Insane Prototype – These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything

IP

Hailing out of Pokrov in Russia, Insane Prototype is a band still cloaked by shadows from world attention but if they continue producing releases as enjoyable and potential strapped as their latest album These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything, it is easy to suspect that a wider recognition is on the horizon. Brimming with creative intrigue and eclectic sounds sculpted into a dark voracious fusion of rock and metal, the release is a potent wake-up call to a band which is still evolving its presence you feel but well on the way to making a loud statement for the wider scene to hear.

Insane Prototype was formed in 2012 by Dmitry Kalinin, the founder of Russian electronic band The Phase, and guitarist Andrei Knyazev. Working on songs written and recorded by Kalinin previously, the pair was soon recording These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything. Since its release the seven track encounter has drawn strong responses and not only in their homeland, its touch impressing and persuading media and new fans further afield. With a full line-up now in place, the band has been earning similarly strong reactions with their live performances, whilst their album continues to make a potent base camp for the next propositions the band is currently working on.

An ambient haze is soon in the arms of a melancholic caress of dark strings as opener Interlude N3 sets up the release. It is an immediately evocative incitement, violins and cello casting a richly emotive embrace to which short Coverabrasing scrubs of guitar and restrained yet intimidating rhythms add their voice. An emerging epic breath blends with the portentous air of the orchestral incitement, the instrumental making an appealing but deceptive start with bred expectations of a blackened or symphonic proposition swiftly set straight with the appearance of Void Reflection. Keen rhythms rap on ears first, quickly joined by the expressive tones of Kalinin which spear themselves with savage roars simultaneously matched by sound. Soon settling into a controlled stroll with jangling riffs and firm beats, the track lays a canvas of nu-metal and melodic rock to which expulsions of aggression and intensity unleash their welcome bait. The song is a solid and captivating encounter, not one to light a fire but with plenty to hold attention tight whilst coaxing out a keen appetite for the forthcoming tracks.

That eagerness is soon fed a healthy dose of invention with Broken Blues, a track which glides in on a sultry flume of sonic enticement and low mellow vocals. With the black velvet tones of bass and again sinew built rhythms making their own slow seduction, the song provides a humid weave of intrigue with a Palms like emotional resonance within a Helldorado coloured ambience. The track smoulders in presence and persuasion, growing in weight and riveting expression across its length and over each taking of its compelling flight. Adding discord kissed keys, blasts of tainted brass, and cloudy washes of guitar, it is an enthralling investigation.

   Demons Of The Past is a different kind of beast, carnivorous riffs caustically gripping ears from the start as punchy rhythms descend on the senses. The track is soon crowding in with greater ferocity through varied vocal intent aligned to a similarly flavoursome and resourceful sonic web of design and intimidation. The track is a demanding and predacious tempest but also offering a seductive croon which simply ignites the imagination, essences of Korn and Nine Inch Nails spicing up the creative blaze. It is a richly textured weave which is taken to greater success and heights by the next up Prey To Passion. Every flirtatious sonic grimace and rapacious toxin of its predecessor is intensified within the instantly predatory encounter. Grooves entwine venomously around ears from the first second of the song, their irresistible grouchy lure emulated and enhanced by the slow Deftones like crawl of vocals and bass tempting. It is a primal enticement which devours the passions, tightening its grip as flames of melodic hues and mellow breath cross the senses. The best track on the album, it simply bewitches and tantalises with a carnally bred beauty.

Another dip into a Korn like tenacity and invention boils contagiously within Things That Overcome, its combination of bruising voracity and melodically driven sonic fire a magnetic persistence which is unrelenting in its solicitous charm and instinctive consumption of the senses. It is a masterful blend which in some ways never goes far enough in either extreme, the song lacking the bravery to go for the jugular or to truly romance the passions. Nevertheless it is an outstanding trigger for the imagination which is not quite matched by the more regular rock spawned closing song, Great Illusion. As the previous track it twists and flares up with hostile intent and ferocious enterprise around concentrated passages of melodic and merciful sonic temptation, making a thrilling proposition but it lacks the bite and sharpness of other songs to quite grace the same heights.

Overall These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything is a hugely impressing introduction from a band easy to see at some point becoming a boldly noticeable presence outside of their local landscape. Insane Prototype is a name to watch out for starting with this fine release.

These Seven Words Do Not Mean Anything is available now @ http://insaneprototype.bandcamp.com/album/these-seven-words-do-not-mean-anything

http://insaneprototype.com/

8/10

RingMaster 10/07/2014

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Overpower – Greatness Within

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Casting a groove infested thrash bred temptation of modern metal Greatness Within makes a potent and intriguing introduction to Croatian metallers Overpower. The band’s debut album does not offer ground-breaking rages or startlingly unique tempests but grips attention with accomplished and enterprising twists on a fusion of sound which instinctively sparks a keen appetite for its recipe. It is a roaring and bruising onslaught of rapacious riffs with matching antagonistic rhythms all bound in a web of grooves and melodic acidity which easily ignites the imagination. Primarily it is an entrance which casts Overpower as a formidable protagonist of flavoursome hostile metal.

The band began in 2006, formed by guitarist Daniel Badanjak, bassist David Vukusic, and drummer Frane Velcic. Playing mainly covers from the likes of Iron Maiden, Metallica, and Judas Priest, the band searched for their own direction with original songs over the next couple of years. A few frontmen were tried whilst Velcic left the band, his departure seeing the joining of drummer Hrvoje Dizdar. After the leaving of another vocalist, the band contacted Velcic to come in as frontman for a gig they were playing. Such its success he decided to remain in the band as vocalist before the Zagreb quartet set about recording Greatness Within. With an open vein of inspiration from the likes of Metallica, Iron Maiden, Pantera, Slayer, and Down to the band and sound, the album boils up a skilled and magnetic storm of voracious metal which may not startle but definitely excites

As soon as the opening steely dark throated tones of bass opens up Paid Trip to Nightmare, attention and swiftly after appetite are caught and ready to embrace the opening song. A heavy swipe of guitar brings drama to the sinister air before casting a captivating web of slightly portentous but enthralling colour to the breath of the song. The kick into a thrash fuelled charge is quick and seamless, the track suddenly a savage rage of destructive rhythms and hungry riffs ridden by the raw and rasping growls of Velcic. Exhaustive and thunderously impacting, the track is an explosive start; a searing solo and anthemic tenacity all adding to the compelling bait.

