DIGITS RELEASE NEW VIDEO FOLLOWS DEBUT EP

Digits Online Promo Shot

DIGITS New EP and video unleashed!

North East riff-tyrants Digits are set to release their debut EP ‘Acquiesce To Violence’ on 11th November. Sounding like the backwater cousins of Glassjaw, Hundred Reasons and Reuben, ‘Acquiesce To Violence’ has already racked up widespread praise from Rocksound, Powerplay and Big Cheese magazine.

The noiseniks have also just received their new video single ‘Golden’ and you can view it here – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXeFHTVQYkQ

www.facebook.com/Digitsuk

Digits Cover Artwork

We Are Fiction – One For Sorrow

WAF_Promo It is not stretching things to say there has been a fair amount of anticipation for the debut album from UK melodic hardcore band We Are Fiction, an eager appetite spawned by the band’s singles and impressive live performances.  Consisting of eleven vibrant and skilfully crafted confrontations, One For Sorrow does not let hopes down even if maybe it does not ignite as many fires in the passions as expected. It certainly expands on all the promise laid down before, spawning even greater potency for future horizons whilst unleashing a few special moments for the now.

Since forming in 2007, the Peterborough quintet has undoubtedly earned that reputation as one of the most energetic and passionate live bands to emerge over recent years, their honest and impacting mix of post and melodic hardcore raging like a new yet familiar provocateur, something which also easily applies to their album. The Destroy Everything Records released riot has a presence and intent which does not exactly surprise, especially if aware of earlier releases, but comes with a fresh and compelling intent which never relinquishes its lure on the imagination and emotions. Some songs raise a greater reaction that others but all leave a satisfaction and enjoyment which makes the album a release well worth exploring.

The album simply explodes into action with opener Mansion House, guitars and drums filling the ears with vibrant and eager riffs and rhythms. With inviting flames of melodic invention offering their persuasion the song has the listener immediately engaged and ready for the fine vocals of Phil Barker backed by the harsher tones of guitarist Marc Kucharski  who bring further passion and enterprise to proceedings. There is nothing openly ground-breaking about the song but with a great blend of raw and seductive elements uniting for an energetic expressive storm the track is an imagination stroking entrance.

The following Bright Lights provides a mellower yet still feisty encounter which is infused by infectious anthemic qualities via riffs and vocals. Once again the guitars of Kucharski and Andi Scott Shaw create a weave of skilled and inventive temptation which veins the firm if restrained attack from drummer Tom Calton and bassist Ryan Chambers. The song keeps attention tightly in the band’s hands as does next up My Dreams Are Haunted, a melodically enchanting and evocative embrace. With all of its rawer and angry essences coming within the varied vocal attack the track is an intriguing venture which is unafraid to wear its heart on its sleeve and shuffle its gait up to keep things unpredictable. Like its predecessor the song fails to maintain the high level of the starting track but still strongly persuades with an intelligent and inventive sculpting to its body.

Both Old Wounds and Sail On make a potent persuasion without igniting fires, the first a blaze of generous melodies and sonic endeavour wrapped around a sinewy core; the rich songwriting of We Are Fiction again proven to be hard to fault at any point across One For Sorrow. Its successor brings a harsher angst fuelled essence into the melodic arms of the song for another inventive and attractive confrontation which is as passionate as it is impressively crafted. Neither track, like quite a few upon the album, linger in the memory or spark off a real fire inside and that is the main or only issue with the album. In its presence it impresses and does get stronger with each encounter, but away from its touch thoughts and emotions struggle to recall what was on offer more often than not. There are exceptions though as with the next up A Thousand Places to Sleep, the opening rhythmic contagion carved by Calton and Chambers simply irresistible and easily matched by the sonic tempting conjured by the guitars. A punk fury fuels the vocals and riffs whilst the drums are a persistent and inciting provocateur. Its virulent lure lessens a little with the cleaner vocals though, as if the aggression is making space though it soon returns to prowl and snarl impressively through the outstanding track. It is one of the major highlights of the release and one which does remain in the memory past its departure.

