presence which catches the breath and imagination far beyond expectations. It is a stunning encounter, thrilling and laying down a teaser of Evan’s forthcoming first album Day One which is irresistible.

Macclesfield based Evans first come to the fore with Rambo & Leroy, earning a reputation and spotlight which took him to the attention of Bernard Sumner and his band Bad Lieutenant after the second demise of New Order. As the band’s co-front-man, guitarist and songwriter, alongside Summer and New Order band mate Stephen Morris (also New Order) as well as Blur’s Alex James, Evans increased his reputation within the band’s success which led to invitations to support the likes of Paul Weller, New Order, Johnny Marr and Doves’ Jimi Goodwin once emerging as a solo artist in 2012. Easy On My Soul was drenched in eager acclaim upon its release slotting nicely in with highly praised appearances at Festival No 6 and the iconic Jodrell Bank music festival. This Is Life is the next adventure and certain to open up a new depth of ardour for his impressively evolving creative persuasion.

The song is a tide of virulent hooks coming in varied shapes and designs, the first an immediate temptation as This is Life opens. A sonic Jake Evans a2486262845_10sigh lights the fuse to a weave of acidically melodic guitar bred hues which instantly recalls The Cult, delicious bait which subsequently embraces the shadows of Sisters Of Mercy too as a great throaty bass seduction and crystalline keys explore the imagination. Evans’ voice has a slightly grainy feel to his expressive tones which only adds richer colour and texture to the contagious enticement, his delivery holding a whisper of Paul Marsh of The Mighty Lemon Drops, as does some of the melodic suasion lapping around his voice. It is a gloriously fascinating proposition which only flourishes further through fine guitar coaxing and a steady but potent rhythmic framing to the smouldering intensity and passion of the song.

Those essences of eighties and nineties bands bring a familiarity to the song which only increases its contagion and appeal but equally there is an originality and invention which as mentioned at the start, fondles and incites an instinctive rapture to the impressive encounter.

It is impossible not to breed a healthy anticipation for the impending Day One from This Is Life alone but placed alongside Easy On My Soul expectations and hopes reach skywards, though you sense they will be well fed and pleasured by Evans when the time comes.

This Is Life is available digitally June 16th @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/this-is-life-single/id879180547

https://www.jakeevansmusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 15/06/2014

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Damn Vandals – Rocket Out Of London

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It is fair to say that psyche rockers Damn Vandals swiftly set themselves a place in British rock as one of the most exhilarating and promising propositions with their 2012 debut album, Done For Desire. It was an encounter drenched in originality and a feverishly diverse flavouring setting the band apart from most. To confirm and stretch all of its potency within a new mentally twisting maelstrom of psychotic goodness, the London band now unleash the senses infestation that is Rocket Out Of London. It is a glorious swagger of caustic abrasion and acidic ingenuity honed from a brawling incitement of garage punk, psyche and stoner rock, as well as a vein of raw punk, simply put demented rock ‘n’ roll at its most addictive.

As for a great many, our admittedly eager affair with Damn Vandals began with the release of their Beautiful Mind EP, a widely acclaimed encounter awakening attention and appetite for the potential and instantly impressive presence of the band. The release and subsequent songs though was only the taster for bigger and major things to come, Done For Desire thrusting the quartet to new levels and into a richer spotlight with its release. Uncompromising but with a contagion to its presence which works under the skin like a welcome niggling itch, the band’s sound has found a new depth and power to its virulence with the new release whilst still retaining the raw dark textures and unhinged threat which stirred up the passions so quickly upon their emergence. As evidenced by Rocket Out Of London, it has become a twisting intrusive beast which wraps with almost insidious intent around the ears, permeating every pore and synapse with an exhaustive toxicity which simply ignites the imagination and passions. Produced by Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) as was its predecessor, the album takes the listener on a dirty and intimidatingly shadowed ride through explorations of themes such as celebrity stalking, hard liquor, death by dreams, madness and homeland security amongst many but ultimately just through the creative mad ingenuity of the band.