The following Final Laughter makes a purposeful if reined start, riffs and rhythms again hitting hard with an even paced intent whilst the excellent bass suasion of Vukusic is grizzled in bestial voice and presence. More expectations feeding than its predecessor, the imposing brute of an encounter still draws an eager hunger with its muscular rhythmic punches, stalking riffs, and the excellent coarse tones of the frontman. It keeps the album on a richly satisfying course before being put in the shadows by the outstanding Conqueror. Instantly wrapping ears in a melodic enticement, the track has thoughts engrossed, especially when stretching its sinews with predacious riffs and again controlled yet intimidating rhythms. It is a commanding persuasion which steals greater glories with its step into a groove spiced melody inflamed passage of resourceful design led by the excellent switch into clean vocals. It is a masterful and riveting turn which works perfectly with the entwining voracity of sound and intent around it; the song easily the best thing on the release.

Both Life in a Lie and the title track give it a run for its money though, the first emerging from a haunting atmosphere with a Pantera like swagger to its stroll and savage tone to the bass. Soon aided by bewitching grooves and the continuing to impress vocals, the song lurches like a predator of carnal persuasion across thoughts and imagination, setting a danger bred canvas lit by searing flames of guitar enterprise. As most songs there is a familiarity to its body and heart but nothing to defuse its impact and absorbing call. In a different guise its successor is much the same, brewing up a less than strikingly new proposition but gripping attention with resourceful and imposingly attentive sounds to which the return of clean vocals alongside the dirtier delivery only increases the pleasure.

The grievous bass sound of Roulette again ignites a swift licking of lips to which the furious torrent of crippling rhythms and riff sculpted severity thrust forward by the raucous spit of dual vocals brings a wider grin. The track is a thoroughly agreeable rampage across ears and emotions. Anthemic and hard hitting, as all the songs, the onslaught of predation leaves passions full but ready for much more which Monster soon provides in uncompromising style. With a gentle guitar and vocal croon the song transfixes senses and imagination, its opening tale the fuse to exploratory thoughts which are given another dose of incitement by the heavy crawling bestial weight and intensity straight after. It comes with a net of sonic intrigue and vindictive rabidity, courtesy of the bass, a weave ridiculously gripping and deliciously infecting.

The song is a mighty end to an impressive release though there is the Outro to actually bring the album to a close but it is a decent but nothing piece of music which just sits showing its creative muscles. Greatness Within is a powerful debut which without drenching itself in originality marks out Overpower as a potential clad strikingly enjoyable prospect, with already the skills and sound to make large and potent statements.

Greatness Within is available now via Geenger Records and @ http://overpowerzg.bandcamp.com/album/greatness-within

https://www.facebook.com/overpowerband/

8.5/10

RingMaster 09/07/2014

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Across The Swarm – Self Titled

ATS photo by Gianvito Greco

Hailing from Bologna, Italian extreme metallers Across The Swarm are an emerging force destined to great and major things if their self-titled debut EP is anything to go by. Consisting of five fascinatingly inventive and irresistibly brutal tracks entwining everything from groove and nu-metal, hard core and drum and bass into their persistently evolving and violating landscapes of sound, the release is a towering and gripping onslaught of intrigue drenched ferocity. It is a startling entrance by the band, one clad in an invigorating unpredictability and exhaustive experimental attitude which is seemingly rare to absent in a great many new bands.

Formed in 2013 out of Lacerater, which released a series of demos itself, Across The Swarm set about working on their first release last December. Recording it at Sliver Studios, the quartet of vocalist Francesco A. Flagiello, guitarists Luca Sammartino and Marco Lambertini, and drummer Riccardo Grechi brought in NK and Sygo from Hallucinator for the DnB samples as well as Simone Bertozzi (The Modern Age Slavery, Mnemic) to provide bass for the recordings. The result is the exhilarating torrent of ideation and voracious sound found on their self-titled introduction, a proposition inflaming ears and imagination right through to hungry passions.

     Hang Out is the first pestilential treat, a grievous rhythmic assault and similarly bred riffs flying at the senses within the first second. It is already more than a straight forward confrontation as varied vicious vocal squalls alongside across-the-swarm-300x300vitriolic grooves wreak havoc with toxic intent and craft, whilst the unpredictable drumming of Grechi disorientates as it impresses. The track is from start to finish incendiary to the imagination, torrentially blasting and irrepressibly seducing with mouth-watering enterprise and striking ingenuity as in its successor Just Bodies. Once again first touch is as barbarous as it is heavy, beats and riffs churning up the senses for bass and guitars to offload a venomous bait which itself twists with a breath-taking ideation. Swinging temptation of drum n bass bred invention soon adds its weight to the suasion, though its brief entrance is soon lost under an avalanche of rhythmic hostility and rigorously intensive grooving. Raw and uncompromising yet precise and deliberately structured in its creative fury, the track consumes an already keen appetite for the release with its staggering endeavour, the smile on the face at its departure the sure sign of something special.

