Reverted – Sputter the Worms

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Though you come out of it feeling there is plenty left for its creators to discover and find to develop a wholly unique voice, it is hard not to be impressed and eagerly captivated by Sputter the Worms the debut album from UK band Reverted. With the release of the band’s new single Die My Saint, taken from the album, a look at the full-length seemed in order. Consisting of thirteen tracks which roar at ears with a ferocious multi-flavoured brew of sound and aggression, the release is a fiery brawl merging thrash, hard rock, and varied essences of metal. The album rampages with imagination and voracity, crawling rigorously over the senses and passions with raw adventure. There is much within it which is arguably familiar but plenty which is vigorously individual as the album riots with thrilling effect.

Reverted began in 2010 and it is fair to say they have made a more than attention grabbing impression. They have backed up the promise showed by live performances with Sputter the Worms, a release which pulls feet and emotions into active submission early on and refuses to let them relax until it has finished its creative charge. The title track thrusts its muscular weight and body through ears first, though its entrance is relatively reserved with thick riffs and pumped beats making a less than forceful coaxing. It is a magnetic start all the same which increases its bait with a great whining acidic flame of guitar which triggers a hungry rampancy in the gait of the track. The bass of Luis L Valle and guitar of Daniel Ruiz stomp with a prowling menace and rasping riffery respectively with the song in full stride whilst the drums of Ozzy Preciado thump with intimidating skill. It is a richly engaging proposition completed by the excellent vocal tones of Tony Vega, his gruff but clean tones ably backed by those of Preciado. Like a mix of Metallica and Fuckshovel, thrash and punk pleasing additives to the heavyweight rocking going on, the song is a masterful opening persuasion.

The potent start is soon backed up by the similarly impressive Magledonia (Harvest of Sin), another brew brought on a thrash bred Sputter The Worms Artworkappetite. The track swaggers and ripples with antagonistic confidence and sonic bait, guitars and drums enslaving attention so the bass can stalk the senses as vocals sprawl with their menacing narrative. With a vein of classic and hard rock virulence to its encounter, the song romps with a straightforward but appetite sparking success before making way for Don´t Try to Steal Me from the Inside. Valle instantly steals early control of thoughts and song with his throaty lines before the rhythms of Preciado explode in highly agitated invention and the track crowds the ears with a predatory intensity. Groove and thrash metal collide perfectly within the song but also scorching flames of melodic and alternative rock add their spice to the exciting mix, with the vocals as the sound unafraid to vary and play with their delivery.

Both the outstanding Dispose of Heartaches and the new single Die My Saint ignite imagination and pleasure further, the first bursting with a devilish intent forging punk and thrash into a psyche rock and nu-metal mesh. The track exhausts and exhilarates the passions, stealing early best song honours though it is soon rivalled by its successor, an urgent aggressor with absorbing twists of sonic endeavour amidst another richly packed flavoursome design. Psyche and nu-metal colours the sinew driven encounter whilst the rhythmic frame is an unrelenting insistence with anthemic persuasion. The pair provides the first major pinnacle of the album, probably the highest peak though plenty of tracks like the following Pulse stand tall alongside their might. A growl erupts in the vocals and sound of the song, intensity driving forward with bestial rabidity to match the barbarous rhythms and the ever predacious bass provocation. There is a grunge flame to the cleaner stretches of the song though proving again the diverse ground and textures the band explores across the album. Admittedly there are familiar sounds at work too, that Metallica feel never far away, but Reverted mix and come up with an overall sound which holds its own in freshness.

The acidic entrance of Tolerance makes a dramatic lure before a mix of progressive rock and groove metal merges to enthral thoughts, the track littering its pleasing bulk with punchy energy, rising crescendos, and abrasive expulsions. It is another potent enticement which as its predecessors welcomingly lingers. It also in many ways closes the most immediate part of the album with the following Stained Soul andonwards, the album places its most adventurous and involved songs though it certainly does not relinquish its grip on appetite and passions. Stained Soul holds a slower gait than previous tracks but with intensity still high fills the vacancy with a focused melodic rock craft, though that is still courted by the rapacious intent the band revels in which ensures the song is no less a threat and aggressor than others.

The gentle caress of Insanity takes longer to persuade than most but with its emotive strings, warm melodic rock centre, and passionate grumble the track easily secures a greedy appreciation whilst the more power ballad like Forsaken with a definite Hetfield and co feel pleases firmly without lighting fires, the same which can be said about Stairs of Guilt. Neither song grips as tightly as others but shows the expansive power of the band in sound and songwriting which certainly excites.

   Sputter the Worms closes with firstly Time, a track which glides through a weave of styles and. As the previous two it fails to spark a full ardour but furthers the impressive skills and imaginative adventure of the band which are to enthuse over and anticipate creating greater triumphs ahead. Final song Bummer is a muscle driven slab of heavy rock with metal roots, a very easy to devour and enjoy straightforward protagonist.

Reverted is a band on a sure and striking rise in presence and creativity, with the potential to be something very special. They have a drama to their songs and an invention which defuses the recognisable elements also carried; the result one thoroughly thrilling ride.

The self-released Sputter the Worms is available now!

http://www.reverted.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ferium – Reflections

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Parading a roaring muscular sound built from numerous metallic essences around a death metal spine, Israeli metallers Ferium more than lives up to the brewing buzz around them with debut album Reflections. Twelve slabs of creative brutality and imaginatively skilled endeavour, the release is a formidable and striking big step into the wider metal world, one which hits hard and impressively initially but only truly reveals its depths and strengths and those of the band across numerous exploits with its intrusive presence. The quintet delves into the rich wells of groove, technical, general extreme metal and more to enhance their core viciousness and persuasion, a fusion as proven by their first full-length which is something not exactly unique but definitely seizing attention and a hungry appetite as it starts setting its own path now and for the future.

