Censored – 2014 Demo

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Everything about the sound of UK metallers Censored is heavy; from avalanche like rhythms and thunderously toned vocals to juggernaut riffs and guttural basslines, their music resonates through ears and bone as forcibly as it does the psyche. Squeezing their insatiable sound into four slabs of heavy metal, the band recently released their debut release, the 2014 Demo. It shows that the band plays metal unafraid to infuse healthy doses of hard and punk rock with just as potent mixes of thrash and stoner rock, into its sizeable provocation. The release is raw, uncompromising, and thoroughly enjoyable.

Formed in 1997 by vocalist Big Al and guitarist Paul C (better known as just PC and also founder of Beguiled and Dream Asylum), the Cumbria band, going on the quality of the songs alone on the demo, we assume had a healthy success. There is little background we can find for the band to be honest but we do know at some point Censored called it a day or went on a hiatus only to be resurrected in 2012 by the pair. Joined this time around by bassist Webby, formerly of Mindcrime and Transgression, and drummer Smurf, the band looks like staying around which on the evidence of their Demo is definitely a good thing.

First track, All In My Name instantly tells you all you need to know about the band. From the first touch of a wiry groove followed swiftly by imposing beats and swipes of cantankerous riffs , the band is pressurising and imposing on ears, their heavy presence inescapable from the off. It is a slow build leaving no room for respite which after a delicious wash of corrosive bass intensity, explodes into a feisty stride of thumping rhythms and caustic riffery. The instantly magnetic lure is increased in potency by the rich tones of Big Al and the increasingly dangerously seductive bass growl breathing down the song’s spine. The track continues to stride purposefully, every swipe from Smurf and abrasive torrent of riffing cast by PC inviting hostility, but veined with a just as appealing melodic acidity. Completed by the excellent vocal devilry of Big Al it is a mighty start and introduction to release and band.

It is just a teaser though as swiftly Carbine Thunder sets a greater incitement to greedily devour. With melodically howling guitar aligning with dark voiced bass bait and rhythmic jabbing, the song makes an intimidating and enthralling start. That potency is soon spread across a controlled but challenging in the face roar of sound and vocals, each element reined in with inventive prowess but dripping passion and energy. Prowling around senses and thoughts, the song is a masterful provocation which is as much belligerently punk as it is voraciously metal, whilst a blues rock spicing only adds to the infectious hue and pleasingly unpredictable nature of the encounter.

   N.F.V. comes next, riding in on a swaggering groove through a muffled sonic breeze. From there a melodic bordering on folkish revelry plays with the imagination, before it all merges for a constantly evolving landscape of thrash bred urgency and slower but sizzling emotive ideation. At times the track leaps at the passions and in other moments wanders off from personal tastes, meaning it lacks the spark and strength to match its predecessors but still leaves a fully satisfying proposition to mull over and pick the rich bones from, like the punk endeavour which fuels the bass.

From that slight slip the EP re-ignites with closing track Demon Bones, a blaze of anthemic ingenuity and raw aggression which from its opening rolling thunder of beats and grizzled riffery enslaves ears and passions. Another addiction breeding enticing from Webby sets up fresh hunger in the appetite before the swing of Big Al’s vocals and those of PC’s grooves, invigorates further the wonderfully turbulent and sonically fiery storm twisting heavy metal into a new shade of pleasure.

Censored unleashes metal which nails its balls proudly to the table and roars with as much passion and mischievous enterprise as it can muster. It is raw and rough around the gills but the band’s first demo is an exciting hint of things to come.

https://www.facebook.com/themightycensored

RingMaster 17/10/12014

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A Breach of Silence – The Darkest Road

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Though the tightness of its grip fluctuates across its fourteen roars, The Darkest Road is a creative fury easy to breed a greedy appetite for. Unleashed by Australian metallers A Breach of Silence, it is a tempestuous slab of varied styles and flavours which has been labelled as “powercore”. Melding the potent flavours of metalcore through to post hardcore, heavy metal on to melodic death metal, and we are missing out many more spices, it is a compelling proposition which never gives ears and imagination time to settle or spawn expectations.