That grin is never far away from the EP to be fair, reprising its joy with Cynical Eyes and beaming even more loudly with the outstanding Formless Wreck. The first of the two is sonic and rhythmic savagery driven by vocal and creative predation. The track starts in a rage and boils up into a carnivorous rabidity yet from its first caustic touch it unleashes waves and veins of acidic grooves and invention sculpted twists which enslave the imagination. It is a contagious tempest of malevolent beauty matched and exceeded by the second of the two, bass and guitars coaxing and licking ears with invention beneath a scourging wind of sound before that previously only glancing bait of drum n bass makes a more thrilling and provocative presence on the release. At any point on the EP it is hard to find true comparisons to suggest and here especially difficult, yet essences of The Browning, Bloodsimple, and Dark Tranquillity is some kind of clue.

The release closes with the virulently compelling Like Water, a hellacious inventively twisted slab of extreme maliciousness cast with technical rapaciousness and imagination bred toxicity. It is a colossal closing to an immense and enthralling incitement. Across The Swarm has uncaged one of the best metal debuts certainly this year and last whilst suggesting a potential which if it comes to bear, and you dare not doubt it, could see the Italians setting new levels and templates for extreme storms ahead.

Across The Swarm is available now @ http://acrosstheswarm.bandcamp.com/album/across-the-swarm

https://www.facebook.com/acrosstheswarm

9/10

RingMaster 04/07/2014

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Beneath Dead Waves – Inertia

Beneath Dead Waves Online Promo Picture

There is a storm brewing within UK metal and it comes in the thrilling shape of London based quintet Beneath Dead Waves. The quintet has just unleashed debut album Inertia, a thunderous and magnetically diverse slab of modern antagonism which is one of the most potential soaked exciting introductions to a band in a long time. It is a monster of a release, an encounter mauling and gnawing the senses but equally seducing with a technical craft and striking imagination which ensures swift allegiance to its call. There is also an undefined vein of familiarity to the proposition which brings a kinship to the unpredictable and ruggedly inventive exploits unveiled. Inertia is not the greatest album this year but right on the frontline of the most thrilling.

Beneath Dead Waves was formed in 2007 in Dorset by vocalist Joey Draper, guitarist Doug Cartwright, and drummer Leigh Costanza, the trio bringing the inspirations of band such as Between The Buried And Me and Tool into their creative whirlpool, as well as varied styles from thrash to groove and nu to progressive metal. The result as evidenced by Inertia is a rigorous persuasion which though holding familiar aspects, is still a unique incitement. The band relocated to London spending the next few years writing and recording before finding guitarist Matt Reeves and bassist Chad McCamlie, whose recruitment brought the band a new depth and potency in sound. Last year saw the band igniting stages and playing with the likes of Monuments, Intronaut, and Scale the Summit, and before its end the single Imperfect released to acclaim and eager appetites. Inertia is the next mighty step in the ascent of the band, one impossible to ignore or not find a forceful hunger for as well as what comes next from the five-piece.

The release opens with Nemacyst, the song taking mere moments to intrigue and fire up attention with its initial swirling graze of guitar Beneath Dead Waves Cover Artworkswiftly joined by dramatically textured riffs and demanding rhythms. Setting down its frame, the song erupts into a thrash fuelled rampancy driven by the raw vocal squalls of Draper, his tones an appealing irritant to match the nagging surge and intensity of the guitars. It is a stirring start which only strengthens its lure when Draper switches to clean a delivery, the frontman showing impressive prowess in both his attacks, and a weave of technical resourcefulness from the guitar. Admittedly on first listens the impressively skilled flourishes felt out of place, walking the wrong side of showing off within the rapacious turmoil, but though here it still does not quite convince, across the album the stunning skills and invention only warm a lustful want for more. The song continues to twist and flirt with ears and thoughts as it crosses it’s almost eight minutes of compelling adventure, painting a startling landscape of expressive ingenuity across an aggressive canvas. It is a stunning start straight away backed up by its successor.

Delirium similarly comes out with all guns blazing, riffs and rhythms crowding senses as a sonic toxin coaxes the imagination. Establishing its intent, a step into a slower predatory stalking ensues, guitars and vocals prowling ears whilst bass and drums draw an intimidating bait to further the seduction. As its predecessor the track swerves into unexpected detours and inventive asides, all seamlessly sculpted and each imposing new narratives and textures to contemplate. As all songs those earlier mentioned influences add spice to the maelstrom but equally here and more so through other songs, you can hear slithers of bands like Dillinger Escape Plan, Korn, Lamb of God, and Exodus at play, though ultimately it is something individual to Beneath Dead Waves.

Both the compelling Deliriant and the title track grip the tightest hold of attention and appetite, the first a hypnotic mesh of dark seduction and rabid hostility which bewitches and violates simultaneously. It is a glorious and exhaustive tempest of merciless attitude and creative intensity, riffs scything across senses whilst rhythms badger and pummel their walls further. It is a formidable provocation to which the again dual vocal incitement of Draper, alluring shadows, and a searing solo cast rich tempting hues. Its successor soothes the bruising with a gentle opening, guitar and keys a warm caress courted by the darker but no more intrusive tone of the bass. With clean vocals adding their tender touch, the song is an elegant breeze though soon prone to eruptions of expressive causticity and sonic abrasing. Again there is a web of technical resourcefulness holding the imagination, taking the listener deeper into a storm gathering weight and passion within the alluring terrain. Eventually that pressure breaks for an equally tempting flame of thrash bred suasion veined by sonic spires, though one bred with melodic and stoner-esque colouring. It is another forcibly convincing emprise of sound and thoughts, the album growing with every breath and song into a mighty marker for the band.

Next up You Were Nothing pushes into a heavier rock fired premise, the vocals of Draper clean but equipped with a great growl which easily slips into his caustic side whilst the guitars groove and court the passions with a smoothly evolving and changing intent. Not the strongest song on the release compared to its companions, the track still pleasingly shows the potent and richly pleasing diversity of the band in songwriting and sound as it makes way for the outstanding Imperfect. It is easy to see why the single lit fires in so many people and the media. From its first Korn like bait, the track just grows and towers over ears with a bitterness soaked antagonism and harsh smothering of riffs. As always it is just a moment in a constantly moving onslaught, clean vocals and melodic crooning worming in on the persuasion as technical enterprise fires up its invention. It is a scintillating encounter, the band merging styles and flavours with creative alchemy so that the song alone sparks determined interest in its creators whilst within the context of the album it shines like an anthemic beacon within a raging fire.