Building on this high Tilt finds a caustic and rapacious edge to sound and presence which takes top honours on the release. There is a delicious heavy rock weight to the song which merges perfectly with the hardcore thrust of the narrative and intensity, and with a scintillating adventure to the vocals employing rap and noise rock magnetism, the track easily stands above the rest, the unexpected and startling elements a seamless and inventively convincing triumph.

The Worst Of It, the latest single from the album is another exciting incitement, its pop punk/melodic hardcore blend contagious anthemic bait mixing a kind of Blink 182, Hundred Reasons, and Mallory Knox brew which makes a very efficient invitation for band and release.

The final trio of songs starting with the highly emotive Wladyslaw continue to please ears and imagination if paling against what just came before. A drama lit melodic and sonic craft scorches the air within the blues kissed song before the stocky charm and intensity of Earth Machine and the emotionally anthemic Forget About Me take over to conclude the album. Both tracks are impressively built and textured and it is hard to lay any faults before their offerings, except that again not a great deal hooks in the memory once they take their leave. Whether that is actually a major fault is debatable as listening to One For Sorrow only makes for one richly fulfilling hour or so.

We Are Fiction is a band yet to push boundaries but as evidenced by One For Sorrow also one who have a skill and instinctiveness to worry it and more importantly make a potently imaginative and satisfying companion within whom you still sense there is much more yet to come…

https://www.facebook.com/wearefiction

8/10

RingMaster 18/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The RHODA MAY ‘Sessions’, out 6th January

Rhoda May Online Promo Shot
UK PROGRESSIVE NEWCOMERS RHODA MAY RELEASE STUNNING DEBUT EP!
 
Coming at you from Surrey (home to Hundred Reasons, Reuben, Vex Red, Foe and Godsized) hugely promising instrumental rock outfit ‘Rhoda May’ are primed to be the next band to nationally break. Pulling from everyone from Rush and Led Zeppelin, to Deftones and Tool, Rhoda May set loose ‘Sessions’ on Monday 6th January.
Although originally conceived during the middle part of 2012 by long time friends Will Pain (Guitar), Mark Sanger (Drums) and Andy Page (Bass), it wasn’t until this year that the band were officially spawned. Ignited by an impromptu knock on the rehearsal room door by a local venue promoter who happened to overhear the band rehearsing, the guys were instantly asked to support popular London rockers Senser. Duly obliging, the trio were swiftly spurred into action and Rhoda May were formed.
From their debut show with Senser, Rhoda May’s climb has been vastly encouraging and recent supports with Heights, Freeze The Atlantic and Three Trapped Tigers have further cemented the band’s fledging reputation. The enterprising three-some have also been working on a series of live videos with Emma Dalesman (Stagecoach, Tommy Reilly), which can be viewed here – www.rhodamay.com/video/ .
The videos were also recorded by producer Jason Wilson (We Are The Ocean, Reuben, Dinosaur Pile Up) who handled their first ‘347 sessions’; the band also recorded a later session titled ‘589 live session’. Both recordings were put down live and in their entirety. Due to the quality and the glowing early feedback for the live sessions, the band decided to release both recordings as a stand alone record. Aptly entitled ‘Sessions’, the EP is an immensely impressive collection of six absorbing cuts of modern rock. From the opening guitar scapes and twisting rhythms of ‘#3’, to the engaging post-rock bite of ‘#4”, on to the fuzzed-up melodic appeal of ‘#5’ and to the majestic groove-laden journey titled ‘#8’, the band illustrate their genuine creative craft, which displays true imagination and the nimble ability to take the listener on an engrossing musical voyage.
Rhoda May - Cover Artwork

faltered – Fortune Favours

Faltered Online Promo shot

Not for the first time it seems this year, we are offering a comparison for an emerging band to one of the UK’s finest aggressive rock bands Reuben. Sadly no more, though as so many we still have dreams of that to be reunited announcement, it seems the Surrey trio is inciting and influencing more and more new bands. Northern Wales alternative rock duo faltered is another appearing to reap those seeds for their own distinctive and adventurous idea. Consisting of brothers Daniel (guitars, vocals) and Conor Cahalane (drums, percussion, lead vocals), the band release their new mini-album Fortune Favours September 2nd, a collection of songs which challenge, tease, and at times disappoint, but all come with a depth of promise and imagination which leaves you recruited to and eager to watch their evolution and future creations.