The Darkest Road follows the successful and acclaimed debut album Dead or Alive which was released a year ago. With having Australia’s prestigious Q Music Award in the Best Heavy Song category (2012) under their belt, which helped lead the band to signing with Eclipse Records, their first full-length pushed A Breach Of Silence into a new intensive and global spotlight, backed potently by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Born of Osiris, Adept, The Amity Affliction, and Upon a Burning Body. Earlier this year the band released their controversial Night Rider ‘first-person shooter’ music video which took inspiration from their obsession with FPS video games and 1960’s classic westerns such as Hang ‘em High and The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Now The Darkest Road is upon us to stir up ears and thoughts whilst making another impressive step in the ascent of the Brisbane quintet.

Recorded with producers Fredrik Nordstrom and Henrik Udd (Bring Me the Horizon, Arch Enemy, In Flames), The Darkest Road as suggested ebbs and follows in the strength of its certainly unrelenting captivation, sometimes throwing a spanner in the works of getting a handle on songs and the release, but it only adds to the welcome and inventive unpredictability and constantly intriguing nature of the encounter. The album certainly starts with furious gusto and anthemic irresistibility, opener T.P.N.E shoving group shouts through ears before wiry grooves and heavy rumbling rhythms join the emerging storm. The raw and caustic vocal squalls of Rhys Flannery swiftly more in with antagonistic and skilled intent which in turn seems to light a fire in the creative swings of drummer Andrew Cotterell and the similarly vivacious motion of the grooves conjured up by Mat Cosgrove and Kerrod Dabelstein. It is a gripping and incendiary blend which is capped off by the throaty lure of bassist Blair Layt and more so by his outstanding clean vocal delivery. The song offers richly flavoursome and agitated metal of the highest order and an inescapable lure into the creative lair of A Breach of Silence, an entrance backed powerfully by the following title track.

The second song caresses ears with the impressive tones of Layt right away, evocative keys coaxing the invitation before riffs and acidic grooves erupt to trap and steal the passions all over again. As its predecessor, the track is a formidable Printencounter which is unafraid to bewitch and bewilder, seduce and rile, with a unique character seeded in the likes of All That Remains and In Flames. Its stature and temptation is matched by Vultures which strides confidently in next. Another certain anthem with its group calls and raging rhythmic confrontation, the song blazes sonically and vocally from the start, the extremes of voices a perfect union within the similarly blended canvas of predatory and melodically smouldering sounds.

Through the intensive yet warming examination of Silhouette, as the others songs upon The Darkest Road, a hope rich and potent roar against life’s obstacles, the band reveals more of their technical and imagination driven resourcefulness. A scent of Bullet For My Valentine hints throughout the evolving and inventive offering before Hang ‘em High sets its own individual fire within the release. Riffs and rhythms spew anger with their intensive and physical intent whilst Flannery almost brawls with ears through his uncompromising and pleasing vocal antagonism. It is a potent and engrossing song if without the spark of those before it, a comment which can be placed before In Reality We Trust also, though as always with the album it is mostly down to personal taste. The song storms and bleeds spite over the senses with skill and enterprise but it is mainly the vocals from both men which steal the plaudits.

From here the album does not have an identity crisis but definitely wrong-foots with persistence. Though all the tracks so far employed a diverse and varied spicing, they were bred from a fierce extreme metal canvas. The excellent Lost at Sea brings a new bloom of sound, immediately expelling a ‘folkish’ tinge to its air as well as a glorious melodic croon across its potent harmonies and sonic narrative. It is a loud whisper of something different in some ways but helps seed a new hostile and captivating breath to the album, and makes for an enthrallingly textured and majestic slice of persuasion.

   This is the End comes next and instantly spins an engaging sonic and rhythmic web around ears. It is a contagiously compelling weave, guitars and bass a simultaneously welcoming and menacing enticement over which the vocals merge hostile and catchy elements with a classic metal spiced attack. Every chord and rhythmic swipe brings a surprise and unexpected twist, the song emerging as another pinnacle and treat for the album, something Immortal is not. To be fair again it is just a personal thing but its heavy/power metal balladry complete with the genre’s trademark vocals warbles and squeals, just does not find a welcome in these ears though it is easy to hear its qualities and know it will be a favourite with classic metal fans. The song is another unique identity within the character of the album, though to call The Darkest Road schizophrenic would be going too far.