Inertia is completed by firstly the virulent and emotive hurricane of A Life Worth Taking and lastly the excellent fiercely yet seductively impacting Suppressional. The track brings hints of Josh Homme inventiveness into a melodic rock embrace which itself is encased in an agonizing swamp of metallic and vehement kissed voracity. It is a stunning end to a striking release, a last showing of the already impressive and sure to grow to greater heights, craft and invention of the band. They and their sound can only get better which is a thrilling thought, one you suspect a new army of fans will also have for Beneath Dead Waves from now on.

Inertia is available now via Nemacystem Records through all stores.

http://www.beneathdeadwaves.com/   

https://www.facebook.com/beneathdeadwaves

9/10

RingMaster 30/06/2014

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BENEATH DEAD WAVES crash in with ‘Inertia’ on 30th June.‏

Beneath Dead Waves Online Promo Picture

UK NEWCOMERS  BENEATH DEAD WAVES RELEASE DEBUT ALBUM THIS SUMMER!

 

London metal combo ‘Beneath Dead Waves’ drop their debut album ‘Inertia’ on Monday 30th June through all digital outlets.

Originally formed in Dorset back in 2007 by Joey Draper (vocals), Doug Cartwright (guitar) and Leigh Costanza (drums), the band take from a cluster of influences spanning from old guard luminaries such as Tool through to contemporary heavyweights such as Between The Buried And Me. The Southern riff masters blend key elements of thrash, groove and nu-metal with an aggressive attitude and progressive mindset to create a unique and striking signature sound.

 

After relocating to London and spending several years writing and recording, the band finally recruited the right members to fully enhance their sound when Matt Reeves (Guitar) and Chad McCamlie (Bass) stepped into the breach and added further weight and depth to the group. By 2013, the quintet began to hit the road and in passing opened for the likes of Monuments, Intronaut and Scale the Summit. By the end of the year, the metal crew released their new single ‘Imperfect’ which garnered strong praise and helped to boost the band’s growing following.

In 2014, Beneath Dead Waves turned their attention to recording their full length debut album, entitled ‘Inertia’. Spitting out eight tracks of venomous edgy heavy metal, the record is laden with mighty riffs and skewed phrasing all fuelled by real invention and earnest intent. From the guttural attack of ‘Nemacyst’ to the album’s namesake ‘Inertia’, which oozes true groove and innovation with its shifting sections and keen use of dynamics, and onto their recent single ‘Imperfect’ which is a blistering full frontal blast of Thrashcore aided by shrewd craft and another thoughtful arrangement, this record is sure to make its mark. Look out as Beneath Dead Waves hit the road this Summer.

 

-BENEATH DEAD WAVES RELEASE ‘INERTIA’ ON MONDAY 30th JUNE THROUGH ALL STORES-

Beneath Dead Waves Cover Artwork

www.facebook.com/beneathdeadwaves

Rage of South – I See, I Say, I Hear

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Unleashing their presence to a wider audience with the release of debut album I See, I Say, I Hear, Italian metallers Rage of South show themselves to be a highly enthralling proposition with the potential to make major inroads into the metal scene with their fiery creative sound. Merging the voracity of thrash metal with the inventive twists and nuances of nu-metal, with plenty more flavouring the brew, the Sciacca quartet captivate the imagination from the first minute of their full-length to its dramatic last. Arguably the band does not really create anything powerfully new for ears though their songs twist and challenge more often than not in a fresh and vigorously provocative way which sets band and certainly the album out from the crowd.

Formed in 2006, Rage of South consists of Tano (vocals/ guitar), Leo (guitar/chorus), Salas (drum), and Smoke (bass/ chorus) and emerged from the Read Only Memory project, a cover band in the early part of the last decade. Turning to work on their own original music alone, the members released their first EP South before changing their sound and intent into a new direction, the moment when Rage of South stepped forward. The release of I See, I Say, I Hear follows a successful year in 2013 which saw the band play the Rock Metal Fest in Taranto, chosen as one of five from 140 emerging bands across Europe. Signing with Red Cat Records for the release of their album, Rage of South looks like making this year just as potent and successful, the release’s strengths and exciting presence holding all the promise to break into a wider, stronger attention.

From the short provocative Intro, the band instantly takes a grip with Sheep as thumping rhythms, gruelling riffs, and antagonistic 632851d6a5e0ef80dc04b7c881d7730eenergy unleash their compelling suasion on the senses. Vocally too the song provokes and incites with craft and passion, their coaxing as impressive as the rigorous and aggressively inventive sounds around them. The song lurches and stomps from start to finish, sinews barracking and nostrils flaring as the intensively driven nu and groove metal fusion violates on a thrash bred urgency whilst sonic enterprise wraps its toxic tendrils excitingly around the whole things.

The immediately punchy Silence continues the impressive start, riffs and grooves again casting a contagious impacting mesh which rhythms and bass intimidate and darken respectively. As with the first song essences of bands like Korn whisper loudly within the tempestuous brawl of sound and animosity but with the rhythms rampaging at certain times with bestial intensity and guitars matching their predacious fury, the track is a constant exhilarating predator, an enthralling encounter matched by the following Prayer. Unveiling an acidic web of guitar to cage attention the song reveals itself a less forceful encounter, passing through captivating melodic scenery with similarly reflective and emotive vocals. It still involves rigid rhythms and rapacious colouring from the guitars and bass but with a pleasing sonic skill and imagination from Leo it is a different kind of an absorbing encounter.