Taking inspirations from the likes of Biffy Clyro, Muse, Hundred Reasons, Vex Red, Fightstar, of course Reuben and more, the pair from deciding to form a band took little time in moving forward by rehearsing, writing, and releasing their debut EP Victorian Post Mortem Photography last year. With its full of promise presence well received as also have been their live performances, a growing fan base was instigated as they began working on new songs which have emerged as Fortune Favours. It is a release which is guaranteed to grab attention, yes it has flaws, some loud in the ear, but there is never a moment that you want slip away quietly from its offering or lose focus.

Opening instrumental Leave It Out makes a potent entrance, crisp beats soon joined by a funk drenched dance of guitar and throaty Faltered-Cover Artworkbass before it is all intensified with a blaze of sinew driven energy and adventure. Courting the senses with its swagger the piece is a magnetic lure to the album and immediately shows the prowess and skill of faltered in creating imaginative and addictive sounds. It’s relatively gentle temptation is then pushed aside by the muscular Fortune Favours The Needy. Again drums lead in the charge with discord lit almost post punk like slashes of guitar and noise rock rapaciousness assaulting the ear. Instantly thoughts of Reuben make their call but the brothers then keep the listener off guard by slipping into a melodic alternative rock restraint which they swiftly shift between and entwine into a pleasing and intriguing emotive narrative. It makes for a strong and rewarding start to the album which has the appetite hungry for the next song.

Worth The Wait coaxes the ear with guitar before expelling a blaze of sonic and acidic might which again only reminds of the previously mention now demised band. With the guitars raising the temperature of the air and the rhythms caging song and thoughts in a provocative mesh, the track is an exciting and perpetually twisting persuasion expanding the already strong pleasure reaped so far.

The following Pulled Over emerges as an intensive emotive reflection which without reaching the heights of the previous songs inspires ear and imagination to embrace its temptation hungrily. Slow tender wraps of melodic caresses intermittently punctuated with hard strikes of rhythmic prodding and scything riffs make a full suasion which is lifted further when the song slips into a delicious reined in stomp which is ingenious and irresistible before subsequently unleashing another furnace of emotional and sonic intensity. Unfortunately for the track to temper its success there are moments where barely hinted at previously, the vocals go astray at times with their notes and quality. The continual changes and erupting fire of sound for the main prevents any real damage but it is a portent of things to come on the album.

     Please Don’t Take This The Wrong Way makes a dramatic and stunning entrance to emphasise the rich talent in songwriting and sound the band has. The almost eighties like, think ABC, guitars are met hand in hand buy a glorious sax croon which takes mere seconds to spark the passions before merging with towering riffs and rhythms. Settling into smouldering intent and melodic warmth with invention and refined enterprise, the song musically paints a colour rich evocation though the vocals again strain against their limits a little. Another good romp of a stroll breaks out to energise things for the fiery finale which simultaneously thrills and deflates appreciation.

Its successor If This Is A Joke Then I’m Not Laughing is another strong moment on the album; caustic guitar swipes and cantankerous riffs initially scorching the senses before a jazzy breath creates another eager vaunt. Once more you think Reuben though as ever faltered twist it into their potent style. The song is an abrasive treat which leaps around with numerous turns and unpredictability but still at times those vocals rub the ear the wrong way, which is openly a problem in the closing Thanks A Million. A soft rock bred track with pressuring intensity giving it depth from the start, the song musically is another accomplished draw on the ear but vocally…well let us just say that the guys seem in a constant quarrel with their notes and the listener’s satisfaction. It is a shame as the song has like the others, the charm and persuasion to light the passions especially with the wonderful addition of strings.