The excellent Hannibal is more from the template of earlier songs, its metalcore voracity and melodic tenacity an infectious and voracious treat which parts for the even heavier and harsher A Place I Know. The song also expels fiery melodic endeavour, again with a more classic spicing, before exploring slimmer post hardcore scenery punctuated with probably the most intensive beats and riffs on the album. It is a song which sets a fire in the belly at times but also lowers its temperature in others, but for intrigue and bold invention it is another notable moment.

Dead and Destroyed is simply brutal, a wall of angst and viciousness which still makes room for vocal croons whilst Krazy Bitch seems to pull in all the things which excites and personally frustrates in the album for a still rather pleasing encounter. The pair leaves the piano and voice sculpted ballad Time Still Remains to close the album, the song a more than decent piece of melodic metal but easy to skip by to get back to the pungent heights the album started on all over again.

The Darkest Road is a striking release, with to be honest any issues found coming from just the individual likes and dislikes we all have in our metal. It is easy to see A Breach of Silence becoming a big player in world metal if this thrilling tempest is anything to go by.

The Darkest Road is available now on Eclipse Records @ http://www.eclipserecords.biz/a-breach-of-silence-the-darkest-road-cd/

https://www.facebook.com/abreachofsilenceband

RingMaster 10/10/2014

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Viathyn – Cynosure

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With a sound which revolves within a web of progressive, folk, power, and melodic metal, drawing on varying degrees of each essence with every twist of their imagination and invention, Canadian metallers Viathyn present another contagious and gripping proposition with new album Cynosure. Nine individual musical and creative emprises thick, the album presents a fruitful and colourful journey for ears and imagination. Every track is an intriguing and at times demanding proposition with more going on than can be taken in on initial unions. It is an attention wanting enticement though which roars with a melodic tenacity and strolls with muscular flirtation to give the richest rewards.

Formed in 2006, initially as the trio of guitarist Tomislav Crnkovic, guitarist Jacob Wright, and drummer Dave Crnkovic, Viathyn released the instrumental Demagogue EP in 2008. From there the band expanded with bassist Alex Kot coming in, whilst Tomislav added vocals to his duties. Debut album The Peregrine Way was unveiled in 2010 to enthused reactions from fans and media alike. It marked the band out for their songwriting, instrumentation, and equally the storytelling which on the album told the journey of an unnamed wandering man, through the highs and lows of his life. Cynosure is bred from the same creative template, in many ways an obvious continuation of its predecessor rather than providing a startling evolution in sound and intent, but still pushing the limits and enterprise of the band to new riveting and pleasing levels.

The album starts with Ageless Stranger, a track with an epic leaning tone and resourceful melodic scenery from the off. Guitars, keys, and vocal harmonies instantly spawn a radiant yet portentous atmosphere which the jabbing beats of Dave guides with a firm hand, leading it all into a rugged terrain of rampant riffs and concussive rhythms. The song is still swarmed over by the melodic appetite of the keys and guitars though, everything coming together for a maelstrom like tempest of enticement. The strong vocals of Tomislav bring another tempting texture to the mix whilst the fluid craft of Jacob bewitches from within the aggressive stride of the song. It is a pungent and invigorating start which as its successor, as much brings thoughts of a Dommin or Volbeat as it does of bands like Wuthering Heights and KingBathmat. The song is a constantly twisting and unpredictable yet flowing proposition matched by The Coachman.

The second song takes little time to explore a richer folk enterprise to its emerging stride of rock ‘n’ roll, before weaving in just as potent essences of heavy metal and melodic rock. It is impossible not to be drawn right into its vigorous revelry, Album Cover - Viathyn  - Cynosure - 2014every turn and new idea a lure to devour with ease and greed. The brief expulsion of raw growls does not quite work but is a mere instant in a song which vocally and musically simply infects ears and imagination for a thoroughly rewarding and enjoyable encounter. There is also a theatrical mischief to the song which is given full clarity at the song’s end before Edward Mordrake thunders in on a storm of rhythmic agitation and fiery sonic temptation. Though not as immediately gripping as its predecessors, the song, with its seamless movement through varied gaits and imaginative endeavours, binds senses and thoughts in its successfully exploratory and surprising expression to keep them hungry and enthralled. The track also raises up slight comparisons to fellow Canadians New Jacobin Club at times, the drama in the skilled invention of the band’s individuals a similar and inescapable persuasion.