Ferium was formed in 2006 taking initial inspirations of Pantera and Lamb Of God into their intent though that expanded over the years with influences from the likes of Textures, Gojira, and Death adding to the fuel driving their invention. Equally growing up in Haifa and the situation in their country has added depth to the lyrical and musical side of their emergence. The band does not directly or openly explore any aspect of the conflict and climate they grew within and felt personally but it is scenery which has brought a raw and uncompromising breath to their sound and presence. Their first release, The New Law EP in 2009 took the band into a strong spotlight at home and further afield, helping to lead Ferium to appearances at big home events such as Summer Carnage and Hallejujahas well as those abroad like Wacken 2009. Last year saw a more intensive time for the band, tours supporting The Agonist, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, and Dawn Heist around Europe and the UK following a show opening for Gojira in Israel. The end of 2013 was marked by the band signing a deal with Transcend Music and the worldwide distribution for the 2012 recorded Reflections, a release you sense could open up a highly receptive hunger for their presence.

Opening track By The Book lays an initial abrasive guitar coaxing upon the ears, a sonic wind brewing alongside it before being punctured Reflections Coverby the heavy probing rhythms of drummer Ron Amar. It is an intriguing start, one offering various options of where the song and album might go without revealing anything too soon. It is not long though before the drums increase their pressure, the bass of Yoni Biton closes in with dark intensive shadows, and the guitars of Elram Boxer and Guy Goldenberg sculpt a weave of tight grooves and searing riffs to transfix thoughts and emotions. With the harsh yet welcoming vocal abrasion of Tiran Ezra unleashing the first narrative, the track wakes up eager attention early, leading it into a magnetic fascination which in turn ignites the imagination. The thrilling song does not really explode at any point but is a constant blaze of invention and technical prowess which is stretched to more dramatic adventures across the album, in fact right away with DownHill From Nothing.

The second song entwines the ears in an infection fuelled groove from its first breath, the guitars seducing with full potency as bass and drums badger the senses into another swift submission. Again the vocals graze and roar with an unbridled causticity but only to accentuate the virulent lure of the song. The bass of Biton prowls and growls with understated but open ingenuity throughout the tempestuous offering yet it is the work of Boxer and Goldenberg which more often than not steals the focus upon the song, the melodies and emotive designs from their strings richly colouring song and imagination. Like the first it has an inescapable contagion to its enterprise and especially its grooved bait, and like its successor draws a greedy appetite for its invention.

Both The Very Existence and Mirror exploit an already eager attention with their individual persuasions, the first creating a weave of djent seeded technical manipulation with an almost thrash spawned antagonistic fury of death metal with metalcore bred essences. It is heavier and more intense than its predecessors without dismissing any of the melodically nurtured sonic exploration which marked their success. With a strong evocative ambience also washing the canvas of the song it is a thought provoking and longer to convince encounter, as is its successor though both refuse to relinquish the grip already seized by the release. The second of these two squall over and ravage the senses with again a stronger rabidity; vocally and rhythmically the track an abusive suasion whilst sonically it sears air and flesh, the combination another offering to feed the hunger inside.

The entrance of Side Effects is exceptional, an intimidating but irresistible gentle tempting from the guitars and the perfect lure into the spiteful aggression to follow. Its gait is almost stalking the ears whilst the outstanding bass hook and acidic guitar toxicity steals the passions below an unreserved rhythmic provocation. Its masterful adventure is replaced by the instrumental The Black Eyes, a piece ripe with classical keys elegance and scuzz surfaced energy. It is music which builds its size and intensity across its skilful narrative, inviting the imagination to cast its own tale though it is less successful with the passions especially with the bestial Lust Fool bursting in right away. It is a bear of a song, muscles holding sway within the black density and throat of the onslaught whilst the guitars lash and rhythms pummel the senses around the ever malicious vocals. It is a drama fuelled, adrenaline driven monstrosity of an encounter and thoroughly scintillating.

After the similarly predacious Caustic Value, an intrusion which easily feeds wants without lighting fires, the album takes another upturn with the brilliant Change Of Winds soon matched by Business On Demand. The first of the two romps with and dancing over ears and senses with grooves and jagged riffery from its first second, the track gnawing, jarring, and disorientating senses magnificently whilst Ezra riles syllables and tones for an equally malevolently textured assault, his variety in delivery a constant pleasure. The track twists and lurches wonderfully, all the time depleting energy and scything slices from the synapses until an exhausted pleasure lies in its wake, one soon re-energised by its successor. An open and familiar groove leads the way under the persistent cosh of rhythms and barracking riffs, the temptation recruiting full allegiance for the subsequent savagery vocally and musically which envelops the still dominant groove cast toxins.  Both tracks provide the pinnacle of the album and the band’s songwriting in brutality and epidemic seduction.

The album is concluded by Blood and its title track, the pair insatiable trespasses bringing an outstanding release to a mighty end, the first of the two an insidiously nasty demonic capture of ears and beyond whilst the last song simply churns up and suffocates emotions with mouthwatering invention and crippling intensity respectively. Wrapped in excellent artwork from Eliran Kantor (Hatebreed, Sodom, Atheist), Reflections is extreme metal of the highest order and shows Ferium as having the potential of forging truly major horizons ahead whilst giving a rather breath-taking treat for the now.

http://www.feriumband.com/

9/10

RingMaster 07/04/2014

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The Milton Incident – Innocence Lost

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French alternative metal band The Milton Incident has built a strong following and reputation in their homeland with their resourcefully potent and rigorously impacting sound whilst also making initial inroads further afield and with the release of their debut album Innocence Lost, it is not too adventurous to suspect that they will be making a similar mark on the attention and passions of the rest of the melodic metal world. Consisting of eleven tracks which are as dramatically contagious as they are skilfully crafted with a fusion of groove and alternative metal with plenty more spicery involved, the album is a thrillingly imaginative proposition. It is not exactly ground-breaking, songs holding a familiarity at times to previously trodden exploits, but with an incendiary passion and distinctly inventive sculpting to the individual premises, it is a release to capture emotions and spark greedy appetites.

Hailing from Paris, The Milton Incident since forming in 2010 has laid down a more than solid presence with a similar strong fanbase through their sound and live performances. Shows with the likes of Kreator, Moonspell, Dagoba, Vulcain, Mass Hysteria, KlogR, and Eyes Set To Kill has only increased the spotlight upon them whilst their music has been played on numerous radio shows worldwide. Recorded with Steeves Hostin (Beyond the Dust) and mixed/mastered by Shawn Zuzek (Daughters of Mara), the Dooweet Records released Innocence Lost makes a stirring full introduction to the band, one destined to leave a lingering mark on the widest attention.