It is hard to resist suggesting the band looks at bringing in a dedicated vocalist and concentrating on the music, which already they are making very impressive waves with. Despite that it has to be said Fortune Favours makes for an enjoyable encounter with some moments of massive quality and incredible promise, so much so that keeping a close eye on faltered is a definite.

www.facebook.com/falteredmusic

www.twitter.com/falteredBandUK

7/10

RingMaster 01/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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DIGITS ‘Acquiesce To Violence’ let loose on Monday 11th November‏

Digits Online Promo Shot
ALTERNATIVE ROCK CREW DIGITS RELEASE NEW EP THIS AUTUMN!
North East riff-tyrants Digits re-release their debut EP ‘Acquiesce To Violence’ and it’s a real belter. Sounding like the backwater cousins of Glassjaw, Hundred Reasons and Reuben, ‘Acquiesce To Violence’ is set loose on Monday 11th November and is available through all digital stores.
 
Taking stock after the demise of their former band, ‘Cut Glass Accent’, Chris Bradley (Vocals & Guitar) and Stu Latham (Bass) enlisted Craig Strawbridge on guitar and drummer Dan Cooper to form a new band; learning from their past mistakes, they aimed to deliver a compelling sound that would be absolutely progressive, experimental and accessible. At this point, Digits were formed.
Extensive gigging and writing soon followed, and by the end of 2012, Digits had completed their debut EP ‘Acquiesce to Violence’, which is slated for a November launch date and rammed full of sonic sledgehammer fists-in-the-air choruses and explosive rhythms that promise to melt your ears.
The EP instantly takes flight with ‘Acquiesce’ as it tips its cap to the low-slung groove of Deftones and the brawling rage of early Biffy Clyro. The recent single ‘Golden’ magnificently comes over you with balanced guitar scapes and soaring vocals before the up-tempo punk-flavored drive of ‘Visceral’ grabs you by the scruff of the neck. Lastly, ‘Violence’ closes the EP and balances melodic hooks with razor sharp riffs. Plug in and soak it up; these guys are set to rise!
Digits Cover Artwork
 

Lower Lands – Eat The Rich

   LL

     Lower Lands is an alternative rock band from Lincoln in the UK, a quartet which has already earned good acclaim and interest but with the first single taken from their upcoming new EP Canvas, it is hard to imagine anything less than a surge of recognition and awareness soaking their presence, but then again music and its deserved rewards have never followed sense so we will see. Eat The Rich is a thrilling slice of punk spiced rock, a song with more than a sense of Reuben and Max Raptor to its persuasion and a melodic prowess combined within a track as impressive as it is infectious.

Released as a free download and accompanied by an excellent video, the song has already garnered strong praise and attention whilst raising the appetite for the June 10th released EP. It follows their previous Growing Pains EP which like the single was released through I Am Mighty Records. It was a release which earned approving reactions but if Eat The rich is any indication, Canvas will soon lift the band to new potent heights within UK rock.

A striking call lone guitar opens up the song’s beckoning though when the bass and drums enter, and with no fault of theirs, there is a a2812758904_2muddy breath which flattens the already in place intrigue. Thankfully it is for mere seconds as the song explodes into a fury of energy and caustic intensity. Into its stride the track settles into a delicious stroll of impressive vocals from Benji Inkley courted by a mix of infectious riffs and a teasing groove from Inkley and Paul Howells with the bass of Jacob Jarvis prowling moodily across their stance. Framed by the excellent rhythms of drummer Rob Purkiss and a blaze of great vocal harmonies, the song is virulently contagious, the snarling elements of the track in league with the tightly melodic and inventively hooked temptation elsewhere to seduce and secure full ardour for its exciting imagination.

If there is any niggle it is at times the song does not bite viciously enough, only teases that it will, but that is being as petty as saying your cup of coffee is one degree too cool on arrival. It is an outstanding song which only makes the wait for the EP impatient. If the likes of Reuben, Max Raptor, and Hundred Reasons make you tingle than Lower Lands and Eat The Rich will make you drool just as blissfully.