As mentioned there is plenty going on to reflect with mere words, this track a prime example as are both the following Shadows In Our Wake and Countess of Discordia, but that richness of depth and often tempestuously unleashed ideation ensures each partaking of a song reveals new aspects and adventures. The first of this pair of songs encloses ears with a heavy aggressive breath though it is soon aligned to an evocative wash of keys and the melodic narrative of the guitars. A thick gothic ambience also coats the song, lingering across the sinew toughened canvas and subsequent dramatic turns within the track whilst the second of the two leads by a great bass coaxing into a heavy and power metal blaze. Whether storming the senses with nostrils flared or seducing with mellower bordering on sinister melodies, the song is a glorious sonic waltz which gets better and bolder with every passing second.

Time Will Take Us All struggles to emulate the success of the previous song but still has ears and thoughts seriously engaged with its opening melancholic caress of keys and guitar, a potency matched by the emotive delivery of Tomislav. It is a song which as all on the album, builds and develops into a different proposition as it proceeds, its gentle climate discovering an imposing turbulence and emotive beauty along the way. It is not a track which lingers as others but provides another gripping tale to immerse within before the excellent folk/power metal escapade of Three Sheets To The Wind steals the passions. With a touch of Alestorm and Tyr to its Celtic folk stomp, the track swiftly recruits unbridled attention. As anthemic as all good power metal triumphs should be, the track soon has body and voice in tandem before exploring a progressive crafted landscape of mystery and invention, to keep ears and thoughts on their toes.

Completed by the dark atmospheric menace of Albedo, an outstanding track which is as predatory as it is sonically radiant and infectiously irresistible, and the closing title track, Cynosure is a peach of an encounter. The last song sums up release and band perfectly, an encounter built on a riotous elegance and creative bedlam honed into something sublime and intricately structured, not forgetting gloriously presented. The album is fun, at times unafraid to let its serious side have a rest, but most of all Cynosure is one of the most enjoyable and enterprising progressive metal releases this year.

The self-released Cynosure is available now @ http://viathyn.bandcamp.com/album/cynosure

http://www.viathyn.com

RingMaster 09/10/2014

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Mausoleum Gate – Self Titled

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Though the band’s self-titled debut album does not grip the passions as rigorously as it might, there is plenty about the new release from Finnish metallers Mausoleum Gate to recommend and breed a healthy appetite for. Spawned in the inspiration of the seventies/eighties heavy metal scene, the band’s release and sound is a skilfully accomplished and magnetic proposition which from an underwhelming start grows to be a potently enjoyable and intriguing encounter within their captivating release.

Formed in 2008 by guitarist Count L.F. and bassist/keyboardist Wicked Ischianus, Mausoleum Gate recorded their debut EP Gateways For The Wicked in 2010, with vocalist V-P. Varpula part of the band’s line-up by this point. After playing that year’s Metal Warning Festival alongside the likes of Sarcofagus and Cloven Hoof, a change in personal saw the current line-up in place with the addition of guitarist Kasperi Puranen and drummer Oscar Razanez alongside the founding pair and Varpula. Last year the band released the well-received Obsessed By Metal 7” with a cassette version of Gateways For The Wicked following whilst 2014 has seen Mausoleum Gate sign with Cruz Del Sur Music for the release of their debut album.

It is a release which makes an impressing statement for the band but starts off with a less than convincing offering in Magic of the Gypsy Queen. To be fair it is more likely personal tastes dictate its failure to persuade but from the gothic caress of keys with haunting child spawned chuckles, the track makes a strong but unsure proposition. Its full entrance grips ears with ease, riffs stirring up attention as grooves flirt with their own baiting. With a heavy bass lure and crisp rhythms and a flourish of keys on board too, it is a captivating engagement but soon losing its edge and tight hold as the vocals of Varpula come in. It should be noted that the singer is an impressive presence but the mix sets him apart from the rest of the song to disrupt the fluency and potency of the song. The music is compelling, especially the excellent guitar enterprise colouring its lure, and vocals alone are strong but together they clash more than work. It is a shame but something which finds a much better balance from hereon in.