From the opening title track, a short disturbing intro of intimidating sound clips and melodic intrigue, the album launches into a fiery and Covermuscular persuasion with Deadset. Its initial coaxing is a menacing almost predatory incitement but it is not long before strong vocal harmonies and melodic entwining wraps engagingly around the ears. That heavier threat is never far from the surface though; expelling bursts of cantankerous grooves and rhythmic antagonism throughout, stalking and gnawing the senses alternatively with the melody rich embrace of the track. It is a striking encounter soon exceeded by the riveting Torn Down, grooves and rhythms again bordering on carnivorous but the perfect complement to the expressive vocals and sonic endeavour which soaks the imagination as rewardingly as the melodic flames. There is a Stone Sour essence to the track in many ways though the song ventures in areas which could be compared to others like Three Days Grace and Tool as well as later Mudvayne too, yet the result is definitely particular to The Milton Incident.

The snarling Deus Ex Machina featuring Shawn Zuzek, rampages across the senses next, again the band merging dark rapacious elements within its elegant and exploratory melodic adventure. It is a magnetic slice of metal which evolves and explores before the ear, an invigorating provocation as contagious as it is intense. Its fluid drama is succeeded by the absorbing Dearest Enemy. From a cyber, almost starkly harsh ambience, the song immerses thoughts in an emotive reflection musically and lyrically whilst aligning them with more cryptically savage elements to its suasion. Like its successor Split Second, the song does not ignite the same heat of passion as other tracks but still leaves thoughts impressed and hungry for more, both tracks skilfully crafted and enjoyably presented with the second of the two holding a Poets Of The Fall like potency before its incendiary climax.

The thrills are turned right up yet again with Dopamine, a virulently infectious confrontation of bruising rhythms, rigidly barbed riffing, and passion drenched vocals. It is a masterful storm of uncompromising aggression and respectful melodic enticement ensnared and driven by ridiculously addictive grooves and unbridled enterprise. A major moment on the continuing to impress release, it is soon matched after the enjoyable emotive breather Irukandji, by Pyromaniac, another growl of senses stripping riffs and inflammatory rhythms courted by a deliciously acidic and caustic groove. With a range and depth of vocals to match the fire and intensity of its intent, the song prowls and sways with primal seduction and thoughtfully lit rapaciousness; like the sinewed assault of an American Head Charge fused with the emotional melodic waltz of an Alter Bridge.

The lofty heights are continued with the outstanding and voracious Conspiracy of Silence, the track an almost pestilential provocation with synapse spearing riffery and sonically drenched bait which infects ears through to passions. Its tremendous outpouring leaves a slight shadow over the following Memento, though the song only adds further coals to the pleasing fire and power of the album, whilst the closing 10-56 provides a classically seeded canvas for the imagination, one coloured by thick melodic hues and epically dramatic emotion. It is an imposing and compelling encounter from The Milton Incident concluding an equally bruising and irrepressibly seducing experience.

    Innocence Lost is an excellent full debut from a band you can expect to be hearing much more of. The Milton Incident has the potential to be a major instigator in melodic metal as their sound explores its brewing individuality for greater uniqueness and impact, something to eagerly anticipate.

http://themiltonincident.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Destrage – Are You Kidding Me? No.

 

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     Destrage is a force which confronts and seduces the imagination with such an exhaustive vivacity of sound and adventure that it becomes a proposition which has you simultaneously confused, bewildered, and thrillingly basking in a maelstrom of sonic alchemy. Hailing from Italy, the band has forged an impressive and unforgettable once bitten presence which is ascending into more fevered attention release by release, but it is the release of new album Are You Kidding Me? No. which feels like the trigger into worldwide recognition and ardour with its Metal Blade Records release. With more flavours, styles, and imagination than a carnival in Rio, the release turns a band which was still waiting to explode around the globe into an exhilarating infection of the psyche and passions with that target in its sights. With words like unpredictable and intriguing the weakest descriptions of the inventive anarchy teasing and ravishing the senses, Destrage is a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.

     Formed in 2005, the Milan quintet has been on a charge of persuading and recruiting hearts at home and further afield since their first days, the current line-up in place since 2007 especially stoking those the fires. From their first demo Self Id Generator, Destrage has continued to evolve into a aurally spectacular provocation, the albums Urban Being of 2009 and The King Is Fat’n’Old the following year potent bait greedily devoured by more and more willing souls, though you suspect it will be nothing compared to the awakening sparked by Are You Kidding Me? No. Live too the band has left wasted bodies and hungry bodies in their wake, the undertaking of tours across Europe, Japan, and numerous festivals and shows where they have shared spaces with the likes of Every Time I Die, Parkway Drive, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Lordi, Moonspell and many more, increasing their stock. The new album though feels and sounds like their time to lead the pack has now come and it is not a moment too soon.

     You may be wondering what the band sound like, which we will endeavour to reveal song by song, but suffice to say it is Coverwonderfully something quite impossible to label. Opener Destroy Create Transform Sublimate tells you all you need to know about Destrage and whether to unreservedly embrace or stand scratching your head over their voracious experimentation and invention. The track opens with a spiral of sonic enterprise courted by aggressive riffs and combative rhythms, the mix alluring and intimidating in equal measure. It is not long before the song is throwing off any restraint to stomp with entwining essences of groove and funk veining a still voracious assault of technical and carnivorous metal. The impressive vocals of Paolo Colavolpe are just as eager to tempt and savage as the music with a delivery as wide as the range of sounds around him. The song aggressively dances like a fusion of Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, and French band Mucho Tapioca, but even with its gait it switches and shuffles its suasion without notice or care.

   With a climactic finale which simply thrills and enthrals, dub and techno added to the spice cupboard of the song, the towering opener is swiftly matched in quality and psyche twisting grandeur by Purania. From a charged entrance of rapacious riffing and similarly hungry rhythms, the song settles into a melodic bordering mellow stroll which lasts just the length of the impatience the band has to light the touch paper to another maze of eclectic sonic fascination. Imagine a hybrid of Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, 6:33, and System Of A Down and you get a glimpse of the beauty and schizophrenic glory of the song, a triumph within which the guitars of Matteo Di Gioia and Ralph Salati craft a narrative and web which bewitches and challenges, their hypnotic mix of creative frenzy and skilful acidic elegance spellbinding within the predatory frame built by bassist Gabriel Pignata and drummer Federico Paulovich.