Get the single @ http://lowerlands.bandcamp.com/album/eat-the-rich-single

https://www.facebook.com/lowerlands

9/10

RingMaster 28/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Fly This For Me: Making Shadows EP

Bringing a much needed muscular invention to the genre of pop punk /melodic punk, UK band Fly This For Me unleash their debut Making Shadows EP to excite and enthuse the ear. Well crafted the four track release is brought with a punk hunger driven by an expansive rock energy and intelligence to incite not only an immediate strong impression but also formidable promise for the future.

Guildford based, Fly This For Me officially formed in the closing blinks of 2011, with members which have their seeds across the UK. Already with a sound on the evidence of the EP which is fresh and evolved beyond just infectious easy to swallow hooks and unbridled keen riffs, the quintet has persistently lit up stages shared with the likes of Blitz Kids, Feed the Rhino, Lost Boys, Marines, Eager Teeth, fiN, and POLAR. It has been a constant garnering of positive responses which with the national release of the EP on July 16th can only accelerate to greater heights and recognition. The release has already been preceded by the video/single Making Shadows taken from the EP released in April, the sparks of acclaim it inspired ready to burst into full flame with the unleashing of these four impressive songs.

The release leaps into view with the sparkling She Said, its entrance more subdued than rushed to make a warm invitation which is lined with stirring riffs and provocative melodic beckoning. Vocalist Tim Cowen instantly marks himself as an expressive and powerful aspect of the sound, his emotive lyrical delivery as appealing as the magnetic sounds around him. The guitars of Sean Kelly and George Rockett light the air with skill and invention to bring a full mesmeric body and incendiary atmosphere to the track. Standing somewhere between the likes of Alexisonfire, Mind Museum and a Foo Fighters/Hundred Reasons like combination, the song is a strong trigger to set the senses up for what emerges as even more satisfying pieces of songwriting.

We All Fall Down takes no time in winding the ear around its hard rock veins of power, the drums of Joe Balchin taking charge from the off whilst the bass of Hannah Greenwood ripples with an intensity which though not always as clearly heard as one would wish adds the depth to make the songs impactful and rounded. The song teases and badgers, twisting with further melodic manipulations from the guitars to fire up the emotions whilst the vocals are as earnest as their delivered content.

Title track comes next and amongst the other unmistakably great songs stands as the best. With a discovered urgency to its breath Making Shadows is a controlled riot with the raw and anthemic edge the best punk inspired songs always have. Fully contagious though again without offering the easy infection of simple hooks and easy to consume melodic candy, the track is a feast of energy, invention, and unreserved heart pleasing rock.

The closing Rock Bottom is equally striking with the band returning to a fuller rock body beneath the hungry air of the song. The track evolves within its wall to be as unpredictable as it is siren like, that infectiousness previously mentioned in full reign here though one more without resorting to the easy pick up lines of other less able bands and songs.

Making Shadows EP is a real pleasure which from its initial impressive introduction grows into a real gem the more one engages their time with it. The release also marks Fly This For Me as a band offering not only a bright and promising future for themselves but for UK rock music too.

www.facebook.com/FlyThisForMeUK

RingMaster 06/07/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Interview with Chris Aylett and Sam Nicholls of Scholars

The end of February saw the release of a single which with an eagerness and energy most bands flounder for immediately installed its creators as a band to swiftly check out and as ones to watch very closely. The band in question was UK rock band Scholars and their single Bad For Business a song which mesmerises whilst firing up the instinct to have fun and express oneself.  We had the pleasure to find out more about the band and their music withy the chance to talk to bassist Chris Aylett and vocalist Sam Nicholls.

Hi gentlemen and welcome to The Ringmaster Review.

For many you have just burst into view so could you please introduce and give a history to the band and its members?

Chris: In a nutshell we’re a 5 piece rock band from Hemel Hempstead. We’ve been together for about 5 years now. Myself and Mike (drums) have always played in the same bands, since we were 11 years old – incidentally our first band was fronted by Frank Carter of Gallows and now Pure Love fame. Tom and Sam knew each other from school and both played in bands of good local repute. We were a 4 piece until last February, when the second guitarist we’d been searching for years finally appeared, in the form of Mr Cal Owen. We’ve recorded and released a lot of demos and we’ve just now reached the point where we’re happy we’ve got enough quality material to record our first album. How would you describe your sound again for newcomers to the band?