The following Demon Droid prowls the senses and imagination with an intimidating pose and ominous breath, riffs and beats predatory before it all erupts into a fiery and antagonistic blaze of heavy metal contagion and adventure. 8032622210712Punchy and with hooks which are as addictive as the melodies are fiery, the song explores its own depths with a progressive breath exploited by the searing invention of the guitars. It is an instant step up for the release which is not quite maintained by the power ballad Lost Beyond the Sun, though it too is equipped with an atmospheric radiance from the keys and the continuing to impress craft and imagination of the guitars. Again there is little to dismiss but just the absence of the spark igniting its predecessor and the next up Mercenaries of Steel which leaves it in their shadow.

The fourth track emerges from rhythmic shadows and a cold ambience to crawl through ears with an intensive examination from riffs and a binding of sonically scorched grooves. This in turn is just a passage into the adrenaline fuelled heart of the song; an Iron Maiden/ Rainbow like weave snarling over and seducing ears. Vocals croon and roar with refreshing expression and harmony as the bass tempts with a throaty growl whilst a seamless switch into a slow progressive exploration by the guitars just bewitches ears and emotions before twisting back into an insatiable and thrilling rampage.

The Kuopio quintet closes the album with its title track, almost twelve minutes of old school heavy metal ingenuity which merges classic genre balladry with a raw and hungry intensity. It is an appealing canvas brought to stronger life by the rich vocal hues and individual musicianship of the band, all combining for a tapestry which spreads and evolves with every minute into an epic and deeply satisfying journey.

Mausoleum Gate, song, album, and band are propositions which worm themselves pleasingly into the passions with every partaking of the accomplished offering. It is not a classic but a release to invite and inspire good attention to a band which has the potential to strike bigger and major heights ahead.

Mausoleum Gate is available now via Cruz Del Sur Music

https://www.facebook.com/MausoleumGate

RingMaster 08/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Singing forest bred blues: an interview with Electric Woodland

Electric Woodland

    Weaving an inescapable and thrilling lure of blues, heavy metal, and classic rock into something organically unique, Norwegian rock band Electric Woodland has been earning eager attention and acclaim through their stunning debut album Potrero. It is a rigorously tantalising encounter which seduces the passions through its skilful infectiousness and riveting old school bred and modern fuelled enterprise. The quartet is making rich marks with their sound and now release so we had to find out more. Thanks to guitarist Christian N. Olsen-Ruud, we explored the origins of Electric Woodland, the making of its first full-length release, opportunities for band in their homeland and much more…

Hi Christian and welcome to the site. Thank you for sharing your time with us as we explore all things Electric Woodland.

Firstly can you tell us about the beginnings of the band, how you all met etc.?

Well, Peder (vocals, guitar) and Emil (drums) are brothers, and Marius (bass) is their cousin, so they didn’t have much of a choice. I (Christian, guitar) first got to know Peder when we both went to the same secondary school and started hanging out. The band started when a mutual friend had built a porch, and asked Peder and I if we wanted to bring a couple of acoustic guitars over and break it in. All of a sudden people started to say that they wanted to come as well, and before we knew it, we had 150 people who were going to show up. We built a stage, Marius and Emil joined, and since every festival around seemed to have closed, we started both the band and a festival called Runerock (Rune is the name of the guy with the porch).

How did the great band name come about?

We come from a place called Skogbygda, which sort of translates to Woodville or Wood village. Growing up in rural Norway and Skogbygda has had a great impact on us, so I guess we wanted to give it a little homage. The other half of the name is from one of our other passions, classic rock, blues rock, and one of the great masters, Jimi Hendrix. As well as giving homage to Skogbygda, we thought that mixing Electric Ladyland in there would sort of define what we wanted to do. Down to earth hard blues rock from the Norwegian forests.

Is Electric Woodland the first musical endeavour for you all?

We’ve all had more or less serious bands before, but Electric Woodland is the first band where we’ve really worked with song writing and recording in the way that we’ve done now. The EP was also the first real studio work we’ve done, but luckily we’ve had great people working with us for both the EP and the album, who have helped us out a lot.

Your music is boldly flavoursome with numerous essences of different styles adding to the mix. What are the predominant inspirations for the band and you as musicians?