    My Green Neighbour rifles ears next, its first breath a frantic tsunami of beats and riffs courting a bedlamic mind-set. Forcing its agitated psyche and attack into a smoother flowing blaze of heavy and melodic metal, the song takes little effort in replicating the temptation of its predecessors, merging varied flames of sound and persistently captivating detours into a brawling riot of invention and insatiable metal manipulation. The stunning tempest then has to step aside for the more primal bordering bestial presence of Hosts, Rifles & Coke, its heavy throated savagery magnetic and even more tantalising when it shares time with a contagion of melodic prowess and mouth-wateringly catchy choruses, all seared by a scotching solo to top things off.

    Both the discordant and masterful mayhem of G.O.D. and the smoother voiced mesmeric Where the Things Have No Colour unveil new scenic aspects of the Destrage’s songwriting and imagination; the first a riot of Faith No More meets Ugly Kid Joe voraciousness aligned to a mind tripping sensibility and the second a progressively honed melodic venture through rapturous harmonies and exotic melodies within an irresistible toxin of craft and infectiousness. Arguably the track is the band at its most restrained artistically but certainly no less potent and imaginative as well as exciting.

     Waterpark Bachelorette has the band squalling and rioting over the senses, grooves and lethal rhythms a blistering endeavour matched by the predacious expulsions of vocals and sound which litter the rampant torrent of rock ‘n’ roll. Guitar doodling veins the song for only the most satisfying results whilst the addictive anthemic call of vocals and hooks make a lingering bait which seeps into the breather of melodic caresses and sonic entanglement. Its excellence is soon equalled by firstly the dramatically textured Before, After and All Around and the almost hysterical invention of – (Obedience), the track verging on maniacal with its avant-garde/melodic metal ants nest of busy yet ordered chaos.

    To prove that the song is still not the deranged imagination of the band exhausted the closing title track takes all honours on the Are You Kidding Me? No. Featuring a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal (Guns’N’Roses), the track is an inventive meshuga but one which knows exactly what it is doing. Fusing experimentation, jazz, funk, and pure dementia into its unrelenting crazed waltz, the track is a triumph of insanity which disorientates and seduces with perfect touch and irreverence. Ending on a sensational emotive stomp of gypsy punk with swing desires and reminding very much of Kontrust and another French band Toumai, the track is a magnificent concluding revelry to a quite brilliant and monumental release.  Quite simply Destrage has provided your probable album of the year.

www.facebook.com/destrage

10/10

Ringmaster 06/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Animus – Fall of the Elite

Animus Online Promo Shot

    If you understandably missed the limited regional release of the Fall of the Elite EP last year, Scottish metallers Animus have provided another chance to immerse in its tempest with its deserved nationwide unleashing. Consisting of four savagely aggressive and rivetingly varied slabs of sonic provocation, the band’s introduction is a mouthwatering onslaught providing a well of satisfaction as deep as the promise also rampaging through its sinews. Its sound whips up an antagonistic fury from a brew of progressive death metal and djent with technical and groove metal, creating a predation which is equally recognisable and innovative. Fall of the Elite certainly suggests this is a band still evolving its presence but one with major expulsions ahead you easily feel.

     Hailing from Dundee, Animus was formed in 2010 by drummer Poul Thomassen and guitarist Sam Gilmour. It was not long before the pair was joined by second guitarist Graham Brown and Gavin Holloway on bass. The first couple of years saw the band playing around Scotland drawing strong support and responses but it was with the addition of vocalist Aaron Fawns in 2012 that it could be said a spark ignited within the band, the quintet finding that something bringing everything into focus and vital explosiveness. A further rampage of shows ensued, including sharing stages with the likes of Bleed From Within, To Kill Achilles, Here Lies A Warning, Heights, Silent Screams, Chronographs, Hero In Error, Our People Versus Yours, and I Divide, all only increasing the stature and reputation of the band. The final weeks of 2012 saw Animus enter the studio to sculpt their debut Fall Of The Elite, influences from the likes of After The Burial, Suicide Silence, Bring Me The Horizon, Whitechapel, and Tesseract spicing up their own distinct toxicity. After a well-received first unveiling, the EP is now poised to work on the rest of the UK with its ravenous and creative intensity.

    Drawing a single breath whilst a groan brews in the background, opener Damnation announces its presence with an intriguingAnimus - Front Cover air accentuated by sirens and an apocalyptic ambience. With the scene set, the track emerges from the anarchy with forcibly twisting grooves and percussive provocation speared by vicious rhythms skirted by predatory riffing. The vocals of Fawns snarl and growl with bile soaked animosity, his direct intent sharing enough variety to engage whilst musically the band lashes and entices the senses with a masterful and bold invention. The song is not the most malevolent and violent proposition but holds an intimidation and intensity which leaves knees buckled and ears scarred as its imagination captures that of its recipient with ease and enterprise.

   The following DB8666 follows suit but instantly uncages a lethal groove and commanding swagger which leaves its predecessor in the shade. The swinging contagion of the track is clad in a threatening musculature upon a djent inspired spine whilst it’s flailing sonic arms and acrid melodic adventure provides the most compelling hues to potently ignite the imagination. Every move and twist of the song is pure infectious bait, at times almost too involved in itself but never relinquishing the tightest entrapment of thoughts and emotions. As all the tracks upon the EP, there is plenty to discover with each subsequent encounter, certain underlying textures and touches unveiled within the increasingly persuasive tempestuous engagement after numerous excursions.