Both Stay Down and That Fear About Me keep thoughts and appetite enslaved, the first though not as striking as the previous songs providing a constantly shifting and persuasive landscape of thought and creative incitement whilst the second almost preys on the listener, prowling and taunting ears and psyche with roving rhythms and entwining sonic endeavour within a caustic and pleasingly raw bluster. Again the song is in the shade of those first few songs but still adds more to the potency and promise of album and band, as does the harder lipped Reflection with its seemingly irritable rhythms and blazing riffery, complemented by just as assertive vocals. The song borders on belligerent as it holds ears and satisfaction in its rewarding hands, scolding and seducing with impressive design.

The wonderfully niggling groove and spite of The Falling Down brings the return of the very lofty heights of the album, the guitars sculpting a corrosive net of sonic animosity aligned to punishing rhythms to which the band’s imagination brings its own excitingly textured ideation. The song is a bewitching protagonist revealing more of the undeniable promise of the inventive band.

     Theme of Juliet provides a rigorous melodically bred slice of accomplished and vivacious multi-flavoured metal before the opening groaning riffery of Let Me Die takes over to forge another major pinnacle upon I See, I Say, I Hear. Instantly the guitars are grinding their toxicity into the senses, swiftly raising new hunger in the appetite as its narrative emerges whilst rhythms add their distinct weight to the persuasion alongside a heavy throated bass line. It is the nagging intrusive grooves though which steal the show, their toxins permeating every synapse and thought to ultimately seduce the passions for the best moment on the album.

Closing with the mutually outstanding Approved, another track scything through the senses with sharp infection soaked grooves and unpredictable invention, the album ends on a massive high equal to the way it started. Certainly there is more to come from and more for Rage of South to find to truly become a distinctly unique prospect but as proven by the immensely enjoyable I See, I Say, I Hear, they are well on the way.

I See, I Say, I Hear is available via Red Cat Records now!

http://www.rageofsouth.com/

8/10

RingMaster 17/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Exploring shadows and dark adventures: an interview with Tiran Ezra of Ferium

Tiran

Entwining groove, technical, and extreme metal into their own vicious and highly persuasive confrontation, Israeli death metallers Ferium have unleashed one of the most potent and thrilling albums so far this year with their debut Reflections. A release which roars, challenges, and rigorously seizes the imagination, the album thrusts Ferium into a deserved new world wide spotlight. Eager to find out more we took the opportunity to talk with vocalist Tiran Ezra, investigating the past of the band, Israeli metal, the new attention upon Ferium and much more…

Hi Tiran and thank you for agreeing to talk with us.

It is probably fair to say that Ferium is still a bit of a secret in world metal but that now seems to be changing especially over the past year or so. Does it feel like things are now happening for the band to you guys?

We feel very fortunate to be getting any type of recognition from people outside of Israel, we’ve worked and are still working very hard just to get a sense of fulfilment and only now we are finally getting a taste of that attention to our music that we needed in order to feed us with a drive to create more buzz around ourselves.

It certainly feels that way.

2013 was a busy and successful year for the band; looking back on it what are your reflections of it and how it impacted on your reputation as a band?

We are happy we did everything we have.

But there is always that bug inside our head that says that we should’ve done more; unfortunately it’s not that easy getting out of Israel every couple of months for a tour, it’s quite like hell on earth to be completely honest.

Before we look at your new debut album, can you tell us about the beginnings of Ferium and the driving force bringing the band into reality?ferium 2

Ever since our major line-up change, bringing Yoni Biton and Ron Amar into the band’s rhythm section, everything seemed a lot more real, providing a fresh sense of understanding towards the music business as a functioning band; I think THAT is the beginning for Ferium.

The past couple of years has made us realised there is quite potent metal scene in Israel but how is the death metal presence in the country?

The scene here is really active when it comes to bands forming or doing any kind of effort to get out of here; the death metal scene is fairly small here since the “core” scene really took the world by the balls, not that it’s a bad thing, but it’s become more than a fashion than a lifestyle. It’s kind of sad to watch from a side if you are a sworn metal fan, because it created this whole new line of people not liking metalheads, for being metalheads, just because they like core, I think that is narrow minded and redundant.

Has it become easier would you say for Israeli metal bands to be noticed and accepted at home and further afield over recent years though?

Absolutely not, no matter where you are from you have to put the same amount of effort to be any kind of a self-respecting band.

Israel is one of the worst places to be on earth when it comes to trying to get out of if you are wishing yourself to be a touring musician.

You recently released your excellent debut album Reflections; did you have any particular hopes for it in regard to attracting attention with a wider audience?

Again, we feel very thankful to get any source of recognition, this is usually not something that you come across, a debut album from Israel getting a worldwide distribution deal, I do believe that the people who catch our theme will be hardcore fans of the material to come in the not so far future.

Reflections CoverHow would you say your sound has evolved and grown between the album and your first release, The New Law EP of 2009?

A lot more organic and dynamic, and all together completely different in terms of approach and in the way we imagine the finalized product.

The album is a brutal and demanding release which on first few plays certainly impresses thoroughly but it is through further plays that the enthralling web of adventurously skilled enterprise and imagination within the dark depths of songs truly reveal their strengths. Do you deliberately sculpt songs that way or it just their organic growth as they come to life?

Very flattered first of all, it really is a bit of both, the true talent is the lyrics and the whole atmosphere of the songs being portrayed by being open for interpretation and not really pushing anything, down anyone’s throat.

How does the songwriting work within the band generally?

Elram and myself at the Studio work first, with pre-recorded riffs, after that going to the rest of the band for confirmation on input and insight.

How has lyrically and musically the band and its music been affected or indirectly found inspiration in the conflicts around your country and home town Haifa?

I believe that the air in Israel really has done something to our brains, every citizen of this place can just feel the atmosphere here, if it’s the honking in the streets by every person, the news on TV saying practically “hey, there’s going to be war n’ stoof” yeah, it sure isn’t nice.

Lyrically & musically it has done nothing to affect, but it has contributed to what all of us are today as intelligent human beings.