How would you describe your sound again for newcomers to the band?

Sam: I think we probably span a couple of different genres and we do try to blend a bit of everything that we enjoy. It’s mainly an alt rock basis but the songs are structured like pop and they’re high energy and often a little pissed off like punk rock. It’s a bit of a frankensound.

What are the influences which have shaped your sound inside and outside of music?

Chris: Musically, our starting point has always been balls-out rock and emo, bands like At The Drive In, Hundred Reasons and Million Dead. You can add to that your classic ‘indie’ bands like The Smiths, The Cure and Tears For Fears – really strong songwriting which pushed the envelope lyrically and musically. You don’t seem to get many bands these days that manage to combine mainstream appeal with genuine musical innovation. More recently we’ve started getting into more electronic music – LFO, Aphex Twin, Flying Lotus – which is starting to have a bit of an effect on our sound.

Where does the band name come from and does it reflect you as musicians?

Chris: I wish there was an interesting story behind the name but there really isn’t. When we started out we had a different singer and me and him threw a few names around based on what we liked the sound of. Scholars stuck. Does it reflect us as musicians? Loosely at best I think!

Hemel Hempstead is your home town, is it a big inspiration for you and does it have a healthy music scene for a relatively small place compared to a city?

Sam: There used to be a really healthy music scene in our town when I was a teenager. I used to go to our local arts centre every weekend to watch local bands. But now they’ve closed down almost all the decent places to play, it’s harder for kids to get into rock music in our town. We’ve actually put on some of our own shows in the past and we hope to do so in the future. They’re always a bit success because everyone is crying out for live music in our town.

Having recently reviewed your fantastic new single Bad For Business, we reflected that though unique you are in the similar high energy and infectious camp alongside the likes of Max Raptor, Innercity Pirates and Baddies, is this comparison you can see yourselves?

Sam: Well having played with and been blown away by both Max Raptor and Baddies, I couldn’t be more flattered by that! They’re very different bands but we certainly do have some overlap with them. Even if it’s just how much we love ‘going off’ properly onstage.

Your first single Tornadoes and Fractures was another great track. How do you feel you have evolved as songwriters from the bands beginnings to the new release though it is actually a relatively short time?

Chris: We’ve definitely refined the process. We used to spend hours upon hours tweaking one song only to realise after several weeks that what we had to start with wasn’t great and we were effectively polishing a turd. We listen back to demos of old and realise how overcomplicated they were – we’d throw in every good idea we had. I think we’ve finally learned that less is more. A shout out must go to our manager Mark who helped show us the way; you can’t overestimate the value of an informed outside perspective.

How does the songwriting process happen within Scholars?

Chris: It’s varied over the years. We used to jam together and see what happened, and although that yielded some good results they were a long time coming. These days we each bring semi-formed ideas to the table and ruthlessly go through them, picking out the choicest morsels to develop. In honesty, we now find that if the bulk of a song hasn’t come together within one rehearsal, it’s not likely to happen. Bad For Business came from one riff and was written in about 20 minutes at the end of a rehearsal, for example.

There seems to be a definite thought given to the visual content of Scholars as well as the music it seems, as with the sleeve design for Tornadoes and Fractures and I believe I read you co-ordinate but vary the colours you wear on stage? Is this just extra fun for you or does it have a deeper importance to the band?

Sam: I think it all comes from a desire to be a little unusual and it just has to feel right to us rather than having any specific significance. We used to actually dress ‘colour coded’ onstage but it felt a bit Power Rangers so it’s more subtle now. The whole team have input on how everything looks and it was actually guitarist Tom who came up with the idea for the origami sleeve for Tornadoes. He brought a prototype to rehearsal and it was just clearly the way to go.

What does a Scholars show offer fans, are they as high energy as your singles so far have suggested?