     The following Home(less) is a bestial display of maliciousness but one aligned to the most creative progressive enticement yet. The guitars sculpt simultaneously uncompromising and seductive endeavours whilst bass and drums carve out bruising lures which also only beckon and threaten. Once again the song is a cascade of innovative manipulations which flirt with indulgence and chaos but only to tease and taunt within its skilled and deliberately devious craft. That dramatic and alluring enterprise is pushed further with the closing title track, its bewitching opening progressive design of melody caressing keys wrapping the ears in a transfixing coaxing before being joined by staccato riffs and splintering rhythms within a brawling cast of sonic causticity. Carnivorous in its stalking and guitar endeavour whilst magnetic in its continually evolving melody induced progressive searing of the air, the track is a smouldering rampancy which seizes an instant lingering submission for its ruinous nature and assault yet slowly burns an even greater seduction in the passions over time and multiple unions.

   The outstanding climax brings a similarly impressive release to a close leaving anticipation and appetite for Animus a greedy hunger. Certainly the release shows that the band is yet to find its truly unique presence but that is only a matter of time with, on the evidence of Fall of the Elite, stronger dramatic triumphs destined to follow. This is an immense exciting start and base for their horizons and the open doorway to eager recognition countrywide.

www.facebook.com/AnimusUK

9/10

RingMaster 03/03/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Def-Con-One – II

 

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    Bawling inventively in the face whilst being driven by a constant fury which simply exhausts and exhilarates the senses, II the new album from UK metallers Def-Con-One, is one of those riveting muscular scourges you just cannot get enough of. It is fair to say that the band employs well ingrained flavours and styles across its riotous body but with a flair and imagination which sets them and the release apart from most. It is a thrilling adventure which rarely leaves you wishing for more in any particular song and constantly has the emotions beaming broadly under the creative onslaught.

     Hailing from Newcastle, the quartet of vocalist Davey Meikle, guitarist Johnny Hunter, bassist Steve Miller, and drummer Antton Lant (ex- Venom and Mpire Of Evil and the brother of Venom frontman Conrad Lant) brew up a sound which merges thrash and groove metal to name just two of their rich spices, into a maelstrom of ferocious enterprise and fierce imagination. II follows the critically acclaimed Warface of 2012, a release which thrust the band into a certain hungry spotlight not found by the band’s 2008 self-released Blood Soaks the Floor, a release which has been seemingly passed over with II described as the bands second full-length. The new provocation reinforces the success of its predecessor whilst unleashing a greater maturity and invention to its striding predation. The band has been described by the organizers of renowned Bloodstock Open Air festival as ‘a bar fight between Machine Head, Slayer and Pantera’ and in many ways that still fits except that the inventiveness and tempest of styles driving the new album has increased and expanded to bounteous new depths.

   The Scarlet Records, who the band signed with before Warface, released rage instantly unleashes its full strength and animositySC 235-2 DEF-CON-ONE the moment the first full breath of H8 Ball hits the ears. Jagged riffs and thumping rhythms are soon splintering cartilage in the opener, a djent savagery riling up the senses whilst the vocals of Meikle switch between clean rock and squalling antagonism in the midst of the continually evolving sonic rabidity. By the halfway point the song has teased thoughts with essences of American Head Charge, Alice In Chains, and Meshuggah, though all merely loud winds in a storm all Def-Con-One. It is a scintillating beginning to the album which immediately slams it up another gear with Broke. An unavoidable Pantera comparison wraps the opening seconds of the song remaining across the whole of its mouthwatering stretch, grooves and rhythmic battering as contagious and magnetic as the expressive vocals and sinew parading riffs equally inciting the juices. As the track, like many on the album, rummages in thoughts and emotions you do feel you know the provocation before it spreads each moment of its narrative but are left satisfaction drenched as everything comes in a uniquely different guise to any waiting expectation.

    The following Soul Possessed is the next on the continuing ascent of the release, its opening melodic caress aligned to clean vocals an appealing but deceptive invitation refusing to hint at the ferocious tsunami of imagination and intensity to follow. The invention of the song comes with an electrified voracity, it’s twisting through straight on corrosive metal into nu and groove lit thrash vivacity irresistible. The track throughout its inventive carnage never settles into more than a few moments of any one direction resulting in a persistently intriguing rampage with imaginative flexibility in its sound and stylish enterprise.

    Both Scarred For Life and Debt To Society were destined to slip below the new plateau set by the previous song but only just miss its lip with the first a breath-taking adrenaline fired torrent of thrash and heavy metal whilst its successor wires veins of southern metal into a ravenous brawl of groove fed heavy metal . The pair feed the already greedy hunger for the album with a full meal of craft and aggressive passion whilst the next up Skinhead Shaped Dent swerves and seduces the listener with a caustic fire of grunge inspired punk aligned to a commanding web of rapacious grooves to raise the stakes. At this point the album can and does no wrong, and whilst that familiarity to other things is never far away it only enlivens the irresistible toxicity of the band’s enterprise.

     The pair of Need A Reason  and Die Again provide the first undulation in the course of the release, the first an intoxicating ear devouring stomp of contagious and at times venomously sonic rabidity whilst the second is a slow meandering slice of classically spawned metal which fails to rise to previous heights. It is to be honest a well-crafted and satisfying piece of songwriting but just does not ferment in the imagination and passions anywhere like the potency of the previous songs. That slight dip though is soon addressed by Damned Disgrace where the already carnivorous bass sound of Miller is at its most primal, and the closing Drag Me To Hell, a rhythmic agitation of pure infection and bestial riffery which leaves the senses sore and blissful. The final track concludes the album as impressively as it started; a lingering last intrusive splinter of ravaging to ignite the passions.

   To be over critical you could accuse II of not being unique enough in many ways to other bands, though there are few fusing as many facets of metal as inventively and successfully as Def-Con-One does. The truth is that when the album emerges as one of the most enjoyable favourites so far this year, certainly for us, giving the strongest fattest satisfaction, who really cares?

http://def-con-one.tripod.com/

9/10

RingMaster 16/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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I Will Tear This World Apart – Self-Titled

I WILL TEAR THIS WORLD APART

    Released at the tail end of 2013, the self-titled debut album from Norwegian metallers I Will Tear This World Apart is one of those provocations which thrills and invigorates from the first encounter but also infects the imagination with seeds which only draw you rapidly back into the antagonistic arms of the storm offered. Consisting of nine songs which rampage and infest the senses like a sonic scourge of metallic breeding, the release is a magnetic merger of styles and angry passion which is unrelenting in its animosity and towering persuasion. The saying goes that ‘you can’t keep a good man down’, but in the face of I Will Tear This World Apart’s ferocity even the Devil might be staggered to his knees under their intensive fury.