Reflections feels like it is part of something bigger rather than an individual encounter, though to be honest I am not sure why it makes me feel that? Am I imagining it or is there a wider aspect yet to be explored to the theme of the album?

Actually it’ll probably be the 1st part of a trilogy of albums that shows a darker side in mine & Elram’s mind.

..And that side is?

Elram’s side of the story is more of a hands on experience with the lyrics we write, and I usually link in to the whole atmosphere and imagine myself in a kind of world where these stories can actually take place.

How was the recording experience with the album, any unexpected obstacles or good surprises rise up in its creation?

Nothing in particular, except being a really long process of mixing and production so we could get that atmosphere we eventually scored.

Did you learn anything in particular which you can take forward into your future releases?

pic: Guy First Video & Photography

pic: Guy First Video & Photography

Mostly Elram did, because he really is the mastermind behind the vision which is Ferium, sound wise.

But when it comes to the actual performance and tightness of the tracks, this is something we all became a lot more professional in.

Can you tell us about the excellent art work wrapping the album?

We actually had a very early demo of the album that had an even more raw approach to the mix, once Eliran Kantor heard that, he decided that the drums will actually portray the Rhino on the cover, but the overall concept of the little man trying to pull down the huge rhino is the epitome of the concept put in a metaphor of a man facing his greatest fears.

Not having had the pleasure yet, the word is that Ferium is a mighty proposition live. Is that aspect the most satisfying of being in a band for you?

It most certainly is; I think that the fact we chose such a direct approach to our sound is to be able to perform them live, perfectly, if not better than the recording.

And talking of live shows, what is next for Ferium in that department?

We have a few autumn dates that we are looking at, but definitely will have a couple of tours until the end of this year all over EU.

Thanks once more for sharing time with us.

Any last thought you would like to leave readers considering?

Thank you for taking in interest in us, we are very grateful for this, buy our album ;)

http://www.feriumband.com/

Read the review of Reflections @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/04/07/ferium-reflections/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 15/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Yugal – Enter The Madness

yugal

Though the dark intrusive provocation unleashed by French metallers Yugal upon their new EP Enter The Madness may not be carving out a dramatically original bedlam, its raw and uncompromising attitude and skilled enterprise makes it an encounter which rigorously infests the imagination and passions. The five track tempest of sound and aggression is an easily accessible and demandingly intensive affair. It holds no major surprises but rewards attendance with a predatory fusion of thrash, death, and groove metal which captivates imagination and appetite alike with its riveting raw sound and invention.

Hailing from Vannes in Brittany, Yugal formed in 2010 with their first demo From Pain to Pleasure emerging the following year. It was the striking six track EP Illusion of Time in 2013 which drew a certain concentrated attention upon the quintet but it is easy to predict that Enter The Madness will be the most potent trigger in thrusting the band into a greater deserved spotlight. Infused with supposedly oriental spices, though we suggest they are more Middle Eastern seeded, the new EP reveals a band which has impressively matured in songwriting and sound whilst retaining the passion and superbly sculpted hostility which marked its predecessor. Arguably the release lacks the unique character to set itself apart from the busy crowd but you can easily feel the potential of that realisation lying in wait within the extremely pleasing proposition.

The release opens with an instant lure of Spanish bred guitar as Mindless Fool edges into view. It is an enchanting entrance which a3390718700_2immediately has thoughts grouping around its emotive texture. The gentle coaxing is soon submerged in a tempestuous roar of thumping rhythms and intensive riffing, a furious but deliberately shaped storm which tenderises the senses ready for the irresistible grooves which begin veining through the thick fury. Those Eastern kissed grooves come with a mischievous swagger, a relish which also permeates the coarse rapacious vocals at times, both sauntering through ears with a confident contagion and magnetic toxicity. The track is a scintillating incitement, setting the release off on a major pinnacle which truthfully is worried but never matched again.

The following Free Jail though gives it a more than valid go, its opening bluster of causticity through again rampant rhythms and coarsely grazing riffs a formidable invitation into mystique clad grooves and refreshing hooks. Group vocals behind the lead provocation also add to the fullness of sound and narrative as the song evolves into something comparable in many ways to Bloodsimple meets Sepultura with extra fuel from Cryptopsy. The guitars weave an enthralling suggestiveness upon the compelling canvas built by the brutal rhythms and predatory basslines, whilst vocally the band reaches deep into its malevolence and anger to bruise the senses just as voraciously though they equally come with an intrigue and swing which makes addictive bait. It is an absorbing antagonist soon matched by the title track, its entrance upon a barbarous flurry of rhythmic intent another viciously catchy beckoning. That infectiousness continues across the whole track as the guitars once again cast woven grooves and melodic acidity into the annihilatory riffery prowling thoughts alongside the dark hearted bass. The song proceeds to ravage and seduce with increasing success and strength, building to a fiery finale which leaves ears ringing and appetite greedy.

Psychotic wraps the ears initially in a reserved sonic ambience though one with a portentous air to its touch; a menacing feeling which soon intensifies with the entrance of intimidating guitar hues and eventually a ravenous assault of drums within similarly rapacious but inviting sonic twists and colour. Though the music does not match its title initially, there is a brewing bedlam behind the driving drums and scarring riffing which without ever truly exploding ensures the track is a constant skittish and evocative antagonist for the psyche. Vocals and guitars again impress with their unpredictable and fluent shifts in attack and designs respectively, whilst the wall of sinews built by drums and the at times bestial tones of the excellent bass work, create an inescapable cage you only want to be confined within.