As you say, our inspirations are many, and it’s a mix of everything from Robert Johnson, through 70s classic rock, to newer stuff like Queens of the Stone Age. In essence it’s a mix of everything we’ve loved when we grew up. When we get asked about this we usually go with the big bands that everyone knows like Queens of the Stone Age, The Doors, Deep Purple, etc., but our biggest influence over the last couple years has probably been a local artist called Amund Maarud. He’s not only helped us out a lot while recording and through Snaxville records, but he’s got a lot of the same influences as us and blends them together into some really cool stuff.

You recently released your debut album Potrero which follows your well received self-titled EP of 2009. How do you see the progression in your sound and songwriting between the two releases?Electric Woodland cover

The four songs on the EP were basically the first four songs we wrote as a band. When it came to Potrero, we wanted to use a bit more time to develop our own sound. While both have a lot of the same influences, Potrero is a bit darker, and both a bit more bluesy and heavy at times.

The album feels a confident and mature collection of songs but with plenty of potential for even greater heights; is that how you feel about it now it is out there drawing in acclaim and new hearts?

Definitely… Although we started to experiment with our own sound on Potrero, it was still only our second recording ever. I do feel we are gaining momentum as song writers and as a band. After recording Potrero, we kind of know more of what we enjoyed recording and what we enjoy playing, so the next album will hopefully reflect that and show some more progression.

Tell us about the recording of Potrero, I believe it was recorded onto analogue tape?

We recorded it at Snaxville Studios in Skogbygda, with the help of Amund and Henrik Maarud. It’s a top, modern studio, but they record everything on analogue tape before any modern technology touches it. We did it in a couple of sessions with some time in between, so that we could think about what we had done and do adjustments in the song writing for the remaining songs if they needed it.

What was behind the decision which it has to be said works a treat in defining the album’s sound.

Again, a lot of our inspiration comes from old blues artists and 60s and 70s rock, so to get that genuine dirty and gritty old school sound, this was what we had to do. The general feeling of recording on tape just felt right as well. You don’t get a million takes when recording on tape, and I think that is a good thing. Each take gets more focused. In a way, it’s also what you always imagined a studio to be. Not just plugging the instruments into a laptop and there’s your album, but you get the whole studio ritual that gets you ‘in the zone’.

Did you go old school/vintage in other aspects of the recording and creating of the album?

A lot of the equipment we use is either vintage or new but made to sound vintage. Some of the pedals we use are clones of old legendary pedals that people like Hendrix, Gilmour and Iommi used, and that’s sort of where we want to go. In addition, a lot of the other equipment in the studio was vintage, form old 70s tape delays to microphones that were used by the BBC in the 60s and 70s.

Is this something you will look to do again or have you already new ideas to explore with the next release?

I think it is important to try to evolve the sound in some way, but in our case it will probably be to try to dive even deeper into that way of working. We really enjoyed it, and really like that type of sound as well. We just need to push it one step further.

There is a raw and gritty texture to the songs on the album, was this deliberately sought or an organic success which just happened?

It was definitely on purpose. We listened to different stuff before recording, and decided that this was what we wanted to do. It’s the sound that we felt the songs needed.

How does the songwriting work within the band?

Usually Peder does most of the writing. He often comes to rehearsals with riffs and lyrics, and we arrange it together into finished songs. Peder and Emil tries out a lot of stuff when they’re both home as well (we rehearse in their old hen house!).

Bad Shoe and the song Electric Woodland steal top honours on the album for us amongst only great tracks. Give us some background to the pair.

They’re two very different songs that’s for sure. Bad Shoe is a rather happy-go-lucky, straight forward, feel good song, where Peder wrote most of it and just brought it to a rehearsal. Electric Woodland is a lot grittier and heavier, and a lot more jam based. It is also without a doubt the song that has evolved the most of all our songs. Some of it was actually some of the first material we produced, and it was almost on the EP as a very straight forward rock song. We started working on it as a band, and suddenly we had new riffs, parts and vocals that took it in a completely different direction.

Is there a particular moment on the album which gives you an extra satisfied tingle inside?

One of the things I’m most pleased with in the response to the album is that everyone seems to have a different favourite song on it. I think that Electric Woodland is probably my pick of the bunch. It’s one of my favourite songs to play live, and the way we just jammed to make it into what it became was a great moment for us as a band. It also has great energy.