     Formed in 2011 and taking its name from the Grown Into Nothing song Wrestling the Lions, I Will Tear This World Apart consists of vocalist Peter Bains who also fronts impressive metallers Killtek and Grown Into Nothing, alongside guitarist Robert Bains also of Grown Into Nothing, drummer Espen Hektoen from death metallers Chton and death thrashers Cleaver, and bassist Sigurd Ekle. Essences of the members other bands do make a loud whisper at times within the presence of IWTTWA but this band has a voice and aggression all of its own which rivals and challenges the strengths of those parallel projects. With a more hardcore causticity adding to the array of metal flavouring from groove to metalcore, thrash to extreme metal, the band brews a sound which is a voracious provocation able to rile and seduce with equal intensity; IWTTWA’s debut album an introduction all metal fans should treat themselves to.

    Released via Trøndercore Records, the tempestuous release throws its full weight against the ears with opener Demonhead, IWTTWAguitars creating sonic smog to tantalise whilst rhythms punch out their own firm enticement. Soon charging full pelt with antagonism flying from every note unleashed and syllable spewed by the intensive scowls of Peter Bains, the track blisters the senses with venomous toxicity and burns the air with rapacious energy. It is an immense start which without powerfully contagious grooves and hooks still seizes a firm place in the passions and memory before making way for the following Case Closed. A very brief heavy dawning soon uncages an aggressive predation of resonating rhythmic thumping and abrasive riffs which scar and invite the imagination to join their raucous belligerence. As the first it is only the core intent as the guitar spawns its own acidic temptation across the almost crusade like squalling vocals to add further inventive bait to the vigorous conflict exciting the emotions.

     Both the stalking bordering bestial presence of Amongst Enemies and the incendiary incitement of Selfinflicted Slavery continue to whip up the senses and appetite for their riveting and richly assertive declarations, the first equipped with enslaving grooves and a heavy duty riffery around again impressing vocals that chains down and ignites the passions whilst its successor also unveiling a groove potency recruits a full submission whilst flaunting melodic and rhythmic allurement within a tsunami of intensity that easily steals thoughts and instinctive allegiance.

     The heat is turned up even further with the unbridled assault of Killers Deserve to Die, its thrash bred charge a ravaging coaxing into a full bodied soak of militant combativeness and gladiatorial sonic adventure matched by the now expected unyielding vocal passion of Peter Bains. The excellent if too short song again is bred from a unity between the quartet in skill and invention which explodes into mouthwatering aural rages leaving only satisfaction and hunger for more in their wake, a greed soon given more healthy sustenance by the ruggedly forceful and uncompromisingly driven You & I and the more predatory gaited if less dramatic Grounded. Both tracks create another cyclone of inventive and merciless entrapment which invigorate and accelerate the emotions into unrestrained satisfaction, something which equally applies to the whole release.

    The second of the just mentioned tracks does not quite match up to the peaks before and the same applies to the thick and slowly moving Keep ‘Em Down, a smouldering almost overbearing sonic dispute and rhythmic altercation which builds its bulk until expanding into a muscular avalanche of intensity and evocative melodically honed atmospheres. Like its predecessor the thunderous encounter leaves only the fullest impressive suasion but just cannot quite reach the heights set previously. Nevertheless both and especially the latter shows how intensive and extensive the band and their creativity can be and go deeper into ahead.

    The album closes on the hellacious Racist, a track which incinerates and seduces senses and imagination with an intertwining intent wrapped in more fearsomely addictive grooves. It is a corrosive and deviously inventive not forgetting addictive and climactic end to an equally stunning album. Though yet to maybe discover a truly unique sound, I Will Tear This World Apart could well be the next big force to break out of Norway on the evidence of their first assault, though whether the world is ready for such nasty goodness we will have to see.

https://www.facebook.com/IWTTWA

9/10

RingMaster 21/01/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Last Ten Seconds Of Life – Invivo[Exvivo]

 

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    With more of a storm than a buzz brewing up around US metallers The Last Ten Seconds Of Life, the Mansfield, Pennsylvania quartet unleash their new album Invivo[Exvivo] to ravage not only their already seemingly submissive homeland but equally Europe and the UK. Ten tracks of virulently malicious and ridiculously compelling extreme provocation the album is a ferocious mix of filth clad aural brutality. A voracious maelstrom of everything from deathcore to grind, groove to nu metal and a flood of plenty more essences poisoning its vitriolic glory, the band’s sound takes no prisoners but neither does it leave the listener searching for rapacious imagination or feverishly rewarding adventure. Some of the tracks take longer to pull a submission than others from the passions but ultimately all succeed on one quite exhausting and riveting scourge.

     Formed in 2010 and consisting of guitarist and songwriter Wyatt McLaughlin, vocalist Storm Strope, bassist Anthony Madara, and drummer Christian Fisher, The Last Ten Seconds Of Life not only build on but stretch strenuously the seeds sown and bred on previous releases, the Justice EP of 2010, debut album Know Your Exits in 2011, and the Warpath EP of the following year. Invivo[Exvivo] takes everything to new impacting levels, its impressive savagery and inventiveness the band at a new vicious creative height. Released by Workhorse Music, it is fair to say that the album is not quite the perfect beast, at times missing a few opportunities in a torrent of successes to tantalise as it rips out the jugular, but there is never a moment or second offered which does not flare up the senses and passions into an excited state.

      Engineered by Grant McFarland and produced by Carson Slovak (August Burns Read, Texas in July), Invivo[Exvivo] last10seconds_infvivo_finalcoveruncages Fertile Steps first to leap upon and savage the senses. The opening breath of the song is an antagonistic brawl and things only intensify as rhythms punch and slap with merciless and spite whilst riffs grind out insidious grooves around the impressive varied venomous squalls of Strope. From the first minute of his appearance the vocalist impresses and leaves ears as hungry for his destructive narrative as the carnivorous sounds around him. The track itself has a definite Slipknot meets Carcass feel at times but also with an unrelenting drench of Pig Destroyer saliva soaking the results.