Another scarring crescendo sees the track make way for the closing Fearless Pride, its appearance also coming upon an intimidating sonic mist which is subsequently speared and stretched by the citric sonic craft and adventure of the guitars. Arguably the most corrosive and raw track on the release, its body a more ‘messy’ and undefined ferocity which only adds to the enjoyment, the song bruises like a wounded bear yet captures the imagination like a gladiatorial warrior. It makes for an intensive and highly satisfying conclusion to the release even without matching earlier successes. With a great and skilled evocative instrumental hidden in its shadows, Enter the Madness feeds ears and passions with a highly accomplished and exciting incitement where to be honest only a major lack of originality is its only issue. You feel listening to the EP that Yugal is still in evolution in sound and distinctiveness but that it is only a matter of time and we for one cannot wait.

The self-released Enter The Madness is available now @ http://yugal.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/Yugalofficial

8.5/10

RingMaster 9/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Reverted – Sputter the Worms

Reverted Hi-Res Pic

Though you come out of it feeling there is plenty left for its creators to discover and find to develop a wholly unique voice, it is hard not to be impressed and eagerly captivated by Sputter the Worms the debut album from UK band Reverted. With the release of the band’s new single Die My Saint, taken from the album, a look at the full-length seemed in order. Consisting of thirteen tracks which roar at ears with a ferocious multi-flavoured brew of sound and aggression, the release is a fiery brawl merging thrash, hard rock, and varied essences of metal. The album rampages with imagination and voracity, crawling rigorously over the senses and passions with raw adventure. There is much within it which is arguably familiar but plenty which is vigorously individual as the album riots with thrilling effect.

Reverted began in 2010 and it is fair to say they have made a more than attention grabbing impression. They have backed up the promise showed by live performances with Sputter the Worms, a release which pulls feet and emotions into active submission early on and refuses to let them relax until it has finished its creative charge. The title track thrusts its muscular weight and body through ears first, though its entrance is relatively reserved with thick riffs and pumped beats making a less than forceful coaxing. It is a magnetic start all the same which increases its bait with a great whining acidic flame of guitar which triggers a hungry rampancy in the gait of the track. The bass of Luis L Valle and guitar of Daniel Ruiz stomp with a prowling menace and rasping riffery respectively with the song in full stride whilst the drums of Ozzy Preciado thump with intimidating skill. It is a richly engaging proposition completed by the excellent vocal tones of Tony Vega, his gruff but clean tones ably backed by those of Preciado. Like a mix of Metallica and Fuckshovel, thrash and punk pleasing additives to the heavyweight rocking going on, the song is a masterful opening persuasion.

The potent start is soon backed up by the similarly impressive Magledonia (Harvest of Sin), another brew brought on a thrash bred Sputter The Worms Artworkappetite. The track swaggers and ripples with antagonistic confidence and sonic bait, guitars and drums enslaving attention so the bass can stalk the senses as vocals sprawl with their menacing narrative. With a vein of classic and hard rock virulence to its encounter, the song romps with a straightforward but appetite sparking success before making way for Don´t Try to Steal Me from the Inside. Valle instantly steals early control of thoughts and song with his throaty lines before the rhythms of Preciado explode in highly agitated invention and the track crowds the ears with a predatory intensity. Groove and thrash metal collide perfectly within the song but also scorching flames of melodic and alternative rock add their spice to the exciting mix, with the vocals as the sound unafraid to vary and play with their delivery.

Both the outstanding Dispose of Heartaches and the new single Die My Saint ignite imagination and pleasure further, the first bursting with a devilish intent forging punk and thrash into a psyche rock and nu-metal mesh. The track exhausts and exhilarates the passions, stealing early best song honours though it is soon rivalled by its successor, an urgent aggressor with absorbing twists of sonic endeavour amidst another richly packed flavoursome design. Psyche and nu-metal colours the sinew driven encounter whilst the rhythmic frame is an unrelenting insistence with anthemic persuasion. The pair provides the first major pinnacle of the album, probably the highest peak though plenty of tracks like the following Pulse stand tall alongside their might. A growl erupts in the vocals and sound of the song, intensity driving forward with bestial rabidity to match the barbarous rhythms and the ever predacious bass provocation. There is a grunge flame to the cleaner stretches of the song though proving again the diverse ground and textures the band explores across the album. Admittedly there are familiar sounds at work too, that Metallica feel never far away, but Reverted mix and come up with an overall sound which holds its own in freshness.

The acidic entrance of Tolerance makes a dramatic lure before a mix of progressive rock and groove metal merges to enthral thoughts, the track littering its pleasing bulk with punchy energy, rising crescendos, and abrasive expulsions. It is another potent enticement which as its predecessors welcomingly lingers. It also in many ways closes the most immediate part of the album with the following Stained Soul andonwards, the album places its most adventurous and involved songs though it certainly does not relinquish its grip on appetite and passions. Stained Soul holds a slower gait than previous tracks but with intensity still high fills the vacancy with a focused melodic rock craft, though that is still courted by the rapacious intent the band revels in which ensures the song is no less a threat and aggressor than others.

The gentle caress of Insanity takes longer to persuade than most but with its emotive strings, warm melodic rock centre, and passionate grumble the track easily secures a greedy appreciation whilst the more power ballad like Forsaken with a definite Hetfield and co feel pleases firmly without lighting fires, the same which can be said about Stairs of Guilt. Neither song grips as tightly as others but shows the expansive power of the band in sound and songwriting which certainly excites.

   Sputter the Worms closes with firstly Time, a track which glides through a weave of styles and. As the previous two it fails to spark a full ardour but furthers the impressive skills and imaginative adventure of the band which are to enthuse over and anticipate creating greater triumphs ahead. Final song Bummer is a muscle driven slab of heavy rock with metal roots, a very easy to devour and enjoy straightforward protagonist.

Reverted is a band on a sure and striking rise in presence and creativity, with the potential to be something very special. They have a drama to their songs and an invention which defuses the recognisable elements also carried; the result one thoroughly thrilling ride.