The album opens with the first single uncaged from its wonderful aural rapaciousness, Twist Up And Tangle. Released mid-March, the dv coversong laid down the strongest bait for the full-length and still holds its intensive grip with an epidemic bait of granite sculpted rhythmic punches and scything sonic swipes of guitar. From its first second the song is an inescapable cage for the senses and emotions, a scarring provocation soon given richer fuel by the ever distinct and voraciously delivered vocals of Jack Kansas. The track is swiftly into a predatory stride, prowling around the ears with a sonically slavering intensity from the guitar of Frank Pick and the dark throated voice of bass held in rein by Adam Kilemore Gardens but still adding commanding menace to the whole of the psychotic fare. It is a masterful and insatiable stalking driven by the magnetic beats of Chris Christianson, but one which with its spewing discord and melodic flames as well as corrosive hooks and breath, provides a raucous dance to shield the fact we are being preyed upon.

Like a mix of Fatima Mansions meets The Birthday Party, the opener alone wakes a hunger to which the following Cities Of A Plastic World adds its own imaginative virulence. The track opens with a rhythmic drama speared by a ridiculously contagious hook, its abrasing hot touch a niggling pleasure just hard to get enough of. Around its tempting Kansas again parades the song’s narrative with unbridled expression whilst the guitar of Pick continuously lights up new corners and adventures to court his primary enticement with skill and enterprise, the album easily his finest inventive and moment yet, as it is of the band itself. The track sculpts another immediate pinnacle in the impending lofty range of the album and is soon equalled by Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live, a sultry stroll with a citrus edge to its grooves and melodic teasing. There is a definite lick of Queens Of The Stone Age initially and Eagles of Death Metal later to its constant erosive taste and hypnotic stance.

I Bring You Love which made up part of the earlier mentioned single keeps the album coursing potently through the body, its psychobilly/Cajun swamp-esque stomp with sliding toxic mesmerism and blues bred frisking irresistible. The track just gets better and more virulent with every crossing of its red-neck terrain with dirty violating rock ‘n’ roll scenery. With more than a feel of Screaming Blue Messiahs to it and always an essence of the previously mentioned Cathal Coughlan led band to the presence of Damn Vandals, the track is a delicious lingering antagonist to unreservedly submit to.

Both Number One Fan and Whisky Going Free provide a new mischief to fully devote attention and passions to, the first merging classic and incendiary garage rock for a rampaging stomp built upon the intensive frame work of Christianson, a cage again laced with riveting guitar revelry and craft. Its successor sidles boisterously up to the ears with tight sinews and deviously coaxing addictive grooves, the track a less expansive dark tango than say the last but with a no less leaner determination in its air and voice to seduce and inflame the passions, which it does with ease.

The following I Hate School hits the spot perfectly but lacks the spark of other tracks, a familiarity and somewhat predictable essence to its body slipping up against the surrounding triumphs. To put it into context though, with absorbing blues/psychedelically teased guitar invention from Pick and a certain unavoidable catchiness to its lure, the song still has feet and emotions fully engaged before next up Mad As Hell takes them on a similarly successful and potent ride, if again without quite matching earlier heady heights. The track rumbles and strolls with attitude and a thought immersing design all the same to keep the fire for the album burning eagerly.

The closing pair of tracks takes the release back to its highest plateaus, the first This Music Blows My Tiny Mind, another incitement with the stance of a predator and the drive of a volcanic eruption expelling sizzling melodic flames, searing hooks, and climactic rhythms building to a quite scintillating final drama. Its successor, the title track brings the album to a glorious closure, its addiction forging rhythmic slavery and scorching guitar endeavour an inescapable virulence guided as masterly as ever by the gripping tones of Kansas. Like a mix of QOTSA, Julian Cope, and Rocket From The Crypt, the track is a brilliant finale to a quite outstanding taking of the soul.

Rocket Over London with ease reveals that Damn Vandals is no longer the potential future of certainly raw British rock ‘n’ roll and garage punk but the template.

http://www.damnvandals.co.uk

http://damnvandals.bandcamp.com/album/rocket-out-of-london

9.5/10

RingMaster 07/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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