    The immense and thrilling start is soon taken up and further by False Awakening and the following A Dime A Dozen, both sonic carnivores which tear through the ears with an intensive heavyweight predation and rhythmic stalking. The first comes from the violent throes of demons, in tone and effect soaked vocals which mingle with the guttural spewing which spills bile with every outpouring. The track stomps as it comes to an early conclusion allowing a breath to be swallowed before its successor produces a pestilential fury of unpredictable and persistently shifting sounds and flavours. Grooves and carnal riffery are irresistible bait in the torrential contagion and malevolently cantankerous heart of the confrontation. It is the first major pinnacle of the album though not that many steps above what came before to be honest such the impressive start of the album.

     Numbskull is the nasty spawn of a hard core and grind union; a track which rampages over and slowly preys on its victim with a continually switching creative intent, again a Slipknot like prompting with Devildriver animosity and Brutal Truth hatred a suggestive texture. It is a downtuned sonic pestilence easy to be consumed by and drool over as is the next up tide of ferocity The Face, a track which scars and seduces simultaneously though both abilities come with an untamed rapacious corrosion.

    Morality emerges from a winding sonic enticement initially before placing itself intimidatingly around the ears to take rhythmic and melodically bred violent swipes. It is a striking entrance but soon losing a part of its compulsion as it employs spoken vocals/sample within a maze of guitar sculpted descriptive noise. The track is strong and constantly slipping in a prod at the appetite but is devoid of the spark which made the previous tracks so irresistible. Arguably the song is too adventurous for its own good and certainly there is not the same fluidity linking all its imagination as that impressive elsewhere on the release. Its ‘weakness’ is instantly amended by Haste Makes Waste and Deadfast though, the first a magnetic tsunami of intensity speared by a great and varied swinish vocal delivery from Strope yet again. The second of the two is another best track contender, niggling hypnotic grooves opening up the throat of the song before its roar and ferocity storms the barricades with a delicious part hardcore, part industrial metal, and all extreme metal esurience. Relentlessly twisting its body and potent resources around and within itself, it is an exceptional blitz of ideas and flavouring which just gets better and better with a great sludgy intensity to its closing incitement.

    To be honest Skeletal took more time than any of the songs to fully convince, though it’s impossibly black and malignant heart and lethal sonic emprise was swift in its captivation. Eventually it did prove itself to be one of the strongest hatefully impressive blessings on the release. Its triumph makes way for the closing Ego Death, a seven minute plus infestation of grooves and rancorous imagination which gnaws away at and suffocates the senses with the densest malevolence jaundiced assault on the album. It completes in Invivo[Exvivo] an outstanding , absorbing, and invigorating intrusion which without being the complete devil is a demon record to make The Last Ten Seconds Of Life your next best brutal friend.

www.facebook.com/thelasttensecondsoflife

9/10

RingMaster 16/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Loudrage – Uglier Than Thou

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2014 is already getting off to a thumping musical year with numerous impressive releases across numerous genres even though barely into its second week and you can add another gem to the growing list in the towering shape of the Uglier Than Thou EP from Romanian death metallers Loudrage. Five tracks of groove infested malevolence which takes the ears and imagination on a rampant dance of incendiary and devilish contagion whilst gnawing away at the insides. It is voraciously compelling protagonist for senses and emotions and easily one of the most scintillating tempestuous assaults daring to molest the psyche in recent months.

     Formed in 2005 and bringing influences from the likes of Six Feet Under, Debauchery, Sepultura, Obituary, Grave, Bolt Thrower, and Deicide into their horror bred malevolence, the Ludus hailing, Transylvania based Loudrage are no strangers to attention and acclaim being named as Best Romanian Death Metal Newcomer in their second year and playing with the likes of Sepultura, Vital Remains, Godphobia, and Rictus Grin in their first couple of years as well as sharing a split DVD with the last of the four in 2007. The following year saw the release of the Rage Unleashed – Tale of a Murderer EP which followed a self-released demo two years earlier. Shows with bands such as Grave, Belphegor, Nile, Opera Ix, Lividity, Furnaze, Nuclear, and Amethyst to name just a few filled the following years as well as the release of the Pungent Roots demo in 2011. Last year saw the quartet of Molester (vocals), Bestial (guitar), Vomital (bass), and Canibal (drums) enter the studio to record their new release and though wide recognition outside of their home territories still escapes them, given luck and attention it is hard to imagine Uglier Than Thou not providing the hefty key to open up new doors in recognition.

   It is fair to say that as soon as opening track Doomed thrusts its muscular intensive frame upon the ear and an instant predacious groove calls from within the tsunami of sound the band has their irresistible hooks in deep. Riffs gnaw away at the senses with torrential persistence whilst the drums clobber the ears with sturdy endeavour and enthusiastic violence. The predominantly death metal track is an unrelenting nagging driven by the guttural squalls of Molester. It is a potent irrepressible mix, arguably not breaking new ground but is virulently contagious especially as little splinters of grooves entwine the tempest from time to time. It is an impressive start to the encounter with greater assaults to come it soon emerges.

     As Long As I Live soon has things instantly aflame as it stomps into view wielding an addiction fuelling groove which wraps around the ears like a salacious temptress. The stroll and swagger of the song is virulent in the extreme, a wonderful carnivorous bass sound constantly chewing upon the infectious lures laid by the guitars alongside corrosive vocals which get better and more impressive as the EP progresses. With the lyrics parading the nastiest dangerous romance and often slight but always open twists and turns to the invention and gait of the song almost taunting, it is a masterful insidious seduction. Again you can argue that Loudrage are revitalising previously sculpted sonic animosity and venom rather than spawning their own but truthfully who cares when it sounds so good.

    Both Fear Me and Suffo-Kate stalk voraciously the new found plateau of the release, the first a thoroughly ravenous intrusion on the senses. Riffs crawl and antagonise the air whilst rhythms show rigid restraint to frame the savagery though still managing to have moments to add their bone splintering spite too. Again the bass feeds the primal beast inside, its stringed jaws a rapacious aggressor alongside the toxic scrub of riffs. Its successor is no less pestilential and more ferocious in its energy and groove lit rabidity. There is also a crunch to the tone of the song, a metallic intensity which infests and resonates in bone and the imagination, whilst the melodic poison raging through the veins and grooves of the track sear and almost asphyxiate the senses. The pair are again pinnacles which linger and drive a real hunger to hear more from the band now and in the future.