Chris: High energy is pretty accurate, we’ve always gone for it live. We quite like people to think that we’re slightly unhinged and that anything could happen. I think some bands forget that when they play a show, the audience are also watching what they’re doing and that’s 50% of the entertainment. It’s actually a bit arrogant to think that your music is so special and mind blowing that you just need to stand around performing it and that’s enough for 30 minutes. Basically, people are overwhelmed with entertainment options these days and unless you’re Sigur Ros you’ve got to do something a bit special to stop people playing Angry Birds while you’re on stage.

More and more bands seem to want to recreate a live sound close to their recordings rather than the other way round these days but I get the impression you guys just go for it in your gigs, it is about having and giving a fun time and show primarily for you?.

Sam: I don’t know exactly how it started but we discovered somewhere along the line that putting everything into your live show just feels really good and I’ve honestly never felt more right with the world than when we’re playing live and really nailing it. It just feels like that’s what I was born to do. So there would really be no point in us meticulously crafting and polishing songs on record and then struggling to play them exactly the same note-for-note live. It’d lose all its appeal for me. I’d rather go the other way around and try to bottle the sound of the live show when we record. It’s a challenge though!

You have shared stages with the likes of Hundred Reasons, The Computers, The Xcerts, Don Brocco and Gay For Johnny Depp, any gigs that have stood out or been a highlight so far?

Sam: Certainly the last night of HR in Nottingham for me, but mainly because I got to do guest vocals on ‘If I Could’ (my teenage self would never have believed you if you’d told him that was going to happen). The whole Don Broco tour was a huge laugh. Shows with the Gays and The Computers are always great but also hard work because they’re ferociously good live bands. We have to seriously step it up so as to not be eclipsed by their madness.

And any you would rather were lost from the memory?

Chris: Yep! We’ve had a handful of absolute shitstorms. We did a round trip of nearly 10 hours in a hired van to do a festival only to have the event shut down seconds before we were about to start playing – we’d set up and were ready to go. On another occasion we had a row with a pissed up soundman whose wife threatened to knock Sam’s block off. In a way the terrible experiences strengthen the bond between you and make the good shows all the better so we tend to laugh them off.

Do you have a focused direction for Scholars in music and sound ahead or do you just let things evolve organically?

Sam: It would be difficult to try and have a solid plan for our sound I think. We’re always trying new things so it’s always changing but we’re also quite good at reining it in, I don’t think we’ll accidentally end up as a funk band or anything.

Is there an album on the horizon, or more singles first?

Chris: There is indeed an album on the way – we’ll be in the studio in April. We’ve got plans for a few singles leading up to it too.

As still a young and upcoming band how hard do you find it to get strong gigs that will elevate your stature compared to those that are great but at a level you have played for a while?

Sam: Well we’re really grateful for all the help and support and great opportunities we receive at the moment. Shows are rarely disappointing for us even if they aren’t necessarily stadium support tours and main stage festival slots. The big break for us would be to get out on tour in support of someone awesome. I’d just like to let Biffy Clyro know that if they’re ever short of an opening act… well y’know.

What is next for the band over the coming weeks?

Chris: We’re filming another video in the next couple of weeks…we’ve got a crazy idea for it and it should be a mental couple of days. Otherwise we’re going to be getting our heads down finishing off songs for the album and starting pre-production.

Many thanks for taking time to chat with us, good luck with your excellent single.

Would you like to end with words for the world?

Sam: Thanks very much. As a wise man once said… Do, or do not. There is no ‘try’.

Oh and lastly how about a dark shameful secret about another band member?

Chris: I’ve been racking my brains for about half an hour and I can’t really think of anything. We’ve all listened to some dodgy bands and had dodgy haircuts in our time but that’s all par for the course. I can give you an interesting fact – Tom (our guitarist, also responsible for recording many of our demos) works for Jeff Wayne of ‘War of the Worlds’ fame and has in his time recorded artists as diverse as Dani Filth and Rhydian off X Factor.

The RingMaster Review 05/03/2012

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