The self-released Sputter the Worms is available now!

http://www.reverted.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

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Ferium – Reflections

Ferium1.lo

Parading a roaring muscular sound built from numerous metallic essences around a death metal spine, Israeli metallers Ferium more than lives up to the brewing buzz around them with debut album Reflections. Twelve slabs of creative brutality and imaginatively skilled endeavour, the release is a formidable and striking big step into the wider metal world, one which hits hard and impressively initially but only truly reveals its depths and strengths and those of the band across numerous exploits with its intrusive presence. The quintet delves into the rich wells of groove, technical, general extreme metal and more to enhance their core viciousness and persuasion, a fusion as proven by their first full-length which is something not exactly unique but definitely seizing attention and a hungry appetite as it starts setting its own path now and for the future.

Ferium was formed in 2006 taking initial inspirations of Pantera and Lamb Of God into their intent though that expanded over the years with influences from the likes of Textures, Gojira, and Death adding to the fuel driving their invention. Equally growing up in Haifa and the situation in their country has added depth to the lyrical and musical side of their emergence. The band does not directly or openly explore any aspect of the conflict and climate they grew within and felt personally but it is scenery which has brought a raw and uncompromising breath to their sound and presence. Their first release, The New Law EP in 2009 took the band into a strong spotlight at home and further afield, helping to lead Ferium to appearances at big home events such as Summer Carnage and Hallejujahas well as those abroad like Wacken 2009. Last year saw a more intensive time for the band, tours supporting The Agonist, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, and Dawn Heist around Europe and the UK following a show opening for Gojira in Israel. The end of 2013 was marked by the band signing a deal with Transcend Music and the worldwide distribution for the 2012 recorded Reflections, a release you sense could open up a highly receptive hunger for their presence.

Opening track By The Book lays an initial abrasive guitar coaxing upon the ears, a sonic wind brewing alongside it before being punctured Reflections Coverby the heavy probing rhythms of drummer Ron Amar. It is an intriguing start, one offering various options of where the song and album might go without revealing anything too soon. It is not long though before the drums increase their pressure, the bass of Yoni Biton closes in with dark intensive shadows, and the guitars of Elram Boxer and Guy Goldenberg sculpt a weave of tight grooves and searing riffs to transfix thoughts and emotions. With the harsh yet welcoming vocal abrasion of Tiran Ezra unleashing the first narrative, the track wakes up eager attention early, leading it into a magnetic fascination which in turn ignites the imagination. The thrilling song does not really explode at any point but is a constant blaze of invention and technical prowess which is stretched to more dramatic adventures across the album, in fact right away with DownHill From Nothing.

The second song entwines the ears in an infection fuelled groove from its first breath, the guitars seducing with full potency as bass and drums badger the senses into another swift submission. Again the vocals graze and roar with an unbridled causticity but only to accentuate the virulent lure of the song. The bass of Biton prowls and growls with understated but open ingenuity throughout the tempestuous offering yet it is the work of Boxer and Goldenberg which more often than not steals the focus upon the song, the melodies and emotive designs from their strings richly colouring song and imagination. Like the first it has an inescapable contagion to its enterprise and especially its grooved bait, and like its successor draws a greedy appetite for its invention.

Both The Very Existence and Mirror exploit an already eager attention with their individual persuasions, the first creating a weave of djent seeded technical manipulation with an almost thrash spawned antagonistic fury of death metal with metalcore bred essences. It is heavier and more intense than its predecessors without dismissing any of the melodically nurtured sonic exploration which marked their success. With a strong evocative ambience also washing the canvas of the song it is a thought provoking and longer to convince encounter, as is its successor though both refuse to relinquish the grip already seized by the release. The second of these two squall over and ravage the senses with again a stronger rabidity; vocally and rhythmically the track an abusive suasion whilst sonically it sears air and flesh, the combination another offering to feed the hunger inside.

The entrance of Side Effects is exceptional, an intimidating but irresistible gentle tempting from the guitars and the perfect lure into the spiteful aggression to follow. Its gait is almost stalking the ears whilst the outstanding bass hook and acidic guitar toxicity steals the passions below an unreserved rhythmic provocation. Its masterful adventure is replaced by the instrumental The Black Eyes, a piece ripe with classical keys elegance and scuzz surfaced energy. It is music which builds its size and intensity across its skilful narrative, inviting the imagination to cast its own tale though it is less successful with the passions especially with the bestial Lust Fool bursting in right away. It is a bear of a song, muscles holding sway within the black density and throat of the onslaught whilst the guitars lash and rhythms pummel the senses around the ever malicious vocals. It is a drama fuelled, adrenaline driven monstrosity of an encounter and thoroughly scintillating.

After the similarly predacious Caustic Value, an intrusion which easily feeds wants without lighting fires, the album takes another upturn with the brilliant Change Of Winds soon matched by Business On Demand. The first of the two romps with and dancing over ears and senses with grooves and jagged riffery from its first second, the track gnawing, jarring, and disorientating senses magnificently whilst Ezra riles syllables and tones for an equally malevolently textured assault, his variety in delivery a constant pleasure. The track twists and lurches wonderfully, all the time depleting energy and scything slices from the synapses until an exhausted pleasure lies in its wake, one soon re-energised by its successor. An open and familiar groove leads the way under the persistent cosh of rhythms and barracking riffs, the temptation recruiting full allegiance for the subsequent savagery vocally and musically which envelops the still dominant groove cast toxins.  Both tracks provide the pinnacle of the album and the band’s songwriting in brutality and epidemic seduction.

The album is concluded by Blood and its title track, the pair insatiable trespasses bringing an outstanding release to a mighty end, the first of the two an insidiously nasty demonic capture of ears and beyond whilst the last song simply churns up and suffocates emotions with mouthwatering invention and crippling intensity respectively. Wrapped in excellent artwork from Eliran Kantor (Hatebreed, Sodom, Atheist), Reflections is extreme metal of the highest order and shows Ferium as having the potential of forging truly major horizons ahead whilst giving a rather breath-taking treat for the now.

http://www.feriumband.com/

9/10

RingMaster 07/04/2014

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