     The EP closes with the groove fest of Intruders; from vocals to riffs, rhythms to those wonderfully infernal grooves the song savages with death metal sculpted hips swaying like a whirling dervish. It is an infection which should be quarantined, though only if we are locked inside with its uncompromising, ferocious devilry. It is a blistering conclusion to an impressively hellacious release. There is nothing to fault the EP over apart from debatably it holding a strong familiarity in some ways to established invention, but as mentioned before it is a minor thought before a major triumph and the moment when Loudrage will be a name eagerly thrust around the metal world.

Go grab Uglier Than Thou as a buy now name your price release at http://loudrage.bandcamp.com/album/uglier-than-thou now!

https://www.facebook.com/loudrageband

9.5/10

RingMaster 10/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Altar of Betelgeuze – Darkness Sustains the Silence

 

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Not completely convincing but feistily compelling Darkness Sustains the Silence, the debut album from Finnish metallers Altar of Betelgeuze is a proposition which has thoughts and emotions leaping all over the place in satisfaction and uncertainty. The eight track release makes an attention grabbing but puzzling initial encounter with successes and deficiencies almost roaring out their persuasions but given plenty of time and listens it slowly emerges as a release metal fans with a wide taste should investigate.

     Released via Memento Mori Records as 2014 opened its eyes, Darkness Sustains the Silence is the successor to the band’s first release, the At The Shrine Of Light EP of 2012. Consisting of members current and former of Decaying and Sclerosistake, the 2010 formed Altar of Betelgeuze employs and infuses a plethora of styles and intrusive flavours into its creativity, so much so that there is not exactly a predominate distinct core sound to their music. Across its muscular body, the album blends doom and death metal and in many ways that is the base for their endeavour, but with thick tides of sludge and groove metal also making their suasions as well as classic metal and stoner rock. It is an ever evolving and testing incitement which challenges your preconceptions and the band’s own ability to merge it all and place the distinct flavours side by side. Determined attention reveals that for the main the band do succeed with a strong craft even if there are elements which just do not cut a potent presence against the stronger towering aspects of the release.

     The album opens with the intro/instrumental Epitaph, a more than decent piece wrapped in a skilled melancholic embrace AOB DSTS coverfrom guitars and bass. It does not give away much as to the rest of the album except proof of the impressive melodic skill which the band openly possesses. The track leads into A World Without End and immediately a wall of doom clad intensity smothers the ear, rhythms colliding with the ear drum and the guitars of Olli Suurmunne and Juho Kareoja casting sonic weaves which tempt and sear. The instant stand out element is the bass of Matias Nastolin, its voice and predation magnetic and its employer’s craft riveting as he goes on to prove across the whole release. Nastolin also provides the dark growling vocals which match the heavy intent of the music, his tones grizzled and malevolent, soaking every chugging riff and bass groan with venomous bile. The track stalks and lumbers across the senses sparking the imagination and appetite, especially when it picks up the pace midway and the bass swaggers with invention and tantalising enterprise around the now spoken vocals of Nastolin. It is a strong and thrilling start to the album and sets up expectations eagerly for the rest of the release.

     The Spiral Of Decay opens with an emotively sculpted coaxing from guitars and bass, again to potent alluring effect. With the drums of Aleksi Olkkola the ignition for the song to expand and stretch its heavy rock flavouring, there is a less intensive pressure on the senses but with the dark growls a still intimidating one…that is until Suurmunne adds his clean vocals to the mix. I have heard people suggest he provides a poor offering to the album but it is hard to agree, his voice for a hard rock track is strong and expressive but it is the style of delivery which just does not fit the track and for the main the album. It is a shame as the guttural and dirty vocals are again thoroughly enjoyable but for personal tastes and thoughts this is where the merging of such varied and different flavours comes unstuck on the release, though admittedly the song is still an appealing and creative encounter.

     There is no such issue with the next up Steamroller, easily the best track on the album. From fiery guitar flames and thunderous slow rhythmic slaps the song stalks the ears with a ravenous chugging and melodic devilry all within a sinew cage provided by Olkkola. Once more the bass finds a tone which seduces infectiously and with the cleaner delivery working well in the context of the song this time and a constant surface snarl covering all, the track is a riveting consumption of sludge/stoner invention. Whether the extreme difference in presence and style of this and say A World Without End works is debatable as being a positive for the album but individually it is a masterful and thrilling brute of an incitement.

      The Middle Eastern kissed opening strains of Smoldering Clouds Above Orion ignites the imagination with ease which the again mouth-watering bass and guitar play runs with across the excellent heavy weight carnivorously vocalised predator of a song, whilst The Approaching Storm bursts upon the senses with cascading rhythms, lingering sonic scorching, and a voracious bass invention and sound which violates and seduces with irresistible craft. The classic metal like clean vocals again leave thoughts and emotions unsure, the track calling out for a bestial delivery throughout as shown as a must by the toxic return of the earlier vocal pestilence, but it is an impressive song overall and another compelling reason to check out the band.

     The album finishes with firstly the death soaked Out Of Control which succeeds and suffers as its predecessor, and the seventeen minute title track. As masterful and enthralling as it is, and skilfully presented, the final track is just too long to earn the focus it deserves for its epic sonic narrative. By the tenth minute, and being a three minute provocation fan at heart it was a proud moment to last that long, thoughts do waver  and hanker a return back to the start of the album as elements repeat and stretch at the final straight. All the same it is rich evidence of the ability and adventurous songwriting of the band, something which again makes Altar of Betelgeuze a deeply promising and captivating provocateur.

    Darkness Sustains the Silence is not perfect by any means but it proves to be an adventure which more than earns the right to be given the fullest attention, and if the lesser issues are ironed out this could be a band to set standards still undiscovered by others.

http://www.facebook.com/aobofficial

http://altarofbetelgeuze.bandcamp.com

7.5/10

RingMaster 09/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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