Electric Woodland 2Obviously Norway is your home, a place where different music seems to find a place but black metal and folk based styles seem to be what people most assign to the country. What is the reality as a band from there and have you found a ready appetite there for your blues seeded sounds?

There’s a lot of melancholic music in Norway. Maybe it’s the long, depressing winters, but if it’s pop, rock, blues or black metal, there’s often a hint of melancholy in there somewhere. It’s certainly true for Norwegian folk music and black metal, and of course, for blues as well. A lot of people also like a bit of rock and classic rock, so I think we fit in nicely!

We get the feeling that across Europe and now starting in the UK recognition and attention is awakening to your presence, how are you seeing this now Potrero is out?

We do feel we’re starting to build up steam. You feel that gradually things are beginning to move, with an interview here and there, some radio plays here and there, gigs at a bit bigger venues, etc. We’re in this band because we love creating and playing music, but getting some recognition and that people enjoy what you do feels great. It’s something we spent a lot of time and effort on, and take a lot of pride in, so that people don’t think it’s just bullshit really helps!

Is Electric Woodland an active live proposition at home and what are the prospects of seeing you tour across Europe and the UK at some point?

We’ve been a bit unlucky with some health issues in the band this year, so we haven’t been able to do as much as we’ve wanted to, but we’ve still managed to get quite a few gigs under the belt. All of us have other jobs, so we try to do a gig whenever we find the time. We hope to do a bit more though, and a tour of the UK and Europe would be great at some point. So tell your local promoter!

For all bands the internet has been full of pros and cons for their musical journey, how have you found it so far?

When four guys can sit and play what can be pretty introvert music, in a forest in the middle of nowhere in Norway, and suddenly have about 200 fans on Facebook from India, you see what a powerful marketing tool the internet can be. It also makes everything so much easier and gives you so many more options when it comes to producing and publishing records. Bands no longer need a record label’s financial backing to be able to produce something, which can mean that you get a bigger variety of bands out there for people to listen to. You get music in all shapes in all shapes and forms, which can be both good and bad, I guess.

What is next for Electric Woodland and across the rest of 2014?

Hopefully, we’ll get the time to write some more music. We’ve got a couple rough drafts of songs for the second album that we want to keep working on, as well as doing a few more gigs this year.

Thanks again for taking time to chat with us.

Any last words you would like to leave us with?

If you get the chance, check us out on Spotify, give us a like on Facebook, and tell us what you think!

And lastly putting yourself in the place of an interviewer what question would you most like to ask to who?

Black Sabbath and the question would be if they needed an opening act!

www.electricwoodland.com

Read our review of Potrero @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/12/07/electric-woodland-potrero/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Krullur – Grounds For Termination

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Hailing from Houston, extreme metallers Krullur have recently linked up with Horror Pain Gore Death Productions and their first fury from the union comes in the blistering shape of the Grounds For Termination EP. Six tracks brewing up a raw and corrosive storm from a healthy collusion of death and thrash metal, the release is a tenaciously satisfying savagery. Not an encounter to roar outside of established templates it is fair to say but one feeding heavily all the wants of a slab of extreme provocation.

Formed in 1989, the band is no newcomer to unleashing ravenous hostility. From early demo Enormity in 1990, the trio has drawn attention through the Godvomit Compilation, a split release with Tumorhead in 1996, and debut album Open Ass Surgery in 2001, amongst a handful of releases. As evidenced by the new encounter, the band uncages as proposition which blends the darkest contagious and hostile elements of thrash and death metal with a further blackened intent and punk predation. Grounds For Termination is their new assault, and though the threesome of band founders Jay Langston (drums) and Marty Langston (guitar) alongside Diego Garza (vocals/bass) who joined the band in 2009,has not uncaged a game changer, it is a release to turn new heads their way and offer a thoroughly enjoyable violation.

Krullur take a chunk out of ears straight away as first track Bringer of Destruction flails with viciously swinging rhythms and similarly driven riffs to set off the onslaught. It is just a grabbing of attention though as once in control the song uncages an infectious stroll of bass hooks and scything beats aligned to caustic scythes of guitar. It is potent thrash bred bait which strides antagonistically over the senses and into the imagination, the punkish vocal growl of Garza adding to the raucous brawl of sound and energy. An abrasive and raw confrontation, the song makes for a captivating start with its Toxic Holocaust meets Sarcofago like ferocity and intensity.

Necromancer of Death follows, building on the appealing entrance of the EP with its classic heavy metal furnace of aggression and enterprise. The guitar spins a web of sonic intrigue and melodic craft which manages to be pleasingly vocal and open within the otherwise oppressive and ferocious weight of the track. To this drums and bass sculpt a demanding yet catchy suffocation, increasing the violent lure and grip of the song. Its success is surpassed by the outstanding Designed for Failure. From its first second, the thrash fuelled tempest strides over and tramples the senses, its gait launching from a predatory stalking to an unbridled assault before combining both for the remainder of its impressive fury. Vocals and guitar steal attention with their punk and melodic enticement respectively, but overall the track is a punchy rage which leaves satisfaction full.

Both Pay by Pain and No Holds Barred provide a distinct and unrelenting savagery, the first a carnivorous monsoon of energy and malevolence but a tempest veined by riveting guitar invention whilst its successor ventures into a more punk rock seeded inhospitality. The song is an exciting blaze of sonic endeavour and rhythmic sadism but again a track which manages to be addictively catchy, its thrash swing an invigorating temptation in the merciless and corrosive rampage.

The EP comes to an end with Infestation, a slower spiteful proposition compared to earlier tracks which preys on the senses and gnaws on the emotions with its vehement coated frenzy of rhythmic incitement and sonic causticity. It makes a fine end to a strongly pleasing release, and though Krullur is not opening up new avenues with Grounds For Termination, the band is definitely putting itself in a bigger window with its enjoyable attack on the senses.

Grounds For Termination is available now via Horror Pain Gore Death Productions @ https://hpgd.bandcamp.com/album/grounds-for-termination

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Krullur/154413801249768

RingMaster 17/09/2014

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Hollywood Heads – Self Titled EP

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Sauntering out of Moscow, Hollywood Heads is a band with a swagger to their presence and lustful intention to their heavy metal exploit. Formed in 2011, the quartet has powerfully awoken the eager attention of their local underground scene but now with the help of their self-titled debut EP, the band is ready to break out into a wider spotlight. Inspired by the likes of Aerosmith, Guns N’ Roses, Motley Crue, Alice Cooper, and Zakk Wylde, their sound is not one bursting with startling originality but it offers boisterous and dirty rock ‘n’ roll which easily lights ears and appetite.

Line-ups changes, as with many bands, has been part of Hollywood Head’s emergence but the EP finds the band at its strongest yet with founding members in bassist Yeti and drummer Dan Mark alongside vocalist Gine King and guitarist Cross_Cover_Hollywood_HeadsFox. The successor to the well-received single Blood City, the EP rocks without any thought of respect or restraint from its first rousing track, the feisty Hollywood Heads. It does not make the most dramatic start but with riffs stirring up air and rhythms prowling with predacious intent, the song makes a strong enough invitation before exploding into a fiery slab of rowdy rock ‘n’ roll with glam rock urges. The slightly wayward tendencies of vocals only add to the energy and excitement brewed in the track whilst guitars unveil a potent craft of sonic endeavour to add fuel to the fire. There are no surprises with the song but plenty to get feet and ears rigorously engaged.

The following Aerogrill is the same, not making shocking statements but igniting body and thoughts with its excellent punkish twang and feverish vivacity around more of those addictive unique vocals. The best track on the release it shows a riveting twist of adventure to the band’s sound. Hooks seduce and grooves bind the senses whilst the virulent stroll of the song takes a hold of the passions. It is not ground-breaking but wholly addictive as it awakens a greedy hunger for the band’s creative brawl.

The EP comes to a close with Game, a proposition showing yet another side to the band’s invention. It is the heaviest track on the release; riffs prowling with weighty enticement as rhythms crisply spear their intensity as vocals roar with lusty relish across their canvas. Lit with an additional blues hue, the song is an accomplished and magnetic close to a fine release.

Hollywood Heads are at the start of a potentially dramatic ascent and success. They have still to evolve their own distinct voice but the EP makes a highly satisfying and pleasing base to start from.

The Hollywood Heads EP is available now

https://www.facebook.com/hollywoodheadsofficial

8/10

RingMaster Review 12/09/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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